BETA

3041 Amendments of Carlos ZORRINHO

Amendment 20 #

2019/2804(RSP)

Draft motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas health systems need to maximise the effectiveness and efficiency, equitable access and sustainability of health services and long-term care, deliver seamless care across services and providers, and deliver improvements that matter to patients and their changing care needsand growing health and care needs, well-being and quality of life;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 22 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Recital C
C. whereas innovative digital solutions for health and care can boost health and quality of life of citizensprevention of diseases and promotion of healthy lifestyles, improve citizens’ quality of life and enable more efficient ways of organiszing and delivering health and care services;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 26 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Recital F
F. whereas patients’ expectations are rising, and there is a need for an empowerment of citizens regarding their health through user-centred services and more ways for people to interact with health services and health professionals;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 35 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 1
1. Welcomes the Commission communication on enabling the digital transformation of health and care in the Digital Single Market which aims to promote health, prevent and control disease, help address pacitizents’ unmet needs, represent an opportunity to improve the sustainability of health systems and make it easier for citizens to have equal access to high quality care through the meaningful use of digital innovations;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 44 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 3
3. Is of the opinion that the digital transformation of health and care needs to be patient-centredsupport citizen-centred services as well as empowering citizens to play a more active role in disease prevention and promotion of health, as well in health and care services, answering the needs of citizen;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 52 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. Stresses that the future of digital health will need to develop secure and effective anonymization and pseudonymization techniques enabling sensible data to be used in health research;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 57 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 5 a (new)
5a. Stresses that a Commission proposal on sharing information and data governance is necessary to tackle the implications for national health systems;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 70 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 10
10. Calls on the Commission to continue promoting the cooperation of Member States’ health authorities to connect to the eHealth digital infrastructure in order to extend its use to also cover the interoperability of Member States’ electronic record systems by supporting the development and adoption of a European electronic health record exchange format, taking into account the Union’s multilingualism as well as user with disabilities;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 84 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 19
19. Calls on the Commission together with the Member States to proceed with the testing of specific applications for cross-border health data exchange for research and health policy to improve prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases in order to help health systems to meet current and future challenges;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 90 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 21
21. Believes that the development of a shared frameworkstandards to harmonise the collection of health data, storage and use in the EU could improve the quality of research and health services provided to citizens, also facilitation universal access;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 99 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 23
23. Considers that digital healthcare tools are well positioned tocould address challenges of accessibility to health information and health literacy, both essential for health promotion, better disease prevention and more effective disease management; considers that these tools, when built with the contribution of the appropriate health professionals and civil society users, allow for more accuracy and completeness of information enabling the promotion of healthy habits and prevention activities, as well as the support to decisions in health and patient adherence to treatments.
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 103 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 24
24. Stresses the importance of person- centred approaches to organising health and care, including by using digital solutions and tools which have a great potential in improving the quality, equity and sustainability of health services but also people’s health and well- being;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 109 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 25
25. Calls on the Commission to work with relevant actors, especially national health systems, to support more cooperation across borders and enlarge the deployment of digitally enabled care models;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 113 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 26
26. Calls on the Commission and Member States to ensure that health professionals improve the necessary competences and skills to collect, analyse and protect health data;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 115 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 27
27. Calls on the Commission to work with Member States and regions to develop networks to educate citizens in the use of digital healthcare, enabling universal and equitable access; considers that, in order to achieve that goal, there is a need to improve systems’ interoperability and users skills, with the highest possible protection of sensitive data with tools and mechanisms provided by the public health systems;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 117 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 27 a (new)
27a. Calls on the Commission and Member States to ensure that all measures to improve citizens digital skills and access to and use of their health data take into consideration sensitive groups such as older citizens, info- excluded people and people with disabilities;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 3 #

2019/0090M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. Stresses the need to ensure that fishing activities are carried out in a sustainable manner in Guinea-Bissau waters by introducing effective controls that should be continuously promoted and monitored, with the support of a joint committee.
2019/11/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 9 #

2019/0090M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Advocates the development of infrastructures, including a deep-water port, for the in situ landing and exploitation of fishery products to ensure that the agreement produces tangible results for local and artisanal fisheries; takes the view that priority should be given to introducing a certification centre tasked with enforcing additional conditions in Guinea-Bissau so that more value can be gained from its fish; in these specific areas, the EU can play a prominent role by providing technical assistance and support for the measures taken by Guinea-Bissau.
2019/11/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 7 #

2019/0078M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 – indent 1
- promoting a sustainable blue economy by supporting small-scale local fisheries, the modernisation of port infrastructure and the position of young people and women, who play an important part in marketing and processing;
2019/11/19
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 21 #

2019/0078M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Recommends that this agreement be brought into line with other programmes, financed by other donors such as the World Bank, to prevent duplication and to ensure public awareness of the different financing sources for different projects.
2019/11/19
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 8 #

2018/2974(RSP)

Draft motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Highlights that European citizens already face direct impacts of climate change; underlines that according to the European Environment Agency, average annual losses caused by weather and climate-related extremes in the Union amounted to around €12.8 billion between 2010 and 2016, and that, if no further action is taken, climate damages in the EU could amount to at least €190 billion by 2080, equivalent to a net welfare loss of 1.8% of its current GDP; further notes that by the end of the century weather-related disasters could affect about two-thirds of the European population annually compared with 5% of the population between 1981-2010 whilst flooding alone could cost EU countries up to EUR 1 trillion per year in damages;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 65 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 7
7. Points that the EU GDP is expected to increase more under zero emissions scenarios than in scenarios with lower emission reductions, however this may be spread unevenly across the EU; considers that the price of non-action would be by far the costliest scenario and would not only result in massive GDP loss in Europe, but also further increase economic inequalities between Member States and regions as some are expected to be harder hit than others by the consequences of inaction;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 77 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 8
8. Welcomes the inclusion of two pathways aiming at reaching net zero GHG emissions by 2050, and the Commission’s support for these; considers this mid- century objective as the only one compatible with the Union's commitments under the Paris Agreement;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 100 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 9 a (new)
9 a. Recalls that by being the first major economy to go for climate neutrality, Europe’s businesses will be able to gain first-mover advantage on international markets to become the global leader in sustainable and resource- efficient production; emphasises that delayed or insufficient action to achieve net-zero GHG emissions by 2050 at the latest will result in ecologically, economically and socially unjustifiable costs and effectively hamper the future competitiveness of Europe’s industrial sector; insists that carbon leakage must be and can be avoided by intelligent policy frameworks;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 119 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 11
11. Believes that Europe's climate transition must be ecologically, economically and socially sustainable; emphasises that tailor-made and sufficiently funded strategies will need to be designed in close collaboration with local and regional public authorities, trade unions, educational institutions, civil society organisations and the private sector, to ensure that social fairness and equal opportunities are offered to all European citizens in this transition while avoiding disproportionate effects on people with low income;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 124 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 11 a (new)
11 a. Believes that young people have increasingly strong social and environmental awareness, which has the power to transform our societies towards a climate resilient future, and that youth education represents one of the most effective tools to combat climate change; stresses the need to actively involve younger generations in building international, intercultural and intergenerational relationships, which underpin cultural change that will support the global efforts for a more sustainable future;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 128 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 11 a (new)
11 a. Considers that social aspects should be fully streamlined throughout all EU climate policy and climate funding;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 129 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 11 b (new)
11 b. Recalls that approximately 50 to 125 million European citizens are currently suffering from energy poverty1a; reiterates its strong conviction that Europe must act swiftly and vigorously to eliminate energy poverty in European households; __________________ 1a http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/e tudes/STUD/2015/563472/IPOL_STU(201 5)563472_EN.pdf
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 130 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 11 c (new)
11 c. Emphasises that inclusion and participation of Europe’s citizens is vital for Europe to reach net-zero GHG emissions by 2050 at the latest; encourages all levels of national, regional and local government to put in place concrete measures stimulating and facilitating the participation of citizens in the transition to the decarbonised society;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 135 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 12
12. Insists that carbon leakage must be and can be avoided by intelligent policy frameworks;deleted
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 195 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 18
18. Emphasises that emissions will have to be reduced close to zero in all Member States and sectors of the economy which should all contribute in the joint efforts to reduce emissions; therefore calls on the Commission to develop pathways to climate neutrality for all sectors; stresses the importance of the polluter pays principle in this regard;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 199 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 18 a (new)
18 a. Emphasises that the successful transition towards a net-zero emission economy requires an integrated approach and the right enabling environment to better stimulate and support zero- and low emission mobility; calls for additional measures to be put in place to enable access to zero- and low-emission vehicles to consumers in all Member States; stresses the need for more public and private investments in the roll-out of recharging and refuelling infrastructure, its integration into the energy systems, as well as the sustainable sourcing, production, supply, re-use and recycling of batteries in Europe, and reiterates the need for coherent action at EU, national, regional and local levels to achieve this;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 206 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 18 a (new)
18 a. Highlights the central role of renewable energy sources in the transition towards a net-zero GHG economy, as energy is currently responsible for 75% of Europe’s GHG emissions;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 220 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 19
19. Considers that technology developments and new, innovative solutions, energy efficiency and sustainable renewable energy in the transport and power sectors will be key; underlines in this respect the importance of technology- specific strategies, such as forelectric mobility, hydrogen or methane;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 225 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 19 a (new)
19 a. Emphasises that the ‘energy efficiency first’ principle entails large GHG emissions reductions possibilities and must be fully taken into account throughout the full energy chain, including energy generation, transmission, distribution and end-use;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 244 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 21
21. Stresses the need to implement the Energy Union and ensure further integration of the European Energy market in order to most effectively decarbonise the power sector and to facilitate investments where most renewable energy production can be effectuated, whilst reducing energy poverty and empowering consumers;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 267 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 22 b (new)
22 b. Notes that approximately 60% of the current global methane is emitted by sources such as agriculture, landfills and wastewater, and the production and pipeline transport of fossil fuels; recalls that methane is a potent GHG with a 100- year warming potential 28 times larger than CO21a and that methane emission reductions can play an important role in reducing ground-level ozone concentrations and their negative impacts on air quality and human health; welcomes the Commission’s intention to reduce methane emissions in concerned sectors, which could deliver further reductions of ozone concentrations in the EU, and to promote methane reductions internationally; __________________ 1a Van Dingenen, R., Crippa, M., Maenhout, G., Guizzardi, D., Dentener, F., Global trends of methane emissions and their impacts on ozone concentrations, EUR 29394 EN, Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg, 2018, ISBN 978-92- 79-96550-0, doi:10.2760/820175, JRC113210
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 276 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 23 a (new)
23 a. Notes that the buildings sector currently accounts for 40% of Europe's energy consumption and 36% of the CO2 emissions1a; stresses that more efficient energy consumption in buildings constitutes a substantial potential for further reducing Europe’s GHG emissions; __________________ 1a https://ec.europa.eu/energy/en/topics/ener gy-efficiency/buildings
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 289 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 23 b (new)
23 b. Notes that increased energy efficiency in the heating and cooling sector can have positive impacts in terms of reducing GHG emissions as well as reducing prices and thereby energy poverty in European households;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 302 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 24
24. Supports active and sustainable forest management at national level, together with concrete means to incentivise the potential of the EU bioeconomy, given the large potential of forests to contribute to strengthening Europe's climate efforts (through sequestration, storage and substitution effects) and achieving the target of zero emissions by 2050 at the latest; recognising the need to halt the loss of biodiversity and the degradation of ecosystems services in the EU by 2020;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 325 #
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 329 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 26
26. Calls for rapid implementation of the EU ETS Innovation Fund and for the start of the first call for proposals in 2019 in order to boost investments in the demonstration of low-carbon industrial breakthrough technologies; calls for the inclusion in the 2021-2027 Multiannual Financial Framework of adequate financial means for supporting investments in the demonstration of low- carbon industrial breakthrough technologialigned with the objectives under the Paris Agreement and to reach net-zero GHG emissions by 2050 at the latest;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 335 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 27
27. Considers that in order for the Union to reach net-zero emissions by 2050 at the latest, substantial private investments need to be mobilised; believes that this requires long- term planning and regulatory stability and predictability for investors and that future EU-regulations need to take this into consideration, especially for the period up to, and post 2030; stresses therefore that the implementation of the Sustainable Finance Action Plan adopted in March 2018 should be prioritised;.
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 353 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 29
29. Stresses the importance of creating a just transition fund, especially for the regions most affected regions,by decarbonisation, combined with a general horizontal streamlining of social aspects into existing climate funding;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 356 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 29 a (new)
29 a. Underlines that climate mainstreaming must be fully integrated in research and innovation content and applied at all stages of the research cycle as one of the principles of EU funding;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 375 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 32
32. Stresses the importance of green public procurement, of ecodesign, and reducing the carbon footprint of products while at the same time aligning them with the circular economy strategy; considers that options to levy products’ carbon content in Europe might be further explored;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 1 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Citation 1 a (new)
- having regard to the Commission communication of 30 April 2004 - e- Health - making healthcare better for European citizens: an action plan for a European e-Health Area (COM(2004)356 final),
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 2 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Citation 1 b (new)
- having regard to the Commission staff working document of 21 December 2007 - Action plan of the lead market initiative in the area of eHealth - Annex I to the communication - A lead market initiative for Europe {COM(2007) 860 final, SEC(2007) 1730},
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 3 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Citation 1 c (new)
- having regard to the Commission Recommendation of 2 July 2008 on cross- border interoperability of electronic health record systems (notified under document number C(2008) 3282)1a, _________________ 1a OJ L 190, 18.7.2008, p. 37–43
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 4 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Citation 1 d (new)
- having regard to the Commission communication of 4 November 2008 on telemedicine for the benefit of patients, healthcare systems and society (COM(2008)689 final),
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 5 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Citation 2 a (new)
- having regard to the Commission communication of 6 December 2012 - eHealth Action Plan 2012-2020 - Innovative healthcare for the 21st century (COM(2012)0736 final),
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 9 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Recital B
B. whereas health systems need to maximise the effectiveness and efficienciciency, equitable access and sustainability of health services and long-term care, deliver seamless care across services and providers, and deliver improvements that matter to patients and their changing care needs;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 14 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Recital C
C. whereas innovative digital solutions for health and care can boost prevention of diseases and promotion of healthy and quality of lifestyles of citizens, and enable more efficient ways of organising and delivering health and care services;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 24 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Recital F
F. whereas patients’ expectations are rising, and there is a need for an empowerment of citizens regarding their health through user-centred services and more ways for people to interact with health services and health professionals;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 30 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Recital G a (new)
G a. whereas several eHealth pilot projects are already being tested in various Member States;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 31 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Recital G b (new)
G b. whereas the recent General Data Protection Regulation has ensured the patients’ rights to access their health data and their privacy protection without entering into data property questions or new rights for patients, but instead it lies with the public health systems as guarantors of the common interest;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 33 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Paragraph 1
1. Welcomes the Commission communication on enabling the digital transformation of health and care in the Digital Single Market which aims to promote health, prevent and control disease, help address patients’ unmet needs, represent an opportunity to improve the sustainability of health systems and make it easier for citizens to have equal access to high quality care through the meaningful use of digital innovations;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 38 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Paragraph 3
3. Is of the opinion that the digital transformation of health and care needs to besupport patient-centred services as well as empowering citizens to play a more active role in the cycle of disease prevention and health and care services;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 43 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Subheading 1 a (new)
Data governance and protection of citizens’ sensitive information
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 46 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. Stresses that the future of digital health will need to develop secure and effective anonymization and pseudo- anonymization techniques enabling sensible data to be used in health research without compromising the privacy of patients; draws attention to the importance of pseudo-anonymization techniques allowing the re-identification of the data donor in case of risk for their health;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 48 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Paragraph 4 b (new)
4 b. Considers that the sensitive nature of health data requires a special protection of the patients’ privacy, which needs specific measures to protect them not only from cyberattacks but also from inadequate uses by the possible users;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 49 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Paragraph 4 c (new)
4 c. Acknowledges that the exploitation of the data generated by health and care sectors come with a significant economic interest and the data governance must have clear responsibility schemes and therefore, this new paradigm requires new public-private relationships to guarantee it;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 50 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Paragraph 4 d (new)
4 d. Believes that the public health systems are the best-placed authorities to manage and/or supervise the collection, anonymization and pseudo- anonymization, custody and exploitation of health data while protecting the patients’ privacy as well as the efficiency, equitable access and sustainability of the whole health and care sector;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 54 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. Stresses that a Commission proposal on sharing information and data governance is necessary to tackle the implications for national health systems;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 63 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Paragraph 8
8. Calls on the Commission to continue promoting the cooperation of Member States’ health authorities to connect to the eHealth digital infrastructure in order to extend its use to also cover the interoperability of Member States’ electronic record systems by supporting the development and adoption of a European electronic health record exchange format, taking into account the Union’s multilingualism and special needs' users;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 77 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Paragraph 14 a (new)
14 a. Considers that the move towards digitalisation would be an opportunity to re-examine public-private partnerships in terms of responsibility and equitable use of research results;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 81 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Paragraph 16
16. Calls on the Commission to proceed together with the Member States with the testing of specific applications for cross-border health data exchange for research and health policy to improve treatment, diagnosis and prevention of diseases in order to help health systems to meet current and future challenges;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 82 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Paragraph 16 a (new)
16 a. Calls on the Commission and Member States to support the use of real- world data in combination with medical data by public health and care providers leading to favourable health outcomes;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 85 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Paragraph 18
18. Believes that the development of a shared frameworkstandards to harmonise the collection of health data, storage and use in the EU could improve the quality of research and health services provided to citizens, also facilitation universal access;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 96 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Paragraph 21
21. Stresses the importance of person- centred approaches to organising health and care, including by using digital solutions and tools which have a great potential in improving the quality, equity and sustainability of health services but also people’s health and well- being;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 100 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Paragraph 22
22. Calls on the Commission to work with relevant actors, especially national health systems, to support more cooperation across borders and enlarge the deployment of digitally enabled care models;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 103 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Paragraph 23
23. Calls on the Commission and Member States to ensure that health professionals improve the necessary competences and skills to collect, analyse and protect health data;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 105 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Paragraph 24
24. Calls on the Commission to work with Member States and regions to develop networks to educate citizens in the use of digital healthcare, enabling universal and equitable access; considers that, in order to achieve that goal, there is a need to improve systems’ interoperability and users skills, with the highest possible protection of sensitive data with tools and mechanisms provided by the public health systems;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 107 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Paragraph 24 a (new)
24 a. Calls on the Commission and Member States to ensure that all measures to improve citizens digital skills and access to and use of their health data take into consideration sensible groups such as elder citizens and people with disabilities;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 15 #

2018/2764(RSP)


Recital D
D. whereas green infrastructure, provides ecosystem services that are crucial to our wellbeing production of urban food, water circulation and retention, the regulation of temperature, the prevention of extreme weather phenomena, the support of biodiversity, including pollinators, improving nutrient cycles and aesthetic, exercise and wellbeing benefits for its inhabitants;(Does not affect the English version.)
2018/11/26
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 29 #

2018/2764(RSP)


Recital G
G. whereas a planted soil and the use of permeable pavements wherever possible – in spaces such as car parks, public parks, pedestrian paths or squares for instance – will help with water retention and combat urban runoffs betterinfiltration and be more likely to improve urban drainage than asphalt and concrete;
2018/11/26
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 35 #

2018/2764(RSP)


Recital H
H. whereas well designed, green infrastructure can act as one of the biggest chances to increase the quantity of ecological corridors, and in this way protect theand foster biodiversity;
2018/11/26
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 42 #

2018/2764(RSP)


Recital K
K. whereas green infrastructure offers an access to nature for those who would not otherwise be able to enjoy it or who might otherwise find it more difficult to engage with the nature, such as children and the ageing population, with the proven benefits in terms of physical and mental health that this entails;
2018/11/26
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 49 #

2018/2764(RSP)


Recital N
N. whereas greener neighbourhoods have shown to increase the economic value of properties as they make areas more desirable amongst prospective buyers, thereby attracting more investment and more companies and creating more jobs;
2018/11/26
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 59 #

2018/2764(RSP)


Recital Q a (new)
Qa. whereas 2020 is the deadline for achieving the first climate action targets set by European cities as part of the commitments enshrined in the New Covenant of Mayors, and whereas this will therefore be a year for assessing and taking stock of progress in which cities can benefit from sharing experiences of success and failure;
2018/11/26
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 72 #

2018/2764(RSP)


Paragraph 5 – point c
c. encouragestablish the conditions enabling citizens to act and improve their own neighbourhoods;
2018/11/26
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 94 #

2018/2764(RSP)


Paragraph 7
7. Urges the Commission to continue supporting ambitious measures ofn energy efficiency and resource efficiencys, in particular water resources, by securing adequate funding for that contribute to sustainable urban development and making cities more resilient, underpinned by green infrastructures of excellence, such as innovation partnerships and joint procurement schemes between European cities; at the same time, encourages municipalities to support citizen-led green initiatives to the greatest extent possible, for example urban gardeningdirect- intervention projects for ecological improvement and green ing projectfrastructure in cities.
2018/11/26
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 6 #

2018/2589(RSP)


Paragraph 2
2. Considers that the primary aim of the Commission should be to avoid that hazardous chemicals enter the material cycle, and to ensure better implementation of current legislation, while addressing those regulatory gaps, including in particular with respect to imported articles, that could act as barriers to a sustainable EU circular economy;
2018/05/02
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 21 #

2018/2589(RSP)


Paragraph 5
5. Calls on the Commission and the Member States, in close conjunction with ECHA, to step up their regulatory activities to promote substitution of substances of very high concern and to restrict substances that pose unacceptable risks to human health or the environment in the context of REACH and specific sectorial or product legislation, so that recycled waste can be used as a major, reliable source of raw material within the Union;
2018/05/02
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 31 #

2018/2589(RSP)


Paragraph 8 a (new)
8a. Underlines that it is of utmost importance that transparency on the presence of substances of concern in consumer products is improved in order to establish public trust in the safety of secondary raw materials; points out that improved transparency would further reinforce incentives to phase-out the use of substances of concern;
2018/05/02
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 41 #

2018/2589(RSP)


Paragraph 10 a (new)
10a. Calls on the Member States and the Commission in this context, in conjunction with ECHA, to increase their efforts to ensure that, by 2020, all relevant substances of very high concern, including substances that meet the equivalent level of concern criterion, such as endocrine disruptors and sensitizers, are placed on the REACH candidate list, as laid down in the 7th Environmental Action Programme;
2018/05/02
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 56 #

2018/2589(RSP)


Paragraph 17
17. Points out that Union rules should ensure that materials recycling does not perpetuate use of hazardous substances; notes with concern that legislation preventing the presence of chemicals in products, including imports, is scattered, neither systematic nor consistent and applies only to very few substances, products and uses, often with many exemptions; regrets the lack of progress on developing a Union strategy for a non- toxic environment with the aim to, among others, reduce exposure to substances of concern in products;
2018/05/02
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 77 #

2018/2589(RSP)


Paragraph 27
27. Believes that the rules for classifying waste as hazardous or non- hazardous should be fully aligned with those for the classification of substances and mixtures under CLP; emphasises the need to further develop the classification framework for waste and chemicals to include hazard endpoints of high concern, such as high persistence, endocrine disruption, bioaccumulation, or neurotoxicity;
2018/05/02
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 2 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 4 a (new)
- having regard to the Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions of 22 November 2016 entitled ‘Next steps for a sustainable European future – European action for sustainability’;1a _________________ 1ahttps://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal- content/EN/TXT/?uri=COM%3A2016%3 A739%3AFIN
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 7 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 4 b (new)
- having regard to the Reflection Paper of the Commission of 30 January 2019 entitled ‘Towards a Sustainable Europe by 2030’;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 9 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 19 g (new)
- having regard to the Third African Union-European Union-United Nations Trilateral Meeting, New York, 23 September 2018, Joint Communiqué, 1a _________________ 1ahttp://europa.eu/rapid/press- release_STATEMENT-18-5882_en.htm
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 10 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 4 f (new)
- having regard to the High-Level Multi-stakeholder Platform on the UN sustainable development goals and to its joint contribution of 11 October 2018, which recommends that the EU develops and implements an overarching visionary and transformative Sustainable Europe 2030 strategy, guiding all EU policies and programmes, including both interim and long-term targets and lay out Europe's vision for a sustainable Europe beyond the 2030 Agenda;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 12 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 19 c (new)
- having regard to the 2018 Global Compact for Migration and Global Compact for Refugees;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 17 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 5 a (new)
- having regard to the European Council conclusions of 18 October 2018 (EUCO13/18), stating that the EU and its Member States are fully committed to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its implementation, and in which the European Council welcomed the intention of the Commission to publish its Reflection Paper in 2018, calling for it to pave the way for a comprehensive implementation strategy in 2019;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 22 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 19 a (new)
- having regard to the DEVE and ENVI Memorandum - Members of the European Parliament united to accelerate progress to health-related Sustainable Development Goals – leaving no one behind, signed on 20th November 2018;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 25 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 19 b (new)
- having regard to the 2015 adopted Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 26 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 19 d (new)
- having regard to the joint EU-UN statements and communiques supporting the realisation of the SDGs and strengthened collaboration with the UN;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 27 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 19 e (new)
- having regard to the Joint Communiqué between the European Union and the United Nations: A renewed partnership in development, New York, 27 September 20181a _________________ 1ahttp://europa.eu/rapid/press- release_STATEMENT-18-5927_en.htm
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 28 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 19 f (new)
- having regard to the Joint EU - UN Press Statement of 23September 20181a _________________ 1ahttp://europa.eu/rapid/press- release_STATEMENT-18-5870_en.htm
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 35 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A
A. whereas the 2030 Agenda, with its indivisible sustainable development goals, has the potential to be transformative and sets out universal, ambitious, comprehensive, indivisible and interlinked goals, aimed at eradicating poverty, fighting discrimination and promotsharing prosperity, ensuring economic, social and territorial cohesion, promoting environmental responsibility, social inclusion and respect for human rights, and strengthening peace and security; whereas these goals require immediate action with a view to full and effective implementation; whereas the 2030 Agenda can unify stakeholders to leverage the full potential of the multilateral system and to more effectively support the countries and people they serve;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 36 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs represent an ambitious vision of the healthier, more prosperous, inclusive and resilient world, it is based on the Union’s core values of democracy and participation, social justice, solidarity and sustainability, respect for the rule of law and human rights, both within Europe and around the globe, and striving to achieve the SDGs therefore naturally follows the European Union’s plans to create a better, healthier and more sustainable future for Europe;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 43 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C
C. whereas many of ththe interconnected and indivisible SDGs and the 169 targets encompassed in the 2030 Agenda directly concern the powers and responsibilities of the Union in addition to national, regional and local authorities and their implementation therefore requires a true multi-level governance approach, with active and broad-based public, civil society and private sector engagement;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 68 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G
G. whereas the United Nations High- Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF) will meet at summit level, under the auspices of the UN General Assembly in September 2019, to take stock of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda as a whole, and at ministerial levelreviewing progress on all SDGs in a comprehensive manner, and at ministerial level (high level political forum) in July 2019 to review progress on SDGs 4 (quality education), 8 (decent work and economic growth), 10 (reduced inequalities), 13 (climate action), 16 (peace, justice and strong institutions) and 17 (partnerships for the goals);
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 71 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G a (new)
G a. whereas the UNGA Summit on SDGs provides an opportunity for the EU and its Member States to highlight their progress in advancing the 2030 Agenda and SDGs in a comprehensive manner;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 75 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital H a (new)
H a. whereas the European Commission Staff Document on Combatting HIV/ AIDS, viral hepatitis and tuberculosis from July 2018 highlights the gaps and limitations in surveillance data for viral hepatitis which make it difficult to assess the distance that EU Member States need to cover to reach the UN SDG target;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 81 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital H b (new)
H b. whereas voluntary national reviews are at present not necessarily consistent and connected with Member States’ national reform programmes within the European Semester process;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 94 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Highlights that the aim of the 2030 Agenda is to achieve greater well-being for all, leaving no-one behind, and that the three pillars of sustainable development, (social, environmental and economic development) as well as its governance dimension, are essential to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs); underlines the fact that sustainable development is a fundamental objective of the Union, as laid down in Article 3(3) of the Treaty on European Union (TEU) and should play a central role in the debate on and the narrative for the future of Europe in particular as the implementation of the SDGs should lead to a paradigm shift and become the EU's over-arching long-term economic model to succeed the current Europe 2020 Strategy;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 103 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Stresses that the Union should renew its commitment to being a global frontrunner in implementing the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, together with its Member States and their local and regional authorities, in line with the principle of subsidiarity and in close cooperation with its international partners; recalls that the EU political engagement should be reflected in the MFF 2021- 2027; underlines that the 2030 Agenda must further catalyse a joined-up approach between the EU’s internal and external action and its other policies and coherence across Union financing instruments for a global response and commitment towards sustainable growth and development;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 121 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 b (new)
4 b. Recognises that health gains must be protected and progress accelerated to reach the SDGs, states that while the world has made remarkable progress on several fronts in health many challenges remain - among them is addressing disparities between people’s health in stable countries and the health of people living in fragile and vulnerable settings and health disparities within countries;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 122 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. Recognises that the 2030 Agenda for sustainable development has reinforced global health as a political priority; states that healthy populations are critical to sustainable development – to ending poverty, promoting peaceful and inclusive societies and protecting the environment, insists that health is also an outcome and indicator of progress that reflects the success of many goals and the 2030 agenda as a whole;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 129 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. Calls on the Commission to identify clearly existing gaps in all relevant policies in order to assess what needs to be done by 2030 in terms of EU policies, legislation, statistics and disaggregated data collection, governance and implementation and to submit a full report on those gaps without further delay sos as to present a comprehensive strategy before the end of 2019;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 135 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Calls on the Commission to propose an all-encompassing EU 2030 strategy for the implementation of the SDGs, which should integrate these goals within the EU’s policies and governance, in order to reinforce the Union’s ability to fulfil its engagements with regard to the 2030 Agenda and strengthen its collaboration with the UN;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 138 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6 a. As a key foundation for building a sustainable Europe, calls on the Commission to lead the development of a sustainable food production and consumption model that protects and removes pressure of food systems on health and the environment and brings economic benefits to farmers, companies and citizens;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 139 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 b (new)
6 b. Calls on the Commission to work, in collaboration with key stakeholders at all levels, towards ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being for all at all ages, in particular with a view to making health care more accessible, affordable, effective, and sustainable, addressing risk factors of non-communicable diseases in a more holistic way, exchanging best practices, and strengthening the capacity to prevent and manage global health threats such as antimicrobial resistance;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 140 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 c (new)
6 c. Calls upon the Commission to align programmatic, financing and operational policies, approaches and methodologies where it can enhance efficiency and effectiveness, with UN and its partners, to improve effectiveness on a number of common priorities—such as gender equality and reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health, climate change and environment, addressing inequalities and poverty;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 144 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 d (new)
6 d. Calls upon the Commission to enhance accountability for delivering collective results for people internally and externally through its MFF;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 149 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. Reiterates its request for such a strategy and underlines the need to clearly set out common indicators and, benchmarks and targets, an analysis of the distance to targets and goals, and required action and means of implementation; stresses that the EU’s 2030 strategy should also outline when and how the Commission and the co- legislator will undertake sustainability impact assessments to reorient existing policies and for new legislative proposals, reviews or recasting of Union legislation;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 150 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7 a. Calls on the Commission to present a reform proposal for the existing European Semester process, which is not as such adapted to be a “European process for SDG policy coordination”, as indicated in the Commission’s reflection paper on Sustainable Europe by 2030 in scenario 1; considers that such a reform should ensure that a European SDG policy coordination does not lead to a parallel policy process to the European Semester, but consist of an integrated and coherent approach based on a new Sustainable Development Pact;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 168 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 a (new)
9 a. Calls on the EU Member States to provide data for the effective monitoring of viral hepatitis in line with the indicators established by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control and calls on the European Commission to closely monitor this process in line with its commitment made in its Communication "Next steps for a sustainable Europe" from November 2016.
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 173 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 b (new)
9 b. Calls on the Commission to align the MFF 2021-27 with the SDGs implementation and use SDG targets to access progress made by the MFF;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 177 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 b (new)
11 b. Reiterates the position of the European Parliament on the future Multi- Annual Financial Framework, which calls for a compulsory and legally binding mid-term revision, following a review of the functioning of the MFF, and taking into account an assessment of the progress made towards the climate target, the mainstreaming of the Sustainable Development Goals and gender equality;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 185 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10 a (new)
10 a. Stresses the need for the EU institutions to show leadership and adapt their own governance to allow the mainstreaming of SDGs within their work; calls on the European Commission to coordinate SDGs at the highest level with a dedicated project team attached to the president office and working with all Commissioners and DGs trained contact points on SDGs; reference should be made in the State of the Union address to the state of play on SDGs implementation; insists that likewise, the European Parliament should ensure that SDGs are coherently mainstreamed across committees;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 187 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Welcomes the establishment of a working party on the 2030 Agenda under the General Affairs Council; calls for the establishment of SDG coordination and cooperation mechanisms between Parliament, the Council and the Commission, andwhich should be clearly framed and determined within an Inter- Institutional Agreement for a Sustainable Europe by 2030, as coherent political processes between the three institutions will be critical for the successful implementation of the 2030 Agenda; calls for the involvement of all three institutions in a future multi- stakeholder platform on sustainable development;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 191 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 c (new)
11 c. Is of the view that policy coherence for sustainable development means that all relevant policies, and all financial and non-financial instruments at European level must in future be designed, implemented and monitored along UN SDG goal achievements, and that the European Commission should, therefore, rapidly develop the necessary policy capacities at all levels;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 193 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 a (new)
11 a. Believes that, in line with UN SDG 17 on Partnerships, the role of the existing Multi-Stakeholder Platform on the UN sustainable development goals should be upgraded and brought into a formal and inter-institutional consultation framework;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 195 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Welcomes the Commission’s commitment to mainstream SDGs into its Better Regulation Agenda and underlines the potential for using the Better Regulation tools strategically in order to evaluate EU policy coherence with regard to the 2030 Agenda; calls on the Commission to establish an SDG check of all new policies and legislation and to ensure full policy coherence in the implementation of the SDGs, while promoting synergies, gaining co-benefits and avoiding trade-offs, both at Union and Member State level; this would in particular require adapting the European Semester by integrating it into a multi- annual sustainable Europe coordination cycle encompassing all dimensions of the SDGs;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 215 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Emphasises the role of regular and adequate ex-ante impact assessments as well as ex-post evaluations; recalls the Treaty obligation to take into account the objectives of development cooperation in all policies likely to affect developing countries;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 223 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 4
Voluntary National Reviews and EU reporting for the UNGA HLPF 2019
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 233 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Welcomes the upcoming in-depth review of SDGs 4 (quality education), 8 (decent work and economic growth), 10 (reduced inequalities), 13 (climate action), 16 (peace, justice and strong institutions) and 17 (partnerships for the goals) and the future in depth reviews of SDG 1: No Poverty, SDG 2: Zero Hunger, SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being, SDG 5: Gender Equality, SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation, SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy, SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure; SDG 1, Sustainable Cities and Communities; SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production, SDG 14: Life Below Water, SDG 15: Life on Land and expects the Union to contribute to the review in full;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 235 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 a (new)
17 a. Welcomes the United Nations High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF) meeting at summit level, under the auspices of the UN General Assembly in September 2019 and thereafter at future summits, to take stock of the implementation of all the SDGs within the 2030 Agenda as a whole and expects the Union to play a leading role in the summit;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 3 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. Emphasises that social as well as climate and environmental policy should play a full role in the European Semester process in addition to the economic dimensions; calls for the inclusion of indicators oriented towards measuring sustainability and well-being;
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 5 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 b (new)
1 b. Calls on the Commission to include the objective to achieve a climate neutral economy in the European Semester; recalls Europe’s commitment to achieving a net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 through a socially fair transition in a cost-efficient manner;
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 6 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 c (new)
1 c. Highlights that the decarbonisation of the EU’s economy will stimulate significant additional investment; recalls that today around 2% of the EU’s GDP is invested in our energy system and related infrastructure; notes that this would have to increase to 2.8% in order to achieve a net-zero greenhouse gas economy, which requires considerable additional investments compared to the baseline;
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 7 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 d (new)
1 d. Recalls the need to align the EU’s financing commitments with the Paris climate goals, including assessing that investments support or are compatible with climate objectives, ramping up climate finance, and mainstreaming climate reporting on financial flows;
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 8 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 e (new)
1 e. Underlines the need to integrate the climate and energy goals set by Member States under the framework of the Energy Union Governance regulation into the European Semester;
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 12 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Considers it important to use the European Semester to accelerate the transition towards a circular, net-zero emission, energy efficient and renewable- energy based economy, contributing to sustainable development and the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals;
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 13 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Considers the European Semester an essential tool without which the EU biodiversity targets, and the relative socio- economic benefits, will not be reached;
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 17 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. Welcomes the European Semester recognition that Member States should pay particular attention to the adaptability of the workforce, to ensure they have the right skills that match technological progress; stresses in this context the need to adopt a just transition approach, ensuring inclusion and participation of all those affected, and supporting the workforce and the creation of decent work and quality jobs;
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 21 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. Stresses that effective investment in healthcare, including health research and disease prevention, is essential for providing citizens with equal access to high quality healthcare services; Underlines the importance of the sustainability of the healthcare sector;
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 23 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6 a. Calls on the Commission to give a territorial dimension to the European semester at both analytic and operational level; considers, furthermore, that in order to ensure the effective management of structural policies, regional and local authorities must be involved in drawing up and taking decisions on these policies through a top-down mixed planning process and vice versa;
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 24 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6 a. Calls for a structured involvement of civil society and environmental organisations within the European Semester process, and for greater involvement of environment ministers within the European Semester process at Council level.
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 26 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 b (new)
6 b. Stresses the need to strengthen the European common response capacity to disasters such as drought in southern European countries, catastrophic floods, forest fires and earthquakes; stresses the need to encourage greater cooperation on the advanced planning of European disaster-response operations by, among other measures, mapping Member States’ assets, drawing up contingency plans and improving risk-management planning.;
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 9 #

2018/2114(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Notes that the Joint Statement and the Common Approach are of a legally non-binding character;
2018/11/22
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 11 #

2018/2114(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Regrets that the Parliament was not fully involved in the procedure to select the new seat of EMA and; Points out that the proceduress followed for the srelecocation of the new location for EMA is not used anymore in this formEMA, which was specific to the situation and did not constitute a precedent, must not be used in the future;
2018/11/22
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 18 #

2018/2114(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Expects the prerogatives of Parliament as co-legislator to be fully respected in future decisions on the location or relocation of agencies; considers that Parliament should be systematically involved from the initial stages of the future processes, and on equal terms with the Council and the Commission;
2018/11/22
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 21 #

2018/2114(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3a. Underlines the value of enhanced exchange of information from the initial stages of future processes for the location of agencies. Such early exchange of information would make it easier for the three Institutions to exercise their rights and prerogatives;
2018/11/22
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 22 #

2018/2114(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Calls on the Commission to provide, by April 2019, an in-depth analysis of the implementation of the Joint Statement and Common Approach as regards the location of the decentralised Agencies in order to launch a revision; In the case that the in-depth analysis identifies shortcomings, calls on the Council to engage, together with the Parliament and the Commission, in a revision of the Joint Statement and Common Approach in a timely manner;
2018/11/22
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 26 #

2018/2114(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Stresses that in case of budgetary decisions regarding decentralised agencies the specificity and workload of the agency has to be taken into account and that possible budgetary cuts cannot be taken on a one size fits all-basis; considers that, in this context, priority should be given to the needs of agencies that are undergoing potentially business-disrupting events and processes such as relocation; furthermore stresses the need to take into account the new climate and sustainability priorities within the next MFF and the tasks attributed to particular agencies for the implementation of the MFF.
2018/11/22
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 27 #

2018/2114(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Stresses that in case of budgetary and staffing decisions regarding decentralised agencies the specificity and workload of the agency has to be taken into account and that possible budgetary and personnel cuts cannot be taken on a one size fits all-basis; furthermore stresses the need to take into account the new climate and sustainability priorities within the next MFF and the tasks attributed to particular agencies for the implementation of the MFF.
2018/11/22
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 30 #

2018/2114(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6a. Notes that the principles of desirability of geographical spread of agencies' seats and of prioritising new Member States as hosts, as stated in the Joint Statement, were not respected in the case of new seats for EMA and EBA;
2018/11/22
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 31 #

2018/2114(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 b (new)
6b. Points out that the Joint Statement advises that, when the legislative authority decides to assign additional tasks to agencies as compared to the initial Commission proposal, the repriorisation of their activities should always be considered as an alternative to granting additional resources 1a; believes that the repriorisation of activities in the remit of the European Medicines Agency should be avoided as much as possible due to the fact that its core mission is safeguarding public health in the EU; __________________ 1a Joint Statement of the European Parliament, the Council of the EU and the European Commission on decentralised agencies, art. 43
2018/11/22
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 4 #

2018/2090(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Highlights the vital role of education, training and re-training that is available for all as the best investment in the EU’s future; strongly believes that digital transformation has a great impact on education systems; stresses that digital competencies are of growing importance for every individual and underlines that in the future, nearly all jobs will require digital skills;
2018/09/06
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 30 #

2018/2090(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Underlines that sufficient infrastructure offering high-quality and accessible connectivity for all citizens is of great importance; highlights the need to close the digital divide by creating an investment- friendly environment and fostering digital infrastructure such as high-capacity broadband networks;
2018/09/06
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 34 #

2018/2090(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Stresses the vital role of high- capacity broadband networks, cybersecurity and artificial intelligence as the backbone of future education and training schemes; underlines the importance of introducing coding classes in all schools, universities and colleges and encouraging schools to participate in the EU Code Week; emphasises the need for access to classes for vulnerable people and those who may not have access to these schemes through education systems;
2018/09/06
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 56 #

2018/2090(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5a. Highlights the gap in access to education and digital skills for the most vulnerable in society; emphasises that equal access and the opportunity to learn digital skills for women and girls should be incorporated and encouraged.
2018/09/06
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 8 #

2018/2089(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B
B. whereas human error is estimated to play a decisive role in the majority of road accidents, and hence driverless vehicles are expected to improve road safety; whereas a safe development of autonomous driving is a prerequisite for accepting this technology in our society; whereas driverless vehicles could bring mobility to those who are unable to drive, encourage car-sharing schemes and optimise the use of infrastructure by relieving traffic congestion, increase fuel efficiency and facilitate alternative energy sources since autonomous vehicles will not need proximate urban parking and thereby contribute to meeting climate targets;
2018/09/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 15 #

2018/2089(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B a (new)
B a. whereas other countries and regions are progressing quickly in the development of autonomous driving and are already adopting strategies for automated vehicles and attracting investment in this field; whereas the economic impact of automated mobility in the EU will be strongly dependent on the ability of European industry to keep pace with international competitors;
2018/09/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 25 #

2018/2089(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital C a (new)
C a. whereas automated and connected vehicles will have a major societal impact in many different areas and already today, the development of connected and automated mobility poses questions about socio-economic impacts and structural change that need to be addressed;
2018/09/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 34 #

2018/2089(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. Stresses that to contribute to the fulfilment of our transport policy goals, autonomous driving should be implemented in a way that significantly contributes to a sustainable transport system that takes into account the environment, climate, road safety, noise and good accessibility for all;
2018/09/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 39 #

2018/2089(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 b (new)
1 b. Highlights that Europe accounts for 23% of global motor vehicle production and that our vision must be for Europe to be a world leader for fully autonomous safe mobility; supports the Commission in its view that for Europe to remain competitive and foster employment, it will be essential that the key technologies, services and infrastructure are developed and produced in Europe and that the necessary regulatory framework is in place; calls on the Commission and Member States to ensure and facilitate the necessary investments needed, in particular for SMEs, to develop the relevant technologies, to create the necessary infrastructure support and to ensure social acceptance for automated mobility;
2018/09/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 52 #

2018/2089(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Calls on the European Commission and Member States to enlarge their policies on autonomous driving to include also collective transport as well as to enlarge their views to all modes of transport;
2018/09/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 55 #

2018/2089(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 b (new)
2 b. Considers that in order to deploy successfully and massively automated vehicles on the roads in the EU, it is also necessary to encompass it with deployment of very High Capacity telecommunication Networks as well as an efficient use of the European GALILEO satellite technology and applications;
2018/09/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 57 #

2018/2089(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 c (new)
2 c. Recalls that the European Parliament in its Resolution of 13 March 2018 on a European Strategy on Cooperative Intelligence Transport Systems urged the Commission to issue a legislative proposal on access to in-vehicle data and resources by the end of the year; calls on the Commission to ensure a level playing field on access to in-vehicle data and resources, protecting consumer rights and promoting innovation and fair competition;
2018/09/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 64 #

2018/2089(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Stresses that autonomous driving will represent a major paradigm-shift that will significantly alter current models of mobility and ownership of vehicles; considers that, if well framed, autonomous driving can represent a major improvement in vehicle-use efficiency, as well as significantly contribute to reduce congestion and consequently reduce CO2 emissions and other pollutants;
2018/09/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 66 #

2018/2089(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 b (new)
3 b. Calls on all relevant actors, Member States and authorities to show collaborative leadership and coordinate and cooperate in order to promote innovation, safeguard investments in automated mobility infrastructure and facilitate cross-border testing;
2018/09/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 70 #

2018/2089(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. Stresses that the deployment of connected and automated mobility technologies in commercial road traffic has structural effects on the labour market, in particular in the transport sector; calls on the Commission and Member States to actively facilitate a dialogue with and between stakeholders, including the social partners, on how to manage and mitigate this structural change. It is essential to ensure a just transition for potential workers whose jobs may change or disappear due to automation, offering them every opportunity to acquire the skills and knowledge they need to master new technology as well as to support them during labour market transitions.
2018/09/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 75 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D
D. whereas the current political momentum should be used to shift to a circular plastics economy, that in line with the waste hierarchy, gives priority to the prevention of plastic waste generation;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 83 #
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 88 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D b (new)
Db. whereas the release of enormous quantities of plastic into the sea has not only an adverse impact on marine resources but also affects economic activities, inter alia by increasing the costs involved in cleaning nets and disposing of litter collected;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 100 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Believes that preventing the generation of plastic waste upfront and boosting our plastics recycling performance are both key to protecting human health and the environment, and supporting a sustainable economic growth; calls on all stakeholders to consider the recent Chinese import ban on plastic waste as an opportunity tofor investing in state-of-the-art recycling capacity in the EUplastic waste prevention, for developing Eco-design requirements for all plastic and plastic containing products, and for investing in state-of-the-art in the EU for collection and sorting and recycling;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 157 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. Calls on the competent authorities in the Member States to ensure that the entire product and waste acquis is fully implemented;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 163 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7a. Stresses the need to take into consideration the impact of plastics on carbon emissions, calls the Commission to update its "monitoring framework for the circular economy" to integrate indicators specifically for plastics, and in particular to monitor the decoupling of plastic generation from fossil feedstocks;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 176 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8 a (new)
8a. Calls on Member States to ban landfilling of plastic waste by 2030 and to manage it according to the provisions laid down in Directive 2008/98/EC;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 182 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Believes that civil society should be able to hold industry accountable for its commitmentcarrying out its obligations; asks the Commission to take this into account in the upcoming ‘New Deal for Consumers’;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 184 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Calls onUrges the Commission to come forward with anfulfil its obligation to update of the essential requirements in the Packaging and Packaging Waste Directive by end of 2020, addressing in particular prevention, design for circularity and over-reuse, promoting high quality recycling and the reduction of excessive packaging; in this regard, calls on the Commission to provide clear guidelines on what should be considered "reusable" and "recyclable" plastic packaging;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 189 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Calls on the Commission to come forward with an update of the essential requirements in the Packaging and Packaging Waste Directive, which takes into account the material properties of each packaging and addressinges in particular prevention, design for circularity, multiple recycling and over- packaging;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 197 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Calls onReminds the Commission to make ‘circularity first’hat prevention is an overarching principle, also for non-packaging plastic items, by developing product standards and revising the eco-design legislative framework and calls on the Commission to further implement this by creating adequate economic and legislative incentives, in particular by broadening the scope of the eco-design legislation to cover all main plastic product groups, including non-energy related product groups, and to gradually include relevant resource efficiency features in the mandatory requirements for product design and to adopt eco- labelling provisions;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 218 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Calls on the Commission to come forward swiftly with quality standards in order to build trust and incentivise the market for secondary plastics; urges the Commission to develop various grades of recycling which are alignedis compatible with the functionality of different products, while safeguarding public health and food safety;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 222 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 a (new)
12a. Points out that the use of recycled plastic materials is not possible for food contact by the current legislation; therefore calls on the Commission to modernize the EU legislative framework for food contact materials, in order to facilitate the use of recycled plastic- and other, endlessly recycled materials where it is safe for human health;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 226 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 b (new)
12b. Urges the Commission and the Member States to introduce incentives for decreasing the use of the plastic materials and to support innovation in packaging in case of all the food products where the packaging in plastic is needed for the fight against food waste and to ensure human safety (fresh meat, dairy products, frozen products etc.), especially during the modernization of the current legislation on the food contact materials;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 237 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Believes that mandatory rules on the use of minimum recycled content for specific products may be needed in order tonew plastic products, in accordance with product specific legislation concerning health, safety and environment, is a requirement in order to promote recycling, reduce the use of fossil-based virgin plastic, curb the excessive quantity of CO2 emitted in their production and thus drive the uptake of secondary raw materials;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 247 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Believes that mandatory rules on recycled content for specific plastic products may be needed in order to drive the uptake of secondary raw materials;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 262 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Stresses that corporate and public procurement has the power to boost innovation in business models and select products that ensure resource efficiency; calls on the Commission to set up an EU learning network on circular procurement in order to harvest the lessons learnt from pilot projects; believes that voluntary, create a standard template and assessment system for tenders that can be reused in a practical way, together with systematic reporting on rate of circular procurement undertaken by public authorities and large corporate groups; believes that these actions could pave the way for binding rules on public circular procurement and their mandatory integration in sustainability reports;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 270 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 a (new)
17a. Highlights that local and regional authorities could contribute to the improvement of plastic recycling through their public procurement policies; believes that they should set eco-design criteria for the purchase of products and services by demanding products made of fully recyclable plastics and products, up to a certain percentage, made of recycled content;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 304 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20 a (new)
20a. Highlights that a transformation in consumer behaviour is pivotal in order to reduce plastic waste generation and littering; calls on the Commission and Member States to finance awareness campaigns, including in schools, to inform the public of the benefits of plastic waste prevention and the need to address littering;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 327 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 22 a (new)
22a. Recognises that restricting the use of single use plastic products will create opportunities for sustainable business models, including the use of alternative materials, such as materials that can be bio-based or endlessly recycled without loss of quality;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 333 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23
23. Stresses that there are various pathways to achieving high collection and recycling rates and a reduction in litter, including deposit-refundextended producer responsibility (EPR) schemes for extended producthe separate collection of all materials including plastics and, where reslevant deponsibility (EPR) schemest refund schemes for certain types of packaging; underlines that the choice of a certain scheme remains within the remit of the competent authority in the Member State, which can take local specificities into account and ensure that any existing well-performing and cost- efficient systems are not jeopardised;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 334 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23
23. Stresses that there are various pathways to achieving high collection and recycling rates and a reduction in litter, including deposit-refundturn schemes or extended producer responsibility (EPR) schemes; underlines that the choice of a certain scheme remains within the remit of the competent authority in the Member State, which can take local specificitiesstresses the need that the fees paid by the producer for the fulfilment of its EPR obligations are modulated by taking into account and ensresource that any existing well-performing and cost-efficient systems are not jeopardisedefficiency criteria,; calls on the Commission to consider options for a more unified approach in the EU to deposit schemes;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 343 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23 a (new)
23a. Stresses that effective extended producer responsibility schemes can have a positive environmental impact by reducing the generation of plastic waste and increasing its separate collection and recycling; welcomes the fact that Directive94/62/EC stipulates that Member States shall establish mandatory EPR schemes for all packaging by end of 2024 and calls on the Commission to assess the possibility of extending this obligation to other plastic products in accordance with Article 8 and 8a of Directive 2008/98/EC;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 358 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24 a (new)
24a. Welcomes the Commission proposal for a Directive "on port reception facilities" which aims to significantly reduce the burden and costs for fishermen of bringing fishing gear and plastic waste back to the port; underlines the important role that fishermen could play, in particular by collecting plastic waste from the sea during their fishing activity, and bringing it back to the port to undergo proper waste management. Stresses that Commission and Member States should incentivize this activity, so that waste derived from clean- up activities would not be covered by any cost recovery system, and fisherman shall not be charged a fee for its treatment;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 366 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 25
25. Strongly supports the Commission in coming forward with clear harmonisedpromoting existing harmonized standards and coming forward with additional standards, where appropriate, with regard to rules on both bio-based content and biodegradability, as a feedstock with specific independent property, in order to tackle existing misconceptions and misunderstandings about bio-plastics and/or biodegradable plastics which can derive from fossil or bio-based feedstock;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 378 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 26
26. Highlights the importance of lifecycle assessments in order to demonstrate a reduced environmental impact for all bio-plasticsat fostering a sustainable bio-economy can contribute to decreasing Europe´s dependency on imported raw materials. Bio-based recyclable packaging and compostable biodegradable packaging could represent an opportunity to promote renewable sources for the production of packaging, where shown to be beneficial from life- cycle perspective;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 385 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 26
26. Highlights the importance of lifecycle assessments in order to demonstrate a reduced environmental impact for all bio-plasticpotential role for bio-plastics compared to alternative plastic products, based on robust lifecycle assessments;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 386 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 27
27. Emphasises that biodegradable plastics can help support the transition to a circular economy, but are not a universal remedy against marine litter; calls, therefore, on the Commission to develop a list of useful products and applications composed of biodegradable plastics, together with clear criteriaset of criteria for packaging when, in line with EU harmonized standards, biodegradable plastic would be preferable and provide an indicative list of useful products and applications. The indicative list should be the starting point for further R&D investments and market development of products and applications;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 398 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 29
29. Calls for a complete ban on oxo- degradable plastic, as this type of plastic does not safely biodegrade and therefore fails to deliver a proven environmental benefit;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 413 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30 a (new)
30a. Underlines that several Member States, such as the UK, France and Italy, have already put in place national legislative measures for banning micro- plastics which are intentionally added to cosmetics; welcomes the scientific assessment that the ECHA is carrying out to examine the impacts of micro-plastics that are intentionally added to products in the context of the REACH restrictions, and to subsequently conclude whether European restrictions would be appropriate for addressing the negative effects linked to their presence on human health and the environment;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 436 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 34
34. Welcomes the Commission’s announcement that an additional EUR 100 million will be invested to drive investment towards circular solutions under Horizon 2020 such as design options, the diversification of feedstock and innovative recycling technologies; supports the development of a Strategic Research Innovation Agenda on plastics to guide future funding decisions;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 441 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 34
34. Welcomes the Commission’s announcement that an additional EUR 100 million will be invested to drive investment towards circular solutions under Horizon 2020; supports the development of a Strategic Research Innovation Agenda on plasticsmaterial circularity to guide future funding decisions;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 446 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 34 a (new)
34a. Calls on the Commission and the Council to make resources available to support further research and investment through the next Multiannual Financial Framework and the Research Framework Programme, reiterates the need to support stakeholder cooperation along the entire value chain through public private partnership to develop innovative solutions building on the circular economy model;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 482 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 36 a (new)
36a. Calls on the EU to actively support the on-going discussions at the United nations and in other international foras, including the G7 and G20, with the aim to strengthen existing tools and develop a new "Global pact for the Environment" which shall include a binding mechanism to halt plastic pollution; stresses that EU should lead by example and ensure they aim for the same level of ambition at the international level as is already aimed for within the European Union;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 6 #

2018/2028(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B a (new)
Ba. whereas according to Unesco only 30-50% of the online content worldwide is in English; and whereas high-quality machine translation and computer-aided translation will help to overcome language barriers and improve cross- lingual information access;
2018/03/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 9 #

2018/2028(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital C
C. whereas multilingualism is one of Europe’s greatest assets, but also one of its biggest challenges, and whereas multilingualism should not be undermined by the emergence of the European gigabit society;
2018/03/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 16 #

2018/2028(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital D
D. whereas LTs can contribute to future European cross-border and cross- language communication, economic growth and social stability,upholding diversity and fostering cohesion and convergence;
2018/03/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 23 #

2018/2028(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital F
F. whereas technological mastery of human language could enable a wide range of innovative IT products and services in industry, commerce, services, government and administration;
2018/03/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 28 #

2018/2028(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital G a (new)
Ga. whereas technological development is growingly language based and has consequences for growth and society, the need for more language aware policies is urgent. Not only technological, but genuinely multidisciplinary research and education on digital communication and language technologies and their relationship to growth and society is needed;
2018/03/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 38 #

2018/2028(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Supports the creation of a coordinated initiative with a robust, large- scale and long-term funding scheme on HLTs with the aim of tackling deep natural language understanding at European, national and regional level, including the participation of research centres, enterprises, in particular SMEs and start- ups, and relevant stakeholders; stresses that this project should be open, cloud-based and interoperable and provide highly scalable, high-performance and robust basic tools for several LT applications;
2018/03/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 46 #

2018/2028(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Urges the development of actions and appropriate funding with the aim of enabling and empowering European SMEs and start-ups to easily have access and use LTs in order to grow their businesses online, thereby boosting their levels of innovation and creating jobs;
2018/03/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 47 #

2018/2028(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. Urges the Commission to set up a HLT financing platform drawing lessons from the current experiences in FP7, Horizon 2020 and CEF; in addition, the Commission should put emphasis on research areas needed for ensuring a deep language understanding such as computational linguistics, linguistics, artificial intelligence, language technology, computer science, and cognitive science;
2018/03/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 48 #

2018/2028(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 b (new)
2b. Stresses the role of EU, Member States, universities and other public institutions in contributing on to a preservation of their languages in the digital world and in developing databases and translation technologies for all EU languages, including smaller languages; calls for coordination between research and industry with a common vision of enhancing the digital possibilities for language translation , and with an open access to data, needed for technological advancement;
2018/03/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 49 #

2018/2028(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 c (new)
2c. Notes that current digital tools and resources for smaller languages, including digital availability of all orthographies and means of sign language translation and digitalisation, are insufficient, hence calls for promoting the technology development for smaller European languages;
2018/03/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 50 #

2018/2028(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 d (new)
2d. Notes that there is a widening gap between English and other EU languages in technology, and that this leads to inequality of access to information between age groups, different regions and Member States, as well as between people with higher and lower education; stresses that by making the content available on different EU languages inequality would be reduced;
2018/03/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 51 #

2018/2028(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 e (new)
2e. Points to the fact that language can be a barrier to the transfer of scientific knowledge, hence urges the Commission to seek solutions to ensure that scientific knowledge is made available in other languages than English;
2018/03/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 52 #

2018/2028(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 f (new)
2f. Notes the positive aspect of open source and open software systems which would benefits EU citizens, since the commercial algorithms are not public whereas open source algorithms are open for anyone to review as well as participate in developing the technology further, which in turn helps to keep the machine languages up to date and alive;
2018/03/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 53 #

2018/2028(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 g (new)
2g. Notes the sensitive nature of some parts of the translation systems which could not be left to the commercial companies and their the free-to-use programs for personal data and privacy reasons, as it is unclear how the companies would use the knowledge gathered through the translation programs in for example translating health data;
2018/03/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 54 #

2018/2028(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 h (new)
2h. Notes that cross sectional research and studies are needed on the consequences of language minorisation in the digital world and its effects on equality and in the access to information;
2018/03/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 59 #

2018/2028(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3a. Notes that language technology is first available in English; is aware that large global and European manufacturers and companies often develop language technology also for the major European languages with relatively large markets: Spanish, French and German (already these languages lack some resources in some sub-areas);stresses however, that general EU level action (policy, funding, research & education) should be taken to ensure the development of Language Technology for small and middle-sized official EU languages and special EU level actions (policy, funding, research and education) should take place to include and encourage regional and minority languages in such development;
2018/03/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 4 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Citation 4
– having regard to Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker’s State of the Union speech of 13 September 2017, where he stressed that it is not acceptable that in some parts of Europe people are sold food of lower quality than in other countries, despite the packaging and the branding being identical;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 6 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Citation 4 a (new)
– having regard to the Commission communication of 11 April 2018 on A New Deal for Consumers (COM(2018)183):
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 7 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Citation 4 b (new)
– having regard to the proposal for a Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on better enforcement and modernisation of EU consumer protection rules (COM(2018)185/3);
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 9 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Citation 4 c (new)
– having regard to the Commission proposal to update the Unfair Commercial Practices Directive in order to make explicit that national authorities can assess and address misleading commercial practices that involve the marketing of products as being identical in several EU countries, if their composition or characteristics are significantly different;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 10 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Citation 4 d (new)
– having regard to the European Parliament major interpellation of 15 March 2017 on the differences in declarations, composition and taste of products in central/eastern and western markets of the EU (O-000019/2017);
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 11 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Citation 4 e (new)
– having regard to the European Parliament resolution of 11 June 2013 on a new agenda for European Consumer Policy (P7_TA(2013)0239);
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 17 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital A a (new)
Aa. whereas shortcomings in the implementation and enforcement of applicable EU food law requirements, for instance in the labelling of mechanically separated meat1a or the use of food additives2a, have regularly been reported by the European Commission’s Health and Food Audits and Analysis services; _________________ 1ahttp://ec.europa.eu/food/audits- analysis/overview_reports/details.cfm?rep _id=76 2ahttp://ec.europa.eu/food/audits- analysis/overview_reports/details.cfm?rep _id=115
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 27 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B
B. whereas proven differences in ingredients could in the long term affect consumers’ health, for example where the level of fat and/or sugar is higher than expected and when consumers are particularly vulnerable such as children and people with dietary and/or health issues;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 34 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B a (new)
Ba. whereas reformulation activities to reduce fat, sugars and salt contents in food are lagging behind in many Central, Eastern and South-Eastern European countries;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 35 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B b (new)
Bb. whereas there have been cases of substantial differences in products such as baby foods, which questions the principle and current methodology of adjusting products to local preferences;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 47 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital C a (new)
Ca. whereas several public opinion surveys have shown that consumers are agitated by such differences in quality, and feel as second class citizens of the EU;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 49 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital C b (new)
Cb. whereas the brand has a significant impact on consumer perception of the product, its value and its quality;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 52 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph –1 (new)
-1. Welcomes the recent Commission initiatives to address the issue, in particular the updating of the Unfair Commercial Practices Directive;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 54 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Welcomes the allocation of EUR 2 million for the development of a common testing methodology, and the inclusion in the EU budget for 2018 of a pilot project that aims to assess different aspects of dual quality for several categories of products; urges Member States and national authorities to actively participate in ongoing initiatives to facilitate the process; highlights the importance of in-depth and timely analysis of food but also non-food products;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 58 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Stresses the urgent need to develop a common testing methodology; highlights the commitment that EU-wide testing results should be available by the end of this year; calls for stronger involvement of the Members of the European Parliament in the process;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 62 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Welcomes the debate on dual quality within the High Level Forum for a Better Functioning Food Supply Chain; stresses the need to involve as many interested actors as possible;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 77 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3a. Is concerned about territorial constraints for traders when purchasing goods; calls on the Commission to examine such cases to enable consumers to fully benefit from the single market;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 79 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 b (new)
3b. Notes that the local producers have difficulties in partaking in the common market, calls on the Commission to determine whether dual quality has negative repercussions for local and regional production;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 89 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. Calls for the increased support for national consumer organisations, so that they can build capacity, develop their testing activities and contribute, alongside with competent authorities, to tracking and exposing situations of unfair product differentiation;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 92 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 b (new)
4b. Acknowledges the argument that products might differ due to consumer preferences, stresses however that consumers should be clearly and timely informed of such differences;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 102 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5a. Strongly condemns the argument that optimisation of composition and/or quality results from consumers' price expectations; highlights that various studies have shown that products of lower quality are often more expensive than their counterparts of higher quality elsewhere in the EU;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 124 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Underlines that national authorities are unable to tackle this issue individually, and calls therefore for a solution to be found at EU level; recalls that Directive 2005/29/EC on unfair commercial practices (UCPD)3 is the main tool for protecting consumers from misleading and unfair practices; calls on the Commission to amendbelieves that amending the Annex I to the UCPD by adding the practice of dual quality to the blacklist. _________________ 3 is the most effective way to tackle cases of dual quality on the market; _________________ 3 OJ L 149, 11.6.2005, p. 22. OJ L 149, 11.6.2005, p. 22.
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 132 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7a. Highlights the need to have effective and comprehensive legislation with clear instructions on how to tackle the issue of dual quality;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 4 #

2018/2003(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Notes that deforestation and forest degradation are the second leading cause of global warming1 ; Emphasizes the importance of the right policy approaches for the integral and sustainable management of forests in order to deliver both carbon and non-carbon benefits1a _________________ 1 https://www.forestcarbonpartnership.org/w hat-redd 1a Article 5 of the Paris Agreement
2018/03/27
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 5 #

2018/2003(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. Affirms the relevance of the type of forest management for the carbon balance in the tropics, as recent papers2a have pointed towards the subtler forms of degradation, and not only large scale deforestation as previously researched, likely to be a very significant source of carbon emissions accounting for more than half of emissions. _________________ 2aA.Baccini et al., 2017: Tropical forests are a net carbon source based on aboveground measurements
2018/03/27
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 6 #

2018/2003(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 c (new)
1 c. Welcomes the publication of the Feasibility study4a on options to step up EU Action against deforestation commissioned by the European Commission’s Directorate General for Environment; notes that the EU is presented as a major economic actor where its demand for forest-risk commodities (of categories of annual crops (e.g. maize, soy), perennial crops (e.g. coffee, palm oil, rubber), livestock (e.g. beef), forest-based (timber, pellets) and extractive industries) plays a larger role than many other regions, with a notable exception of China; and EU demand is clearly a driver of the problem of global deforestation; _________________ 4aFinal report published in 1/2018; developed by a consortium led by COWI, and including Ecofys and Milieu; available at http://ec.europa.eu/environment/forests/p df/feasibility_study_deforestation_kh0418 199enn_main_report.pdf
2018/03/27
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 13 #

2018/2003(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 e (new)
1 e. Notes that it is well established and uncontested that the conversion of tropical forest to agriculture, plantations and other land uses causes a significant loss of species, and particularly forest specialist species.
2018/03/27
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 22 #

2018/2003(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 h (new)
1 h. Stresses that secondary forests, regenerating largely through natural processes after significant human or natural disturbance of the primary forests, provide, next to primary forests, also crucial ecosystem services, livelihood for local population as well timber provision; considers that as their survival is threatened also by illegal logging, any action addressing transparency and accountability of forest management should target also secondary, and not only primary forests;
2018/03/27
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 25 #

2018/2003(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 i (new)
1 i. Stresses that the gap in implementation of the EU Timber Regulation could be a driver for unsustainable management of forests in sourcing countries, as the chain of control is only as strong as its weakest link in the single market; notes in this context that in some Member States the act transposing the Regulation enters into force only in April 2018;7a _________________ 7aThe law transposing the EUTR enters into force in Slovakia on 1st April 2018
2018/03/27
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 26 #

2018/2003(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 j (new)
1 j. Notes the opening of the public consultation on the products´ scope of the Timber Regulation; Considers that the possible choice in the questionnaire of the reduction of the scope to be covered by the Regulation is not a justified one given that illegal trade flourishes within the current scope of the Regulation; Further notes a favourable position of the European Confederation of the Woodworking Industries towards extending the scope of the Timber Regulation to all wood products;
2018/03/27
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 29 #

2018/2003(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 m (new)
1 m. Notes the existence of models of community forestry/collective customary tenure which can bring a number of benefits10a including an increase in the forest area and in available water resources, fight against illegal logging by putting clear rules in place on timber access and a strong system of forest monitoring; proposes that more research and support is provided to help develop legal frameworks on community forestry; _________________ 10aa case from Nepal presented by ClientEarth, available at https://www.clientearth.org/what-can-we- learn-from-community-forests-in-nepal/
2018/03/27
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 30 #

2018/2003(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 n (new)
1 n. Stresses that recognition of tenure rights of peoples e.g. via constitution is not necessarily applied in practice11a and therefore ensuring that tenure rights are respected should be actively screened by the EU for the purpose of Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPA) and for individual cases of EU development funding; _________________ 11arecent case (WaTER project financed by DG DEVCO) of violation of tenure rights of Kenyan indigenous peoples Ogiek and Sengwer despite the recognition of their rights to land in the Constitution, particularly Article 63(2)(d)) and in the 2016 Community Land Act
2018/03/27
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 31 #

2018/2003(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 o (new)
1 o. Recalls that the report by the Commission on the functioning of the Transparency Directive 2013/50/EU that introduces disclosure requirement for payments to governments by listed and large non-listed companies with activities in the extractive industry and logging of primary (natural and semi-natural) forests should be submitted by 27th November 2018 to the European Parliament and the Council; further notes that this should be accompanied by a legislative proposal; in light of a possible review calls on the Commission to consider extending the obligation to other industry sectors affecting forests, and to other forests than primary forests;
2018/03/27
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 39 #

2018/2003(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 b (new)
2 b. Considers that efforts to halt deforestation must include local capacity- building, technological aid, the sharing of best practices between communities and support to help smallholders make the most effective use of their existing croplands without resorting to further forest conversion; stresses, in this context, the strong potential of agro-ecological practices to maximise ecosystem functions via mixed, high diversity planting, agroforestry and permaculture techniques, without resorting to input dependency or monocultures.
2018/03/27
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 43 #

2018/2003(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 d (new)
2 d. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to expand the scope of the EU Timber Regulation to cover all products that are or may be made of wood, and that contain or may contain wood, taking into account impact on pulp and wood processing industries in the European Union and unfair competition with products currently not covered by the legislation (e.g. printed paper) entering the EU without any guarantee of the prime material being legally sourced wood.
2018/03/27
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 44 #

2018/2003(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Calls for the EU to maintain its commitment to step up ongoing negotiations on the Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Voluntary Partnership Agreements; stresses the need to ensure that logging concessions awarded corruptly or illegally are not legitimised through the VPA and that these agreements are in line with international law and commitments concerning environmental protection, human rights and sustainable development, and that they bring about adequate measures for the conservation and sustainable management of forests, including the legal protection of the rights of local communities and indigenous peoples; recognising their tenure and customary rights.
2018/03/27
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 58 #

2018/2003(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. Calls on the Commission and Member States to develop a process that is triggered when conflict breaks out in a VPA partner country, including appointment of an independent panel to conduct an assessment of the risk of conflict timber and need for VPA suspension at all stages of negotiations where evidence that timber trade revenues are fuelling conflict;
2018/03/27
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 70 #

2018/2003(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Calls for the EU to establish a binding regulatory framework to ensure that all agricultural commodity importers’ supply chains are traceable back to the origin of the raw material; notes that the new technologies, e.g. blockchain technology can be used to track origin of commodities, and stresses that this could be used in practice to increase transparency around the origin of different commodities and practically remove forest degradation and deforestation from the supply chains
2018/03/27
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 77 #

2018/2003(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Calls on the Commission to press ahead with developing anshow political will and leadership by committing to deliver as soon as possible before the end of this Commission's mandate an ambitious EU action plan on deforestation and forest degradation, which would include concrete regulatory measures to ensure that no supply chains or financial transactions linked to the EU result in deforestation or, forest degradation or human rights violations.
2018/03/27
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 82 #

2018/2003(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 e (new)
2 e. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to make full use of existing diplomatic and institutional processes and dialogues to encourage countries which process and/or import significant quantities of tropical timber, e.g. China or Vietnam, to adopt effective legislation banning the imports of illegally harvested timber and requiring operators to conduct due diligence;
2018/03/27
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 115 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 1 a (new)
(1a) Cybercrime is a fast growing threat to the Union, its citizens and its economy. In 2017, 80 % of the European companies have experienced at least one cyber incident. The Wannacry-attack in May 2017 affected more than 150 countries and 230 000IT-systems and had significant impacts on critical infrastructures such as hospitals. This underlines the necessity for the highest cybersecurity standards and holistic cybersecurity solutions, involving people, products, processes and technology in the Union, as well as for European leadership in the matter, and for Digital autonomy.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 116 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 1 b (new)
(1b) This regulation contributes to the protection of the environment through the protection of environment-relevant infrastructures and networks such as nuclear infrastructures.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 117 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 1 c (new)
(1c) This regulation contributes to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals, in particular to the goal “Industry, innovation and infrastructure”.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 118 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 1 d (new)
(1d) The Competence Centre and the Cybersecurity Competence Community should, in order to foster European competitiveness and highest cybersecurity standards internationally, seek the exchange on cybersecurity solutions, products and standards with the international community.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 119 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 5
(5) Substantial disruption of network and information systems can affect individual Member States and the Union as a whole. The highest level of security of network and information systems throughout the Union is therefore essential for the smooth functioning of the society and economy, i.e. the internal market. At the moment, the Union depends on non-European cybersecurity providers. However, it is in the Union’s strategic interest to ensure that it retains and develops essential cybersecurity technological capacities to secure its Digital Single Market, and in particular to protect critical networks and information systemsthe protection of data and critical networks and information systems of European citizens and companies, including critical infrastructures for the functioning of society such as transport systems, health systems and banking, and the Digital Single Market and to provide key cybersecurity services.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 120 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 6
(6) A wealth of expertise and experience in cybersecurity research, technology and industrial development exists in the Union but the efforts of industrial and research communities are fragmented, lacking alignment and a common mission, which hinders competitiveness and effective protection of critical data, networks and systems in this domain. These efforts and expertise need to be pooled, networked and used in an efficient manner to reinforce and complement existing research, technology, skills and industrial capacities at Union and national levels.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 121 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 6 a (new)
(6a) SMEs are crucial actors in the European cybersecurity sector that can provide cutting-edge solutions due to their agility. SMEs that are not specialised in cybersecurity however, are also prone to be more vulnerable to cyber incidents due to high investment and knowledge requirements to establish effective cybersecurity solutions. It is therefore necessary that the Competence Centre and the Cybersecurity Competence Network provide special support for SMEs by facilitating their access to knowledge and training in order to allow them to secure themselves sufficiently and to allow those who are active in cybersecurity to contribute to the European leadership in the field.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 122 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 8
(8) The Competence Centre should be the Union’s main instrument to develop European leadership in cybersecurity, to pool investment in cybersecurity research, technology and industrial development, to support SMEs in gathering expertise in cybersecurity and to implement relevant projects and initiatives together with the Cybersecurity Competence Network. It should deliver cybersecurity-related financial support from the Horizon Europe and, Digital Europe programmes and the European Defence Fund for actions related to defence, and should be open to the European Regional Development Fund and other programmes where appropriate. This approach should contribute to creating synergies and coordinating financial support related to cybersecurity research, innovation, technology and industrial development and avoiding duplication.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 127 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 12
(12) National Coordination Centres should be selected by Member States and approved by the Competence Centre. In addition to the necessary administrative capacity, Centres should either possess or have direct access to cybersecurity technological expertise in cybersecurity, notably in domains such as cryptography, ICT security services, intrusion detection, system security, network security, software and application security, or human and socie, societal and environmental aspects of security and privacy. They should also have the capacity to effectively engage and coordinate with the industry, the public sector, including authorities designated pursuant to the Directive (EU) 2016/1148 of the European Parliament and of the Council23 , and the research community in order to establish a continuous public- private dialogue on cybersecurity. _________________ 23 Directive (EU) 2016/1148 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 6 July 2016 concerning measures for a high common level of security of network and information systems across the Union (OJ L 194, 19.7.2016, p. 1).
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 130 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 14
(14) Emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence, Internet of Things, high-performance computing (HPC) and quantum computing, blockchain and concepts such as secure digital identities create at the same time new challenges for cybersecurity as well as offer solutions. Assessing and validating the robustness of existing or future ICT systems will require testing security solutions against attacks run on HPC and quantum machines. The Competence Centre, the Network and the Cybersecurity Competence Community should help advance and disseminate the latest cybersecurity solutions and research to bridge the valley of death of innovation of cybersecurity technologies and services. At the same time the Competence Centre and, the Network and the Cybersecurity Competence Community should be at the service of developers and operators in critical sectors such as transport, energy, health, financial, government, telecom, manufacturing, defence, and space to help them solve their cybersecurity challenges.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 135 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 14 a (new)
(14a) Due to the fast changing nature of cyber threats and cybersecurity, the Union needs to be able to adapt fast and continuously to new developments in the field. Hence, the Competence Centre, the Cybersecurity Competence Network and the Cybersecurity Competence Community should be flexible enough to ensure the required reactivity. They should facilitate solutions that help entities to be able to constantly build capability to enhance their and the Union’s resilience.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 136 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 14 b (new)
(14b) The Competence Centre should have the objectives to establish European leadership and expertise in cybersecurity, and by that guarantee the highest security standards in the Union, ensure the protection of data, information systems, networks and critical infrastructures in the Union, create new high-quality jobs in the area, prevent brain drain from the European cybersecurity experts to third countries, and add European value to the already existing national cybersecurity measures.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 137 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 15
(15) The Competence Centre should have several key functions. First, the Competence Centre should facilitate and help coordinate the work of the European Cybersecurity Competence Network and nurture the Cybersecurity Competence Community. The Centre should drive the cybersecurity technological agenda and pool, share and facilitate access to the expertise gathered in the Network and the Cybersecurity Competence Community, and to cybersecurity infrastructure. Secondly, it should implement relevant parts of Digital Europe and Horizon Europe programmes by allocating grants, typically following a competitive call for proposals. Thirdly, the Competence Centre should facilitate joint investment by the Union, Member States and/or industr, training opportunities and awareness raising programmes in line with the Digital Europe Programme for citizens and businesses to overcome the skill gap by the Union, Member States and/or industry. It should pay special attention to the enabling of SMEs in the area of cybersecurity.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 141 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 16
(16) The Competence Centre should stimulate and support the long-term strategic cooperation and coordination of the activities of the Cybersecurity Competence Community, which would involve a large, open, interdisciplinary and diverse group of European actors involved in cybersecurity technology. That Community should include in particular research entities, supply-side industries, and demand -side industries including SMEs, and the public sector. The Cybersecurity Competence Community should provide input to the activities and work plan of the Competence Centre and it should also benefit from the community- building activities of the Competence Centre and the Network, but otherwise should not be privileged with regard to calls for proposals or calls for tender.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 144 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 17
(17) In order to respond to the needs of the public sector and both demand and supply side industries, the Competence Centre’s task to provide cybersecurity knowledge and technical assistance to the public sector and industries should refer to both ICT products and services and all other industrial and technological products and solutions in which cybersecurity is to be embedded.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 149 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 19
(19) In order to ensure structured and sustainable collaboration, the relation between the Competence Centre and the National Coordination Centres should be based on a contractual agreement that should be harmonised on European level.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 155 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 21 a (new)
(21a) In order to avoid duplication and to ensure the most efficient establishment of cybersecurity expertise in the Union, the Competence Centre, the Network and the Cybersecurity Competence Community should act coherently, consistently and complementary with ENISA, the “Cybersecurity Act”(COM(2017)0477) and the European Standardisation Organisations, bearing in mind that ENISA should continue fulfilling its strategic objectives especially in the field of cybersecurity certification as defined in the “Cybersecurity Act” while the Competence Centre should act as an operational body in cybersecurity.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 159 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 25
(25) In order for the Competence Centre to function properly and effectively, the Commission and the Member States should ensure that persons to be appointed to the Governing Board have appropriate professional expertise and experience in functional areas and that gender balance is ensured. The Commission and the Member States should also make efforts to limit the turnover of their respective Representatives on the Governing Board in order to ensure continuity in its work.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 163 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 27
(27) The Competence Centre should have an Industrial and Scientific Advisory Board as an advisory body to ensure regular dialogue with the private sectorand public sector, including SMEs, consumers’ organisations and other relevant stakeholders from all parts of the Union. The Industrial and Scientific Advisory Board should focus on issues relevant to stakeholders and bring them to the attention of the Competence Centre’s Governing Board. The composition of the Industrial and Scientific Advisory Board and the tasks assigned to it, such as being consulted regarding the work plan, should ensure sufficient representation of the above-mentioned stakeholder groups in the work of the Competence Centre.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 165 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 28
(28) The Competence Centre and its activities should benefit from the particular expertise and the broad and relevant stakeholders’ representation built through the contractual public-private partnership on cybersecurity during the duration of Horizon2020, through its Industrial and Scientific Advisory Board. and the pilot projects under Horizon2020 on the Cybersecurity Competence Network, through its Industrial and Scientific Advisory Board. The Competence Centre and Industrial and Scientific Advisory Board should, if appropriate, consider replications of existing structures, for example as working groups.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 166 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 33 a (new)
(33a) In order to ensure uniform conditions for the implementation of this Regulation, implementing powers should be conferred on the Commission when provided for by this Regulation. Those powers should be exercised in accordance with Regulation (EU) No 182/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 167 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 34
(34) Since tThe objectives of this Regulation, namely the development of European leadership in cybersecurity through retaining and developing Union’s cybersecurity technological and industrial capacities, increasing the competitiveness of the Union’s cybersecurity industry and turning cybersecurity into a competitive advantage of other Union industries, cannot be sufficiently achieved by the Member States due the fact that existing, limited resources are dispersed as well as due to the scale of the investment necessary, but can rather by reason of avoiding unnecessary duplication of these efforts, helping to achieve critical mass of investment and ensuring that public financing is used in an optimal way be better achieved at Union level. In addition, only actions on the European level can ensure the highest level of cybersecurity in all Member States and thus close security gaps existing in some Member States that create security gaps for the whole Union. Hence, the Union may adopt measures, in accordance with the principle of subsidiarity as set out in Article 5 of the Treaty on European Union. In accordance with the principle of proportionality as set out in that Article, this Regulation does not go beyond what is necessary in order to achieve that objective.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 176 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 2
(2) ‘cybersecurity products and solutions’ means ICT products, services or processes with the specific purpose of protecting data, network and information systems, their users and affected persons from cyber threats;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 181 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) retain and develop the cybersecurity technological and industrial capacities and expertise necessary to secure and further the protection of data of European citizens and companies, critical infrastructures for the functioning of society such as transport systems, health systems, banking, and its Digital Single Market;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 182 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point b a (new)
(ba) develop European leadership in cybersecurity and ensure the highest cybersecurity standards throughout the Union reinforcing its Digital autonomy;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 183 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point b b (new)
(bb) reinforce the trust of citizens, consumers and businesses in the digital world, and therefore contributing to the goals of the Digital Single Market Strategy;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 184 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point b c (new)
(bc) increase the uptake of cybersecurity products and solutions developed within the Union;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 185 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point b d (new)
(bd) raise awareness on cybersecurity and reduce the skill gap in cybersecurity in the Union
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 187 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 a (new)
Article 3 a Coherence, consistency and complemenetarity In implementing this Regulation, consistency, synergies and complementarity with the “Cybersecurity Act” (COM(2017)0477), the European Standardisation Organisations, European bodies and institutions as referred to in Art. 10 of this Regulation, other relevant Programmes of Union action and relevant Union policies shall be ensured. Unnecessary duplications shall be avoided.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 194 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point 3 – point a
(a) having regard to the state-of-the-art cybersecurity industrial and research infrastructures and related services , acquiring, upgrading, operating and making available such infrastructures and related services to a wide range of users across the Union from industry, including particular SMEs, the public sector and the research and scientific community;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 196 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point 3 – point b
(b) having regard to the state-of-the-art cybersecurity industrial and research infrastructures and related services, providing support to other entities, including financially, to acquiring, sharing, upgrading, operating and making available such infrastructures and related services to a wide range of users across the Union from industry, including particular SMEs, the public sector and the research and scientific community;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 197 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point 3 – point c
(c) providing cybersecurity knowledge and technical assistance to industry, research institutions and public authorities, in particular by supporting actions aimed at facilitating access to the expertise available in the Network and the Cybersecurity Competence Community;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 200 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point 3 – point c a (new)
(ca) operating as a one stop shop for cyber security solutions financed through other programmes like InvestEU or the Single Market Programme, in particular for SMEs;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 202 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point 3 – point c b (new)
(cb) bringing together stakeholders from industry, trade unions, academia, research organisations and public entities to ensure long-term cooperation on developing and implementing cybersecurity products and solutions, including pooling and sharing of resources and information regarding such products and solutions if appropriate;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 206 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point 4 – point a
(a) stimulating the whole innovation cycle of cybersecurity and bridging the valley of death of innovation by enhancing cybersecurity research, development and the uptake of Unionmarket uptake cybersecurity products and holistic solutions by public authorities and user industries in the Union;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 213 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point 4 – point d
(d) providing financial support and technical assistance to cybersecurity start- ups and SMEs to connect to potential markets and to attract investment, enhance expertise on cybersecurity in these companies and to attract investment to be able to implement cybersecurity products and solutions and/or to become competitive players in the field;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 215 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point 5 – point a
(a) supporting further development, pooling and sharing of cybersecurity skills and competences, where appropriate together with relevant EU agencies and bodies including ENISA and supporting the objective on advanced digital skills of the Digital Europe Programme where appropriate.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 221 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point 6 – point b
(b) support large-scale research and demonstration projects in next generation cybersecurity technological capabilities, in collaboration with the industry and, research institutions, public sector and authorities, including the Network;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 223 #

2018/0328(COD)

(c) support research and innovation for standardisation in cybersecurity technology in cooperation with the European Standardisation Organisations;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 226 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point 7 – point c
(c) bringing together stakeholders, to foster synergies between civil and defence cyber security research and markets, development of cybersecurity products and solutions, and markets; in line with the Union goals as laid out by Common Foreign and Security Policy and the Permanent Structured Cooperation;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 229 #

2018/0328(COD)

8a. provide special support to SMEs by facilitating their access to knowledge and training through tailored access to the deliverables of the Competences Centres in order to allow them to secure themselves sufficiently and to allow those who are active in cybersecurity to become more competitive and to contribute thereby to the European leadership in the field.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 236 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 – paragraph 4
4. The nominated National Coordination Centre shall have the capability to support the Competence Centre and the Network in fulfilling their mission laid out in Article 3 of this Regulation. They shall possess or have direct access to technological expertise in cybersecurity and be in a position to effectively engage and coordinate with industry, the public sector and, the research community and citizens.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 237 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 – paragraph 5
5. The relationship between the Competence Centre and the National Coordination Centres shall be based on a contractual agreement harmonised on Union level and signed between the Competence Centre and each of the National Coordination Centres. The agreement shall provide for the rules governing the relationship and division of tasks between the Competence Centre and each National Coordination Centre.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 239 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 – paragraph 5 a (new)
5a. The Commission may, by means of implementing acts, define the elements of the contractual agreements referred to in paragraph 5 of this Article, including their format. Those implementing acts shall be adopted in accordance with the advisory procedure referred to in Article - 45.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 241 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 1 – point b
(b) facilitating the participation of industry, in particular for SMEs, and other actors at the Member State level in cross- border projects;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 242 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 1 – point b a (new)
(ba) incentivising cross-border- projects, particularly for SMEs;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 243 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 1 – point c
(c) contributing, together with the Competence Centre, to identifying and addressing sector-specific cyber security industrial challenges;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 244 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 1 – point c a (new)
(ca) cooperating closely with National Standardisation Organisations to ensure the uptake of existing standards and to involve all relevant stakeholders, particularly SMEs, in setting new standards.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 245 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 1 – point e
(e) seeking to establish synergies with relevant activities at the national and, regional and local level;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 247 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 1 – point g
(g) promoting and disseminating the relevant outcomes of the work by the Network, the Cybersecurity Competence Community and the Competence Centre at national or, regional or local level;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 249 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 1
1. The Cybersecurity Competence Community shall contribute to the mission of the Competence Centre as laid down in Article 3 and enhance, pool, share and disseminate cybersecurity expertise across the Union.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 250 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 2
2. The Cybersecurity Competence Community shall consist of industry from the demand- and supply-side, including SMEs, the European Standardisation Organisations, associations of users, academic and non-profit research organisations, and associations as well as public entities and other entities dealing with operational and technical matters. It shall bring together the main stakeholders with regard to cybersecurity technological and industrial capacities in the Union. It shall involve National Coordination Centres as well as Union institutions and bodies with relevant expertise. as referred to in Art.10 of this regulation.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 256 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 3 – introductory part
3. Only entities which are established within the Union may be accredited as members of the Cybersecurity Competence Community. They shall demonstrate that they have cybersecurity expertise with regard to at least one of the following domains, the European Economic Area (EEA) and the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) having their executive management structures in the Union or in an EEA- or EFTA-country and which are not controlled by any other third country or by any other third country entity:
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 263 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 4
4. The Competence Centre shall accredit entities established under national law as members of the Cybersecurity Competence Community after an harmonised assessment made by the National Coordination Centre of the Member State and the Competence Centre where the entity is established, on whether that entity meets the criteria provided for in paragraph 3. An accreditation shall not be limited in time but may be revoked by the Competence Centre at any time if it or the relevant National Coordination Centre considers that the entity does not fulfil the criteria set out in paragraph 3 or it falls under the relevant provisions set out in Article 136 of Regulation XXX [new financial regulation].
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 264 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. National Coordination Centres of the Member States shall aim to achieve a balanced representation of stakeholders in the Community, including SMEs.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 265 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 4 b (new)
4b. The Commission may, by means of an implementing act, further specify the criteria provided for in paragraph 3 and the procedures for assessing and accrediting entities that meet those criteria. That implementing act shall be adopted in accordance with the advisory procedure referred to in Article -45.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 266 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 5 a (new)
5a. Existing entities participating in public-private partnerships on cybersecurity on the European level shall be members of the Cybersecurity Competence Community and shall take a leading role in stimulating and supporting the cooperation and coordination of the Cybersecurity Competence Community, continuing the work they have done so far.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 268 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 1 – point 5 a (new)
(5a) encourage Community members that are manufacturers and service providers to certify their products and services under certification schemes adopted under the Cybersecurity Act.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 271 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 2
2. Such cooperation shall take place within the framework of working arrangements agreed between the Competence Centre and the respective Union institution, body, office or agency. Those arrangements shall be submitted to the prior approval of the Commission, as well as for information to the European Parliament.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 275 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 12 – paragraph 1
1. The Governing Board shall be composed of one representative of each Member State, two representatives of the European Parliament and five representatives of the Commission, on behalf of the Union.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 280 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 12 – paragraph 3
3. Members of the Governing Board and their alternates shall be appointed in light of their knowledge in the field of technologycybersecurity technology or research as well as of relevant managerial, administrative and budgetary skills. Gender balance shall be taken into account. The Commission and the Member States shall make efforts to limit the turnover of their representatives in the Governing Board, in order to ensure continuity of the Board’s work. The Commission and the Member States shall aim to achieve a balanced representation between men and women on the Governing Board.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 288 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 12 – paragraph 7
7. The European Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA) and the Industrial and Scientific Advisory Board shall be a permanent observers in the Governing Board, providing it with advice. The Governing Board shall have the utmost regard to the views expressed by ENISA. Due to its experience in the field, ENISA shall be especially consulted for research-related projects.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 292 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 3 – point e a (new)
(ea) adopt the working arrangements referred to in Article 10(2).
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 295 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 3 – point l
(l) promote the Competence Centre globally, so as to raise its attractiveness and make it an internationally renowned world-class body for excellence in cybersecurity;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 296 #

2018/0328(COD)

(qa) adopt transparency rules for the Competence Centre;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 297 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 3 – point r
(r) adopt an anti-fraud and anti- corruption strategy that is proportionate to the fraud and corruption risks having regard to a cost-benefit analysis of the measures to be implemented, as well as adopt adequate protection measures for whistleblowers;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 299 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 3 – point s
(s) adopt the methodology to calculate the financial contribution from Member Statesan extensive definition of financial contributions from Member States and a methodology to calculate the amount of Member States’ voluntary contributions that can be accounted for as financial contributions according to this definition. This calculation shall be executed at the end of every financial year;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 303 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 14 – paragraph 1
1. The Governing Board shall elect a Chairperson and a Deputy Chairperson from among the members with voting rights, for a period of two years, taking into account gender balance. The mandate of the Chairperson and the Deputy Chairperson may be extended once, following a decision by the Governing Board. If, however, their membership of the Governing Board ends at any time during their term of office, their term of office shall automatically expire on that date. The Deputy Chairperson shall ex officio replace the Chairperson if the latter is unable to attend to his or her duties. The Chairperson shall take part in the voting.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 314 #

2018/0328(COD)

3. The Governing Board shall take its decisions by a majority of at least 75% of all votes, including the votes of the members who are absent, representing at least 75% of the total financial contributionsof the ratio of the individual Member States’ financial contributions to their Gross Domestic Product to the Competence Centre. The financial contribution will be calculated based on the estimated expenditures proposed by the Member States referred to in point c of Article 17(2) and based on the report on the value of the contributions of the participating Member States referred to in Article 22(5).
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 318 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 16 – paragraph 3
3. The Executive Director shall be appointed by the Governing Board from a list of candidates proposed by the Commission, following an open, non- discriminatory and transparent selection procedure.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 324 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 2 – point s
(s) prepare an action plan following-up conclusions of internal or external audit reports, as well as investigations by the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF) and reporting on progress twice a year to the Commission, the European Parliament and regularly to the Governing Board;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 326 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 18 – paragraph 1
1. The Industrial and Scientific Advisory Board shall consist of no more than 1625 members. The members shall be appointed by the Governing Board according to an open, transparent and non-discriminatory procedure from among the representatives of the entities of the Cybersecurity Competence Community. In the determination of its members, existing European cybersecurity organisations shall be particularly taken into consideration. The Governing Board shall further ensure the representation from supply- and demand- side industry, SMEs, the public sector and research organisations.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 331 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 18 – paragraph 2
2. Members of the Industrial and Scientific Advisory Board shall have expertise either with regard to cybersecurity research, industrial development, professional servicecybersecurity training and education, industrial development, offering or successfully implementing professional cybersecurity services or products or the deployment thereof. The requirements for such expertise shall be further specified by the Governing Board.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 334 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 18 – paragraph 4
4. The term of office of members of the Industrial and Scientific Advisory Board shall be threefour years. That term shall be renewable.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 336 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 18 – paragraph 5
5. Representatives of the Commission and of the European Network and Information Security Agency mayshall participate in and support the works of the Industrial and Scientific Advisory Board.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 339 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 19 – paragraph 2
2. The Industrial and Scientific Advisory Board mayshall advise the Governing Board on the establishment of working groups on specific issues relevant to the work of the Competence Centre where necessary under the overall coordination of one or more members of the Industrial and Scientific Advisory Board.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 340 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 19 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. The Industrial and Scientific Advisory Board shall have observer status in the Governing Board to be able to provide regular advice to the Governing Board.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 345 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 20 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
The Industrial and Scientific Advisory Board shall regularly advise the Competence Centre in respect of the performance of its activities and shall:
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 348 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 20 – paragraph 1 – point 1
(1) provide to the Executive Director and the Governing Board strategic advice and input for the strategic orientation and operations of the Competence Centre as far as industry and science is concerned, and for drafting the work plan and multi- annual strategic plan within the deadlines set by the Governing Board;
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 350 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 20 – paragraph 1 – point 3
(3) promote and collect feedback on the work plan and multi-annual strategic plan of the Competence Centre and advise the Governing Board on how to improve the Competence Centre’s strategic orientation and operation according to this feedback.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 360 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 22 – paragraph 4
4. The Commission may terminate, proportionally reduce or suspend the Union’s financial contribution to the Competence Centre if the participating Member States do not contribute, contribute only partially or contribute late with regard to the contributions referred to in paragraph 1. The Commission’s termination, reduction or suspension of the Union’s financial contribution shall be proportionate in amount and time to the reduction, termination or suspension of the Member States’ contributions.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 361 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 23 – paragraph 3 – point b – introductory part
(b) contributions from the participating Member States, as defined in more detail according to Article 13, paragraph 3, point (s), in the form of:
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 362 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 30 – paragraph 1
1. The Competence Centre shall take appropriate measures to ensure that, when actions financed under this Regulation are implemented, the financial interests of the Union are protected by the application of preventive measures against fraud, corruption and any other illegal activities, by regular and effective checks and, if irregularities are detected, by the recovery of the amounts wrongly paid and, where appropriate, by effective, proportionate and dissuasive administrative sanctions.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 363 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 31 – paragraph 7
7. The staff of the Competence Centre shall be gender balanced and consist of temporary staff and contract staff.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 364 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 34 – paragraph 2 – point c a (new)
(ca) Articles 22 [Ownership of results], 23 [Ownership of results] and 30 [Application of the rules on classified information] Regulation No XXX [European Defence Fund] shall apply to participation in all defence-related actions by the Competence Centre, when provided for in the Work plan, the grant of non- exclusive licenses may be limited to third parties established or deemed to be established in Members States and controlled by Member States and/or nationals of Member States.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 365 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 35 – paragraph 1
1. The Competence Centre shall carry out its activities with athe highest level of transparency.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 366 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 35 – paragraph 2
2. The Competence Centre shall 2. ensure that the public and any interested parties are given appropriate, objective, reliable and easily accessible information in due time, in particular with regard to the results of its work. It shall also make public the declarations of interest made in accordance with Article 41.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 367 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 38 – paragraph 3
3. The evaluation referred to in paragraph 2 shall include an assessment of the results achieved by the Competence Centre, having regard to its objectives, mandate and tasks. If the Commission considers that the continuation of the Competence Centre is justified with regard to its assigned objectives, mandate and tasks, tasks, effectiveness and efficiency, it may propose that the duration of the mandate of the Competence Centre set out in Article 46 be extended.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 368 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 42 – paragraph 1
The Competence Centre Governing Board shall adopt rules for the prevention and management of conflicts of interest in respect of its members, bodies and staff, including the Executive Director. Those rules shall contain the provisions intended to avoid a conflict of interest in respect of the representatives of the members serving in the Governing Board as well as the Scientific and Industrial Advisory Board in accordance with Regulation XXX [new Financial Regulation].
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 370 #

2018/0328(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 45 a (new)
Article 45 a Committee procedure 1. The Commission shall be assisted by a committee. That committee shall be a committee within the meaning of Regulation (EU) No 182/2011. 2. Where reference is made to this paragraph, Article 4 of Regulation (EU) No182/2011 shall apply.
2019/01/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 111 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 3
(3) Following an integrated approach and in order to contribute to the enhancement of the competitiveness and innovation capacity of the Union's defence industry, a European Defence Fund should be established. The Fund should aim at enhancing the competitiveness, innovation, efficiency and, environmental performance and technological and industrial autonomy of the Union's defence industry thereby contributing to the Union's strategic autonomy by supporting the cross border cooperation between Member States and between enterprises, research centres, national administrations, international organisations and universities, in the research phase and in the development phase of defence products and technologies. To achieve more innovative solutions and an open internal market, the Fund should support the cross-border participation of defence small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) and middle capitalisation companies (mid-caps).
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 119 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 7
(7) In order to ensure that the Union's and its Member States' international obligations are respected in the implementation of this Regulation, actions relating to products or technologies the use, development or production of which are prohibited by international law should not receive funding under the Fund. In this respect, the eligibility of actions related to new defence products or technologies, such asin particular those that are specifically designed to carry out lethal strikes without any human control over the engagement decisions, should also be subject to developments in international law. not be allowed until the adoption of an international, binding convention for their prohibition. All actions, may they relate to new or more traditional defence products or technologies, should be ethically screened by a mixed, gender-balanced group of experts. Additional ethical screening in the course of any action could be activated by MEPs.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 122 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 7 a (new)
(7a) Regarding exports of products which would be the result of research or development actions of the Programme, particular attention should be paid to article 7 of the Arms Trade Treaty which provides that even if the export is not prohibited, exporting State Parties shall, in an objective and non-discriminatory manner and taking into account relevant factors, assess the potential that the conventional arms or items: (a) would contribute to or undermine peace and security;(b) could be used to: (i) commit or facilitate a serious violation of international humanitarian law;(ii) commit or facilitate a serious violation of international human rights law;(iii) commit or facilitate an act constituting an offense under international conventions or protocols relating to terrorism to which the exporting State is a Party; or(iv) commit or facilitate an act constituting an offense under international conventions or protocols relating to transnational organized crime to which the exporting State is a Party.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 124 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 9
(9) As the objective of the Fund is to support the competitiveness and innovation, innovation and industrial autonomy of the Union defence industry by leveraging and complementing collaborative defence research and technology activities and de- risking the development phase of cooperative projects, actions related to the research and development of a defence product or technology should be eligible to benefit from it. This will also apply to the upgrade, including the interoperability thereof, of existing defence products and technologies.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 139 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 13
(13) In certain circumstances, if this is necessarycritical for achieving the objectives of the action, it should be possible to derogate from the principle that recipients and their subcontractors should not be subject to control by non-associated third countries or non-associated third country entities. In that perspective, legal entities established in the Union that are controlled by a non- associated third country or a non- associated third country entity can be eligible if relevant and strict conditions relating to the security and defence interests of the Union and its Member States are fulfilled. The participation of such entities should not contravene the objectives of the Fund. Applicants should provide all relevant information about the infrastructure, facilities, assets and resources to be used in the action, and demonstrate that their input could not be brought by European entities.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 158 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 31
(31) The Commission should establish annual or multiannual work programmes in line with the objectives of the Fund. The Commission should be assisted in the establishment of the work programme by a committee of Member States. In order to benefit from its expertise in the defence sector, the European Defence Agency will be given the status of an observer in the committee. Given the specificities of the defence area, the European External Action Service should also assist in the committee of Member States. The European Parliament may send representatives to the committee.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 168 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 41
(41) Reflecting the importance of tackling climate change in line with the Union's commitments to implement the Paris Agreement and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, this Fund will contribute to mainstream climate action in the Union's policies and to the achievement of an overall target of 25 % of the EU budget expenditures supporting climate objectives by including the environmental impact reduction as a goal and award criteria for the Fund. . Relevant actions will be identified during the Fund's preparation and implementation, and reassessed in the context of its mid- term evaluation.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 176 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 43 b (new)
(43b) The Fund should support industry best practice in corporate governance and procurement practices. This should include the possibility for anonymous and confidential whistleblowing, through hotlines operated by third parties and with procedures in place to prevent retaliation. The award procedure should reflect these corporate governance standards with the goal of raising corporate accountability standards in the European defence sector.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 186 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point a
(a) support collaborative research projects that could significantly boost the performance of future European capabilities, aiming at maximising innovation and introducing new defence products and technologies, including disruptive ones;
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 188 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point b
(b) support collaborative development projects of defence products and technologies consistent with defence capability priorities commonly agreed by Member States within the framework of the Common Foreign and Security Policy and in particular in the context of the CDP of the Common Security and Defence Policy, thus contributing to greater efficiency of defence spending within the Union, achieving greater economies of scale, reducing the risk of unnecessary duplication and as such reducing the fragmentation of defence products and technologies throughout the Union. Ultimately, the Fund will lead to greater interoperability between Member States' capabilities and the acquisition of European equipment by Member States.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 198 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1
1. The financial envelope for the implementation of the European Defence Fund for the period 2021 – 2027 shall be EUR 13 0001 453 000 000 in current priceonstant prices. This financial envelope shall be additional to pre-existing MFF headings.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 230 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 2
2. Proposals shall be systematically screened to identify those actions raising complex or serious ethics issues and submit them to an ethics assessment. Ethics screenings and assessments shall be carried out by the Commission with the support of experts on defence ethics. The Commission shall ensure the transparency of the ethics procedures as much as possible, selected on a gender-balanced basis, whose list is public and updated regularly. These experts shall represent a diversity of opinions in the military, technology and civil protection fields (including medical staff). The Commission shall ensure the transparency of the ethics procedures and the experts shall collectively publish an annual report on the ethical issues they had to debate and assess.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 237 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 3 b (new)
3b. An Ethics conformity certificate shall be published by the Commission for each project.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 241 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 4
4. If appropriate, eEthics checks shall be carried out by the Commission during the implementation of the action. For serious or complex ethics issues, th, at the Commission's discretion or upon request of the European Parliament. Those checks shall be carried out by the Commission with the support of experts on defence ethics.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 243 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 5
5. Actions which are not ethically acceptable may be rejected or terminated at any time. The termination of an action shall request a majority vote of the European Parliament.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 248 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 2
2. The Fund may provide funding in any of the forms laid down in the Financial Regulation, in particular grants, prizes and procurementthe forms of grants, prizes and procurement as laid down in the Financial Regulation. It may also provide financing in the form of financial instruments within blending operations by providing the non- repayable forms of support to blending operations.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 277 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 2 – introductory part
2. By derogation from paragraph 1, an applicant established in the Union or in an associated country and controlled by a non- associated third country or a non- associated third country entity may be eligible for funding if this is necessarycritical for achieving the objectives of the action and provided that its participation will not put at risk the security interests of the Union and its Member States. In order to ensure protection of the security interests of the Union and its Member States, the call for proposals shall require the applicant to provide information demonstrating notably that:
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 286 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 2 – point c a (new)
(ca) the non-associated third country or third country entity provides a technological and/or industrial input which could not be supplied by a European entity.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 316 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 3 – point i
(i) the development of technologies or assets increasing efficiency and reducing the environmental impact across the life cycle of defence products and technologies;
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 336 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 6
6. Actions for the development of products and technologies the use, development or, production or trade of which is prohibited by applicable international law shall not be eligible.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 338 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 6 a (new)
6a. Actions for the development of products and technologies which could serve the following purposes shall not be eligible: (i) commit or facilitate a serious violation of international humanitarian law; (ii) commit or facilitate a serious violation of international human rights law; (iii) commit or facilitate an act constituting an offense under international conventions or protocols relating to terrorism ; (iv) commit or facilitate an act constituting an offense under international conventions or protocols relating to transnational organized crime.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 341 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 6 b (new)
6b. Conversely, actions for the development of products and technologies aiming at the prevention, annulation or mitigation of the effects on human victims of military conducts contrary to international law, shall be encouraged.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 347 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 12 – paragraph 3
3. For the award of funding for development actions, the Commission shall act by means of implementing acts adopted in accordance with the procedure referred to in Article 28 paragraph 2delegated acts.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 349 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point c a (new)
(ca) contribution to the industrial autonomy of the European defence industry by enhancing defence technologies or products in line with defence capability priorities agreed by Member States within the framework of the Common Foreign and Security Policy;
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 351 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point d
(d) contribution to the security and defence interests of the Union in line with the priorities referred to in Article 3 paragraph 2 and, where appropriate, regional and international cooperative agreements, provided that they serve the Union’s security and defence interests and do not exclude the participation of any Member State;
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 357 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point e a (new)
(ea) contribution to reducing the environmental impact of defence products, providing innovative solutions enabling the phase out of environmentally harmful substances where possible;
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 361 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point f a (new)
(fa) appropriate transparency and accountability provisions among contractors and sub-contractors shall be considered one of the criteria.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 394 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 21 – paragraph 1
Blending operations decided under this Fund shall be implemented in accordance with the [InvestEU regulation] and Title X of the Financial Regulation. The amount of expenditure from this programme to be blended with a financial instrument shall be non-refundable.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 408 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 23 – paragraph 3 – point a
(a) at least two Member States and/or associated countries iprovide guarantendes to procure the final product or use the technology in a coordinated way, including joint procurement;
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 420 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 27 – paragraph 1
1. The Fund shall be implemented by annual or multi annual work programmes established in accordance with Article [110] of the Financial Regulation. Work programmes shall set out, where applicable, the overall amount reserved for blending operations. The European Parliament may select a representative group of Members to assist the committee.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 423 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 27 – paragraph 2
2. The Commission shall adopt the work programmes by means of implementing acts in accordance with the procedure referred to in Article 28 paragraph 2delegated acts.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 424 #

2018/0254(COD)

2a. Based on the work programmes' elaboration process and in close cooperation with the Committee, the Commission shall carry out an upfront assessment of possible duplication cases with existing capabilities or already funded research or development projects within the EU. Where such duplication cases may occur, no award decision shall be taken on the action in question unless there is an agreement to phase-out the pre-existing technology or equipment, assorted with proper industrial and social transition tools.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 425 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 27 – paragraph 2 b (new)
2b. The work programmes shall set out the categories of projects to be funded under the Programme, in line with the defence priorities referred to in Article 3.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 435 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 29 – paragraph 2
2. Independent experts shall be Union's citizens identified and selected on the basis of calls for expressions of interest addressed to relevant organisations such as Ministries of Defence and subordinated agencies, research institutes, universities, non-governmental organisations, business associations or enterprises of the defence sector with a view to establishing a list of experts. By derogation from Article [237] of the Financial Regulation, this list shall not be made public that is gender balanced.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 456 #

2018/0254(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – part 2 – paragraph 2 a (new)
Indicator 5: Europeanisation of military equipment: Measured by: financial share and geographical spread of Programme- funded projects in terms of European public procurement or potential acquisitions
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 62 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 5
(5) The InvestEU Fund should contribute to improving the competitiveness of the Union, including in the field of innovation and digitisation, advancing technologies and innovations combatting climate change, the sustainability of the Union's economic growth, the social resilience and inclusiveness and the integration of the Union capital markets, including solutions addressing their fragmentation and diversifying sources of financing for the Union enterprises. To that end, it should support projects that are technically and economically viable by providing a framework for the use of debt, risk sharing and equity instruments underpinned by a guarantee from the Union's budget and by contributions from implementing partners. It should be demand-driven while support under the InvestEU Fund should at the same time focus on contributing to meeting policy objectives of the Union.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 68 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 6
(6) The InvestEU Fund should support investments in tangible and intangible assets to foster sustainable growth, investment and employment, and thereby contributing to improved well-being and fairer income distribution in the Union. Intervention through the InvestEU Fund should complement Union support delivered through grants.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 72 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 7
(7) The Union endorsed the objectives set out in the United Nations Agenda 2030 and its Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement in 2015 as well as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030. To achieve the agreed objectives, including those embedded in the environmental policies of the Union, action pursuing sustainable development is to be stepped up significantly. Therefore, the principles of sustainable development should feature prominently inmust be the basis of the design of the InvestEU Fund.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 76 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 9
(9) Reflecting the importance of tackling climate change in line with the Union's commitments to implement the Paris Agreement and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, the InvestEU Programme will contribute to mainstream climate actions and to the achievement of an overall target of 2530 % of the Union budget expenditures supporting climate objectives. Actions under the InvestEU Programme are expected to contribute 3at least 40 % of the overall financial envelope of the InvestEU Programme to climate objectives. Relevant actions will be identified during the InvestEU Programme's preparation and implementation and reassessed in the context of the relevant evaluations and review processes.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 79 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 10
(10) The contribution of the InvestEU Fund to the achievement of the climate target will be tracked through an EU climate tracking system developed by the Commission in cooperation with implementing partners and using in an appropriate way the criteria established by [Regulation on the establishment of a framework to facilitate sustainable investment14 ] for determining whether an economic activity is environmentally sustainable. _________________ 14The InvestEU Programme will also contribute to implementing other dimensions of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in line with the Communication on the next steps for a sustainable European future which aims to mainstream the SDGs into EU policies and initiatives, with sustainable development as an essential guiding principle for all its policies. _________________ 14 COM(2018)353. COM(2018)353.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 87 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 13
(13) Low infrastructure investment rates in the Union during the financial crisis undermined the Union's ability to boost sustainable growth, competitiveness and convergence. Sizeable investments in the European infrastructure and energy efficiency are fundamental to meet the Union's sustainability targets, including the Union's commitments towards the SDGs, and the 2030 energy and climate targets. Accordingly, support from the InvestEU Fund should target investments into sustainable development-compatible projects on transport, energy, including energy efficiency and renewable energy, environmental, climate action, maritime and digital infrastructure. InvestEU must prioritise the areas that enable the Union to meet its 2030 and mid-century sustainability and climate targets. To maximise the impact and the value added of Union financing support, it is appropriate to promote a streamlined investment process enabling visibility of the project pipeline and consistency across relevant Union programmes. Bearing in mind security threats, investment projects receiving Union support should take into account principles for the protection of citizens in public spaces. This should be complementary to the efforts made by other Union funds such as the European Regional Development Fund providing support for security components of investments in public spaces, transport, energy and other critical infrastructure.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 94 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 13 a (new)
(13a) The Energy Performance of Buildings directive (Directive (EU) 2018/844) requires Member States to establish a long-term renovation strategy to support the renovation of the national stock of residential and non-residential buildings, both public and private, into a highly energy efficient and decarbonised building stock by 2050, facilitating the cost-effective transformation of existing buildings into nearly zero-energy buildings. Member States are also required to facilitate access to appropriate mechanisms for the aggregation of projects and the reduction of the perceived risk for investors and the private sector.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 124 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 19 a (new)
(19a) The InvestEU Fund should also support just transition actions and strategies supporting investments addressing the situation of workers in specific sectors like coal/lignite mining, automotive, that could be affected from the transition to a low-carbon economy. The Invest EU fund should be able to support the transformation of those economies towards sustainable activities and attract alternative innovative businesses, start-ups, and industries with the aim of building a sustainable regional economy. Further synergies with additional supporting schemes like the modernisation Fund to be set up for the period 2021-2030 as well as other national and Union ‘s programmes addressing fair transition should also be promoted.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 184 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point b
(b) the sustainability of the Union economy and its growthgrowth of a sustainable economy, enabling the Union to achieve the SDGs and the objectives of the Paris Climate agreement;
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 199 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point d a (new)
(da) to contribute to an overall target of at least 30% of the EU budget expenditures that must support climate objectives and to allocate to that end at least 40% of the overall financial envelope of the EUInvest Programme to support investments that will directly help to deliver on the EU’s commitments in the Paris Agreement, the EU's 2030 climate and energy targets monitored by Regulation EU (XX) [Governance of the Energy Union] and a net-zero greenhouse gas emissions economy by 2050.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 202 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point d b (new)
(db) to increase investment in climate mitigation and adaptation by contributing at least 40% of its overall financial envelope to climate objectives.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 204 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1
The EU guarantee for the purposes of the EU compartment referred to in point (a) of Article 8(1) shall be EUR 38 000 000 000 (current prices). It shall be provisioned at the rate of 40 %. The Commission may decide to select a financial institution that has a broad coverage across the Union and knowledge of EU policies.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 208 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 a (new)
The projects to be financed with the additional amount shall be dedicated exclusively for actions that are eligible under the eligibility criteria set up in the rules of the Union programme under which the amount has been transferred .
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 210 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 2
2. The indicative distribution of the amount referred to in the first subparagraph of paragraph 1 is set out in Annex I to this Regulation. The Commission may modify the amounts referred to in that Annex I, where appropriate, by up to 15 % for each objective. It shall inform the European Parliament and the Council of any modification.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 220 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) sustainable infrastructure policy window: comprises sustainable investment in the areas of transport, energy,renewable energy, energy efficiency investments, in line with the 2030 and 2050 energy frameworks; digital connectivity, supply and processing of raw materials, space, oceans and water, waste, nature and other environment infrastructure, equipment, mobile assets and deployment of innovative technologies that contribute to the environmental or social sustainability objectives of the Union, or to both, or meet the environmental or social sustainability standards of the Union;
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 241 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 3 – subparagraph 1
Financing and investment operations under the sustainable infrastructure policy window referred to in point (a) of paragraph (1) shall be subject to climate, environmental and social sustainability proofing with a view to minimise detrimental impacts and maximise benefits on climate, environment and social dimension. For that purpose, promoters requesting financing shall provide adequate information based on guidance to be developed by the Commission. Projects below a certain size defined in the guidance shall be excluded from the proofing., using criteria established by the [Regulation on the establishment of a framework to facilitate sustainable investment] for determining whether an economic activity is environmentally sustainable. Projects below a certain size defined in the guidance shall be excluded from the proofing, but must demonstrate the positive contribution to the environmental and social sustainability objectives of the Union
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 249 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 3 – subparagraph 2 a (new)
estimate the impact on employment and job creation;
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 250 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 3 – subparagraph 2 b (new)
contribution to the Sustainable Development Goals.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 252 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 4
4. Implementing partners shall provide the information necessary to allow the tracking of investment that contributes to meeting the Union objectives on climate and environmentsocial, climate and environment objectives of the Union, based on guidance to be provided by the Commission.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 255 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 5
5. Implementing partners shall targetensure that at least 750 % of the investment under the sustainable infrastructure policy window significantly contribute to meeting the Union objectives on climate and environment. , in line with the EU commitments made at the 21st Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 296 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. The InvestEU Fund shall not support activities related to production, processing, distribution, storage or combustion of fossil fuels, with the exception of investment related to clean vehicles as defined in Article 4 of Directive 2009/33/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 320 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 1
1. The Commission shall be advised by an advisory board which shall have two configurations, namely representatives of implementing partners and representatives of Member States. Both configuration shall strive to ensure gender balance among their Members.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 385 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – introductory part
The financing and investment operations mayshall fall under one or more of the following areas:
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 393 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 1 – point c
(c) development, smartening and modernisation of sustainable energy infrastructure (transmission and distribution level, storage technologies, smart grids);
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 402 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 1 a (new)
1a. deployment of electric charging infrastructure.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 434 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 5 – point f
(f) new effective and accessible healthcare products, including pharmaceuticals, medical devices and advanced therapy medicinal products, having difficulties to find appropriate private funding.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 438 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 6 – introductory part
6. Development and, deployment and scaling up of digital technologies and services, in particular through:
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 445 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 6 a (new)
6a. robotics and automatisation.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 447 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 7 – introductory part
7. Financial support to entities employing up to 3 000 employees, with a particular focus on SMEs and small mid- cap companies, in particular through:
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 472 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 13 – point b
(b) to foster the competitiveness of space systems and technologies, addressing in particular vulnerabilityindependence of supply chains;, including dual use aspects,
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 474 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 13 – point d
(d) to foster Union's autonomy for safe and secure access to space, including dual use aspects.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 488 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex III – point 4 a (new)
4a. Number of alternative fuel infrastructure points deployed
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 489 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex III – point 4 b (new)
4b. Climate change: Amount of CO2 emissions reduced by Invest EU operations.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 84 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 3
(3) The Programme should aim at supporfighting climate change, by decarbonizing the transport and energy sector, supporting environmentally and socially sustainable projects and, where appropriate, by climate change mitigation and adaptation actions. In particular, the contribution of the Programme to achieving the goals and objectives of the Paris Agreement to keep the global average temperature rise well below 2°C with the aim to stay below 1.5°C, as well as the proposed 2030 climate and energy targets and long-term decarbonisation objective should be reinforced.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 98 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 4
(4) Reflecting the importance of tackling climate change in line with Union’s commitments to implement the Paris Agreement, and the commitment to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, this Regulation should therefore mainstream climate action and lead to the achievement of an overall target of 2530% of the EU budget expenditures supporting climate objectives18 . Actions under this Programme are expected to contribute 60% of the overall financial envelope of the Programme to climate objectives, based inter alia on the following Rio markers: i) 100% for the expenditures relating to railway infrastructure, alternative fuels, clean urban transport, electricity transmission, electricity storage, energy efficiency, smart grids, CO2 transportation and renewable energy; ii) 40% for inland waterways and multimodal transport, and gas infrastructure - if enabling increased use ofa measurable transition away from fossil fuels through for example renewable hydrogen or bio-methane. Relevant actions will be identified during the Programme's preparation and implementation, and reassessed in the context of the relevant evaluations and review processes. In order to prevent that infrastructure is vulnerable to potential long term climate change impacts and to ensure that the cost of greenhouse gas emissions arising from the project is included in the project's economic evaluation, projects supported by the Programme should be subject to climate proofing in accordance with guidance that should be developed by the Commission coherently with the guidance developed for other programmes of the Union where relevant. __________________ 18 COM(2018) 321, page 13
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 108 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 4 a (new)
(4a) Aside from setting the overall target of 30% of the EU budget expenditures supporting climate objectives, it is at least as important to make sure not a single action or project supported by the EU budget undermines or goes against our commitments to tackle climate change, the implementation of the Paris Agreement, the achievement of a net-zero greenhouse gas emissions economy by 2050 and the pathway to reach the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 114 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 6
(6) An important objective of this Programme is to deliver increased synergies between the transport, energy and digital sector. For that purpose, the Programme should provide for the adoption of cross-sectoral work programmes that could address specific intervention areas, for instance as regards connected and automated mobility or alternative fuelsfilling the gaps in alternative fuels infrastructure throughout the European Union as there is a strong need to increase the uptake of alternative fuels and create a stable environment for investment.. In addition, the Programme should allow, within each sector, the possibility to consider eligible some ancillary components pertaining to another sector, where such an approach improves the socio-economic benefit of the investment. Synergies between sectors should be incentivized through the award criteria for the selection of actions.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 116 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 6
(6) An important objective of this Programme is to deliver increased synergies between the transport, energy and digital sector. For that purpose, the Programme should provide for the adoption of cross-sectoral work programmes that could address specific intervention areas, for instance as regards connected and automated mobility or alternative fuel, remote sensing for monitoring transport emissions, or renewable fuels leading to significant greenhouse gas reductions. In addition, the Programme should allow, within each sector, the possibility to consider eligible some ancillary components pertaining to another sector, where such an approach improves the socio-economic benefit of the investment. Synergies between sectors should be incentivized through the award criteria for the selection of actions.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 175 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 11
(11) The TEN-T guidelines require, with regard to new technologies and innovation, that the TEN-T enables the decarbonisation of all transport modes by stimulating energy efficiency as well as the use of alternative fuels. Directive 2014/94/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council21 establishes a common framework of measures for the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure in the Union in order to minimise dependence on oil and to mitigate the environmental impact of transport and requires Member States to ensure that recharging or refuelling points accessible to the public are made available by 31 December 2025. As outlined in the Commission proposals22 of November 2017, a comprehensive set of measures to promote low-emission mobility is necessary including financial support where the market conditions do not provide a sufficient incentive. Furthermore, the current system of National Framework Plans (NFPs) could be improved by more efficient instruments including concrete, binding and enforceable targets. __________________ 21 Directive 2014/94/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 October 2014 on the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure (OJ L 307, 28.10.2014, p. 1). 22 Commission Communication "Delivering on low-emission mobility A European Union that protects the planet, empowers its consumers and defends its industry and workers" – COM(2017) 675
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 176 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 11
(11) The TEN-T guidelines require, with regard to new technologies and innovation, that the TEN-T enables the decarbonisation of all transport modes by stimulating energy efficiency as well as the use of alternative fuelrenewable fuels which lead to significant greenhouse gas reductions. Directive 2014/94/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council21 establishes a common framework of measures for the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure in the Union in order to minimise dependence on oil and to mitigate the environmental and climate impact of transport and requires Member States to ensure that recharging or refuelling points accessible to the public are made available by 31 December 2025. As outlined in the Commission proposals22 of November 2017, a comprehensive set of measures to promote low-emission mobility is necessary including financial support where the market conditions do not provide a sufficient incentive. __________________ 21 Directive 2014/94/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 October 2014 on the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure (OJ L 307, 28.10.2014, p. 1). 22 Commission Communication "Delivering on low-emission mobility A European Union that protects the planet, empowers its consumers and defends its industry and workers" – COM(2017) 675
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 190 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 13
(13) In order to improve the completion of transport projects in less developed parts of the network, a Cohesion Fund allocation should be transferred to the Programme to finance transport projects in the Member States eligible for financing from the Cohesion Fund. In an initial phase and within a limit of 70% of the transferred envelope, the selection of projects eligible for financing should respect the national allocations under the Cohesion Fund. The remaining 30% of the transferred envelope should be allocated on a competitive basis to projects located in the Member States eligible for financing from the Cohesion Fund with priority to cross- border links and missing links. The Commission should support Member States eligible for financing from the Cohesion Fund in their efforts to develop an appropriate pipeline of projects, in particular by strengthening the institutional capacity of the public administrations concerned.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 219 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 17
(17) Regulation (EU) No 347/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council27 identifies the trans-European energy infrastructure priorities which need to be implementhave been established in order to meet the Union's energy and climate policy objectives, identifies projects of common interest necessary to implement those priorities, and lays down measures in the field of the granting of permits, public involvement and regulation to speed up and/or facilitate the implementation of those projects, including criteria for the eligibility of such projects for Union financial assistance. The list of projects of common interest, eligibility criteria and TEN-E guidelines should be revised before the end of 2021 to take fully into account the goals and objectives of the Paris Agreement as well as the Union’s climate and energy targets for 2030 and beyond; to facilitate an enhanced dialogue between the European Parliament , the Council and the Commission on the lists of projects of common interest; and to unlock bottlenecks for increased investments for electricity and smart grid projects. __________________ 27 Regulation (EU) No 347/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 April 2013 on guidelines for trans- European energy infrastructure and repealing Decision No 1364/2006/EC and amending Regulations (EC) No 713/2009, (EC) No 714/2009 and (EC) No 715/2009 (OJ L 115, 25.4.2013, p. 39).
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 231 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 18 a (new)
(18a) Directive [Energy Efficiency Directive] highlights energy efficiency as the first priority for decarbonising the EU energy system and calls for well-designed and effective Union financial instruments to support energy efficiency measures. Investments to enhance energy efficiency should therefore also be eligible for CEF funding, where they fulfil other criteria laid down in this regulation.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 232 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 19
(19) While completion of network infrastructure remains the priority to achieve the development of renewable energy, integrating cross-border cooperation on renewable energy and developing a smart and efficient energy system including storage and demand response solutions that help balance the grid, reflects the approach adopted under the Clean Energy for all Europeans initiative with a collective responsibility to reach an ambitious target for renewable energy in 2030 and the changed policy context with ambitious long-term decarbonisation objectives.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 256 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 24
(24) Schools, universities, libraries, local, regional or national administrations, main providers of public services, hospitals and medical centres, transport hubs and digitally intensive enterprises are entities and places that can influence important socio-economic developments in the area where they are located. Such socio- economic drivers need to be at the cutting edge of Gigabit connectivity in order to provide access to the best services and applications for European citizens, business and local communities. The Programme should support access to Gigabit connectivity and advanced 5G mobile connectivity for these socio- economic drivers with a view to maximising their positive spill-over effects on the wider economy and society, including by generating wider demand for connectivity and services.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 264 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 25
(25) In addition, building on the successwide acceptance of the WiFi4EU initiative, the Programme should continue to support the provision of free, high quality, local wireless connectivity in the centres of local public life, including entities with a public mission such as public authorities and providers of public services as well as outdoor spaces accessible to the general public, in order to promote the Union's digital vision in local communities.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 270 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 28
(28) The deployment of backbone electronic communications networks, including withe use of submarine cables to connecting European territoriescountries or the European Union to third countries on other continents or connecting European islands or overseas territories to the mainland, is needed in order to provide necessary redundancy for such vital infrastructure, and to increase the capacity and resilience of the Union's digital networks. However, such projects are often commercially non-viable without public support.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 273 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 29
(29) Actions contributing to projects of common interest in the area of digital connectivity infrastructure shall deploy the technology best suited for the specific projectbest available and suitable technology, while proposing the best balance between state-of-the-art technologies in terms of data flow capacity, transmission security, network resilience and cost efficiency, and should be prioritised by way of work programmes taking into account criteria set out in this Regulation. Deployments of very high capacity networks can include passive infrastructure, in view of maximising socio-economic as well as environmental benefits. Finally, when prioritising actions, the potential positive spill-overs in terms of connectivity shall be taken into account, for example when a project deployed can improve the business case for future deployments leading to further coverage of territories and population in areas which have remained uncovered so far.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 301 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 32
(32) The prolicy objectives of this Programme aimed at reaching a zero-emission infrastructure will be also addressed through financial instruments and budgetary guarantee under the policy window(s) [...] of the InvestEU Fund. The Programme's actions should be used to address market failures or sub-optimal investment situations, in a proportionate manner, without duplicating or crowding out private financing and have a clear European added value.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 304 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 33
(33) In order to favour an integrated development of the innovation cycle, it is necessary to ensure complementarity between the innovative solutions developed in the context of the Union Research and Innovation framework programmes and the innovative solutions deployed with support from the Connecting Europe Facility. For this purpose, synergies with Horizon Europe, which are consistent with the commitments under the Paris Agreement, will ensure that: (a) research and innovation needs in the areas of transport, energy and in the digital sector within the EU are identified and established during Horizon Europe’s strategic planning process; (b) the Connecting Europe Facility supports large- scale roll-out and deployment of innovative technologies and solutions in the fields of transport, energy and digital infrastructure, and in synergies between those fields, in particular those resulting from Horizon Europe; (c) the exchange of information and data between Horizon Europe and the Connecting Europe Facility will be facilitated, for example by highlighting technologies from Horizon Europe with a high market readiness that could be further deployed through the Connecting Europe Facility.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 374 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point i
(i) “digital connectivity infrastructure” means very high capacity networks, 5G systems, very high quality local wireless connectivity, backbone networks, and submarine cables that are essential to assure connectivity, as well as operational digital platforms directly associated with transport and energy infrastructure;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 407 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1
1. The Programme has the general objective to develop, decarbonise and modernise the trans-European networks in the fields of transport, energy and digital and to facilitate cross-border cooperation in the field of renewable energy, taking into account and energy efficiency, in full consistency of the long- term decarbonisation commitments and with emphasis on synergies among sectors.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 409 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1
1. The Programme has the general objective to develop and modernise the trans-European networks in the fields of transport, energy and digital and to facilitate cross-border cooperation in the field of renewable energy, taking into accountin order to help achieve the long-term decarbonisation commitments and contribute to sustainable and inclusive growth, with emphasis on synergies among sectors.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 446 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point a – point i a (new)
(ia) to contribute to the comprehensive Union-wide deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure, in accordance with Article 33 of Regulation (EU) No 1315/2013,where the industry, notably manufacturers, suppliers, energy and fuel producers contribute 90 % of the overall investment.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 470 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point b
(b) In the energy sector, to contribute to the decarbonisation of the economy by the development of projects of common interest relating to further integration of the internal energy market, interoperability of networks across borders and sectors, facilitating decarbonisation and ensuring security of supply, and toensuring security of supply by increasing the EU’s energy independence, facilitateing cross- border cooperation in the area of renewable energy and to stimulate energy efficiency;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 482 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point c
(c) In the digital sector, to contribute to the deployment of very high capacity digital networks and 5G systems, to the increased resilience and capacity of digital backbone networks on EU territories, with special attention to the interconnection among European islands and overseas territories to the mainland, by linking them to neighbouring territories, as well to the digitalisation of transport and energy networks.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 541 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 2 – point b
(b) up to EUR 8,650,000,000 for the specific objectives referred to in Article 3(2)(b), out of which up to 1at least 20% for the cross-border projects in the field of renewable energy
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 545 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 2 – point b
(b) up to EUR 8,650,000,000 for the specific objectives referred to in Article 3(2)(b), out of which up to 105% for the cross-border projects in the field of renewable energy
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 559 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 8
8. As regards the amounts transferred from the Cohesion Fund, 30% of these amounts shall be made available immediately to all Member States eligible for funding from the Cohesion Fund to finance transport infrastructure projects in accordance with this Regulation, with priority to cross-border and missing links. Until 31 December 2023, the selection of projects eligible for financing shall respect the national allocations under the Cohesion Fund with regard to 70% of the resources transferred. As of 1 January 2024, resources transferred to the Programme which have not been committed to a transport infrastructure project shall be made available to all Member States eligible for funding from the Cohesion Fund to finance transport infrastructure projects in accordance with this Regulation.deleted
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 581 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 9
9. Resources allocated to Member States under shared management may, at their request, be transferred to the Programme. The Commission shall implement those resources directly in accordance with [point (a) of Article 62(1)] of the Financial Regulation or indirectly in accordance with point (c) of that Article. Where possible those resources shall be used for the benefit of the Member State concerned.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 620 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 3
3. Studies aiming at the development and identification of cross-border projects in the field of renewable energy and energy efficiency shall be eligible for funding under this Regulation.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 639 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 3 – point a
(a) actions contributing to access to very high capacity networks capable of providing Gigabit and 5G connectivity for socio- economic drivers shall be prioritised taking into account the function of the socio- economic drivers, the relevance of the digital services and applications enabled by providing the underlying connectivity, and the potential socio- economic benefits to citizens, business and local communities, including the potential positive spill-overs in terms of connectivity, in accordance with Part V of the Annex;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 642 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 3 – point c
(c) with regard to actions contributing to the deployment of 5G systems, priority shall be given to implementation of 5G pilot projects and deployment of 5G corridors along major terrestrial transport paths, including the trans-European transport networks. The extent to which the action contributes to ensuring coverage along major transport paths enabling the uninterrupted provision of synergy digital services, while maximising potential positive spill-overs for territories and population in the vicinity of the project deployment area shall also be taken into account. An indicative list of projects that could benefit from support is included in Part V of the Annex;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 644 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 3 – point d
(d) projects aiming at the deployment of cross-border backbone networks linking the Union to third countries and reinforcing links within the Union territory, including with submarine cables,through the use of submarine cables within the Union and linking the Union to third countries, not only to reinforce interconnections to the Union but also to allow it to have capacity to offer transit between third continents, paying special attention to the interconnection of islands and overseas territories to mainland, as shall be prioritised according to the extent to which they significantly contribute to increasing the quality of service to be offered, resilience and capacity of electronic communications networks in Union territory and beyond the Union;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 651 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 3 – point g
(g) the extent to which the deployed technology is the best suitedavailable and suitable for the specific project, while proposing the best balance between state- of-the-art technologies in terms of data flow capacity, transmission security, network resilience and cost efficiency.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 686 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 2 – point a – point i i
(ii) actions implementinghaving a significant cross- border impact links of the comprehensive network in accordance with Chapter II of Regulation (EU) No 1315/2013, notably the sections listed in Part III of the Annex to this Regulation;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 694 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 2 – point a – point iii
(iii) actions implementing sections of the comprehensive network located in outermost regions in accordance with Chapter II of Regulation (EU) No 1315/2013, including actions relating with connections within a outermost region and to the relevant urban nodes, maritime ports, inland ports and rail-road terminals of the comprehensive network as defined at Annex II to Regulation (EU) No 1315/2013;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 715 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 2 – point b – point ii
(ii) actions supporting telematic applications systems, including for safety and emissions control purposes, in accordance with Articles 31 (Telematic applications), 33 (New technologies and innovation), 34 (Safe and secure infrastructure) and 36 (Environmental protection) of Regulation (EU) No 1315/2013;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 752 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 2 – point b – point ix a (new)
(ixa) actions improving the accessibilities of the outmost regions;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 784 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 3 – point -a (new)
(-a) Actions relating to the decarbonisation of the economy:
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 789 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 3 – point a a (new)
(aa) actions related to energy infrastructure projects contributing to improving energy efficiency where these projects have an influence on cross- border energy flows, inter alia through demand response and smart grids.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 790 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 3 – point a a (new)
(aa) Actions relating to energy efficiency or demand side response;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 791 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 3 – point a b (new)
(ab) actions supporting smart grid projects, where such projects integrate electricity generation, distribution or consumption using real time system management and influencing cross- border energy flows;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 792 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 3 – point a c (new)
(ac) actions improving cross-border electricity interconnection across member States to achieve the 15% interconnection target by 2030 as defined in the Regulation (EU) 375/2016;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 799 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 4 – subparagraph 1 – point a
(a) actions supporting Gigabit and 5G connectivity of socio-economic drivers;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 800 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 4 – subparagraph 1 – point c
(c) actions implementing 5G pilot projects and uninterrupted coverage with 5G systems of all major terrestrial transport paths, including the trans-European transport networks;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 801 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 4 – subparagraph 1 – point d
(d) actions supporting deployment of backbone networks including with submarine cables, within and across Member States and between the Union and third countries in order to assure territorial cohesion within the Union and also the interconnection of Europe to other Continents;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 804 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 4 – subparagraph 1 – point e
(e) actions supporting access of European households to very high capacity networks and implementing the EU strategic connectivity targets;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 821 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Actions that contribute to the comprehensive Union-wide deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure, in accordance with Article 33 of Regulation (EU) No 1315/2013, where the industry, notably manufacturers, suppliers, energy and fuel producers contribute 90 % of the overall investment.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 829 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 4
4. Legal entities established in a third country which is not associated to the Programme are exceptionally eligible to receive support under the Programme where this is indispensable for the achievement of the objectives of a given project of common interest or of a cross- border project in the field of renewable energy and also in the field of backbone digital networks including through the use of submarine cables.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 845 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) economic, social, climate and environmental impact (benefits and costs);
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 858 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point b a (new)
(ba) development of telecom industries;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 860 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point b b (new)
(bb) intra Union territories cohesion;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 862 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point c
(c) cross-border dimension or accessibility to the outmost regions;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 867 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point c a (new)
(ca) Efficiency first principle
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 878 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point h
(h) need to overcome financial obstacles such as insufficient commercial viability, high upfront costs or the lack of market finance;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 880 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point i
(i) cConsistency witribution to the Union and national energy and climate plans., the EU decarbonisation objectives and commitments under the Paris agreement;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 882 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point i
(i) consistency withtribution to the achievement of Union and national energy and climate plans.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 884 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point i a (new)
(ia) Contribution to lowering the EU's greenhouse gas emissions;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 887 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point i a (new)
(ia) the potential CO2 reduction achieved by the project
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 961 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 14 – paragraph 3 – point b
(b) The co-financing rates may be increased to a maximum of 75 % for actions in line with the EU's commitments under the Paris Agreement and contributing to the development of projects of common interest which, based on the evidence referred to in Article 14(2) of Regulation (EU) No 347/2013, provide a high degree of regional or Union-wide security of supply, strengthen the solidarity of the Union or comprise highly innovative solutions.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 962 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 14 – paragraph 3 – point b
(b) The co-financing rates may be increased to a maximum of 75 % for actions contributing to the development of projects of common interest which have a significant impact on reducing CO2 emissions or, based on the evidence referred to in Article 14(2) of Regulation (EU) No 347/2013, provide a high degree of regional or Union-wide security of supply, strengthen the solidarity of the Union or comprise highly innovative solutions.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 966 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 14 – paragraph 4
4. For works in the digital sector, the following maximum co-financing rates shall apply: for works relating to the specific objectives referred to in Article 3 (2) (c), the amount of Union financial assistance shall not exceed 30% of the total eligible cost. The co-financing rates may be increased up to 50% for actions with a strong cross-border dimension, such as uninterrupted coverage with 5G systems along major transport paths or deployment of backbone networks between Member States and between the Union and third countries, and up to 75% for actions implementing the Gigabit and 5G connectivity of socio-economic drivers. Actions in the field of providing local wireless connectivity in local communities shall be funded by Union financial assistance covering up to 100 % of the eligible costs, without prejudice to the principle of co- financing.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 998 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) the action has not started within onetwo years following the starting date indicated in the grant agreement;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 1032 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 21 – paragraph 1
1. Evaluations shall be carried out in a timely manner but at least every two years to feed into the decision- making process.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 1072 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – part I – table – Digital – Specific Objectives and Indicators
Digital Contribution to the New connections to very high capacity deployment of digital networks for socio-economic drivers and connectivity very high quality wireless connections for infrastructure throughout local communities the European Union and between the Union and other continents Number of CEF actions enabling 5G connectivity along transport paths New very high capacity of interconnections between islands and overseas territories and mainland to assure territorial cohesion New very high capacity of interconnections between the Union and other continents Number of CEF actions enabling new connections to very high capacity networks for households Number of CEF actions contributing to the digitalisation of energy and transport sectors
2018/09/26
Committee: TRAN
Amendment 1116 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – part III – point 1 – table – Core network corridor “Atlantic”
Core network corridor "Atlantic" Alignment Gijón – León – Valladolid A Coruña – Vigo – Orense – León– Zaragoza – Pamplona/Logroño – Bilbao Tenerife/Gran Canaria – Huelva/Sanlúcar de Barrameda – Sevilla – Córdoba Algeciras – Bobadilla – Madrid Sines/Lisboa – Madrid – Valladolid Sines – Ermidas Lisboa – Aveiro – Leixões/Porto – Douro river Porto – Vigo Aveiro – Valladolid – Vitoria-Gasteiz – Bergara – Bilbao/Bordeaux – Tours – Paris – Le Havre/Metz – Mannheim/Strasbourg Saint Nazaire – Nantes – Tours Pre- Cross- Evora – Merida Rail identified border sections Vitoria-Gasteiz – San Sebastián – Bayonne – Bordeaux Aveiro – Salamanca Douro river (Via Navegável do Douro) Inland waterways
2018/09/26
Committee: TRAN
Amendment 1179 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – part IV – point 1 – paragraph 1
Cross-border projects in the field of renewable energy shall promote the cross- border cooperation between Member States in the field of planning, development and cost-effective exploitation of renewable energy sources with the aim of contributing to the Union´s long term decarbonisation targets.
2018/09/26
Committee: TRAN
Amendment 1182 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – part IV – point 2 – paragraph 1 – point b
(b) it shall provide cost savings in the deployment of renewables and/or benefits for system integration, security of supply or innovation in comparison to a similar project implemented by one of the participating Member States alone or to a planned alternative cross-border energy project;
2018/09/26
Committee: TRAN
Amendment 1187 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – part IV – point 3 – paragraph 1 – point f a (new)
(fa) effects on local nature and environment
2018/09/26
Committee: TRAN
Amendment 1193 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – part V – point 1 – heading
1. Gigabit and 5G connectivity to socio- economic drivers
2018/09/26
Committee: TRAN
Amendment 1195 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – part V – point 1 – paragraph 2 – indent 2
– Gigabit Connectivity for education and research centres, in the context of the efforts to facilitate the use of inter alia high-speed computing, cloud applications and big data, close digital divides and to innovate in education systems, to improve learning outcomes, enhance equity and improve efficiency.49 _________________ 49 See also COM(2018) 22 final - Commission Communication on the Digital Education Action Plan
2018/09/26
Committee: TRAN
Amendment 1196 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – part V – point 1 – paragraph 2 – indent 2 a (new)
– 5G or very-high capacity wireless broadband connectivity for education and research centres, hospitals and medical centres in the context of the efforts to bring uninterrupted 5G wireless broadband coverage to all urban centres by 2025.
2018/09/26
Committee: TRAN
Amendment 1206 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – part V – point 3 – heading
3. Indicative list of 5G corridors and cross-border connections eligible for funding
2018/09/26
Committee: TRAN
Amendment 1209 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – part V – table – Core network “Atlantic”
Core network corridor and cross-border "Atlantic" Cross-border sections for CAM Porto-Vigo and Merida-Evora Azores and Madeira Islands - Lisbon - Paris - experimentation Amsterdam - Frankfurt Aveiro - Salamanca More extensive section for larger scale Metz – Paris - Bordeaux – Bilbao – Vigo – deployment of CAM Porto – Lisbon -Bilbao – Madrid – Lisbon
2018/09/26
Committee: TRAN
Amendment 1210 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – part V – table – Core network “Mediterranean”
Core network corridor and cross-border "Mediterranean" Cross-border sections for CAM - experimentatioSubmarine cable networks Lisbon – experimentation Marseille – Milan More extensive section for larger scale Budapest – Zagreb – Ljubljana / Rijeka / deployment of CAM Split
2018/09/26
Committee: TRAN
Amendment 85 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 7 a (new)
(7a) For the implementation of the Programme, it is a prerequisite to invest in infrastructure in order to ensure an appropriate level of connectivity through 5G and ultra-fast broadband networks. It´s also a prerequisite to invest in training, easy, and balanced access to improve inclusivity, better public service delivering and higher skilled jobs.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 86 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 7 b (new)
(7b) Europe has to make decisive investments in its future, building strategic digital capacities in order to benefit from the digital revolution. A substantial budget (of at least 9.2 billion euro) must be ensured at EU level for this purpose, which must be complemented by sizable investment efforts at national and regional level, namely with a consistent and complementary relationship with structural and cohesion funds.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 87 #

2018/0227(COD)

(8) The Commission's Communication on 'A new, modern Multiannual Financial Framework for a European Union that delivers efficiently on its priorities post- 2020'57 outlines among the options for the future financial framework a programme for Europe's digital transformations to deliver 'strong progress towards smart growth in areas such as high quality data infrastructure, connectivity and, cybersecurity' and digitalization of public administrations. It would seek to secure European leadership in supercomputing, next generation internet, artificial intelligence, robotics and big data. It would reinforce the competitive position of industry and businesses in Europe across the digitised economy, ensure accessibility to the opportunities connected to the digitalization of public services throughout Europe and would have a significant impact on filling the skills gap across the Union. _________________ 57 COM(2018) 98 final
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 94 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 9 a (new)
(9a) The Next Generation Internet initiative launched by the European Commission in 2017 should also provide ground for the implementation of the Programme as it aims towards a more open Internet with better services, more intelligence, greater involvement and participation, addressing technological opportunities arising from advances in various research fields, extending from new network architectures and software- defined infrastructures to new concepts for services and applications.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 96 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 10
(10) The general objective of the Programme should be to support the digital transformation of industry and to foster better exploitation of the industrial potential of policies of innovation, research and technological development, for the benefit of businesses and citizens all over the Union in close connection with the Digital Single Market improvement. The programme should be structured into five Specific Objectives reflecting key policy areas, namely: high- performance computing, cybersecurity, artificial intelligence, advanced digital skills, and deployment, best use of digital capacities and interoperability. For all these areas, the Programme should also aim at better aligning Union, Member States and regional policies and strategies, and pooling of private and industrial resources in order to increase investment and develop stronger synergies, namely to develop better infrastructures and improve training policies. The implementation of the program should focus on the dematerialisation of processes and administrative simplification, particularly in the application processes.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 114 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 14 a (new)
(14 a) The example of the WIFI4EU initiative should be replicated in a way to improve a balanced access to new networks, services and applications to all European Citizens.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 117 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 16
(16) The high performance computing and the related data processing capacities in the Union should allow to ensure wider use of high performance computing by industry and, more generally, in areas of public interest in order to seize unique opportunities that supercomputers bring to society as regards health, environment and security as well as competitiveness of industry, notably small and medium-sized enterprises, improved by added power of collaborative networks.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 135 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 25
(25) The European Council in its conclusions of 19 October 2017 stressed that to successfully build a Digital Europe, the Union needs in particular labour markets, training and education systems fit for the digital age and that there is a need to invest in digital skills, to empower and enable all Europeans; with an integrated approach.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 136 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 26 a (new)
(26a) Considering the need for a holistic approach, the Program should also take into account the areas of inclusion, qualification, training and specialization which, in addition to the advanced digital competences, are decisive for the creation of added value in the knowledge society.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 162 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point e
(e) '"Digital Innovation Hub' means legal entity designated or selected in an open and competitive procedure in order to fulfil the tasks" (DIH) serve the purposes of: (i) foster innovation at regional and/or national levels, narrowing the gap between R&D results and adoption and take-up of products and services through paths that go from proof-of-concept, to prototype and demonstrator (ii) assist entrepreneurs uander the Programme, in particular providing access to technolo industry, in particular the European Enterprise Network and SMEs, to attract digictal expertise and experimentation facilities, such as equipment and software tools to enable the digital transformation of the industry. ly skilled people contributing to a geographically balanced and cohesive development (iii) widespread digital innovative technologies and services to industry (manufacturing, agriculture, etc.) and the public sector (health, education, administration).
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 167 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point e a (new)
(ea) "European Network of Digital Innovation Hubs" (EU-DIH) means a decentralised Network across the Union of legal entities designated or selected in an open and competitive procedure in order to fulfil the tasks under the Digital Europe Programme supporting pan- European collaboration, in particular providing access to technological expertise and experimentation facilities, such as infrastructure, equipment and software tools, brokerage, legal advice etc., to enable the digital transformation of the industry.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 170 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
1. The Programme has the following general objective: to support the digital transformation of the European economy and society and bring its benefits to European citizens and businesses. The Programme, in close coordination with Horizon Europe, the Internal Market program and in particular the actions supporting SMEs, investEU instrument, CEF and ESIF, will:
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 179 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point b a (new)
(ba) support the digital transformation of the public sector and their access to new digital infrastructures;
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 183 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) deploy, coordinate at the Union level and operate an integratedroperable world- class exascale77 supercomputing and data infrastructure in the Union that shall be accessible on a non-commercial basis to public and private users and for publicly funded research purposes in accordance with the Regulation establishing the European High Performance Computing Joint Undertaking; _________________ 77 Billions of billions of floating operations per second
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 190 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 5 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) build up and strengthen core artificial intelligence capacities in the Union intended for civil use, including data resources and libraries of algorithms in compliance with data protection legislation; and ensuring that humans remain at the centre of the development, deployment and decision-making of AI;
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 204 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) support, together with Member States, the procurement of advanced cybersecurity equipment, tools and data infrastructures in full compliance with data protection legislation and ensuring EU strategic autonomy;
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 212 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 – paragraph 1 – point c
(c) ensure a wide deployment of the latest cybersecurity solutions across the economy with special attention to vulnerable economic operators;
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 213 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 – paragraph 1 – point d
(d) reinforce capabilities within Member States and private sector aiming at developing a cybersecurity culture within organisations and to help them meet Directive (EU) 2016/1148 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 6 July 2016 concerning measures for a high common level of security of network and information systems across the Union79 . _________________ 79 OJ L 194, 19.7.2016, p. 1–30 OJ L 194, 19.7.2016, p. 1–30
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 225 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
The financial intervention by the Union under Specific Objective 4. Advanced Digital skills shall support the development of advanced digital skills in areas supported by this programme, thus contributing to increase Europe's talent pool, fostering greater professionalism, especially with regard to high performance computing, big data analytics, cybersecurity, distributed ledger technologies, robotics and artificial intelligence. The financial intervention shall pursue the following operational objectives: to stimulate employability, vocational training and specialisation in digital technologies and applications,
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 255 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 1 – point a a (new)
(aa) Ensure a broad citizens access to High Quality Internet, namely with the replication of the WIFI4EU initiative (WIFI4EU2) and deployment of Very High Capacity Network in areas where there is lack of connectivity, in particular rural and remote areas.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 261 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 1 – point d
(d) offer to public administrations access to testing and, piloting and scaling-up of digital technologies, including their cross-border use;
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 268 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 1 – point g
(g) ensure a continuous capacity at the Union level to observe, analyse and adapt to fast-evolving digital trends, as well as sharing and mainstreaming best practices according to our digital identity, as a result of the application of the acquis of values and principles shared by the countries of the European Union to the transformation processes that lead to the development of the digital society;
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 275 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 1 – point h a (new)
(ha) help to ensure very high capacity networks are available to outermost regions, remote and less populated areas contributing to reduce the digital divide;
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 276 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 1 – point i
(i) build up and strengthen the network of Digital Innovation Hubs, with a balanced distribution ensuring a full coverage of Europe, improving convergence, contribute to fill the gap and reduce the digital divide, in particular between Cohesion countries and other member states.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 277 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 5
5. Resources allocated to Member States under shared management may, at their request, be transferred to the Programme. The Commission shall implement those resources directly in accordance with point (a) of Article 62(1) of the Financial Regulation or indirectly in accordance with point (c) of that Article. Where possible those resources shall be used to the maximum extent possible for the benefit of the Member State concerned.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 284 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 2
2. The cooperation with third countries and organisations mentioned in paragraph 1 under Specific Objective 2 and 3. Cybersecurity and Trust and Artificial Intelligence shall be subject to Article [12]. For actions under Specfic objective 1, High Performance Computing, the cooperation with third countries will be limited to those countries that are members of the European High Performance Computing Joint Undertaking.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 287 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 12 – paragraph 5
5. The work programme may also provide that legal entities established in associated countries and legal entities established in the EU but controlled from third countries are not eligible for participation in all or some actions under Specific Objective 3 for1, 2 and 3 for strategic autonomy and security reasons. In such cases calls for proposals and calls for tenders shall be restricted to entities established or deemed to be established in Member States and controlled by Member States and/or nationals of Member States.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 294 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 14 – paragraph 2
2. The Programme may provide funding in any of the form of primarily public procurements of grants as well as grants and prizes as laid down in the Financial Regulation, including notably procurement as a primary form as well as grants and prizes. It may also provide financing in the form of financial instruments within blending operations only by providing the non-repayable forms of support to blending operations.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 295 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 15 – paragraph 1
The Programme may be implemented through European Partnerships agreed within the Strategic programming Process between the Commission and the Member States . This may include in particular contributions to existing or new public- private partnerships in the form of joint undertakings established under Article 187 TFEU. For these contributions, provisions relating to European Partnerships under [Horizon Europe Regulation, ref to be added] apply.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 299 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 16 – paragraph 1
1. During the first year of the implementation of the Programme, an initial network of Digital Innovation Hubs shall be established across the EU.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 308 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 16 – paragraph 2 – point b
(b) appropriate management capacity, staff and infrastructure, and skills to carry out RD&;I;
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 309 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 16 – paragraph 2 – point d
(d) appropriate financial guarantees, issued preferably by a public authority, corresponding to the level of Union funds it will be called upon to manage.capacity;
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 311 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 16 – paragraph 2 – point d a (new)
(da) links with existing ICT Hubs created under Horizon 2020, the EUinvest Hub and the European Entreprise network;
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 312 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 16 – paragraph 2 – point d b (new)
(db) guarantees, issued preferably by a public authority, corresponding to the level of Union funds it will be called upon to manage;
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 313 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 16 – paragraph 2 – point d c (new)
(dc) alignment with cohesion funds priorities;
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 317 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 16 – paragraph 3 – point b
(b) the need to ensure by the initial network a coverage of the needs of industry and areas of public interest and a comprehensive and balanced geographical coverage, improving convergence and contribute to fill the gap between the cohesion countries and the other member states.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 319 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 16 – paragraph 4
4. Additional Digital Innovation Hubs shall be selected on the basis of an open and competitive process, in such a way to ensure the widest geographical coverage across Europe. The number of entities of the network shall be proportional to the population of a given Member States and ithere shall be a priority to have at least one Digital Innovation Hub per Member State. To address the specific constraints faced by the EU outermost regions, additional Innovation Hubs shall be selected in those regions or specific entities may be nominated to cover their needs independently of their population.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 326 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 16 – paragraph 5
5. The Digital Innovation Hubs mayshall receive funding in the form of grants.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 335 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 18 – paragraph 3
3. Legal entities established in a third country which is not associated to the Programme are exceptionally eligible to participate in specific actions where this is necessary for the achievement of the objectives of the Programme and when it does do not imply additional security risks for the EU or put in question the EU's strategic autonomy.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 337 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 18 – paragraph 6
6. Legal entities established in a third country which is not associated to the programme should in principle bear the cost of their participation.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 338 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 19 – paragraph 1
Grants under the Programme shall be awarded and managed in accordance with Title VIII of the Financial Regulation. and may cover up to 100% of the eligible costs on duly justified reasons, without prejudice of the co-financing principle;
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 343 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 20 – paragraph 1 – point g a (new)
(ga) where applicable, a reduction of digital divide between regions, citizens or business;
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 347 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 21 – paragraph 1
Blending operations decided under this Programme shall be implemented in accordance with the [InvestEU regulation] and Title X of the Financial Regulation. The amount of expenditure from this programme to be blended with a financial instrument shall be non-refundable.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 362 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – part 1 – point 1.2 a (new)
1.2a Number of entreprises from non- participating countries that are part of the Supply chain of the HPC infrastructure.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 363 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – part 2 – point 2.2 a (new)
2.2a Number of concrete AI applications supported by the programme that are being currently commercialised.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 364 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – part 4 – point 4.2 a (new)
4.2a Rate of satisfaction of the programme among users.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 365 #

2018/0227(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – part 4 – point 4.2 b (new)
4.2b Number of students, recent graduates and unemployed that have improved their status after training provided in the framework of the programme.
2018/09/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 259 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Recital 7 a (new)
(7 a) Our future is intimately linked to the future of the seas, oceans and coasts. The seas, oceans and coasts provide multiple ecosystem services and a wealth of resources, influence climate and provide many economic opportunities. The concept Blue Economy (every economic activity associated to oceans, seas, ports and coastal areas) was defined by the European Commission in its report in September 2012 Communication from the Commission: Blue Growth opportunities for marine and maritime sustainable growth. Horizon Europe will give special attention to activities related to the Blue Economy in all pillars with special focus on clusters ‘Food and Natural Resources'.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 273 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 2 – paragraph 2 – point a
(a) strengthening Europe’s scientific base and reinforcing and spreading excellence;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 284 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 2 – paragraph 2 – point b
(b) increasing collaboration across sectors and disciplines, including social sciences and humanities;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 305 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 2 – paragraph 2 – point e
(e) attracting, training and retaining, in particular young researchers and innovators in the European Research Area, including through mobility of researchers;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 315 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 2 – paragraph 2 – point h a (new)
(h a) supporting implementation of UN Sustainable Development Goals;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 320 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 2 – paragraph 2 – point i
(i) reinforcing the link between research and, innovation and education, and other policies, including Sustainable Development Goals;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 321 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 2 – paragraph 2 – point i
(i) reinforcing the link between research and, innovation, education and other policies, including Sustainable Development Goals;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 329 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 2 – paragraph 2 – point k
(k) involving societal actors, including citizens and end-users in co-design and co- creation processes;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 334 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 2 – paragraph 2 – point k a (new)
(k a) translating research outcomes into meaningful, tangible benefits for citizens;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 341 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 2 – paragraph 2 – point m a (new)
(m a) accelerating the transition towards a green, sustainable and decarbonised European industry and society;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 343 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 2 – paragraph 2 – point n
(n) improving skills for research and for technical and social innovation;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 344 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 2 – paragraph 2 – point n
(n) improving skills for research and innovation;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 373 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point 2 – point b
(b) cluster 'Inclusive and Secure Society', as described in Annex I, Pillar II, section 2;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 376 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point 2 – point b a (new)
(b a) cluster 'Secure Society', as described in Annex I, Pillar II, section 2a;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 395 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point 3 – point a a (new)
(a a) SME Instrument for incremental innovation, as described in Annex I, Pillar III, section 1a;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 429 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 5 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
1. For each mission, a mission board mayshall be established, following an open call for nominations or expression of interest.. It shall be composed of around 15 independent, high level individuals including relevant end-users' representatives and shall connect to a high-level panel tasked with ensuring a comprehensive research strategy in the broader field, such as in health. The mission board shall advise upon the following:
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 490 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 9 – paragraph 1
1. The Commission shall establish a European Innovation Council (EIC) for implementing actions under Pillar III 'Open Innovation' which relate to the EIC. The EIC shall operate according to the following principles: focus on breakthrough and disruptive innovation, as well as incremental and social innovation, autonomy, ability to take risk, efficiency, effectiveness, transparency and accountability.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 491 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 9 – paragraph 1
1. The Commission shall establish a European Innovation Council (EIC) for implementing actions under Pillar III 'Open Innovation' which relate to the EIC. The EIC shall operate according to the following principles: focus on breakthrough and disruptive innovation, incremental innovation, autonomy, ability to take risk, efficiency, effectiveness, transparency and accountability.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 512 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 10 – paragraph 3 – subparagraph 1
The EIC Board shall be composed of 15 to 20 high level individuals drawn from various parts of Europe's research and innovation ecosystem, including entrepreneurs, corporate leaders, investors, academic experts and researchers. It shall contribute to outreach actions, with EIC Board members striving to enhance the prestige of the EIC brand.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 522 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 10 – paragraph 3 – subparagraph 3 a (new)
The European Parliament shall be informed and consulted before the appointment of the President and the members of the EIC Board.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 551 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 12 a (new)
Article 12 a Steering Board for Health 1. The Commission shall establish a Steering Board for Health for implementing the actions under Pillar II 'Global Challenges and Industrial Competitiveness' which relates to the cluster 'Health'. 2. The Steering Board for Health shall focus on the following principles: creating synergy between health research programs through coordination and cooperation, promoting patients and society engagement, with co-design and co-implementation of health missions by stakeholders, providing scientific advice and recommendations. The actions should provide value oriented health research, better health solutions and reduce health inequalities. 3. The Steering Board for Health shall: (a) provide for citizens’ participation and engagement in a bottom-up decision making process, (b) foster sustainability in funding strategies and mechanisms allowing for long-term projects and ambitious missions, (c) ensure fruitful transnational research collaborations that maximize the European potential and translate results into health systems, (d) increase the use of multidisciplinary research between disease areas where commonalities exist and thereby decrease duplication and isolated research. (e) increase visibility of Horizon Europe and its benefit for EU citizens, address fragmentation of responsibilities for science and research within the EU governing bodies, streamline the existing funding mechanisms. 4. The Steering Board for Health shall provide a comprehensive research strategy and steering in developing the work programmes and missions related to Health, including programs in other Challenges. 5. The Steering Board for Health shall be an independent science-led stakeholder group, composed of actors from biomedical research and innovation, other relevant sectors of research and industry and with strong participation of patient representatives and citizens. 6. The Steering Board for Health shall be composed of 13 to 15/ 15 to 20 high level individuals drawn from across disciplines and activities, in the fields of research, innovation, public health and wellbeing. The members of the Steering Board for Health shall be appointed by the Commission, following an open call for nominations or for expression of interests or both, whichever the Commission will find more appropriate, and taking into account the need for balance in expertise, gender, age and geographical distribution. Their term of office shall be limited to two years, renewable twice, with a rolling appointments system. 7. The Steering Board for Health shall have a chair who shall be appointed by the Commission following a transparent recruitment process. The President shall be a high profile public figure linked to the health research field. 8. The Steering Board for Health shall establish: (a) the strategy for the the cluster 'Health'. (b) the blueprint for steering coordination and cooperation between the health programes, related pillars, such as EIC, ERC, as well as within Strategic Partnerships and the EU structural funds. The blueprint shall ensure more visibility and coordination of the existing financial mechanisms allocated to health research, shall steer coordination and cooperation, and shall develop the work programmes and missions related to Health. (c) the methods and procedures for designing, selecting and implementation of the health missions.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 578 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – paragraph 5
The Strategic Planning will help to develop and realise the implementation of policy for the relevant areas covered, at EU level as well as complementing policy and policy approaches in the Member States. EU policy priorities, including the UN SDGs, will be taken into consideration during the Strategic Planning process to increase the contribution of research and innovation to the realisation of policy. It will also take into account foresight activities, studies and other scientific evidence and take account of relevant existing initiatives at EU and national level.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 675 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part I – point 2 – point 2.2 – point 2.2.2 – paragraph 1
The EU needs a strong, resilient and creative human resource base, with the right combination of skills to match the future needs of the labour market, to innovate and to convert knowledge and ideas into products and services for scientific, economic and social benefit. This can be achieved through training researchers to further develop their core research competences as well as enhance their transferable skills such as a creative and entrepreneurial mindset. This will allow them to face current and future global challenges, and improve their career prospects and innovation potential.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 729 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – paragraph 3
Research and innovation are key drivers of sustainable development, including sustainable growth and industrial competitiveness, and they will contribute to finding solutions to today’s problems, to reverse as quickly as possible, the negative and dangerous trend that currently links economic development, the use of natural resources and social issues, and turn it into new business opportunities.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 745 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – paragraph 6 a (new)
The role of fundamental research but also the contribution from the whole spectrum of research disciplines, including Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH), will be central to the call definition. The clusters will contribute to the development of knowledge-based learning societies and the achievement of societal progress.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 761 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 1 – point 1.1 – paragraph 4
These health challenges are complex, interlinked and global in nature and require multidisciplinary, cross-sectorial and transnational collaborations. Research and innovation activities will build close linkages between discovery, clinical, epidemiological, environmental and socio- economic research as well as with regulatory sciences. They will harness the combined skills of academia and industry and foster their collaboration with health services, patients, policy-makers, civil society organisations and citizens in order to leverage on public funding and ensure the uptake of results in clinical practice as well as in health care systems. They will foster strategic collaboration at EU and international level in order to pool the expertise, capacities and resources needed to create economies of scale, scope and speed as well as to share the expected benefits and financial risks involved.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 780 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 1 – point 1.2 – point 1.2.1 – paragraph 1
People in vulnerable stages of life (birth, infancy, childhood, adolescence, pregnancy, mature and late adulthood), including people with disabilities or injuries, have specific health needs that require better understanding and tailorpersonalised solutions. This will allow reducing related health inequalities and improving health outcomes to the benefit of active and healthy ageing throughout the life course, in particular through a healthy start of life reducing the risk of mental and physical diseases later in life.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 798 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 1 – point 1.2 – point 1.2.1 – paragraph 2 – indent 6 a (new)
- Pediatric diseases;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 811 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 1 – point 1.2 – point 1.2.2 – paragraph 1
Improved understanding of health drivers and risk factors determined by the social, economic and physical environment in people’s everyday life and at the workplace, including the health impact of digitalisation, pollution, climate change and other environmental issues, will contribute to identify and mitigate health risks and threats; to identify and to reducinge death and illness from exposure to chemicals and environmental pollution; to supporting environmental-friendly, healthy, resilient and sustainable living and working environments; to promoting healthy lifestyles and consumption behaviour; and to developing an equitable, inclusive and trusted society.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 819 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 1 – point 1.2 – point 1.2.2 – paragraph 2 – indent 2
– Environmental, occupational, economic, political, social and behavioural factors impacting physical and mental health and well-being of people and their interaction, with special attention to vulnerable and disadvantaged people;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 832 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 1 – point 1.2 – point 1.2.3 – paragraph 2 – indent 1 a (new)
- Infrastructure and capabilities to harness the potential of genomic medicine advances into standard clinical practice;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 836 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 1 – point 1.2 – point 1.2.3 – paragraph 2 – indent 4
TSuitable, safe, effective and affordable treatments or cures, including both pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 842 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 1 – point 1.2 – point 1.2.3 – paragraph 2 – indent 7 a (new)
- Infrastructure and capabilities to harness the potential of genomic medicine advances into standard clinical practice.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 846 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 1 – point 1.2 – point 1.2.4 – paragraph 2 – indent 1
– Drivers for the emergence or re- emergence of infectious diseases and their spread, including transmission mechanisms from animals to humans (zoonosis), or from other parts of the environment (water, soil, plants, food) to humans and the implementation of empirical preventative solutions that minimize transmission;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 847 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 1 – point 1.2 – point 1.2.4 – paragraph 2 – indent 1
– Drivers for the emergence or re- emergence of infectious diseases and their spread, including transmission from animals to humans (zoonosis), or from other parts of the environment (water, soil, plants, food) to humans and the implementation of empirical preventative solutions that minimize transmission;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 849 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 1 – point 1.2 – point 1.2.4 – paragraph 2 – indent 2 a (new)
- Development of new antibiotics to combat superbacteria.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 853 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 1 – point 1.2 – point 1.2.4 – paragraph 2 – indent 3
VSuitable, safe, effective and affordable vaccines, diagnostics, treatments and cures for infectious diseases, including co-morbidities and co- infections;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 868 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 1 – point 1.2 – point 1.2.5 – paragraph 1
Health technologies and tools are vital for public health and contributed to a large extent to the important improvements achieved in the quality of life, health and care of people, in the EU. It is thus a key strategic challenge to design, develop, deliver and implement suitable, affordable, trustable, safe, and cost-effective tools and technologies for health and care, taking due account of the needs of people with disabilities and the aging society. These include artificial intelligence and other digital tools and technologies, offering significant improvements over existing ones, as well as stimulating a competitive and sustainable health-related industry that creates high-value jobs. The European health-related industry is one of the critical economic sectors in the EU, accounting for 3% of GDP and 1.5 million employees.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 873 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 1 – point 1.2 – point 1.2.5 – paragraph 1
Health technologies and tools are vital for public health and contributed to a large extent to the important improvements achieved in the quality of life, health and care of people, in the EU. It is thus a key strategic challenge to design, develop, deliver and implement suitable, trustable, safe, and cost-effective tools and technologies for health and care, taking due account of the needs of people with disabilities and the aging society. These include artificial intelligence and other digital tools and technologies, offering significant improvements over existing ones, as well as stimulating a competitive and sustainable health-related industry that creates high-value jobs. The European health-related industry is one of the critical economic sectors in the EU, accounting for 3% of GDP and 1.5 million employees.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 884 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 1 – point 1.2 – point 1.2.5 – paragraph 2 – indent 5
– The safety, efficacy and quality of tools and technologies for health and care as well as their ethical legal and social impact, their cost-effectiveness and affordability;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 891 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 1 – point 1.2 – point 1.2.6 – paragraph 1
Health systems are a key asset of the EU social systems, accounting for 24 million employees in the health and social work sector in 2017. It is a main priority to render health systems accessible, affordable, cost- effective, resilient, sustainable and trusted as well as to reduce inequalities, including by unleashing the potential of data-driven and digital innovation for better health and person- centred care building on open European data infrastructures. This will advance the digital transformation of health and care.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 900 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 1 – point 1.2 – point 1.2.6 – paragraph 2 – indent 4 a (new)
- Equity in service access and health outcomes;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 915 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 2 – introductory part
2. CLUSTER 'INCLUSIVE AND SECURE SOCIETY'
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 920 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 2 – point 2.1 – paragraph 1
The EU stands for a unique way of combining economic growth with social policies, with high levels of social inclusion, shared values embracing democracy, human rights, gender equality and the richness of diversity. This model is constantly evolving and needs to deal with the challenges from amongst other things, globalisation and technological change. Europe also has to respond to the challenges arising from persistent security threats. Terrorist attacks and radicalisation, as well as cyber-attacks and hybrid threats, raise major security concerns and put particular strain on societies.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 929 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 2 – point 2.1 – paragraph 3
European citizens, state institutions and the economy need to be protected from the continued threats of organised crime, including firearms trafficking, drug trafficking and trafficking in human beings. Strengthening protection and security through better border management is also key. Cybercrime is on the increase and related risks are diversifying as the economy and society digitalise. Europe needs to continue its effots to improve cybersecurity, digital privacy, personal data protection and combat the spread of false and harmful information in order to safeguard democratic and economic stability. Lastly, further efforts are required to limit the effects on lives and livelihoods of extreme weather events which are intensifying due to climate change, such as floods, storms or droughts leading to forest fires, land degradation and other natural disasters, e.g. earthquakes. Disasters, whether natural or man-made, can put at risk important societal functions, such as health, energy supply and government.deleted
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 936 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 2 – point 2.1 – paragraph 4
The magnitude, complexity and trans- national character of the challenges call multi-layered EU action. Addressing such critical social, political, cultural and economic issues, as well as security challenges, only at national level would carry the danger of inefficient use of resources, fragmented approaches and dissimilar standards of knowledge and capacity.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 942 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 2 – point 2.1 – paragraph 5
Security research is part of the wider comprehensive EU response to security threats. It contributes to the capability development process by enabling the future availability of technologies and applications to fill capability gaps identified by policy-makers and practitioners. Already, funding to research through the EU's framework programme has represented around 50% of total public funding for security research in the EU. Full use will be made of available instruments, including the European space programme (Galileo and EGNOS, Copernicus, Space Situational Awareness and Governmental Satellite Communications). Synergies are sought with the activities supported by EU- funded defence research and duplication of funding is avoided. Cross-border collaboration contributes to developing a European single security market and improving industrial performance, underpinning the EU's autonomy.deleted
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 947 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 2 – point 2.1 – paragraph 8
Activities will contribute directly to the following Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in particular: SDG 1 - No Poverty; SDG 4 - Quality Education; SDG 5 – Gender equality; SDG 8 – Decent Work and Economic Growth; SDG 9 – Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure; SDG 10 - Reducing Inequalities; SDG 11- Sustainable Cities and Communities; SDG 16 – Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 959 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 2 – point 2.2 – point 2.2.1 – paragraph 2 – indent 8 a (new)
- The role of cities as platforms for citizen-driven innovation and co-creation.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1005 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 2 – point 2.2 – point 2.2.3 – paragraph 2 – indent 9 b (new)
- New innovative models of Social Economy.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1013 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 2 – point 2.2 – point 2.2.4
2.2.4. Disaster-Resilient Societies Disasters arise from multiple sources, whether natural or man-made, including those from terrorist attacks, climate- related and other extreme events (including from sea level rises), from forest fires, heat waves, floods, earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic events, from water crises, from space weather events, from industrial and transport disasters, from CBRN events, as well as those from resulting cascading risks. The aim is to prevent and reduce the loss of life, harm to health and the environment, economic and material damage from disasters, ensure food security as well as to improve the understanding and reduction of disaster risks and post-disaster lesson learning. Broad Lines – Technologies and capabilities for first responders for emergency operations in crisis and disaster situations; – The capacities of society to better manage and reduce disaster risk, including through nature-based solutions, by enhancing prevention, preparedness and response to existing and new risks – Interoperability of equipment and procedures to facilitate cross-border operational cooperation and an integrated EU market.deleted
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1033 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 2 – point 2.2 – point 2.2.5
2.2.5. Protection and Security There is a need to protect citizens from and to respond to security threats from criminal including terrorist activities and hybrid threats; to protect people, public spaces and critical infrastructure, from both physical (including CBRN-E) attacks and cyber-attacks; to fight terrorism and radicalisation, including understanding and tackling terrorist ideas and beliefs; to prevent and fight serious crime, including cybercrime, and organised crime; to support victims; to trace criminal financial flows; to support the use of data for law enforcement and to ensure the protection of personal data in law enforcement activities; to support air, land and sea EU border management, for flows of people and goods. It is essential to maintain flexibility rapidly to address new security challenges that may arise. Broad Lines – Innovative approaches and technologies for security practitioners (such as police forces, border and coast guards, customs offices), public health practitioners, operators of infrastructure and those managing open spaces; – Human and social dimensions of criminality and violent radicalisation, in relation to those engaged or potentially engaged in such behaviour as well as to those affected or potentially affected; – The mind-set of citizens, public authorities and industry to prevent the creation of new security risks and to reduce existing risks, including those from new technologies such as Artificial Intelligence; – Combatting disinformation and fake news with implications for security; – Interoperability of equipment and procedures to facilitate cross-border and inter-agency operational cooperation and develop an integrated EU market. – Ensuring the protection of personal data in law enforcement activities, in particular in view of rapid technological developments.deleted
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1052 #

2018/0225(COD)

2.2.6. Cybersecurity Malicious cyber activities not only threaten our economies but also the very functioning of our democracies, our freedoms and our values. Cyber threats are often criminal, motivated by profit, but they can also be political and strategic. Our future security and prosperity depend on improving our ability to protect the EU against cyber threats. The digital transformation requires improving cybersecurity substantially, to ensure the protection of the huge number of IoT devices expected to be connected to the internet, including those controlling power grids, cars and transport networks, hospitals, finances, public institutions, factories, homes. Europe must build resilience to cyber- attacks and create effective cyber deterrence. Broad Lines – Technologies across the digital value chain (from secure components to cryptography and self-healing software and networks); – Technologies to address current cybersecurity threats, anticipating future needs, and sustaining a competitive industry; – A European cybersecurity competence network and competence centre.deleted
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1075 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 2 a (new)
2 a. CLUSTER 'SECURE SOCIETY' 1.1. Rationale Europe has to respond to the challenges arising from persistent security threats. Terrorist attacks and radicalisation, as well as cyber-attacks and hybrid threats, raise major security concerns and put particular strain on societies. European citizens, state institutions and the economy need to be protected from the continued threats of organised crime, including firearms trafficking, drug trafficking and trafficking in human beings. Strengthening protection and security through better border management is also key. Cybercrime is on the increase and related risks are diversifying as the economy and society digitalise. Europe needs to continue its efforts to improve cybersecurity, digital privacy, personal data protection and combat the spread of false and harmful information in order to safeguard democratic and economic stability. Lastly, further efforts are required to limit the effects on lives and livelihoods of extreme weather events which are intensifying due to climate change, such as floods, storms or droughts leading to forest fires, land degradation and other natural disasters, e.g. earthquakes. Disasters, whether natural or man-made, can put at risk important societal functions, such as health, energy supply and government. The magnitude, complexity and trans- national character of the challenges call. Addressing the trans-national character of the security challenge call multi- layered EU action due to its magnitude and complexity, to avoid the inefficient use of resources, fragmented approaches and dissimilar standards of knowledge and capacity. Security research is part of the wider comprehensive EU response to security threats. It contributes to the capability development process by enabling the future availability of technologies and applications to fill capability gaps identified by policy-makers and practitioners. Already, funding to research through the EU's framework programme has represented around 50% of total public funding for security research in the EU. Full use will be made of available instruments, including the European space programme (Galileo and EGNOS, Copernicus, Space Situational Awareness and Governmental Satellite Communications).Synergies are sought with the activities supported by EU- funded defence research and duplication of funding is avoided. Cross-border collaboration contributes to developing a European single security market and improving industrial performance, underpinning the EU's autonomy. Research and Innovation activities in this Societal Challenge will be overall aligned with the Commission's priorities on Democratic Change; Jobs, Growth and Investment; Justice and Fundamental Rights; Migration; A Deeper and Fairer European Monetary Union; Digital Single Market. It will respond to the commitment of the Rome Agenda to work towards: "a social Europe" and "a Union which preserves our cultural heritage and promotes cultural diversity". It will also support the European Pillar of Social Rights, and the Global Compact for safe, orderly and regular migration. Security research responds to the commitment of the Rome Agenda to work towards "a safe and secure Europe", contributing to a genuine and effective Security Union. Synergies with the Justice Programme and with the Rights and Values Programme, which support activities in the area of access to justice, victims' rights, gender equality, non- discrimination, data protection and promotion of the European citizenship will be exploited. Activities will contribute directly to the following Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in particular: SDG 1 - No Poverty; SDG 9 – Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure; SDG 11- Sustainable Cities and Communities; SDG 16 – Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions. 1.2.Areas of Intervention 1.2.1.Disaster-Resilient Societies Disasters arise from multiple sources, whether natural or man-made, including those from terrorist attacks, climate- related and other extreme events (including from sea level rises), from forest fires, heat waves, floods, earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic events, from water crises, from space weather events, from industrial and transport disasters, from CBRN events, as well as those from resulting cascading risks. The aim is to prevent and reduce the loss of life, harm to health and the environment, economic and material damage from disasters, ensure food security as well as to improve the understanding and reduction of disaster risks and post-disaster lesson learning. Broad Lines – Technologies and capabilities for first responders for emergency operations in crisis and disaster situations; – The capacities of society to better manage and reduce