BETA

991 Amendments of Monika BEŇOVÁ

Amendment 6 #

2019/2824(RSP)


Citation 8 a (new)
- having regard to the European Commission Communication on Stepping up EU Action to Protect and Restore the World's Forests of 23 July 2019 and the EU Forest Strategy of 20 September 2013;
2019/11/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 35 #

2019/2824(RSP)


Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. Considers that we are facing an ecological emergency, which requires significant actions in Europe and beyond; calls on the Commission to place nature protection and restoration as a top priority in the European Green Deal alongside climate change;
2019/11/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 39 #

2019/2824(RSP)


Paragraph 2
2. Expresses its concern that the 2020 Aichi Biodiversity Targets will not be met with the current trajectory of biodiversity loss, and reiterates its calls on all Parties to step up their efforts; regrets that the EU is not on track to achieve its headline target of halting biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation by 2020; urges the Commission and Member States to commit to immediate, substantial and additional efforts on biodiversity conservation and restoration so as to meet the EU targets;
2019/11/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 42 #

2019/2824(RSP)


Paragraph 3
3. Recalls that biodiversity and healthy ecosystems are key for achieving the objectives of the Paris Agreement and strengthen EU’s resilience capacities toward climate change; recalls the importance of preserving biodiversity and nature based solutions for climate change mitigation; asks therefore for more coherence between the CBD and UNFCCC; calls on the Commission to better integrate biodiversity into its climate policies and ensure that EU climate funding is also used to protect and restore natural ecosystems as a way of achieving climate mitigation and adaptation;
2019/11/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 49 #

2019/2824(RSP)


Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Highlights that, according to scientific research1a, natural climate solutions (NCS) can provide over one- third of the cost-effective climate mitigation needed between now and 2030 to stabilise warming to below 2 °C; regrets, however, that despite the potential of NCS, land-based sequestration efforts receive only about 2.5% of the global climate mitigation budget; calls for an increased use of EU and international climate funding to protect and restore natural ecosystems as a way of achieving climate mitigation and adaptation; _________________ 1a https://www.pnas.org/content/114/44/1164 5
2019/11/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 60 #

2019/2824(RSP)


Paragraph 4
4. Welcomes, in this regard, the commitments, made by Ursula von der Leyen in the political guidelines for the next European Commission 2019-2024 and in the mission letter to the Commissioner for Environment and Oceans, to present a Biodiversity Strategy for 2030 as part of the European Green Deal, and her intention for the EU to lead the world at the 2020 Conference of the Parties to the CBD, as it did at the 2015 Paris Climate Conference;
2019/11/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 87 #

2019/2824(RSP)


Paragraph 12
12. Underlines the need to increase ambition and functioning for the post-2020 global biodiversity framework; calls on the Commission and Member States to strengthen the implementation mechanisms of the CBD, to actively pursue the development of clear performance indicators, tracking instruments and peer review/reporting mechanisms to improve the transparency and accountability for Parties and the overall effectiveness of the next Biodiversity Strategy Plan;
2019/11/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 92 #

2019/2824(RSP)


Paragraph 13
13. Highlights that an international framework in the form of a legally binding agreement is needed to protect global biodiversity, to stop its current decline and to restore all aspects of biodiversity; believes that such a framework should have a clear goal and be based on specific, measurable including quantifiable, ambitious, realistic and time- bound targets and firm commitments, comprising of Nationally Determined Contributions for Biodiversity (NDCBs) and other appropriate instruments, financial commitments and improved capacity building assurances, as well as a 5-yearly monitoring and review mechanism, with an emphasis on an upward trajectory of ambition; highlights the need for regular reporting by the Parties and a harmonised collection and treatment of comparable and consistent data and indicators for a good monitoring process;
2019/11/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 113 #

2019/2824(RSP)


Paragraph 16
16. Highlights the necessity of appropriate financing for biodiversity; underlines that biodiversity proofing in the next Multiannual Financial Framework and mainstreaming biodiversity across policy areas will have a significant and positive effect on reaching the 2050 Vision; calls on the Commission and the Council to set up a clear target for biodiversity mainstreaming of minimum 10% in the MFF that is additional to the spending on climate mainstreaming; emphasises also the need to establish a more transparent, comprehensive and stringent methodology for the tracking of biodiversity and climate expenditure; reiterates its calls to at least double the current funding of LIFE Programme; calls also for the phase out of harmful subsidies;
2019/11/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 126 #

2019/2824(RSP)


Paragraph 17
17. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to promote the establishment of new international financial mechanisms for biodiversity conservation linked to the CBD; callsnotes that economic activities can be important drivers of global biodiversity decline and loss of natural capital; calls therefore on businesses and financial organisations to make and share strong commitments and contributions to biodiversity, including by biodiversity-proofing their activities, and highlights the importance of leveraging private financing initiatives in this regard; regrets the inconsistency of data set on finance flows for biodiversity that come from domestic and international public and private sources, that puts at risk the tracking and reporting systems and negatively affects any potential reform;
2019/11/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 137 #

2019/2824(RSP)


Paragraph 19 a (new)
19 a. Points out that international organisations such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the UN Environment Program and the OECD agree that environmental taxation is an essential tool in addressing environmental challenges such as biodiversity loss; welcomes initiatives such as the Green Fiscal Policy Network of the UN Environmental Programme and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to facilitate knowledge sharing and dialogue on green fiscal reform; draws attention to the Aichi target 3 and the need of positive incentives for the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity as well as on SDG 15 and the need to mobilise and significantly increase financial resources from all sources to conserve and sustainably use biodiversity and ecosystems; highlights therefore the potential of fair environmental taxation that is in line with the polluter pays principle as a way to reduce damage to the environment and generate financial resources for nature protection; calls on the EU and its Member States to increase the use of environmental taxation;
2019/11/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 151 #

2019/2824(RSP)


Paragraph 21
21. Notes however the negative impact of intensive agriculture and pesticide use on biodiversity; calls ontherefore on the Commission and the Parties to undertake strong commitments towards sustainable agriculture and forestry, including requirements for the sustainable use of plant protection products and their reduction as well as strategies to ensure the protection of soil and habitats; calls on the Commission to propose an ambitious EU-wide binding target for the reduction of pesticide use and on the Commission, Member States and regional governments to increase support to the agriculture and forestry sectors in the transition to sustainable practices;
2019/11/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 160 #

2019/2824(RSP)


Paragraph 21 a (new)
21 a. Recalls that according to the Communication of the Commission on Stepping up EU Action to Protect and Restore the World's Forests, forests are indispensable for our Planet’s life-support systems, covering 30% of the Earth’s land area and hosting 80% of its biodiversity; stresses that deforestation is a major cause of biodiversity decline; expresses its concern on the impact of EU consumption on deforestation as the EU is the final consumer of 10% of the products associated with deforestation; calls on the Commission to propose a comprehensive set of measures to reduce the EU consumption footprint on land, including legislation that ensures deforestation-free supply chains;
2019/11/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 188 #

2019/2824(RSP)


Paragraph 24 a (new)
24 a. Points out that conservation and protected areas are necessary to safeguard biodiversity, and the benefits that humans derive from nature as well as for combatting climate change; calls on the EU to push during the negotiations for an increased level of ambition with 30 percent of the planet to be protected by 2030 and potentially having half the planet protected by 2050, thereby going beyond the Aichi Biodiversity Targets of protecting 17 percent of terrestrial and inland water areas and 10 percent of coastal and marine areas by 2020;
2019/11/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 194 #

2019/2824(RSP)


Paragraph 25
25. Recalls the importance of innovation, research and development in order to achieve the objectives of the 2050 Vision; calls on the Commission and the Council to increase the budget allocation for Horizon Europe to 120 billion in the next MFF, to benefit in particular the cluster on natural resources, and to launch a mission on protection and restoration of biodiversity within Horizon Europe; calls on the Parties to focus in particular on the links between biodiversity preservation and benefits to human health and economic well-being, and to coordinate data collection measures;
2019/11/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 202 #
2019/11/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 205 #

2019/2824(RSP)


Paragraph 28
28. Stresses that capacity building and awareness-raising are key for a successful implementation and to create greater understanding of the importance of biodiversity; therefore welcomes the COP14 decision which invites parties, other governments, and donors in a position to do so, to provide financial resources for capacity building, technical assistance, and technology transfer;
2019/11/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 210 #

2019/2824(RSP)


Paragraph 30 a (new)
30 a. Considers that transformative changes in societies are needed to tackle climate change, degradation of the environment and loss of biodiversity; stresses the importance of following the principle of a just transition ensuring that the process is inclusive and equitable;
2019/11/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 20 #

2019/2804(RSP)

Draft motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas health systems need to maximise the effectiveness and efficiency, equitable access and sustainability of health services and long-term care, deliver seamless care across services and providers, and deliver improvements that matter to patients and their changing care needsand growing health and care needs, well-being and quality of life;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 22 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Recital C
C. whereas innovative digital solutions for health and care can boost health and quality of life of citizensprevention of diseases and promotion of healthy lifestyles, improve citizens’ quality of life and enable more efficient ways of organiszing and delivering health and care services;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 26 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Recital F
F. whereas patients’ expectations are rising, and there is a need for an empowerment of citizens regarding their health through user-centred services and more ways for people to interact with health services and health professionals;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 35 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 1
1. Welcomes the Commission communication on enabling the digital transformation of health and care in the Digital Single Market which aims to promote health, prevent and control disease, help address pacitizents’ unmet needs, represent an opportunity to improve the sustainability of health systems and make it easier for citizens to have equal access to high quality care through the meaningful use of digital innovations;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 44 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 3
3. Is of the opinion that the digital transformation of health and care needs to be patient-centredsupport citizen-centred services as well as empowering citizens to play a more active role in disease prevention and promotion of health, as well in health and care services, answering the needs of citizen;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 52 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. Stresses that the future of digital health will need to develop secure and effective anonymization and pseudonymization techniques enabling sensible data to be used in health research;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 57 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 5 a (new)
5a. Stresses that a Commission proposal on sharing information and data governance is necessary to tackle the implications for national health systems;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 70 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 10
10. Calls on the Commission to continue promoting the cooperation of Member States’ health authorities to connect to the eHealth digital infrastructure in order to extend its use to also cover the interoperability of Member States’ electronic record systems by supporting the development and adoption of a European electronic health record exchange format, taking into account the Union’s multilingualism as well as user with disabilities;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 84 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 19
19. Calls on the Commission together with the Member States to proceed with the testing of specific applications for cross-border health data exchange for research and health policy to improve prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases in order to help health systems to meet current and future challenges;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 90 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 21
21. Believes that the development of a shared frameworkstandards to harmonise the collection of health data, storage and use in the EU could improve the quality of research and health services provided to citizens, also facilitation universal access;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 99 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 23
23. Considers that digital healthcare tools are well positioned tocould address challenges of accessibility to health information and health literacy, both essential for health promotion, better disease prevention and more effective disease management; considers that these tools, when built with the contribution of the appropriate health professionals and civil society users, allow for more accuracy and completeness of information enabling the promotion of healthy habits and prevention activities, as well as the support to decisions in health and patient adherence to treatments.
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 103 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 24
24. Stresses the importance of person- centred approaches to organising health and care, including by using digital solutions and tools which have a great potential in improving the quality, equity and sustainability of health services but also people’s health and well- being;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 109 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 25
25. Calls on the Commission to work with relevant actors, especially national health systems, to support more cooperation across borders and enlarge the deployment of digitally enabled care models;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 113 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 26
26. Calls on the Commission and Member States to ensure that health professionals improve the necessary competences and skills to collect, analyse and protect health data;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 115 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 27
27. Calls on the Commission to work with Member States and regions to develop networks to educate citizens in the use of digital healthcare, enabling universal and equitable access; considers that, in order to achieve that goal, there is a need to improve systems’ interoperability and users skills, with the highest possible protection of sensitive data with tools and mechanisms provided by the public health systems;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 117 #

2019/2804(RSP)


Paragraph 27 a (new)
27a. Calls on the Commission and Member States to ensure that all measures to improve citizens digital skills and access to and use of their health data take into consideration sensitive groups such as older citizens, info- excluded people and people with disabilities;
2019/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 1 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Citation 12
— having regard to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) special report entitled ‘Global Warming of 1.5°C’, its fifth assessment report (AR5) and its synthesis report, and the Global Commission on Adaptation’ report on Adaptation (GCA), the IPCC special report on Climate Change and Land, and the IPCC special report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 8 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Citation 15 a (new)
- having regard to the Solidarity and Just Transition Silesia Declaration, signed at the side lines of the COP24 climate conference,
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 24 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Recital C a (new)
Ca. whereas climate change disproportionately affects developing countries, despite developing countries emitting far less CO2 than developed countries;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 69 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 7
7. Stresses that the IPBES 2019 Global Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, the IPCC Special Report on Climate Change and Land (SRCCL), the IPCC special report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate (SROCC) and the Global Commission on Adaptation’ report on Adaptation (GCA) recognises climate change as one of the main direct drivers of biodiversity loss during the past 50 yearsand land degradation, and underlines that its negative effects on nature and biodiversity, eco-systems services, oceans and food security are projected to become increasingly important in the next decades;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 81 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 8
8. Calls on all Parties to contribute constructively to the process to be put in place towards 2020 when NDCs need to be updated so as to ensure their compatibility with the long-term temperature goal of the Paris Agreement; acknowledges that current pledges are not yet sufficient to reach the goals of the Agreement; stresses, therefore, that global GHG emissions should peak as soon as possible and that all Parties, especially the EU and all G20 nations, should step up their efforts and update their NDCs by 2020; early 2020 as the Paris Agreement foresees;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 93 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 10
10. Calls on the country holding the EU Presidency and the Commission to submit to the UNFCCC as soon as possible the Union’s long-term strategy to reach domestic net-zero emissions inas early as possible and the latest by 2050; stresses that in order to reach domestic net- zero GHG emissions in 2050 in the most cost- efficient manner, and in order to avoid relying on carbon removal technologies that would entail significant risks for ecosystems, biodiversity and food security, the 2030 ambition level will need to be raised; believes it to be of the utmost importanceregrets that the UN Climate Summit was a missed opportunity for the EUnion to send a clear message during the UN Climate Summit in September 2019 that it stands ready to enhance its contribution tot higher ambitions and show leadership for the achievement of the Paris Agreement.;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 103 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 11
11. Supports an update of the Union’s NDC; calls, therefore, on EU leaders to support an increase in the level of ambition of the Union’s NDC with an economy-wide target of 55 % domestic GHG emission reductions by 2030 compared to 1990 levels; calls, therefore, on EU leaders to support an increase in the level of ambition of the Union’s NDC; considers that this is to be done in combination with enshrining in EU law the target to reach carbon neutrality as soon as possible and at the latest by 2050; calls also on other global economies to update their NDCs to bring about global effects;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 108 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 11 a (new)
11a. Stresses that in order to reach the Paris Agreement objectives, we need concrete implementing measures and enforcement at national and EU level;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 109 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 11 b (new)
11b. Emphasises that all climate policies have to be pursued following the principle of a just transition, in close cooperation with civil society and social partners; believes, therefore, that strengthened social partnership and civil society engagement at national and EU level is a necessary condition to achieve carbon-neutrality of all sectors of society in a fair, inclusive and socially sustainable manner; is of the opinion that nature-based solutions, the restoration and conservation of ecosystems and biological diversity is vital as enabler of climate change mitigation and adaptation;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 121 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 13
13. Recognises the achievements of the COP24 in Katowice, which reinforced the momentum for climate action, and with the completion of the Paris Agreement Work Program (the Katowice Rulebook), delivered operational guidance for the Paris Agreement; notes however, that some unfinished business from Katowice must be completed at COP25, namely on Article 6 mechanisms; considers in addition that several implementation decisions will need to be taken at COP25, specifically in the areas of mitigation, adaptation, transparency and support; looks forward to a successful outcome of the Review of the Warsaw International Mechanism on Loss and Damage at COP25 as well as the outcomes on the negotiations on the Gender Action Plan at COP25; recognises that there will be further discussions to agree common timeframes at COP25;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 129 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 15
15. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to advocate for strict and robust international rules relating to Article 6 of the Paris Agreement to prevent loopholes in accounting or double counting of emission reductions; expresses concern at the potential use towards NDC targets of units issued under the Kyoto Protocol as this would seriously deteriorate the environmental integrity of the future mechanisms established under Article 6; supports a share of proceeds from the Article 6 mechanism(s) going towards supporting the underfunded Adaptation Fund;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 146 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 19
19. Reiterates that adaptation action is an inevitable necessity for all countries if they are to minimise negative effects of climate change and make full use of the opportunities for climate-resilient growth and sustainable development; stresses the need to develop systems and tools to keep track of progress and effectiveness of national adaptation plans and actions; calls on Member States to strengthen their national energy and climate plans and bring them in line with the Paris Agreement goals;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 148 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 19 a (new)
19a. Recognises that climate change is not a localised challenge and that climatic impacts outside the EU have implications within the EU as well; for instance, hurricanes, droughts, floods and forest fires have the potential to impact EU food and water security, as well as the supply chains of services and goods; calls on the Commission and the Member States to prioritise scaling-up international climate finance for adaptation, to equal climate finance for mitigation, and also provide climate finance for loss and damage;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 160 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 21 a (new)
21a. Stresses the importance of the replenishment process of the Green Climate Fund and encourages Member States to at least double their contributions for the initial resource mobilisation in USD value;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 161 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 21 b (new)
21b. Stresses the importance of operationalising the global goal on adaptation and of mobilising major new funds for adaptation in developing countries; calls for the EU and its Member States to commit to a significant increase in the adaptation finance they provide; recognises the need for progress also on the issue of loss and damage, for which additional resources should be raised through innovative sources of public finance using the Warsaw International Mechanism;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 165 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 22
22. Stresses that the EU’s budget should be coherent with its international commitments on sustainable development and with its mid- and long-term climate and energy targets and should not be counterproductive to these targets or hampering their implementation; calls therefore on the Commission to put forward, where applicable, harmonised and binding rules on climate and biodiversity proofing of EU investments; calls on the European Investment Bank to put a rapid end to lending to fossil fuel projects and asks the EU Member States to end all export credit guarantees to fossil fuel projects; calls for specific public guarantees in favour of green investments, labels and fiscal advantages for green investment funds and for issuing green bonds;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 182 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 23 a (new)
23a. Reminds the parties of the need to allocate sufficient resources to move from commitments to actions and to implement the necessary measures to achieve the Paris Agreement objectives; supports the new momentum for introducing a carbon adjustment mechanism at the European borders for imports to the EU in order to create a level playing field of international trade and avoid carbon leakage; calls, therefore, on the European Commission and the Member States to introduce a fair and progressive carbon taxation as soon as possible;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 187 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 23 b (new)
23b. Underlines that in the course of the sustainable energy transition, the problem of energy poverty needs to be tackled by strengthened energy consumers’ rights and information, enhanced energy efficiency measures in buildings, especially for low-income households, and through social policies;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 188 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 23 c (new)
23c. Believes that democratisation of the energy system is crucial for the sustainable energy transition to be successful; calls, therefore, on improving citizens’ rights and abilities to participate in the production of safe and clean energy;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 192 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 24
24. Expresses its satisfaction with the growing global mobilisation of an ever- broader range of non-state actors committed to climate action with concrete and measurable deliverables; highlights the critical role of civil society, the private sector and sub-state governments in pressurising and driving public opinion and state action; and in sharing knowledge and best practices on the development and implementation of mitigation and adaptation measures; calls on the EU, the Member States and all Parties to stimulate, facilitate and engage with non-state actors, who increasingly become frontrunners in the fight against climate change;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 195 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 24 a (new)
24a. Stresses in this light also the role of the private sector, including corporations and the financial markets, to contribute to sustainability goals: welcomes the efforts to introduce legislation on the sustainability of finance and urges the Commission to introduce transparency and accountability for investee companies, especially when it comes to undermining sustainability and human rights in developing countries;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 204 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 26 a (new)
26a. Emphasises that young people and future generations bear the disproportionate burden of climate consequences; demands, therefore, better inclusion in climate policy decision- making of young people at local, regional, national and EU level;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 221 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 28
28. Regrets that the transport sector, especially the aviation and maritime sectors, is the only sector in which emissions have grown since 1990; stresses that this is not compatible with long-term sustainable development, which instead requires reductions in emissions from all sectors of society at a great and faster rate; recalls that the transport sector will need to be fully decarbonised by 2050; notes that the Commission’s analysis shows that the current global targets and measures envisaged by the International Maritime Organisation and the International Civil Aviation Organisation respectively, even if fully implemented, fall short of the necessary emissions reductions, and that significant further action consistent with the economy-wide objective of net-zero emissions is needed; considers that in order to ensure the consistency of NDCs with the economy-wide commitments required by the Paris Agreement, Parties should be encouraged to include emissions from international shipping and aviation and to agree and implement measures at international, regional and national level to address emissions from these sectors;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 223 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 29
29. Expresses concern about the level of ambition of ICAO’s Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA) given the ongoing work on the standards and recommended practices meant to implement the scheme from 2019; stresses that further dilution of the CORSIA scheme is unacceptable; calls upon the Commission and the Member States to do their utmost in strengthening CORSIA’s provisions and in supporting the adoption of a long-term goal to significantly reduce in-sector emissions of the aviation sector; in this vein also points to the necessity to address non-carbon GHG from aviation in any European or international scheme;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 243 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 32
32. Notes that approximately 60 % of the world’s methane is emitted by sources such as agriculture, landfills and wastewater, and the production and pipeline transport of fossil fuels; recalls that methane is a potent GHG with a 100- year global warming potential, 28 times more powerful than CO2 ; reminds the Commission of its legal obligation to explore as soon as possible policy options for rapidly addressing methane emissions as part of a Union strategic plan for methane, and to present legislative proposals to Parliament and the Council to that effect;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 259 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 33
33. Strongly supports the continuation and further strengthening of the Union’s political outreach and climate diplomacy, which is essential for raising the profile of climate action in partner countries and global public opinion; encourages the Commission and the Member States to approach EU climate diplomacy in a holistic manner by incorporating the interlinkages between climate change and the following areas: sustainable development, agriculture, conflict resolution, migration and humanitarian concerns in order to facilitate the global transition towards net zero emissions, climate resilience, sustainable development and food and water security.
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 262 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 33 a (new)
33a. Calls upon the Commission and the Member States to make use of all available instruments (e.g. international negotiations, trade and regional agreements, international partnerships) to help promote and foster cooperation in the global transition towards net zero emissions, climate resilience, sustainable development and food and water security;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 271 #

2019/2712(RSP)


Paragraph 35
35. Stresses the need to mainstream climate ambition into all EU policies, including trade policy; calls on the Commission to ensure that all new trade and investment agreements signed by the EU are fully compatible with the Paris Agreement and that environmental and climate provisions are legally binding and enforceable; asks the Commission to carry out and publish a comprehensive assessment of the consistency of the existing and forthcoming agreements with the Paris Agreement;
2019/10/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 6 #

2019/2086(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Notes that the fees paid by industry vary substantially year by year, which complicates budget planning and that fees paid with regard to one regulation can only be used in that section of the Agency’s budget, which can mean surplus in one section and deficit in other sections of the budget;, and notes that the sustainability of financing of the budget was not yet achieved; calls for a dialogue on how to reform the financing mechanism of the Agency with the aim of putting it on sustainable basis.
2019/12/12
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 3 #

2019/2078(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Believes that the Authority should continue paying special attention to public opinion, and commit itself to increased openness and increased transparency;
2019/12/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 4 #

2019/2055(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 19
19. Points to the challenges identified by DG SANTE in its AAR in the implementation of the Union’s Third Health Programme 2014-2020 (the ‘Health Programme’); notes that those challenges relate to the current funding mechanism of the Health Programme, which only allows for project-oriented funding and can have a negative impact on the longer-term sustainability of the actions undertaken, and to the complexity of some mechanisms in the Health Programme, such as joint actions implemented with Member States, which implies that timelines from the initial planning of the activity to its actual launch can be lengthy; notes the conclusions of the European Court of Auditors in Special report No 21/2019 on antimicrobial resistance (AMR), according to which the activities of the Commission and agencies have led to some progress, for example in veterinary and food-related issues; regrets, however, that according to the same report there is little evidence to date that the health burden of AMR has been reduced in the Union;
2019/12/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 11 #

2019/0101(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 3 a (new)
(3a) Access to vehicle repair and maintenance information for independent operators is crucial in order to re- establish consumers trust.
2019/12/17
Committee: IMCO
Amendment 12 #

2019/0101(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 3 b (new)
(3b) Recent violations of the existing legal framework by manufacturers, including legal obligations under Regulation (EC) No 715/2007, demonstrated the lack of control and enforcement mechanisms. Consumers were left without satisfactory compensation, since even where compensation was granted, it did not bring the vehicles into conformity with Euro 5 and 6 standards. Since increasingly issued diesel bans across European cities affect citizens’ daily life, adequate compensation measures would be the re-equipment of affected vehicles with the latest exhaust treatment technology (“hardware change”) or the offer of conversion premiums in case the consumer wishes to exchange a purchased vehicle for a cleaner model.
2019/12/17
Committee: IMCO
Amendment 15 #

2019/0101(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 11
(11) In order to contribute to the achievement of the Union’s air quality objectives and to reduce vehicle emissions, the power to adopt acts in accordance with Article 290 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFUE) should be delegated to the Commission in respect of the detailed rules on the specific procedures, tests and requirements for type approval. That delegation should include supplementing Regulation (EC) No 715/2007 by such revised rules as well as the test cycles used to measure emissions; the requirements for the implementation of the prohibition on the use of defeat devices that reduce the effectiveness of emission control systems; the measures necessary for the implementation of the obligation of a manufacturer to provide unrestricted and standardised access to vehicle repair and maintenance information especially but not limited to vehicles that have been sold to consumers who have been misinformed about the emission level of such vehicles, resulting in damages caused to consumers; the adoption of a revised measurement procedure for particulates. The delegation should further include amending Regulation (EC) No 715/2007 for the purposes of revising the final conformity factors downwards to reflect technical progress in PEMS and recalibrating the particulate mass based limit values and introducing particle number based limit values. It is of particular importance that the Commission carry out appropriate consultations during its preparatory work, including at expert level, and that those consultations are conducted in accordance with the principles laid down in the Interinstitutional Agreement on Better Law-Making of 13 April 2016. In particular, to ensure equal participation in the preparation of delegated acts, the European Parliament and the Council should receive all documents at the same time as Member States' experts, and their experts systematically should have access to meetings of Commission expert groups dealing with the preparation of delegated acts.
2019/12/17
Committee: IMCO
Amendment 16 #

2019/0101(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 14
(14) Since the objectives of this Regulation, namely to lay down rules on emissions from motor vehicles in order to contribute to the achievement of the basic air quality objectives, cannot be sufficiently achieved by the Member States as motor vehicles with a valid type approval may be marketed across national boundaries and consumers have to be equally protected in the whole Union but can rather, by reason of the scale and effects of the action, be better achieved at Union level, the Union may adopt measures, in accordance with the principle of subsidiarity as set out in Article 5 of the Treaty on European Union. In accordance with the principle of proportionality, as set out in that Article, this Regulation does not go beyond what is necessary in order to achieve those objectives.
2019/12/17
Committee: IMCO
Amendment 18 #

2019/0101(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 6
Regulation (EC) No 715/2007
Article 8 – paragraph 1
The Commission is empowered to adopt delegated acts in accordance with Article 14a in order to supplement Articles 6 and 7. This shall include the definition and updating of technical specifications relating to the way in which OBD and vehicle repair and maintenance information shall be provided, with special attention being paid to the specific needs of SMEs, micro-enterprises and self-employed operators.;
2019/12/17
Committee: IMCO
Amendment 19 #

2019/0101(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1
This Regulation shall enter into force on the thirdfifth day following that of its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union.
2019/12/17
Committee: IMCO
Amendment 85 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 9
9. Notes however that those pathways rely to a large extent on carbon removal technologies, including through carbon capture and storage and direct air capture, that yet have to prove their feasibility; considers that the EU net-zero strategy should not overly rely on such technologies, which should complement direct emissions reductions; believes that further aemissions reductions by 2030 isare needed if the Union is to avoid relying on carbon removal technologies that would entail significant risks for ecosystems, biodiversity and food security as confirmed by the IPCC 1.5 report; notes that the most cost efficient and scientifically proven carbon removal technology is the production of wood-based products combined with sustainable forest management;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 124 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 11 a (new)
11 a. Believes that young people have increasingly strong social and environmental awareness, which has the power to transform our societies towards a climate resilient future, and that youth education represents one of the most effective tools to combat climate change; stresses the need to actively involve younger generations in building international, intercultural and intergenerational relationships, which underpin cultural change that will support the global efforts for a more sustainable future;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 199 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 18 a (new)
18 a. Emphasises that the successful transition towards a net-zero emission economy requires an integrated approach and the right enabling environment to better stimulate and support zero- and low emission mobility; calls for additional measures to be put in place to enable access to zero- and low-emission vehicles to consumers in all Member States; stresses the need for more public and private investments in the roll-out of recharging and refuelling infrastructure, its integration into the energy systems, as well as the sustainable sourcing, production, supply, re-use and recycling of batteries in Europe, and reiterates the need for coherent action at EU, national, regional and local levels to achieve this;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 220 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 19
19. Considers that technology developments and new, innovative solutions, energy efficiency and sustainable renewable energy in the transport and power sectors will be key; underlines in this respect the importance of technology- specific strategies, such as forelectric mobility, hydrogen or methane;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 296 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Subheading 5
Maximising the climate potential of forests and their contribution to the bio-economy
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 308 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 24 a (new)
24 a. Highlights the need to make sustainable forest management more comercially competitive and to support practical measures with significant storage and sequestration effects such as using timber as building material both in cities and rural areas, replacement of fossil fuels and as a tool for better water retention;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 311 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 25
25. Recognises the positive, but ultimately limited potential for afforestation in Europe; therefore, believes that afforestation initiatives must be complemented by concrete initiatives and incentives aiming to maximisenhance the sequestration potential, while securing and enhancing the health of existing forest lands through restoration in order to reap benefits for bothe climate, bio-economy and biodiversity, supports, therefore, the afforestation of abandoned and marginally productive agricultural land, agroforestry and the minimisation of conversion of forest areas to other land uses;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 377 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 32 a (new)
32 a. Emphasises that the transition towards a net-zero GHG economy requires renewable energy sources as well as the substitution of products and materials which are fossil-based or which create high emissions during production with products and materials based on renewable resources.
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 32 #

2018/2776(RSP)


Paragraph 1
1. Welcomes the Commission communication on enabling the digital transformation of health and care in the Digital Single Market which aims to promote health, prevent and control disease, help address patients’ unmet needs and make it easier for citizens to have equal access to high quality care through the meaningful use of digital innovations and encourages the use of meaningful pilot projects utilizing digital innovation, as well as horizontal cooperation with patient centred platforms;
2018/10/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 21 #

2018/2774(RSP)


Paragraph 3
3. Welcomes the funding allocated until to now by the Union for the search for early detection and future treatment of Lyme borreliosis (up to 16 million euros through projects such as ANTIDotE, ID- LYME and LYMEDIADEX);
2018/06/28
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 8 #

2018/2759(RSP)


Paragraph 1
1. Highlights that the role of circular economy indicators, such as waste management, production and consumption rates or trade of recyclable raw materials, is to provide a compass tohat guides policy makers in many fields and businesses in many sectors towards decisions that deliver sustainable economic, social and environmental development in the European Union and to measure progress towards the proposed goals of preservation of the world´s resources, jobs creation, and generation of competitive advantages;
2018/06/26
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 14 #

2018/2759(RSP)


Paragraph 2
2. Highlights that the complex dynamics governing the transition towards circular economy requires clear and robust policy-relevant indicators that are based on comprehensive data, from which the most pertinent information for decision makers can be extracted, in order to make the transition more transparent;
2018/06/26
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 17 #

2018/2759(RSP)


Paragraph 3
3. Notes that the identified indicators focus primarily on waste generation. Regrets that the communication does not present a more comprehensive and holistic set of indicators that would allowing to measure the decoupling of economic growth from resource use and environmental impact. Highlights that the Monitoring Framework should at least cover the full range of objectives and concrete actions of the Circular Economy Action Plan in order to have an effective instrument for measuring circularity and progress towards the achievement of its objectives, specifically the actions listed under the section on production and consumption and in terms of strategic value chains and value retention with material flows in the Member States;.
2018/06/26
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 19 #

2018/2759(RSP)


Paragraph 4
4. Notes the absence of any reference to the shift from overconsumption to sustainable consumption in the Commission’s existing set of indicators; as these references would accurately reflect the progress made so far.
2018/06/26
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 20 #

2018/2759(RSP)


Paragraph 5
5. Calls on the Commission to improve its knowledge base and overall data availability for measuring progress in the circular economy, utilising, as much as possible, existing or easily generated data and frameworks in order to limit administrative burdens. Also calls on the unification of the data collection measures, as they vary widely among the Member States, and thus only provide a rough picture of the situation;
2018/06/26
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 22 #

2018/2759(RSP)


Paragraph 6
6. Highlights the need of a flexible monitoring framework due to the multifaceted and dynamic nature of transition, allowing for the speedy adaptation of the indicators to maintain its effectiveness and accuracy;
2018/06/26
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 27 #

2018/2759(RSP)


Paragraph 7
7. Highlights the importance of resource productivity as one of the key elements to secure sustainable growth and jobs in the EU, therefore regrets the lack of a resource productivity indicator in the Monitoring Framework. Underlines that the total raw material input productivity indicator shall encompass both biotic and abiotic raw materials and shall consider imported goods not only with a view to their own weight, but also their entire specific primary raw material input, this is put in relation with the gross domestic product to which the value of imported goods has been added, further stresses the need to review the current indicators and come up with new ones, as there is no indicator that would efficiently measure the progress towards completing Sustainable Development Goals, specifically SDG 12 that indicates responsible consumption and production patterns;
2018/06/26
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 29 #

2018/2759(RSP)


Paragraph 8
8. Requests that the Commission ensure that monitoring framework complements analytical work of the Resource efficiency and Raw material scoreboards, and that these indicators, as well as indicator measuring the progress towards SDGs, be integrated into the monitoring framework for the circular economy;
2018/06/26
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 35 #

2018/2759(RSP)


Paragraph 12
12. Reminds the Commission of its obligation to present a common methodology and minimum quality requirements for the uniform measurement of levels of food waste by 31 March 2019 serving as an additional indicator, and that it should be integrated into the monitoring framework;
2018/06/26
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 38 #

2018/2759(RSP)


Paragraph 13
13. Stresses the need to take into consideration the impact of circular economy on carbon emissions and to develop a specific indicator on how to achieve decarbonisation goals;
2018/06/26
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 41 #

2018/2759(RSP)


Paragraph 15
15. Welcomes the self-sufficiency indicator but highlights that is does not provide information about the relative importance of the different metal categories and therefore we call on revision of this indicator;
2018/06/26
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 39 #

2018/2599(RSP)


Paragraph 1
1. Emphasises that the identification and registration of cats and dogs is a crucial and necessary first step in the fight against illegal trade, and that registration and identification are key conditions for control, enforcement, and traceability;are key conditions for ensuring control, enforcement and traceability of companion animals. These are necessary elements to fight illegal trade effectively
2018/05/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 44 #

2018/2599(RSP)


Paragraph 2
2. Urges the European Commission to come forwardmake use of the delegated powers, via a delegated act under the Animal Health Law, with a proposal for detailed, compatible systems for the means and methods of identification and registration of cats and dogs in databases in the Member States, which should be linked through an EU platform;
2018/05/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 75 #

2018/2599(RSP)


Paragraph 11
11. Calls for the Directorate for Health and Food Audits and Analysis' inspection programmes (European Commission - DG Health and Food Safety) to include checks onaudit Member State’s compliance with Regulation (EU) No 576/2013;
2018/05/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 78 #

2018/2599(RSP)


Paragraph 13
13. Calls on the Commission to propose consistent and enforceable breeding rules foEU wide breeding guidelines which shall prohibit breeding practices that pose health risks or other forms of harm to cats and dogs and other companion animals, to be put in place across the EUhese shall be disseminated through information campaigns or training initiatives across the EU; encourages horizontal cooperation among Member States for the purpose of improving and ratifying such breeding standards;
2018/05/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 25 #

2018/2598(RSP)


Paragraph 1
1. Recalls that climate change is one of the most important challenges for mankind and that all states and players worldwide need to do their utmost to fight it; underlines that timely international cooperation, solidarity as well as consistent and persistent commitment to joint action isby all parties are the only solution forward to fulfil the collective responsibility towards the entire planet;
2018/06/29
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 30 #

2018/2598(RSP)


Paragraph 3
3. Considers that profound and possibly irreversible impacts at 2°C rise in global temperatures might be avoided if the more ambitious target of 1.5°C is attained; stresses that this goal would require rising global GHG emissions to fall to net zero by 2050; underlines that the necessary technological solutions needed are available and are becoming increasingly cost competitive and that all EU policies should be closely aligned to the chosen emissions targets of individual states; looks forward, therefore, to the findings of the 2018 Special IPCC report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 ºC above pre-industrial levels;
2018/06/29
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 34 #

2018/2598(RSP)


Paragraph 4
4. Underlines that, according to the WHO, climate change affects the social and environmental determinants of health - clean air, safe drinking water, sufficient food and secure shelter - and that between 2030 and 2050, 250 000 additional deaths per year, are expected from malnutrition, malaria, diarrhoea, and heat stress, are expected with e. Extreme high air temperatures contributing directlyare direct contributors to deaths from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, particularly among elderly people;
2018/06/29
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 41 #

2018/2598(RSP)


Paragraph 6
6. Calls on all Parties to contribute constructively to the process to be put in place towards 2020 when NDCs need to be updated and to ensure that their NDCs are in line with the long-term temperature goal of the Paris Agreement; acknowledges that current pledges are inot yet sufficient in order to reach the goals of the Agreement; stresses, therefore, that global GHG emissions should reach their peak as soon as possible and that all parties, especially the EU and all G20 nations, should step up their efforts and update their NDCs by 2020, following the 2018 Talanoa dialogue; considers that commitments of individual countries must be balanced;
2018/06/29
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 53 #

2018/2598(RSP)


Paragraph 7
7. Stresses the importance of an ambitious EU climate policy in order to act as a credible and reliable partner globally, of maintaining the EU’s global climate leadership and adherence to the Paris Agreement inter alia through revisiting its own mid- and long-term goals and policy instruments, as well as through successfully concluding and adopting before COP24 ambitious provisions under the ongoing legislative revisions in the energy and climate package; calls on the Commission to prepare by the end of 2018 a mid-century zero emissions strategy for the EU, providing a by the end of 2018, that would provide a specific, cost- efficient pathway towards reaching the net zero emissions goal adopted in the Paris Agreement;
2018/06/29
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 61 #

2018/2598(RSP)


Paragraph 9
9. Welcomes the entry into force of the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol on 1 January 2019 with 27 Parties having so far deposited their instruments of ratification, including seven Member States; calls upon all Parties to the Montreal Protocol to take all necessary steps towards its swift ratification as a necessary contribution to the implementation of the Paris Agreement and meeting the mid-term and long-term climate and energy targets;
2018/06/29
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 63 #

2018/2598(RSP)


Paragraph 10
10. Welcomes the ratification of the Doha Amendment to the Kyoto Protocol by all the Member States and the deposition of the joint Union ratification on 21 December 2017; considers that this step will provide an important negotiating leverage for the successful conclusion of the 2018 climate negotiations, and thanks to collaborative efforts, effectively reduce greenhouse emissions;
2018/06/29
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 70 #

2018/2598(RSP)


Paragraph 12
12. Recognises the achievement of the Presidencies of COP22 and COP23 that jointly prepared the design of the 2018 Talanoa Dialogue which was broadly approved by the Parties and launched in January 2018; looks forward to its first results during COP24 and the political conclusions thereafter; looks forward to non-state actors input and calls on all Parties to submit their contributions in a timely manner in order to facilitate the political discussion in Katowice; considers that the Parties should review the current efforts and strengthen global ambition to achieve proposed goals;
2018/06/29
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 2 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 4 a (new)
- having regard to the Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions of 22 November 2016 entitled ‘Next steps for a sustainable European future – European action for sustainability’;1a _________________ 1ahttps://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal- content/EN/TXT/?uri=COM%3A2016%3 A739%3AFIN
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 7 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 4 b (new)
- having regard to the Reflection Paper of the Commission of 30 January 2019 entitled ‘Towards a Sustainable Europe by 2030’;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 9 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 19 g (new)
- having regard to the Third African Union-European Union-United Nations Trilateral Meeting, New York, 23 September 2018, Joint Communiqué, 1a _________________ 1ahttp://europa.eu/rapid/press- release_STATEMENT-18-5882_en.htm
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 10 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 4 f (new)
- having regard to the High-Level Multi-stakeholder Platform on the UN sustainable development goals and to its joint contribution of 11 October 2018, which recommends that the EU develops and implements an overarching visionary and transformative Sustainable Europe 2030 strategy, guiding all EU policies and programmes, including both interim and long-term targets and lay out Europe's vision for a sustainable Europe beyond the 2030 Agenda;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 12 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 19 c (new)
- having regard to the 2018 Global Compact for Migration and Global Compact for Refugees;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 17 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 5 a (new)
- having regard to the European Council conclusions of 18 October 2018 (EUCO13/18), stating that the EU and its Member States are fully committed to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its implementation, and in which the European Council welcomed the intention of the Commission to publish its Reflection Paper in 2018, calling for it to pave the way for a comprehensive implementation strategy in 2019;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 22 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 19 a (new)
- having regard to the DEVE and ENVI Memorandum - Members of the European Parliament united to accelerate progress to health-related Sustainable Development Goals – leaving no one behind, signed on 20th November 2018;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 25 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 19 b (new)
- having regard to the 2015 adopted Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 26 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 19 d (new)
- having regard to the joint EU-UN statements and communiques supporting the realisation of the SDGs and strengthened collaboration with the UN;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 27 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 19 e (new)
- having regard to the Joint Communiqué between the European Union and the United Nations: A renewed partnership in development, New York, 27 September 20181a _________________ 1ahttp://europa.eu/rapid/press- release_STATEMENT-18-5927_en.htm
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 28 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 19 f (new)
- having regard to the Joint EU - UN Press Statement of 23September 20181a _________________ 1ahttp://europa.eu/rapid/press- release_STATEMENT-18-5870_en.htm
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 34 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A
A. whereas the 2030 Agenda has the potential toshould be transformative and sets out universal, ambitious, comprehensive, indivisible and interlinked goals, aimed at eradicating poverty, fighting discrimination and promoting prosperity, environmental responsibility, social inclusion and respect for human rights, and strengthening peace and security; whereas these goals require immediate action with a view to full and effective implementation;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 35 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A
A. whereas the 2030 Agenda, with its indivisible sustainable development goals, has the potential to be transformative and sets out universal, ambitious, comprehensive, indivisible and interlinked goals, aimed at eradicating poverty, fighting discrimination and promotsharing prosperity, ensuring economic, social and territorial cohesion, promoting environmental responsibility, social inclusion and respect for human rights, and strengthening peace and security; whereas these goals require immediate action with a view to full and effective implementation; whereas the 2030 Agenda can unify stakeholders to leverage the full potential of the multilateral system and to more effectively support the countries and people they serve;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 36 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs represent an ambitious vision of the healthier, more prosperous, inclusive and resilient world, it is based on the Union’s core values of democracy and participation, social justice, solidarity and sustainability, respect for the rule of law and human rights, both within Europe and around the globe, and striving to achieve the SDGs therefore naturally follows the European Union’s plans to create a better, healthier and more sustainable future for Europe;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 37 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas the 2030 Agenda is based on the Union’s core values of democracy and participation, social justice, solidarity and sustainability, respect for the rule of law and human rights, both within Europe and around the globe, and striving to achieve the SDGs therefore it naturally follows that the European Union’s plans to create a better, healthier and more sustainable future for Europe should be amongst its strategic priorities;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 43 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C
C. whereas many of ththe interconnected and indivisible SDGs and the 169 targets encompassed in the 2030 Agenda directly concern the powers and responsibilities of the Union in addition to national, regional and local authorities and their implementation therefore requires a true multi-level governance approach, with active and broad-based public, civil society and private sector engagement;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 49 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D a (new)
D a. whereas the European Union’s policy and governance framework already includes a certain number of binding and non-binding policy targets, benchmarks and indicators such as in the budgetary, social, energy and climate fields, without consisting of a comprehensive, coherent and joined up policy strategy;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 68 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G
G. whereas the United Nations High- Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF) will meet at summit level, under the auspices of the UN General Assembly in September 2019, to take stock of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda as a whole, and at ministerial levelreviewing progress on all SDGs in a comprehensive manner, and at ministerial level (high level political forum) in July 2019 to review progress on SDGs 4 (quality education), 8 (decent work and economic growth), 10 (reduced inequalities), 13 (climate action), 16 (peace, justice and strong institutions) and 17 (partnerships for the goals);
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 71 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G a (new)
G a. whereas the UNGA Summit on SDGs provides an opportunity for the EU and its Member States to highlight their progress in advancing the 2030 Agenda and SDGs in a comprehensive manner;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 75 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital H a (new)
H a. whereas the European Commission Staff Document on Combatting HIV/ AIDS, viral hepatitis and tuberculosis from July 2018 highlights the gaps and limitations in surveillance data for viral hepatitis which make it difficult to assess the distance that EU Member States need to cover to reach the UN SDG target;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 81 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital H b (new)
H b. whereas voluntary national reviews are at present not necessarily consistent and connected with Member States’ national reform programmes within the European Semester process;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 94 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Highlights that the aim of the 2030 Agenda is to achieve greater well-being for all, leaving no-one behind, and that the three pillars of sustainable development, (social, environmental and economic development) as well as its governance dimension, are essential to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs); underlines the fact that sustainable development is a fundamental objective of the Union, as laid down in Article 3(3) of the Treaty on European Union (TEU) and should play a central role in the debate on and the narrative for the future of Europe in particular as the implementation of the SDGs should lead to a paradigm shift and become the EU's over-arching long-term economic model to succeed the current Europe 2020 Strategy;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 103 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Stresses that the Union should renew its commitment to being a global frontrunner in implementing the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, together with its Member States and their local and regional authorities, in line with the principle of subsidiarity and in close cooperation with its international partners; recalls that the EU political engagement should be reflected in the MFF 2021- 2027; underlines that the 2030 Agenda must further catalyse a joined-up approach between the EU’s internal and external action and its other policies and coherence across Union financing instruments for a global response and commitment towards sustainable growth and development;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 121 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 b (new)
4 b. Recognises that health gains must be protected and progress accelerated to reach the SDGs, states that while the world has made remarkable progress on several fronts in health many challenges remain - among them is addressing disparities between people’s health in stable countries and the health of people living in fragile and vulnerable settings and health disparities within countries;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 122 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. Recognises that the 2030 Agenda for sustainable development has reinforced global health as a political priority; states that healthy populations are critical to sustainable development – to ending poverty, promoting peaceful and inclusive societies and protecting the environment, insists that health is also an outcome and indicator of progress that reflects the success of many goals and the 2030 agenda as a whole;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 129 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. Calls on the Commission to identify clearly existing gaps in all relevant policies in order to assess what needs to be done by 2030 in terms of EU policies, legislation, statistics and disaggregated data collection, governance and implementation and to submit a full report on those gaps without further delay sos as to present a comprehensive strategy before the end of 2019;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 135 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Calls on the Commission to propose an all-encompassing EU 2030 strategy for the implementation of the SDGs, which should integrate these goals within the EU’s policies and governance, in order to reinforce the Union’s ability to fulfil its engagements with regard to the 2030 Agenda and strengthen its collaboration with the UN;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 138 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6 a. As a key foundation for building a sustainable Europe, calls on the Commission to lead the development of a sustainable food production and consumption model that protects and removes pressure of food systems on health and the environment and brings economic benefits to farmers, companies and citizens;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 139 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 b (new)
6 b. Calls on the Commission to work, in collaboration with key stakeholders at all levels, towards ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being for all at all ages, in particular with a view to making health care more accessible, affordable, effective, and sustainable, addressing risk factors of non-communicable diseases in a more holistic way, exchanging best practices, and strengthening the capacity to prevent and manage global health threats such as antimicrobial resistance;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 140 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 c (new)
6 c. Calls upon the Commission to align programmatic, financing and operational policies, approaches and methodologies where it can enhance efficiency and effectiveness, with UN and its partners, to improve effectiveness on a number of common priorities—such as gender equality and reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health, climate change and environment, addressing inequalities and poverty;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 144 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 d (new)
6 d. Calls upon the Commission to enhance accountability for delivering collective results for people internally and externally through its MFF;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 149 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. Reiterates its request for such a strategy and underlines the need to clearly set out common indicators and, benchmarks and targets, an analysis of the distance to targets and goals, and required action and means of implementation; stresses that the EU’s 2030 strategy should also outline when and how the Commission and the co- legislator will undertake sustainability impact assessments to reorient existing policies and for new legislative proposals, reviews or recasting of Union legislation;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 150 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7 a. Calls on the Commission to present a reform proposal for the existing European Semester process, which is not as such adapted to be a “European process for SDG policy coordination”, as indicated in the Commission’s reflection paper on Sustainable Europe by 2030 in scenario 1; considers that such a reform should ensure that a European SDG policy coordination does not lead to a parallel policy process to the European Semester, but consist of an integrated and coherent approach based on a new Sustainable Development Pact;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 168 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 a (new)
9 a. Calls on the EU Member States to provide data for the effective monitoring of viral hepatitis in line with the indicators established by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control and calls on the European Commission to closely monitor this process in line with its commitment made in its Communication "Next steps for a sustainable Europe" from November 2016.
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 173 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 b (new)
9 b. Calls on the Commission to align the MFF 2021-27 with the SDGs implementation and use SDG targets to access progress made by the MFF;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 177 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 b (new)
11 b. Reiterates the position of the European Parliament on the future Multi- Annual Financial Framework, which calls for a compulsory and legally binding mid-term revision, following a review of the functioning of the MFF, and taking into account an assessment of the progress made towards the climate target, the mainstreaming of the Sustainable Development Goals and gender equality;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 185 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10 a (new)
10 a. Stresses the need for the EU institutions to show leadership and adapt their own governance to allow the mainstreaming of SDGs within their work; calls on the European Commission to coordinate SDGs at the highest level with a dedicated project team attached to the president office and working with all Commissioners and DGs trained contact points on SDGs; reference should be made in the State of the Union address to the state of play on SDGs implementation; insists that likewise, the European Parliament should ensure that SDGs are coherently mainstreamed across committees;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 187 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Welcomes the establishment of a working party on the 2030 Agenda under the General Affairs Council; calls for the establishment of SDG coordination and cooperation mechanisms between Parliament, the Council and the Commission, andwhich should be clearly framed and determined within an Inter- Institutional Agreement for a Sustainable Europe by 2030, as coherent political processes between the three institutions will be critical for the successful implementation of the 2030 Agenda; calls for the involvement of all three institutions in a future multi- stakeholder platform on sustainable development;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 191 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 c (new)
11 c. Is of the view that policy coherence for sustainable development means that all relevant policies, and all financial and non-financial instruments at European level must in future be designed, implemented and monitored along UN SDG goal achievements, and that the European Commission should, therefore, rapidly develop the necessary policy capacities at all levels;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 193 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 a (new)
11 a. Believes that, in line with UN SDG 17 on Partnerships, the role of the existing Multi-Stakeholder Platform on the UN sustainable development goals should be upgraded and brought into a formal and inter-institutional consultation framework;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 195 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Welcomes the Commission’s commitment to mainstream SDGs into its Better Regulation Agenda and underlines the potential for using the Better Regulation tools strategically in order to evaluate EU policy coherence with regard to the 2030 Agenda; calls on the Commission to establish an SDG check of all new policies and legislation and to ensure full policy coherence in the implementation of the SDGs, while promoting synergies, gaining co-benefits and avoiding trade-offs, both at Union and Member State level; this would in particular require adapting the European Semester by integrating it into a multi- annual sustainable Europe coordination cycle encompassing all dimensions of the SDGs;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 215 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Emphasises the role of regular and adequate ex-ante impact assessments as well as ex-post evaluations; recalls the Treaty obligation to take into account the objectives of development cooperation in all policies likely to affect developing countries;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 223 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 4
Voluntary National Reviews and EU reporting for the UNGA HLPF 2019
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 233 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Welcomes the upcoming in-depth review of SDGs 4 (quality education), 8 (decent work and economic growth), 10 (reduced inequalities), 13 (climate action), 16 (peace, justice and strong institutions) and 17 (partnerships for the goals) and the future in depth reviews of SDG 1: No Poverty, SDG 2: Zero Hunger, SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being, SDG 5: Gender Equality, SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation, SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy, SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure; SDG 1, Sustainable Cities and Communities; SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production, SDG 14: Life Below Water, SDG 15: Life on Land and expects the Union to contribute to the review in full;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 235 #

2018/2279(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 a (new)
17 a. Welcomes the United Nations High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF) meeting at summit level, under the auspices of the UN General Assembly in September 2019 and thereafter at future summits, to take stock of the implementation of all the SDGs within the 2030 Agenda as a whole and expects the Union to play a leading role in the summit;
2019/02/11
Committee: DEVEENVI
Amendment 3 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. Emphasises that social as well as climate and environmental policy should play a full role in the European Semester process in addition to the economic dimensions; calls for the inclusion of indicators oriented towards measuring sustainability and well-being;
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 5 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 b (new)
1 b. Calls on the Commission to include the objective to achieve a climate neutral economy in the European Semester; recalls Europe’s commitment to achieving a net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 through a socially fair transition in a cost-efficient manner;
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 6 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 c (new)
1 c. Highlights that the decarbonisation of the EU’s economy will stimulate significant additional investment; recalls that today around 2% of the EU’s GDP is invested in our energy system and related infrastructure; notes that this would have to increase to 2.8% in order to achieve a net-zero greenhouse gas economy, which requires considerable additional investments compared to the baseline;
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 7 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 d (new)
1 d. Recalls the need to align the EU’s financing commitments with the Paris climate goals, including assessing that investments support or are compatible with climate objectives, ramping up climate finance, and mainstreaming climate reporting on financial flows;
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 8 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 e (new)
1 e. Underlines the need to integrate the climate and energy goals set by Member States under the framework of the Energy Union Governance regulation into the European Semester;
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 12 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Considers it important to use the European Semester to accelerate the transition towards a circular, net-zero emission, energy efficient and renewable- energy based economy, contributing to sustainable development and the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals;
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 17 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. Welcomes the European Semester recognition that Member States should pay particular attention to the adaptability of the workforce, to ensure they have the right skills that match technological progress; stresses in this context the need to adopt a just transition approach, ensuring inclusion and participation of all those affected, and supporting the workforce and the creation of decent work and quality jobs;
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 21 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. Stresses that effective investment in healthcare, including health research and disease prevention, is essential for providing citizens with equal access to high quality healthcare services; Underlines the importance of the sustainability of the healthcare sector;
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 24 #

2018/2119(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6 a. Calls for a structured involvement of civil society and environmental organisations within the European Semester process, and for greater involvement of environment ministers within the European Semester process at Council level.
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 9 #

2018/2114(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Notes that the Joint Statement and the Common Approach are of a legally non-binding character;
2018/11/22
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 11 #

2018/2114(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Regrets that the Parliament was not fully involved in the procedure to select the new seat of EMA and; Points out that the proceduress followed for the srelecocation of the new location for EMA is not used anymore in this formEMA, which was specific to the situation and did not constitute a precedent, must not be used in the future;
2018/11/22
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 18 #

2018/2114(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Expects the prerogatives of Parliament as co-legislator to be fully respected in future decisions on the location or relocation of agencies; considers that Parliament should be systematically involved from the initial stages of the future processes, and on equal terms with the Council and the Commission;
2018/11/22
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 21 #

2018/2114(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3a. Underlines the value of enhanced exchange of information from the initial stages of future processes for the location of agencies. Such early exchange of information would make it easier for the three Institutions to exercise their rights and prerogatives;
2018/11/22
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 22 #

2018/2114(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Calls on the Commission to provide, by April 2019, an in-depth analysis of the implementation of the Joint Statement and Common Approach as regards the location of the decentralised Agencies in order to launch a revision; In the case that the in-depth analysis identifies shortcomings, calls on the Council to engage, together with the Parliament and the Commission, in a revision of the Joint Statement and Common Approach in a timely manner;
2018/11/22
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 26 #

2018/2114(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Stresses that in case of budgetary decisions regarding decentralised agencies the specificity and workload of the agency has to be taken into account and that possible budgetary cuts cannot be taken on a one size fits all-basis; considers that, in this context, priority should be given to the needs of agencies that are undergoing potentially business-disrupting events and processes such as relocation; furthermore stresses the need to take into account the new climate and sustainability priorities within the next MFF and the tasks attributed to particular agencies for the implementation of the MFF.
2018/11/22
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 27 #

2018/2114(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Stresses that in case of budgetary and staffing decisions regarding decentralised agencies the specificity and workload of the agency has to be taken into account and that possible budgetary and personnel cuts cannot be taken on a one size fits all-basis; furthermore stresses the need to take into account the new climate and sustainability priorities within the next MFF and the tasks attributed to particular agencies for the implementation of the MFF.
2018/11/22
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 30 #

2018/2114(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6a. Notes that the principles of desirability of geographical spread of agencies' seats and of prioritising new Member States as hosts, as stated in the Joint Statement, were not respected in the case of new seats for EMA and EBA;
2018/11/22
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 31 #

2018/2114(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 b (new)
6b. Points out that the Joint Statement advises that, when the legislative authority decides to assign additional tasks to agencies as compared to the initial Commission proposal, the repriorisation of their activities should always be considered as an alternative to granting additional resources 1a; believes that the repriorisation of activities in the remit of the European Medicines Agency should be avoided as much as possible due to the fact that its core mission is safeguarding public health in the EU; __________________ 1a Joint Statement of the European Parliament, the Council of the EU and the European Commission on decentralised agencies, art. 43
2018/11/22
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 12 #

2018/2112(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Reaffirms Parliament’s strong support for establishing an efficient and independent EPPO, in order to reduce the presently fragmented nature of national law enforcement efforts to protect the EU budget, and to strengthen the fight against financial fraud in the European Union;
2018/12/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 28 #

2018/2112(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Emphasises that the implementation of the EPPO will require effective and efficient cooperation between the national prosecutors and the EPPO, and with the agencies of the EU, such as the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF) and Eurojust, it is also encouraged that capacity building should begin at earliest possible time in order to develop harmonised standards of operation;
2018/12/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 76 #

2018/2108(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Stresses that the Member States should transpose the directive correctly in order to ensure the highest level of quality and secure easily accessible cross-border healthcare for patients and encourages development of access gates to the NCP in order to foster access to digital space for health insitutions;
2018/12/05
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 5 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 3 a (new)
– having regard to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1948,
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 6 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 3 b (new)
– having regard to UN Resolution A/70/L.1 adopted by the General Assembly on 25 September 2015 entitled ‘Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development’,
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 7 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 3 c (new)
– having regard to UN Resolution A/RES/60/7 adopted by the General Assembly on 1 November 2005 on the Holocaust Remembrance,
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 10 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 4 a (new)
– having regard to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol (A/RES/61/106) adopted on 13 December 2006,
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 12 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 6 a (new)
– having regard to the Council of Europe Parliamentary Assembly Resolution 2153 (2017) – Promoting the inclusion of Roma and Travellers,
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 14 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 8 a (new)
– having regard to the Declaration of the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe on the Rise of Anti- Gypsyism and racist violence against Roma in Europe, adopted on 1 February 2012,
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 15 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 8 b (new)
– having regard to General Policy Recommendation No 13 of the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance (ECRI) on combating anti- Gypsyism and discrimination against Roma,
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 16 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 10 a (new)
– having regard to Council Directive 2000/43/EC of 29 June 2000 implementing the principle of equal treatment between persons irrespective of racial or ethnic origin[1], [1]OJ L 180, 19.7.2000, p. 22.
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 19 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 10 b (new)
– having regard to the Council recommendation of 9 December 2013 on effective Roma integration measures in the Member States, to the Council conclusion of 8 December 2016 on Accelerating the process of Roma integration and of 13 October 2016 on the European Court of Auditors Special Report No 14/2016,
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 20 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 10 c (new)
– having regard to Council Framework Decision 2008/913/JHA of 28 November 2008 on combating certain forms and expressions of racism and xenophobia by means of criminal law,
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 21 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 10 d (new)
– having regard to the Commission Communications on Roma integration (COM(2010)0133, COM(2012)0226,COM(2013)0454, COM(2015)0299, COM(2016)0424), including the Communication on an EU Framework for National Roma Integration Strategies up to 2020(COM(2011)0173),
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 23 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 11 a (new)
– having regard to its resolutions on Roma[1], [1] OJ C 4E, 7.1.2011, p. 7; OJ C 308E,20.10.2011, p. 73;OJ C 199 E, 7.7.2012, p. 112; OJ C 468, 15.12.2016, p. 36; OJC 468, 15.12.2016, p. 157.
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 24 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 11 b (new)
– having regard to its resolution of 15 April 2015 on the occasion of International Roma Day –anti-Gypsyism in Europe and EU recognition of the memorial day of the Roma genocide during World War II[1], [1]OJ C 328, 6.9.2016, p. 4.
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 25 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 11 c (new)
– having regard to its resolution of 25 October 2017 on the fundamental rights aspects in Roma integration in the EU: fighting anti-Gypsyism (2017/2038(INI)),
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 26 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 11 d (new)
– European Parliament resolution of 7 February 2018 on protection and non- discrimination with regard to minorities in the EU Member States (2017/2937(RSP)),
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 27 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 13 a (new)
– having regard to its resolution of 4 February 2014 on the EU Roadmap against homophobia and discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity (2013/2183(INI)),
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 35 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 15 a (new)
– having regard to the Fundamental Rights Agency’s EU-MIDIS I and II surveys and various other surveys and reports on Roma,
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 40 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A
A. whereas the rights of persons belonging to national or ethnic, religious and linguistic minorities, LGBTI people and people living with disabilities are an integral part of human rights, which are universal, indivisible and independent, and whereas protecting and promoting minority rights is essential for peace, security and stability and for promoting tolerance, mutual respect and understanding and co- operation among all persons living on their territory;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 44 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A a (new)
Aa. whereas people belonging to minorities often face multiple and intersectional discriminations;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 166 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8 a (new)
8a. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to safeguard the protection of minorities within minorities and tackle the inequalities within inequalities, since people belonging to minorities often face multiple and intersectional discriminations;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 182 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 1
National and ethnic minorities
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 188 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Notes that national/ethnic minorities are groups of persons belonging to minorities who have been living on the same territory and sharing a common identity, in some instances as a result of border changes, in others as a result of living a long time in an area, whereby they have managed to preserve their identity; calls on the Member States and the Commission to protect the cultural and linguistic identity of national/ethnic minorities, and to create conditions for the promotion of that identity; points to the important role that regional and local authorities in the EU can play in protecting national/ethnic minorities, and considers that administrative reorganisation and territorial districting must not have negative consequences for them;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 193 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Notes that persons belonging to national/ethnic minorities have the right to exercise fully and effectively their human rights and fundamental freedoms without any discrimination and in full equality before the law;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 198 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Notes that maintaining the cultural heritage of the EU is a common interest of the Member States; calls on the EU institutions and its Member States to support, enhance and promote the cultural rights of national/ethnic minorities;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 203 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to recognise the contribution of national/ethnic minorities to the cultural heritage of the Union, to reinforce dialogue with the representatives of national/ethnic minorities and to identify and implement coordinated policies and actions for the sustainable management of preserving and developing their culture;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 208 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14
14. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to involve and support national/ethnic minorities and their representatives in fostering knowledge and skills that are necessary in order to safeguard, sustainably manage and develop cultural heritage and that should be handed down to future generations; calls on the Member States and the Commission to establish and maintain concrete cultural funds for the representatives of regional and minority rights, both at horizontal and vertical levels;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 213 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Highlights the fact that media plays a central role with regard to cultural and linguistic rights; recalls that being able to receive and publish information in a language one can fully understand and communicate in is a precondition for equal and effective participation in public, economic, social and cultural life; notes in this regard that special attention must be given to the needs of persons belonging to national/ethnic minorities living in rural and remote areas;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 218 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Calls on the Member States and the Commission to ensure that the media can operate independently and free from discrimination in minority languages, to take into account national/ethnic minorities when licensing or privatising media services, including assigning TV and radio broadcasters, to provide appropriate funds for self-governance to organisations representing minorities, with a view to fostering their sense of belonging to, and identification with, their respective minority groups, and to bring their identities, languages, histories and cultures to the attention of the majority;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 223 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Calls on the Member States and the Commission to refrain from political and legal acts and policies that aim to prescribe restrictive measures, such as subtitling and/or translation obligations and mandatory quotas for programmes in official languages; calls on the Members States and the Commission to allow and promote the presence of regional or minority-language media, also on online interfaces; calls on the Member States and the Commission to ensure appropriate funding or grants for organisations and media representing national/ethnic minorities, in view of their regional specificities and needs;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 228 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 a (new)
17a. Calls on Member States to make the history, including the atrocities committed against a minority group, and the culture of national/ethnic minorities part of the curricula in schools;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 230 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 b (new)
17b. Calls on Member States to launch cultural dialogues, including but not exclusively in schools, on the different forms and faces of hate against minority groups, such as anti-Gypsyism, anti- Semitism, Islamophobia, Afrophobia, etc.
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 231 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 c (new)
17c. Calls on Member States, in order to create mutual trust, to set up national truth and reconciliation commissions in order to acknowledge the persecution, exclusion and disownment of Roma people through the centuries, and to document these issues in an official white paper;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 232 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 d (new)
17d. Calls on Member States to clearly condemn and sanction the denial of atrocities against national/ethnic minorities, such as the Roma Holocaust;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 233 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 e (new)
17e. Calls on Member States to hold and honour major commemoration days of minority groups at state level;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 234 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 f (new)
17f. Calls on Member States to establish institutions displaying the history and culture of minority groups, support them financially and by the necessary regulations;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 235 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 2 a (new)
The respect and protection of identity
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 236 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 g (new)
17g. Calls on Member States to secure state recognition of national/ethnic minorities, in order to fight identity insecurity of members of minority groups;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 237 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 h (new)
17h. Calls on Member States, in order to fight stigmatisation, scapegoating and hate speech that so many minorities suffer from on a daily basis, to – launch anti hate-speech campaigns and cultural dialogues; – clearly condemn and sanction hate speech and hate crime; – sensitise the police force about over- and under-policing by mandatory, in-service trainings; – set up anti-hate crime units with knowledge of the challenges of different minority groups in police forces; – guarantee that members of minority groups are equal before the law and ensure that they have equal access to justice and procedural rights;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 238 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 2 b (new)
Citizenship rights
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 239 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 i (new)
17i. Is deeply concerned by the number of people who are denied their citizenship because of their ethnicity, such as thousands of Roma in the EU, which results in the complete denial of their rights and pushes them to the very margins of society; stresses that the situation and legal status of non-citizens permanently resident in Member States need to be addressed;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 240 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 j (new)
17j. Calls on the Member States to take immediate corrective measures to stop discriminatory birth registration, to carry out birth registration of members of minority groups without discrimination and to ensure that the issued ID cards are non-discriminatory;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 241 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 2 c (new)
Civil rights
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 242 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 k (new)
17k. Calls on Member States to safeguard that members of minority groups can practise their civil rights without fear; in this respect, calls on Member States to include mandatory human rights, democratic citizenship and political literacy training courses in their school curricula at all levels in order to strengthen the self-confidence of members of minority groups and their ability to exercise and demand their equal rights;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 243 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 l (new)
17l. Encourages Member States to provide minority groups guaranteed representation in national, regional and local governments and parliaments;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 244 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 2 d (new)
Fighting segregation and discrimination, including intersectional discrimination
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 245 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 m (new)
17m. Deeply regrets that little progress has been made on the adoption of the proposal for an Equal Treatment Directive and calls on the Commission and the Council to re-launch the relevant negotiations with the aim of concluding them as soon as possible;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 246 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 n (new)
17n. Is deeply concerned by the widespread discrimination, including intersectional discrimination, and segregation of members of minority groups in all areas of life, often resulting in their deep poverty and exclusion from the society; calls on Member States to take both proactive and reactive measures to safeguard equal access of members of minority groups to services, goods, information, etc. in all walks of life, and to provide mandatory trainings to duty- bearers, who are key to the correct implementation of EU and Member State legislation and who have to be equipped to serve all citizens from a human rights- based approach; calls on the Commission and Member States to address intersectional discrimination both in their policies and through their funding programmes;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 247 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 2 e (new)
Active and meaningful participation
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 248 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 o (new)
17o. Considers active and meaningful social, economic, political and cultural participation by minority groups as key; calls, therefore, on the Commission and the Member States to design strategies featuring both proactive and reactive measures on the basis of real, systematic consultations with minority groups representatives, and to involve them in the running, monitoring and evaluation of mainstream programmes and projects launched at all levels, including at the local level in order to safeguard their inclusiveness and non-discrimination;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 249 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 p (new)
17p. Stresses that the development of any cultural heritage policy should be inclusive, community-based and participatory, involving consultation and dialogue with the minority communities concerned;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 251 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18
18. Notes that education is a key element of socialisation and development, and that the continuity of mother tongue education is vital to preserving their cultural and linguistic identity; notes that, when it comes to minority language education, there is no one single best- practice model that is suitable for all national/ethnic minorities; notes that special attention shall be paid to people using sign language;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 257 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19
19. Calls on the Member States and the Commission to promote and support the official use of languages spoken by national/ethnic minorities in the territories where they live, at local or regional level, in conformity with the principles of the FCNM and the Language Charter, while taking into account that the protection and encouragement of the use of regional and minority languages should not be to the detriment of official languages and the obligation to learn them;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 262 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20
20. Calls on the Member States and the Commission to ensure that persons belonging to national/ethnic minorities have rights and adequate opportunities to receive education in a minority language and for instruction in their mother tongue in both public and private educational institutions; calls on the Member States to formulate appropriate education policies, bearing in mind the right for education in a minority language and the needs of national/ethnic minorities; calls on the Members States and the Commission to incorporate the best practices in teaching foreign languages into the methodology of teaching official languages when it comes to curricula for schools which provide education in a minority language; notes that the Member States should ensure that both the regional or minority language and the official language are taught using appropriate methods;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 273 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21
21. Calls on the Member States to define preferential thresholds in the learning of regional or minority languages; calls on the Member States and the Commission to ensure that people belonging to national/ethnic minorities living in rural area, or living in widely scattered settlements, have the right to receive education in a minority language, e.g. in their mother tongue and ; calls on the Member States and the Commission to ensure that education reforms and policies do not restrict the right to receive education in a minority language;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 293 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 26
26. Calls the Member States and the Commission to allow and promote, with regard to the administrative authorities and public service organisations, the use of regional or minority languages in practice, according to the principle of proportionality, such as in relations between private individuals and organisations on the one hand, and public authorities on the other; calls on the Member States to make information and public services available in these languages, including on the internet, in areas where people belonging to national/ethnic minorities are traditionally present; encourages municipal authorities to ensure the use of regional and minority languages; encourages the Member States to use the good practices already existing within the Member States as guidelines;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 299 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 28
28. Notes that the visual representation of regional and minority languages – road signs, street names, the names of administrative, public and commercial institutions, etc. – is essential to promoting and protecting national/ethnic minority rights, as it reflects, and contributes to, the vital use of regional and minority languages, encouraging persons belonging to national/ethnic minorities to use, preserve and develop their linguistic diversity, identity and language rights, express their multi-ethnic local identity, and strengthen their sense of ownership as members of groups living in a local or regional community;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 306 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 29
29. Calls on the Member States to take action to prevent administrative and financial obstacles that could delay linguistic diversity at European and national level and impede the usage and application of linguistic rights of persons belonging to national/ethnic minorities;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 333 #

2018/2036(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30 – indent 3
– a legislative proposal for a directive, based on the aforementioned points, on minimum standards for minorities in the EU, with clear benchmarks and sanctions;
2018/06/22
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 75 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D
D. whereas the current political momentum should be used to shift to a circular plastics economy, that in line with the waste hierarchy, gives priority to the prevention of plastic waste generation;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 83 #
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 88 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D b (new)
Db. whereas the release of enormous quantities of plastic into the sea has not only an adverse impact on marine resources but also affects economic activities, inter alia by increasing the costs involved in cleaning nets and disposing of litter collected;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 100 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Believes that preventing the generation of plastic waste upfront and boosting our plastics recycling performance are both key to protecting human health and the environment, and supporting a sustainable economic growth; calls on all stakeholders to consider the recent Chinese import ban on plastic waste as an opportunity tofor investing in state-of-the-art recycling capacity in the EUplastic waste prevention, for developing Eco-design requirements for all plastic and plastic containing products, and for investing in state-of-the-art in the EU for collection and sorting and recycling;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 124 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Calls on the Commission to establish a post-2020 policy for the circular economy based on a strong research and pillar of innovation pillar, and to ensure that the necessary commitments will be available in the new Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF);
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 157 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. Calls on the competent authorities in the Member States to ensure that the entire product and waste acquis is fully implemented;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 163 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7a. Stresses the need to take into consideration the impact of plastics on carbon emissions, calls the Commission to update its "monitoring framework for the circular economy" to integrate indicators specifically for plastics, and in particular to monitor the decoupling of plastic generation from fossil feedstocks;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 176 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8 a (new)
8a. Calls on Member States to ban landfilling of plastic waste by 2030 and to manage it according to the provisions laid down in Directive 2008/98/EC;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 182 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Believes that civil society should be able to hold industry accountable for its commitmentcarrying out its obligations; asks the Commission to take this into account in the upcoming ‘New Deal for Consumers’;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 184 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Calls onUrges the Commission to come forward with anfulfil its obligation to update of the essential requirements in the Packaging and Packaging Waste Directive by end of 2020, addressing in particular prevention, design for circularity and over-reuse, promoting high quality recycling and the reduction of excessive packaging; in this regard, calls on the Commission to provide clear guidelines on what should be considered "reusable" and "recyclable" plastic packaging;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 197 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Calls onReminds the Commission to make ‘circularity first’hat prevention is an overarching principle, also for non-packaging plastic items, by developing product standards and revising the eco-design legislative framework and calls on the Commission to further implement this by creating adequate economic and legislative incentives, in particular by broadening the scope of the eco-design legislation to cover all main plastic product groups, including non-energy related product groups, and to gradually include relevant resource efficiency features in the mandatory requirements for product design and to adopt eco- labelling provisions;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 218 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Calls on the Commission to come forward swiftly with quality standards in order to build trust and incentivise the market for secondary plastics; urges the Commission to develop various grades of recycling which are alignedis compatible with the functionality of different products, while safeguarding public health and food safety;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 237 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Believes that mandatory rules on the use of minimum recycled content for specific products may be needed in order tonew plastic products, in accordance with product specific legislation concerning health, safety and environment, is a requirement in order to promote recycling, reduce the use of fossil-based virgin plastic, curb the excessive quantity of CO2 emitted in their production and thus drive the uptake of secondary raw materials;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 262 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Stresses that corporate and public procurement has the power to boost innovation in business models and select products that ensure resource efficiency; calls on the Commission to set up an EU learning network on circular procurement in order to harvest the lessons learnt from pilot projects; believes that voluntary, create a standard template and assessment system for tenders that can be reused in a practical way, together with systematic reporting on rate of circular procurement undertaken by public authorities and large corporate groups; believes that these actions could pave the way for binding rules on public circular procurement and their mandatory integration in sustainability reports;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 270 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 a (new)
17a. Highlights that local and regional authorities could contribute to the improvement of plastic recycling through their public procurement policies; believes that they should set eco-design criteria for the purchase of products and services by demanding products made of fully recyclable plastics and products, up to a certain percentage, made of recycled content;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 281 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19
19. Believes that the presence of a substance of concern should not be a blanket justification for precluding the recycling of waste streams for specific, well-defined and safe applications, since this could stifle innovation and discourage recycling potential in favour of incineration;deleted
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 304 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20 a (new)
20a. Highlights that a transformation in consumer behaviour is pivotal in order to reduce plastic waste generation and littering; calls on the Commission and Member States to finance awareness campaigns, including in schools, to inform the public of the benefits of plastic waste prevention and the need to address littering;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 334 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23
23. Stresses that there are various pathways to achieving high collection and recycling rates and a reduction in litter, including deposit-refundturn schemes or extended producer responsibility (EPR) schemes; underlines that the choice of a certain scheme remains within the remit of the competent authority in the Member State, which can take local specificitiesstresses the need that the fees paid by the producer for the fulfilment of its EPR obligations are modulated by taking into account and ensresource that any existing well-performing and cost-efficient systems are not jeopardisedefficiency criteria,; calls on the Commission to consider options for a more unified approach in the EU to deposit schemes;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 343 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23 a (new)
23a. Stresses that effective extended producer responsibility schemes can have a positive environmental impact by reducing the generation of plastic waste and increasing its separate collection and recycling; welcomes the fact that Directive94/62/EC stipulates that Member States shall establish mandatory EPR schemes for all packaging by end of 2024 and calls on the Commission to assess the possibility of extending this obligation to other plastic products in accordance with Article 8 and 8a of Directive 2008/98/EC;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 350 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24
24. Underlines that fiscal policy remains a Member State competence and opposes the introduction of an EU-wide plastics tax as a potential own resource stream for the EUTakes note of the Commission's proposal "on the system of Own Resources of the European Union" that introduces a national contribution calculated on the amount of non-recycled plastic packaging waste. Underlines that this proposal can create an incentive for Member States to reach the plastic packaging waste recycling targets laid down in the Directive 94/62/EC; however, this approach is not completely coherent with the principles defined in the waste hierarchy where priority shall be given to the prevention of waste generation;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 358 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24 a (new)
24a. Welcomes the Commission proposal for a Directive "on port reception facilities" which aims to significantly reduce the burden and costs for fishermen of bringing fishing gear and plastic waste back to the port; underlines the important role that fishermen could play, in particular by collecting plastic waste from the sea during their fishing activity, and bringing it back to the port to undergo proper waste management. Stresses that Commission and Member States should incentivize this activity, so that waste derived from clean- up activities would not be covered by any cost recovery system, and fisherman shall not be charged a fee for its treatment;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 366 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 25
25. Strongly supports the Commission in coming forward with clear harmonisedpromoting existing harmonized standards and coming forward with additional standards, where appropriate, with regard to rules on both bio-based content and biodegradability, as a feedstock with specific independent property, in order to tackle existing misconceptions and misunderstandings about bio-plastics and/or biodegradable plastics which can derive from fossil or bio-based feedstock;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 378 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 26
26. Highlights the importance of lifecycle assessments in order to demonstrate a reduced environmental impact for all bio-plasticsat fostering a sustainable bio-economy can contribute to decreasing Europe´s dependency on imported raw materials. Bio-based recyclable packaging and compostable biodegradable packaging could represent an opportunity to promote renewable sources for the production of packaging, where shown to be beneficial from life- cycle perspective;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 386 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 27
27. Emphasises that biodegradable plastics can help support the transition to a circular economy, but are not a universal remedy against marine litter; calls, therefore, on the Commission to develop a list of useful products and applications composed of biodegradable plastics, together with clear criteriaset of criteria for packaging when, in line with EU harmonized standards, biodegradable plastic would be preferable and provide an indicative list of useful products and applications. The indicative list should be the starting point for further R&D investments and market development of products and applications;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 398 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 29
29. Calls for a complete ban on oxo- degradable plastic, as this type of plastic does not safely biodegrade and therefore fails to deliver a proven environmental benefit;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 413 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30 a (new)
30a. Underlines that several Member States, such as the UK, France and Italy, have already put in place national legislative measures for banning micro- plastics which are intentionally added to cosmetics; welcomes the scientific assessment that the ECHA is carrying out to examine the impacts of micro-plastics that are intentionally added to products in the context of the REACH restrictions, and to subsequently conclude whether European restrictions would be appropriate for addressing the negative effects linked to their presence on human health and the environment;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 436 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 34
34. Welcomes the Commission’s announcement that an additional EUR 100 million will be invested to drive investment towards circular solutions under Horizon 2020 such as design options, the diversification of feedstock and innovative recycling technologies; supports the development of a Strategic Research Innovation Agenda on plastics to guide future funding decisions;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 446 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 34 a (new)
34a. Calls on the Commission and the Council to make resources available to support further research and investment through the next Multiannual Financial Framework and the Research Framework Programme, reiterates the need to support stakeholder cooperation along the entire value chain through public private partnership to develop innovative solutions building on the circular economy model;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 482 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 36 a (new)
36a. Calls on the EU to actively support the on-going discussions at the United nations and in other international foras, including the G7 and G20, with the aim to strengthen existing tools and develop a new "Global pact for the Environment" which shall include a binding mechanism to halt plastic pollution; stresses that EU should lead by example and ensure they aim for the same level of ambition at the international level as is already aimed for within the European Union;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 4 #

2018/2023(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Welcomes the Action Plan on Alternative Fuels Infrastructure and highlights that further coordination at EU level is needed;, therefore we call on the Commission and the European Council to propose a roadmap for the next 5 years.
2018/06/12
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 8 #

2018/2023(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 (new)
This roadmap should outline the common policy framework and common goals for all Member States, as the cooperation between Member States must be strengthened at regional and local levels.
2018/06/12
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 16 #

2018/2023(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 – subparagraph 1 (new)
Calls on the Member States to give due regard to the principles enshrined in TEN-T Core and Comprehensive networks as wells as Common European transport policy when drafting their national policy frameworks.
2018/06/12
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 23 #

2018/2023(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Notes with concern that the level of ambition and the degree of fulfilment of national policy frameworks differ profoundly between Member States; in order to reach sustainable transport in the EU more integrated and transparent approach is needed. Notes that regular progress reporting would be beneficial to the attainment of the overall goal.
2018/06/12
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 36 #

2018/2023(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Underlines the need for comprehensive private charging infrastructure allowing charging of electric vehicles at home and in the workplace, taking into account the need for both public and private investments to achieve sufficient coverage. Notes that increased dissemination of information, namely that privates sectors' involvement is critical to achieving the outlined targets;
2018/06/12
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 55 #

2018/2023(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Stresses that more emphasis on smart charging solutions is needed; notes that this can be achieved by ensuring that requirements in private and shared public charging infrastructure go further than the minimum provisions outlined in the revision of the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive1 ; _________________ 1Stresses that insufficiently recharging infrastructure is one of the main barriers of implementing sustainable transportation in the EU. _________________ 1 OJ L 153, 18.6.2010, p. 13. OJ L 153, 18.6.2010, p. 13.
2018/06/12
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 66 #

2018/2023(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Encourages the provision of increased incentives for the development of shore-side electricity supply at both in-land and maritime ports and emphasises the improvements to be gained from shore-side electricity in regards tosuch as low CO2 emissions and, improved air quality;, and other environmental benefits.
2018/06/12
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 73 #

2018/2023(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Calls on Member States to support policies that stimulate the offer of alternatively fuelled light and heavy-duty vehicles, such as ambitious emissions standards to be reached by 2025 and 2030 for new passenger cars and new light commercial vehicles, including binding sales targets for zero and low emission vehicles. Recognizes that the challenges associated with transition towards sustainable transport are created throughout the supply chain. Therefore, stresses the need for dialogue and concerted effort between all stakeholders.
2018/06/12
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 4 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Citation 4
– having regard to Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker’s State of the Union speech of 13 September 2017, where he stressed that it is not acceptable that in some parts of Europe people are sold food of lower quality than in other countries, despite the packaging and the branding being identical;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 6 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Citation 4 a (new)
– having regard to the Commission communication of 11 April 2018 on A New Deal for Consumers (COM(2018)183):
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 7 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Citation 4 b (new)
– having regard to the proposal for a Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on better enforcement and modernisation of EU consumer protection rules (COM(2018)185/3);
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 9 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Citation 4 c (new)
– having regard to the Commission proposal to update the Unfair Commercial Practices Directive in order to make explicit that national authorities can assess and address misleading commercial practices that involve the marketing of products as being identical in several EU countries, if their composition or characteristics are significantly different;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 10 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Citation 4 d (new)
– having regard to the European Parliament major interpellation of 15 March 2017 on the differences in declarations, composition and taste of products in central/eastern and western markets of the EU (O-000019/2017);
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 11 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Citation 4 e (new)
– having regard to the European Parliament resolution of 11 June 2013 on a new agenda for European Consumer Policy (P7_TA(2013)0239);
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 17 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital A a (new)
Aa. whereas shortcomings in the implementation and enforcement of applicable EU food law requirements, for instance in the labelling of mechanically separated meat1a or the use of food additives2a, have regularly been reported by the European Commission’s Health and Food Audits and Analysis services; _________________ 1ahttp://ec.europa.eu/food/audits- analysis/overview_reports/details.cfm?rep _id=76 2ahttp://ec.europa.eu/food/audits- analysis/overview_reports/details.cfm?rep _id=115
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 27 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B
B. whereas proven differences in ingredients could in the long term affect consumers’ health, for example where the level of fat and/or sugar is higher than expected and when consumers are particularly vulnerable such as children and people with dietary and/or health issues;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 34 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B a (new)
Ba. whereas reformulation activities to reduce fat, sugars and salt contents in food are lagging behind in many Central, Eastern and South-Eastern European countries;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 35 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B b (new)
Bb. whereas there have been cases of substantial differences in products such as baby foods, which questions the principle and current methodology of adjusting products to local preferences;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 47 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital C a (new)
Ca. whereas several public opinion surveys have shown that consumers are agitated by such differences in quality, and feel as second class citizens of the EU;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 49 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital C b (new)
Cb. whereas the brand has a significant impact on consumer perception of the product, its value and its quality;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 52 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph –1 (new)
-1. Welcomes the recent Commission initiatives to address the issue, in particular the updating of the Unfair Commercial Practices Directive;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 54 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Welcomes the allocation of EUR 2 million for the development of a common testing methodology, and the inclusion in the EU budget for 2018 of a pilot project that aims to assess different aspects of dual quality for several categories of products; urges Member States and national authorities to actively participate in ongoing initiatives to facilitate the process; highlights the importance of in-depth and timely analysis of food but also non-food products;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 58 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Stresses the urgent need to develop a common testing methodology; highlights the commitment that EU-wide testing results should be available by the end of this year; calls for stronger involvement of the Members of the European Parliament in the process;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 62 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Welcomes the debate on dual quality within the High Level Forum for a Better Functioning Food Supply Chain; stresses the need to involve as many interested actors as possible;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 77 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3a. Is concerned about territorial constraints for traders when purchasing goods; calls on the Commission to examine such cases to enable consumers to fully benefit from the single market;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 79 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 b (new)
3b. Notes that the local producers have difficulties in partaking in the common market, calls on the Commission to determine whether dual quality has negative repercussions for local and regional production;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 89 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. Calls for the increased support for national consumer organisations, so that they can build capacity, develop their testing activities and contribute, alongside with competent authorities, to tracking and exposing situations of unfair product differentiation;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 92 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 b (new)
4b. Acknowledges the argument that products might differ due to consumer preferences, stresses however that consumers should be clearly and timely informed of such differences;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 102 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5a. Strongly condemns the argument that optimisation of composition and/or quality results from consumers' price expectations; highlights that various studies have shown that products of lower quality are often more expensive than their counterparts of higher quality elsewhere in the EU;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 124 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Underlines that national authorities are unable to tackle this issue individually, and calls therefore for a solution to be found at EU level; recalls that Directive 2005/29/EC on unfair commercial practices (UCPD)3 is the main tool for protecting consumers from misleading and unfair practices; calls on the Commission to amendbelieves that amending the Annex I to the UCPD by adding the practice of dual quality to the blacklist. _________________ 3 is the most effective way to tackle cases of dual quality on the market; _________________ 3 OJ L 149, 11.6.2005, p. 22. OJ L 149, 11.6.2005, p. 22.
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 132 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7a. Highlights the need to have effective and comprehensive legislation with clear instructions on how to tackle the issue of dual quality;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 16 #

2018/0358M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Recital H
H. whereas the agreement builds on the investment protection provisions included in the EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), which was ratified by Parliament on 15 February 2017; emphasises that the new public Investment Court System was integrated into the already finalised CETA agreement by the European Parliament's efforts, thereby replacing the old private ISDS-system.
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 30 #

2018/0358M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Welcomes the EU’s new approach to investment protection and its enforcement mechanism (ICS), which has replaced the investor-to-state dispute settlement (ISDS); underlines the fact that ICS represents a modern, innovative and reformed investment resolution mechanism; notes that it marks significant change in the level of substantive protection afforded to investors and the manner in which investor-state disputes are resolved; regrets, however, that the scope of application still extends slightly beyond mere non-discrimination between foreign and domestic investors
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 40 #

2018/0358M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Stresses that the agreement guarantees that EU investors in Vietnam will get fair and equitable treatment and will suffer no discrimination in relation to Vietnamese investors; notes that the agreement properly protects EU investors from illegitimate expropriation; regrets that protection against discriminatory measures does not go hand-in-hand with obligations for investors to exercise due diligence with regard to sustainable business practices in compliance with human rights and international labour conventions as well as environmental standards.
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 44 #

2018/0358M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Recalls that the ICS plans to establish a Permanent Investment Tribunal of First Instance and an Appeal Tribunal, whose members will have to possess comparable qualifications to those held by judges of the International Court of Justice, and will have to demonstrate expertise in public international law and not just commercial law, in addition to satisfying strict rules of independence, impartiality, integrity and ethical behaviour through a binding code of conduct designed to prevent direct or indirect conflicts of interests; stresses that the European Court of Justice sees the ICS in full compliance with EU law as expressed in opinion 1/17 of the Court.
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 31 #

2018/0356M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D
D. whereas Vietnam joined the WTO in 2007 and is now one of the most open and pro-free trade economies in the world, as shown by its 16 trade agreements with 56 countries; recognises that the EU and Vietnam continue to have widely differing stances on political and civil rights, the recommendations of international human rights bodies concerning Vietnam as well as the implementation of said recommendations; recognises that freedom of expression is restricted in Vietnam.
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 100 #

2018/0356M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Stresses the improved access under this agreement to Vietnamese public procurement in line with the Government Procurement Agreement (GPA), as Vietnam is not yet a member of the GPA; underlines that the government procurement chapter of the EVFTA achieves a degree of transparency and procedural fairness comparable to other FTAs that the EU has signed with developed and more advanced developing countries; underlines that the agreement must not restrict the political room for manoeuvre in procurements when it comes to setting requirements on what is to be procured and demands on e.g. environment, labour and employment conditions;
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 120 #

2018/0356M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 a (new)
9a. Calls on the EU and Vietnam to set up a clear action plan to help SMEs make use of the opportunities offered by the agreement, starting by increasing transparency and disseminating all the relevant information;
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 122 #

2018/0356M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Underlines that the agreement safeguards the EU’s right to apply its own standards to all goods and services sold in the EU and upholds the EU’s precautionary principle; underlines that the EU’s high standards, including in national laws, regulations and collective agreements, should never be seen as trade barriers;
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 136 #

2018/0356M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 a (new)
11a. Welcomes the commitments made by Vietnam in the TSD chapter of the Agreement but calls for additional efforts in order to demonstrate effective progress and the full implementation of commitments therein, inter alia, by giving evidence of tangible action aiming at eradicating persecution of community leaders, including human rights defenders, environmental activists and workers' rights activists;
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 137 #

2018/0356M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 a (new)
11a. Regrets that the efforts to improve the enforceability of the TSD chapter, as repeatedly called for by the European Parliament and also mentioned in the mission letter for the new EU Trade Commissioner, are not yet reflected in this agreement. Calls on the Joint Committee to immediately begin work on strengthening the enforcement of TSD provisions.
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 139 #

2018/0356M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 b (new)
11b. Recalls that Article 8 in the Treaty of the Functioning of the European Union states that “in all its activities, the Union shall aim to eliminate inequalities, and to promote equality, between men and women”; welcomes that both Vietnam and the EU have signed the WTO Buenos Aires Declaration on Women and Trade and calls on the Parties to put in value and practice the responsibilities undertaken therein, by strengthening and improving the commitments on gender and trade in this agreement; recalls the Commission´s engagement to include Gender Chapters in future EU trade agreements; is aware that this commitment was taken after the Free Trade Agreement with Vietnam was concluded, notwithstanding, calls on the EU and Vietnam to commit themselves to evaluate its implementation on the basis of gender disaggregated data and to include a specific Chapter on Gender and Trade in its future review;
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 141 #

2018/0356M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 b (new)
11b. Calls for the establishment of a Joint Committee of the Vietnamese National Assembly and the European Parliament to improve coordination and review of the measures of the TSD chapter and the implementation of the agreement as a whole, welcomes the favourable position of the Chairperson of the National Assembly of Vietnam towards this call for action and calls for a Memorandum of Understanding between both parliaments to be negotiated rapidly.
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 142 #

2018/0356M(NLE)

11c. Calls the EU and Vietnam to cooperate to develop an action plan, accompanied by available EU programmes, to fight child labour, including the necessary due diligence framework for enterprises;
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 144 #

2018/0356M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Welcomes the concrete steps taken by the Vietnamese Government so far, including amending labour legislation and the legal framework on the minimum age at work, aimed at abolishing child labour and making commitments on non- discrimination and gender equality at work; encourages the Vietnamese National Assembly to finalise these steps as announced at the end of November 2019
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 159 #

2018/0356M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 a (new)
13a. Encourages the Parties to make full use of the provisions for cooperation on improving animal welfare and on capacity building for the development of high animal welfare standards; calls on the Parties to develop an action plan for the cooperation on animal welfare as soon as possible;
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 160 #

2018/0356M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 a (new)
13a. Stresses the central role of implementing decrees in the implementation of the revised labour code and ratified ILO conventions, stresses the European Parliament's willingness to engage in an active dialogue on this issue and calls on the EU to support necessary capacity building measures.
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 164 #

2018/0356M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14
14. Welcomes the commitment to effectively implement multilateral environmental agreements such as the Paris Agreement on climate change, and to act in favour of the conservation and sustainable management of wildlife, biodiversity and forestry; recalls that the Agreement provides for specific measures to fight against Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated fishing (IUU) and to promote a sustainable and responsible fishery sector, including aquaculture; recognises in this context the yellow card Vietnam has been given as well as the measures already taken to improve the situation; calls for further action in line with the findings of the November 2019 review mission.
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 168 #

2018/0356M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14
14. Welcomes the commitment to effectively implement multilateral environmental agreements such as the Paris Agreement on climate change, and to act in favour of the conservation and sustainable management of wildlife, biodiversity and forestry; underlines the importance of both Parties’ effective implementation of the Paris Agreement and of cooperation on these matters; recalls that the Agreement provides for specific measures to fight against Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated fishing (IUU) and to promote a sustainable and responsible fishery sector, including aquaculture;
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 192 #

2018/0356M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18
18. Stresses that the involvement of civil society in monitoring the implementation of the agreement is crucial, and calls for the swift establishment of domestic advisory groups following the entry into force of the agreement and for the balanced representation of civil society therein;therein, including independent organisations from the labour and environmental sectors; supports the efforts of civil society organisations in Vietnam to develop proposals in this regard and will support capacity building efforts; calls on the government of Vietnam to swiftly begin preparations for the establishment of DAGs.
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 195 #

2018/0356M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18
18. Stresses that the involvement of independent civil society and social partners in monitoring the implementation of the agreement is crucial, and calls for the swift establishment of domestic advisory groups following the entry into force of the agreement and for the balanced representation of civil society thereiindependent, free and diverse civil society organisations therein, including representatives for organisations for human rights, labour rights and environmental protection;
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 201 #

2018/0356M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18 a (new)
18a. Renews its concerns regarding the implementation of the new Cyber security Act, specifically on localisation and disclosure requirements as well as the protection of personal data. Welcomes the willingness to engage in an intensive dialogue, including the commitment of the Chairperson of the National Assembly of Vietnam to include both parliaments in the discussion and deliberation of the implementing decrees.
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 206 #

2018/0356M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19
19. Acknowledges the institutional and legal link between the FTA and the PCA, which ensures that human rights are placed at the core of the EU-Vietnam relationship; urges the Parties to make full use of the agreements in order to improve the urgent human rights situation in Vietnam; underlines the importance of an ambitious Human Rights Dialogue between the EU and Vietnam;
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 212 #

2018/0356M(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19 a (new)
19a. Stresses that the agreement has already fostered changes in many areas through dialogue and sees the agreement as the basis for further improvements for the people through dialogue.
2019/11/13
Committee: INTA
Amendment 10 #

2018/0336(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 4 a (new)
(4 a) Whereas, the committee upon its deliberations in assessing potential infringement of the rules on protection of personal data should take extra care when scrutinizing online campaigns conducted via digital platforms, including but not limited, to Facebook.
2018/11/23
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 27 #

2018/0332(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 4
(4) A lively public debate is taking place on summer-time arrangements and some Member States, including a significant portion of the public, have already expressed their preference to discontinue the application of such arrangements. In the light of these developments, it is necessary to continue safeguarding the proper functioning of the internal market and to avoid any significant disruptions thereto caused by divergences between Member States in this area. Therefore, it is appropriate to put an end in a coordinated way to summer-time arrangements.
2019/01/28
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 47 #

2018/0331(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 1
(1) This Regulation aims at ensuring the smooth and transparent functioning of the digital single market in an open and democratic society, by preventing the misuse of hosting services for terrorist purposes. The functioning of the digital single market should be improved by reinforcing legal certainty for hosting service providers, reinforcing users’ trust in the online environment, and by strengthening safeguards to the freedom of expression and information.
2019/02/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 99 #

2018/0331(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 9
(9) In order to provide clarity about the actions that both hosting service providers and competent authorities should take to prevent the dissemination of terrorist content online, this Regulation should establish a definition of terrorist content for preventative purposes drawing on the definition of terrorist offences under Directive (EU) 2017/541 of the European Parliament and of the Council9 . Given the need to address the most harmful terrorist propaganda online, the definition should capture material and information that incites, encourages or advocates the commission or contribution to terrorist offences, provides instructions for the commission of such offences or promotes the participation in activities of a terrorist group. Such information includes in particular, but is not limited to text, images, sound recordings and videos. When assessing whether content constitutes terrorist content within the meaning of this Regulation, competent authorities as well as hosting service providers should take into account factors such as the nature and wording of the statements, the context in which the statements were made and their potential to lead to harmful consequences, thereby affecting the security and safety of persons. The fact that the material was produced by, is attributable to or disseminated on behalf of an EU-listed terrorist organisation or person constitutes an important factor in the assessment. Content disseminated for educational, journalistic or research purposes should be adequately protected. Furthermore, the expression of radical, polemic or controversial views in the public debate on sensitive political questions should not be considered terrorist content. _________________ 9Directive (EU) 2017/541 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 March 2017 on combating terrorism and replacing Council Framework Decision 2002/475/JHA and amending Council Decision 2005/671/JHA (OJ L 88, 31.3.2017, p. 6).
2019/02/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 113 #

2018/0331(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 11
(11) A substantial connection to the Union should be relevant to determine the scope of this Regulation. Such a substantial connection to the Union should be considered to exist where the service provider has an establishment in the Union or, in its absence, on the basis of the existence of a significantsubstantial number of users in one or more Member States, or the targeting of activities towards one or more Member States. The targeting of activities towards one or more Member States can be determined on the basis of all relevant circumstances, including factors such as the use of a language or a currency generally used in that Member State, or the possibility of ordering goods or services. The targeting of activities towards a Member State could also be derived from the availability of an application in the relevant national application store, from providing local advertising or advertising in the language used in that Member State, or from the handling of customer relations such as by providing customer service in the language generally used in that Member State. A substantial connection should also be assumed where a service provider directs its activities towards one or more Member State as set out in Article 17(1)(c) of Regulation 1215/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council10 . On the other hand, provision of the service in view of mere compliance with the prohibition to discriminate laid down in Regulation (EU) 2018/302 of the European Parliament and of the Council11 cannot, on that ground alone, be considered as directing or targeting activities towards a given territory within the Union. _________________ 10 Regulation (EU) 1215/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 12 December 2012 on jurisdiction and the recognition and enforcement of judgments in civil and commercial matters (OJ L 351, 20.12.2012, p. 1). 11 Regulation (EU) 2018/302 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 28 February 2018 on addressing unjustified geo-blocking and other forms of discrimination based on customers’ nationality, place of residence or place of establishment within the internal market and amending Regulations (EC) No 2006/2004 and (EU) 2017/2394 and Directive 2009/22/EC (OJ L 601, 2.3.2018, p. 1).
2019/02/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 123 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Title 1
Proposal for a DIRECTIVE OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL on common standards and procedures in Member States for returning illegalrregularly staying third-country nationals (recast) A contribution from the European Commission to the Leaders’ meeting in Salzburg on 19-20 September 2018
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 134 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 4
(4) That European return policy should be based on common standards, for persons to be returned in a humane manner and with full respect for their fundamental rights and dignity, as well as international law, including refugee protection and human rights obligations. Clear, transparent and fair rules need to be established to provide for an effective return policy which serves as a deterrent to irregular migrationn effective and efficient return policy and ensures coherence with and contributes to the integrity of the Common European Asylum System and the legal migration system.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 136 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 6
(6) Member States should ensure that the ending of illegalrregular stay of third- country nationals is carried out through a fair and transparent procedure. According to general principles of EU law, decisions taken under this Directive should be adopted on a case-by-case basis and based on objective criteria, implying that consideration should go beyond the mere fact of an illegalrregular stay. When using standard forms for decisions related to return, namely return decisions and, if issued, entry-ban decisions and decisions on removal, Member States should respect that principle and fully comply with all applicable provisions of this Directive.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 143 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 8
(8) The need for Union and bilateral readmission agreements with third countries to facilitate the return process is underlined. International cooperation with countries of origin at all stages of the return process is a prerequisite to achieving sustainable return. Continued efforts to improve already existing bilateral readmission agreements should be maintained. Efforts should be made to align the existing readmission agreements to this Directive.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 148 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 9
(9) It is recognised that it is legitimate for Member States to return illegalrregularly staying third-country nationals, provided that fair and efficient asylum systems are in place which fully respect the principle of non-refoulement.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 150 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 10
(10) In accordance with Council Directive 2005/85/EC12 , a third-country national who has applied for asylum in a Member State should not be regarded as staying illegalrregularly on the territory of that Member State until a negative decision on the application, or a decision ending his or her right of stay as asylum seeker has entered into force. __________________ 12Council Directive 2005/85/EC of 1 December 2005 on minimum standards on procedures in Member States for granting and withdrawing refugee status (OJ L 326, 13.12.2005, p. 13).
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 154 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 11
(11) To ensure clearer and more effective rules for granting a period for voluntary departure and detaining a third- country national, determining whether there is or there is not a risk of absconding should be based on Union-wide objective criteria. Moreover this Directive should set out specific criteria which establish a ground for a rebuttable presumption that a risk of absconding existsand limited criteria.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 172 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 14
(14) In order to promote voluntary return, Member States should have operational programmes providing for enhanced return assistance and counselling, which mayshould include support for reintegration in third countries of return, taking into account the common standards on Assisted Voluntary Return and Reintegration Programmes developed by the Commission in cooperation with Member States and endorsed by the Council.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 210 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 22
(22) The situation of third-country nationals who are staying illegalrregularly but who cannot yet be removed should be addressed. Their basic conditions of subsistence should be defined according to national legislation. In order to be able to demonstrate their specific situation in the event of administrative controls or checks, such persons should be provided with written confirmation of their situation. Member States should enjoy wide discretion concerning the form and format of the written confirmation and should also be able to include it in decisions related to return adopted under this Directive.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 273 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 38 a (new)
(38a) Union data protection legislation is applicable to any processing of personal data in the return management systems of the Member States, including the communication of this data to the central system operated by the European Border and Coast Guard Agency. Return management systems should respect the principles of lawfulness, fairness and transparency; purpose limitation; data minimisation; accuracy; storage limitation; integrity and confidentiality; and accountability of the data controller. The national return management systems should not contain any information obtained during the personal interview carried out on the basis of Article 15 of Directive 2013/32/EU (Asylum Procedures Directive).
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 331 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 – paragraph 1 – point b
(b) lack of residence, fixed abode or reliable address;deleted
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 336 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 – paragraph 1 – point c
(c) lack of financial resources;deleted
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 377 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 7 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
1. Member States shall impose on third-country nationals the obligation to cooperate withfacilitate the cooperation between third-country nationals and the competent authorities of the Member States at all stages of the return procedures. That obligation shall include the following in particular:All information on the procedure shall be given to the third country nationals in a language which they understand.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 411 #
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 413 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 1
1. Member States shall issue a return decision to any third-country national staying illegalrregularly on their territory, without prejudice to the exceptions referred to in paragraphs 2 to 5.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 415 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 2
2. Third-country nationals staying illegalrregularly on the territory of a Member State and holding a valid residence permit or other authorisation offering a right to stay issued by another Member State shall be required to go to the territory of that other Member State immediately. In the event of non-compliance by the third- country national concerned with this requirement, or where the third-country national’s immediate departure is required for reasons of public policy or national security, paragraph 1 shall apply.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 417 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 3
3. Member States may refrain from issuing a return decision to a third-country national staying illegalrregularly on their territory if the third-country national concerned is taken back by another Member State under bilateral agreements or arrangements existing on 13 January 2009. In such a case the Member State which has taken back the third-country national concerned shall apply paragraph 1.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 419 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 4
4. Member States may at any moment decide to grant an autonomous residence permit or other authorisation offering a right to stay for compassionate, humanitarian or other reasons to a third- country national staying illegalrregularly on their territory. In that event no return decision shall be issued. Where a return decision has already been issued, it shall be withdrawn or suspended for the duration of validity of the residence permit or other authorisation offering a right to stay.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 421 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 5
5. If a third-country national staying illegalrregularly on the territory of a Member State is the subject of a pending procedure for renewing his or her residence permit or other authorisation offering a right to stay, that Member State shall consider refraining from issuing a return decision, until the pending procedure is finished.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 425 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 6 – subparagraph 1
Member States shallmay issue a return decision immediately after the adoption of a decision ending a legal stay of a third- country national, including a decision not granting a third-country national refugee status or subsidiary protection status in accordance with Regulation (EU) …/… [Qualification Regulation].
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 469 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 10 – paragraph 1
1. Member States shall take all necessary measures to enforce the return decision if no period for voluntary departure has been granted in accordance with Article 9(4) or if the obligation to return has not been complied with within the period for voluntary departure granted in accordance with Article 9. Those measures shall include all measures necessary to confirm the identity of illegalrregularly staying third-country nationals who do not hold a valid travel document and to obtain such a document.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 484 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 12 – paragraph 1
1. Before deciding to issue a return decision in respect of an unaccompanied minor, assistance by appropriate bodies other than the authorities enforcing return shall be granted with due consideration being given to the best interests of the child.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 492 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 – introductory part
Return decisions shallmay be accompanied by an entry ban:
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 510 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 14 – paragraph 1
1. Each Member State shall set up, operate, maintain and further develop a national return management system, which shall process all the necessary information for implementing this Directive, in particular as regards the management of individual cases as well as of any return- related procedure, including reintegration in the country of return.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 517 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 14 – paragraph 3 – subparagraph 1
Member States shall establish programmes for providing logistical, financial and other material or in-kind assistance, in accordance with national legislation, for the purpose of supporting the return of illegalrregularly staying third-country nationals who are nationals of third countries listed in Annex I to Council Regulation 539/200130 . __________________ 30Council Regulation (EC) No 539/2001 of 15 March 2001 listing the third countries whose nationals must be in possession of visas when crossing the external borders and those whose nationals are exempt from that requirement (OJ L 81, 21.3.2001, p. 1).
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 521 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 14 – paragraph 3 – subparagraph 2
Such assistance mayshall include support for reintegration in the third country of return.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 534 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 15 – paragraph 2
2. Member States shall provide, upon request, a written or oral translation of the main elements of decisions related to return, as referred to in paragraph 1, including information on the available legal remedies in a language the third- country national understands or may reasonably be presumed to understand.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 617 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 20 – paragraph 2
2. Families detained pending removal shall be providedPending removal families and unaccompanied minors shall be provided with alternative measures to detention, with separate accommodation guaranteeing adequate privacy.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 626 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 20 – paragraph 4
4. Unaccompanied minors shall as far as possibleMinors shall be provided with accommodation in institutions provided with personnel and facilities which take into account the needs of persons of their age.
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 638 #

2018/0329(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 22 – paragraph 1
1. Member States shall establish return procedures applicable to illegalrregularly staying third-country nationals subject to an obligation to return following a decision rejecting an application for international protection taken by virtue of Article 41 of Regulation (EU) …/… [Asylum Procedure Regulation].
2019/02/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 16 #

2018/0218(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 1
(1) The Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions entitled ‘The Future of Food and Farming’ of 29 November 2017 sets out the challenges, objectives and orientations for the future Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) after 2020. These objectives include, inter alia, the need for the CAP to be more result-driven, to boost modernisation and sustainability, including the economic, social, environmental and climate sustainability of the, including the incorporation of sustainable development goals in the development of agricultural systems, forestry and rural areas, and to help reducing the Union legislation- related administrative burden for beneficiaries.
2019/01/10
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 91 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 7
(7) Complying with the Union's commitments under the Paris Agreement on Climate Change requires the transformation of the Union into an circular-energy efficient, renewable energy based, low carbon and climate resilient society. This in turn requires actions, with a special focus on sectors that contribute most to the current levels of CO2greenhouse gas output and pollution, contributing to the implementation of the 2030 energy and climate policy frameworkEuropean Union objectives agreed in the Climate and Energy legislation and the Member States' Integrated National Energy and Climate Plans and preparations for the Union's mid-century and long-term climate and energy strategy. The Programme should also include measures contributing to the implementation of the Union's climate adaptation policy to decrease vulnerability to the adverse effects of climate change.
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 100 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 12
(12) The Union's most recent Environmental Implementation Review package21 indicates that significant progress is required to accelerate implementation of the Union environment acquis and enhance the integration of environmental and climate objectives into other policies. The Programme should therefore act as a catalyst to achieve the required progress through developing, testing and replicating new approaches; supporting policy development, monitoring and review; promoting greater awareness and communication; developing good governance; enhancing stakeholder involvement; mobilising investments across Union investment programmes or other financial sources and supporting actions to overcome the various obstacles to the effective implementation of key plans required by environment legislation. _________________ 21 Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions - The EU Environmental Implementation Review: Common challenges and how to combine efforts to deliver better results (COM/2017/063 final).
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 115 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 17
(17) The Union's long-term objective for air policy is to achieve levels of air quality that do not cause significant negative impacts on and risks to human health. Public awareness about air pollution is high and citizens expect authorities to act. Directive (EU) 2016/2284 of the European Parliament and of the Council26 stresses the role Union funding can play in achieving clean air objectives. Therefore, the Programme should support projects, including strategic integrated projects, which have the potential to leverage public and private funds, to be showcases of good practice and catalysts for the implementation of air quality plans and legislation at local, regional, multi- regional, national and trans-national level. These efforts to improve air quality should be consistent with the greenhouse gas lowering requirements and the long term need to decarbonise the European economy, gradually replacing fossil-based energy infrastructures with infrastructures based on renewable energy sources, where technically possible. _________________ 26 Directive (EU) 2016/2284 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 December 2016 on the reduction of national emissions of certain atmospheric pollutants, amending Directive 2003/35/EC and repealing Directive 2001/81/EC (OJ L 344, 17.12.2016, p. 1).
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 119 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 17 a (new)
(17a) Special attention should be given to promoting the abandonment of sources of air pollution, in particular fossil-fuel based domestic heating and power plants. To address the problem of air pollution, efforts should be focused on switching to renewable energy sources, thereby favouring a long-term perspective.
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 125 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 20
(20) The improvement of governance on environmental, climate change and related clean energy transition matters requires involvement of civil society by raising public awareness, including through a communication strategy that takes into account the new media and social networks, increases consumer engagement, and broadening ofs stakeholder involvement, including non-governmental organisations, in consultation on and implementation of related policies.
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 133 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 22
(22) The Programme should prepare and support market players for the shift towards a clean, circular, energy-efficient, renewable energy based, low-carbon and climate-resilient economy by testing new business opportunities, upgrading professional skills, facilitating consumers' access to sustainable products and services, engaging and empowering influencers and testing novel methods to adapt the existing processes and business landscape. To support a broader market uptake of sustainable solutions, general public acceptance and consumer engagement should be promoted. The final consuming sectors such as buildings, services, industry and transport should be included in the sub-programme Clean Energy Transition to contribute to energy efficiency and renewable energy use.
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 141 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 24
(24) Reflecting the importance of tackling climate change iTackling climate change is one of the most important global challenges requiring a coordinated and ambitious response. In line with the Union's commitments to implement the Paris Agreement and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, this Programme will contribute to mainstream climate actions and to the achievement of an overall target of 25 % of the EU budget expenditures supporting climate objectives. Actions under this Programme are expected to contribute 61% of the overall financial envelope of the Programme to climate objectives. Relevant actions will be identified during the Programme's preparation and implementation, and reassessed in the context of the relevant evaluations and review processes.
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 147 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 25
(25) In the implementation of the Programme due consideration should be given to the strategy for outermost regions30 in view of Article 349 TFEU and the specific needs and vulnerabilities of these regions. Union policies other than environmental, climate, circular economy and relevant clean energy transition policies should also be taken into account. _________________ 30 COM(2017) 623 final
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 176 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1
1. The general objective of the Programme is to contribute to the shift towards a clean, circular,sustainable, circular, resource- and energy-efficient, low-carbon and climate-resilient economy, including through the transition to clean energy- efficient and renewables-based energy system, to the protection and improvement of the quality of the environment and to halting and reversing biodiversity loss, thereby contributing to sustainable development. The Programme shall also contribute to better environmental and climate governance at all levels, including better involvement of civil society, NGOs and local actors.
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 182 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point a
(a) to develop, demonstrate and promote innovative techniques and approaches for reaching the objectives of the Union legislation and policy on environment and climate action, including the transition to clean energrenewable energy and increased energy efficiency, and to contribute to the application of best practice and to improve the knowledge in relation to nature and biodiversity;
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 205 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 5 – paragraph 1
1. The financial envelope for the implementation of the Programme for the period 2021-2027 shall be EUR 5 4507 272 000 000 in current prices.
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 208 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 5 – paragraph 2 – point a – introductory part
(a) EUR 3 5005 322 000 000 for the field Environment, of which
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 212 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 5 – paragraph 2 – point a – point 1
(1) EUR 2 150 003 261 420 000 for the sub- programme Nature and Biodiversity and
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 217 #

2018/0209(COD)

(2) EUR 1 350 002 060 580 000 for the sub- programme Circular Economy and Quality of Life;
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 254 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 1
The Programme shall be implemented in a way which ensures its consistency with the European Regional Development Fund, the European Social Fund, the Cohesion Fund, the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development, and the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund, Horizon Europe, Innovation Fund under the Emission Trading System, the Connecting Europe Facility and InvestEU, in order to create synergies, particularly as regards strategic nature projects and strategic integrated projects, and to support the uptake and replication of solutions developed under the Programme.
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 263 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 1
Grants under the Programme shall be awarded and managed in accordance with Title VIII of the Financial Regulation and co-financed by a rate of 75% of total eligible costs.
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 273 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. A legal entity established outside the Union may be able to participate in the projects referred to in Article 10, provided the beneficiary coordinating the project is based in the Union and the activity to be carried out outside the Union meets the requirements set out in paragraph 4 of Article 10.
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 283 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) projects financed by the Programme shall avoid underminingcontribute to environmental, climate or relevant clean energy objectives of the Programme and, whenevere possible, shall promote the use of green public procurement;
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 287 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point a a (new)
(a a) projects financed by the Programme shall make a significant contribution to the achievement of at least one of the objectives set out in Article 3;
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 288 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point a b (new)
(a b) projects financed by the Programme shall be cost-effective and technically and financially coherent;
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 296 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point f
(f) where appropriate, special regard shall be given to projects in geographical areas with specific needs or vulnerabilities, such as areas where rehabilitation of polluted sites is needed, areas with specific environmental challenges or natural constraints, trans- border areas or outermost regions.
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 307 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 1
1. The Programme shall be implemented by at least two multiannual work programmes referred to in Article 110 of the Financial Regulation. Work programmes shall set out, where applicable, the overall amount reserved for blending operations.Commission is empowered to adopt delegated acts in accordance with Article 21 to complement this Regulation by adopting at least two multiannual work programmes referred to in Article 110 of the Financial Regulation;
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 313 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. The Commission shall ensure that co-legislators and stakeholders are adequately consulted when work programmes are developed.
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 317 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 2 – point c a (new)
(c a) the technical methodology for the project selection procedure and selection and award criteria for grants in conformity with Articles 2 and 13 of this Regulation;
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 319 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 2 – point c c (new)
(c c) qualitative and quantitative output and impact indicators, in accordance with Article 18(3), for each sub-programme and type of projects;
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 321 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 2 – point c b (new)
(c b) indicative timetables for the calls for proposals for the period covered by the multiannual work programme;
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 325 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. The Commission shall ensure that unused funds in a given call for proposals are reallocated between the different types of projects referred to in Article 10.2.
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 329 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 19 – paragraph 2
2. The interim evaluation of the Programme shall be performed once there is sufficient information available about the implementation of the Programme, but no later than four years after the start of the Programme implementation. That interim evaluation shall, where necessary, be accompanied by a proposal for an amendment of this Regulation.
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 330 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 19 – paragraph 4
4. The Commission shall communicate the conclusions of the evaluations accompanied by its observations, to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions. The Commission shall make the results of the evaluations publicly available.
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 82 #

2018/0104(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 9
(9) Security features are necessary to verify if a document is authentic and to establish the identity of a person. The establishment of minimum security standards and the integration of biometric data in identity cards and in residence cards of family members who are not nationals of a Member State is an important step to render their use in the Union more secure. The inclusion of such biometric identifiers should allow citizens to fully benefit from their free movement rights.
2018/10/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 83 #

2018/0104(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 9 a (new)
(9 a) This Regulation does not establish a centralised database at Union level and the biometric data collected for the purpose of this Regulation should not be stored in national databases. Biometric identifiers outside the storage medium should be stored in a highly secure manner only for the time required to produce the national identity card or residence cards and destroyed once stored in the storage medium.
2018/10/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 100 #

2018/0104(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 17
(17) Identity cards as well as residence cards of a family member of a Union citizen with insufficient security standards should be phased out taking into account both the security risk and the costs incurred by Member States. In general, a period of five years should be sufficient to strike a balance between the frequency with which documents are usually replaced and the need to fill the existing security gap within the European Union. However, for cards which do not have important features, in particular machine readability, a shorter period of two years is necessary on security grounds.deleted
2018/10/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 102 #

2018/0104(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 19
(19) It is necessary to specify in this Regulation the basis for the collection and storage of data on the storage medium of identity cards and residence documents. In accordance with their national legislation or Union law, Member States may store other data on a storage medium for electronic services or other purposes relating to the identity card or residence document. The processing of such data including their collection and the purposes for which they can be used should be authorised by national or Union law. All national data should be physically or logically separated from biometric data referred to in this Regulation. When entering and storing extra data in accordance with their national legislation or Union law, Member States should have performed a thorough data protection impact assessment, with a focus on processing of special categories of personal data. Member States should explicitly inform the applicants for documents, in written form and with an exhaustive list, about all the possible extra data stored.
2018/10/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 105 #

2018/0104(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 19 a (new)
(19 a) The introduction of new security features for identity cards of Union citizens and of residence documents issued to Union citizens and their family members should not cause higher fees for issuing such documents.
2018/10/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 129 #

2018/0104(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 5 – introductory part
(5) The following persons shall be exempt from the requirement to give fingerprints, if a Member State decides to take such fingerprints:
2018/10/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 155 #

2018/0104(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 5 – paragraph 1
Identity cards which do not meet the requirements of Article 3 shall cease to be valid at their expiry or by five years after [the date of application of the Regulation], whichever is earlier. However, identity cards which do not include a functional machine-readable zone (MRZ) compliant with ICAO document 9303 part 3 (seventh edition, 2015) shall cease to be valid at their expiry or by two years after [the date of application of this Regulation], whichever is earlierbe valid until the end of their validity period.
2018/10/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 165 #

2018/0104(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – title
7 UMutual recognition and uniform format
2018/10/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 166 #

2018/0104(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 1 a (new)
(1 a) Residence cards for family members of Union citizens who are not nationals of a Member State shall be mutually recognised by Member States both as identity and travel documents.
2018/10/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 171 #

2018/0104(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 2 a (new)
(2 a) This Regulation does not establish a centralised database at Union level and the biometric data collected for the purpose of this Regulation shall under no circumstances be stored in national databases. Biometric identifiers outside the storage medium shall be stored in a highly secure manner only for the time required to produce the national identity card or residence cards and destroyed immediately once stored in the storage medium.
2018/10/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 172 #

2018/0104(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 a (new)
Article 9 a The procedure for taking fingerprints and a facial image shall fully respect the specific needs of children and be applied in accordance with the safeguards laid down in Article 24 the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, in the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms and in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. The principle of the best interest of the child shall be a primary consideration during the whole procedure of taking biometric data.
2018/10/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 173 #

2018/0104(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 b (new)
Article 9 b Collection of biometric identifiers (1) The biometric identifiers shall be collected by qualified and duly authorised staff designated by the national authorities responsible for issuing identity cards. (2) Where difficulties are encountered in the collection of biometric identifiers, Member States shall ensure that appropriate procedures are in place to guarantee the dignity of the person concerned. (3) Facial images shall be collected by authorized officers on the spot where and when the EU citizen applies for a national identity card.
2018/10/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 175 #

2018/0104(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 1
(1) Without prejudice to the application of Regulation (EU) 2016/679, persons to whom an identity card or residence document is issued shall have the right to verify the personal data contained in the documents and, where appropriate, to ask for rectification or erasure. Member States shall put in place specific procedures that facilitate the exercise of these rights.
2018/10/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 197 #

2018/0104(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 12 – paragraph 2
(2) No sooner than six years after the date of application of this Regulation, the Commission shall carry out an evaluation of this Regulation and present a report on the main findings to the European Parliament, the Council and the European Economic and Social Committee, with a special focus on the impact on fundamental rights of European citizens. The evaluation shall be conducted according to the Commission's better regulation Guidelines.
2018/10/11
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 7 #

2018/0065(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 7
(7) The technology that is necessary to meet the Euro 5 limits is already available however the Commission concluded in its report to the European Parliament and the Council on the basis of the comprehensive environmental effect study carried out according to Article 23(4) of Regulation (EU) No 168/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council regarding the Euro 5 emission step, that the date of application of the Euro 5 emission limits for certain L-category vehicles (L6e-B, L2e-U, L3e-AxT and L3e-AxE) will need to be postponed from 2020 to 2022 to increase the cost beneficial ratio compared to the base line. In addition manufacturers of these vehicles, which are mainly SMEs, require more lead time to ensure that the transition towards zero emission powertrains, such as electrification can be achieved in a cost effective way. However, it is recognised that early transition towards zero emission technology, where possible, will have a positive impact on the overall environmental goals of the Union.
2018/06/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 176 #

2018/0018(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 1
(1) The development of health technologies is a key driver of economic growth and innovation for the benefit of all citizens in the Union. It forms part of an overall market for healthcare expenditure that accounts for 10% of EU gross domestic product. Health technologies encompass medicinal products, medical devices and medical procedures, as well as measures for disease prevention, diagnosis or treatment.
2018/06/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 179 #

2018/0018(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 2
(2) Health Technology Assessment (HTA) is an evidence-based process that allows competent authorities to determine the relative effectiveness of new or existing technologies. HTA focuses specifically on the added value of a health technology in comparison with other new or existing health technologies. , and recognises the beneficial effects which these new or existing technologies may have for the health of all citizens in the Union.
2018/06/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 191 #

2018/0018(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 5
(5) The carrying out of parallel assessments by multiple Member States and divergences between national laws, regulations and administrative provisions on the processes and methodologies of assessment can result in health technology developers being confronted with multiple and divergent requests for data. It can also lead to both duplications and variations in outcomes that increase the financial and administrative burdens that act as a barrier to the free movement of the health technologies concerned and the smooth functioning of the internal market. There are also economic benefits for Members States that can be gained through the reduction of duplications and variations in outcomes.
2018/06/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 250 #

2018/0018(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 34
(34) Since the objectives of this Regulation, namely to approximate the rules of the Member States on carrying out clinical assessments at national level and establish a framework of mandatory joint clinical assessments of certain health technologies at Union level, cannot be sufficiently achieved by the Member States alone, but can rather, by reason of their scale and effects, be better achieved at Union-level, the Union may adopt measures, in accordance with the principle of subsidiarity as set out in Article 5 of the Treaty on the European Union. In accordance with the principle of proportionality, as set out in that Article, this Regulation does not go beyond what is necessary in order to achieve that objective,. The Regulation objectives are namely to approximate the rules of the Member States on carrying out clinical assessments at national level, and establish a framework of mandatory joint clinical assessments of certain health technologies at Union level.
2018/06/18
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 1 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 10 a (new)
- having regard to the Communication from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions - A thematic strategy on the sustainable use of pesticides {COM(2006) 373 final} {SEC(2006)894} {SEC(2006) 895} {SEC(2006) 914} of 12 July 2006,1a _________________ 1a https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal- content/EN/TXT/?uri=celex:52006DC037 2
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 8 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 9 a (new)
- having regard to Directive2013/39/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 12 August 2013amending Directives 2000/60/EC and 2008/105/EC as regards priority substances in the field of water policy,
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 12 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 9 b (new)
- having regard to Council Directive98/83/EC of 3 November 1998 on the quality of water intended for human consumption,
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 26 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 27 a (new)
- having regard to the Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council establishing rules on support for strategic plans to be drawn up by Member States under the Common agricultural policy (CAP Strategic Plans) and financed by the European Agricultural Guarantee Fund (EAGF) and by the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD) and repealing Regulation (EU)No 1305/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council and Regulation (EU)No 1307/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council (COM(2018)392 final,
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 42 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B a (new)
B a. whereas the use of conventional plant protection products is increasingly subject to public debate, due to the potential risks they pose to human health, animals and the environment;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 44 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B b (new)
B b. whereas Integrated Pest Management implementation is mandatory in the Union in accordance with the Directive; whereas Member States and local authorities should place more emphasis on the sustainable use of pesticides, including low-risk plant protection alternatives;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 47 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B c (new)
B c. whereas the available evidence clearly shows that the implementation of the Directive is not sufficiently aligned with related EU policies in the field of pesticides, agriculture and sustainable development, notably but not exclusively the Common Agricultural Policy and Plant Protection Products Regulation;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 48 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B d (new)
B d. whereas Europe currently stands at a crossroads that will determine thefuture of the agriculture sector and the Union’s possibility to achieve a sustainable use of pesticides, most notably through the reform of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP); whereas the reform of the CAP brings with it a substantial potential to strengthen the streamlining and harmonisation of policies as well as the implementation of the Directive and to facilitate the transition towards more environmentally- sustainable agricultural practices;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 50 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B e (new)
B e. whereas there is increasing evidence of an ongoing mass death of insects in Europe; whereas the observed sharp decline in insects has negative impacts on the entire ecosystem and biological diversity but also on the agricultural sector and its future economic wellbeing and output; whereas there is indisputable evidence that the decline in insects is linked to the current levels of pesticide use;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 51 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B f (new)
B f. whereas stakeholders in the agricultural sector are concerned that the insufficient implementation of the Directive has de facto created a unlevelled playing field in Europe with diverging national practices impeding the optimal uptake of sustainable alternatives on the market; whereas this situation has created economic barriers for alternative low-risk and non-chemical products to sufficiently penetrate the EU market which reduces their attractiveness to farmers, who may instead opt for more cost-effective alternatives in the short-term;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 52 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B g (new)
B g. whereas the available evidence shows that the Directive, as well as related actions at EU-level, has great potential to further enhance and add value to national efforts and actions in the agricultural sector and protection for the environment and human health;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 53 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B h (new)
B h. whereas organic agriculture plays an important role as a low pesticide input system and should be further encouraged;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 54 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B i (new)
B i. whereas Regulation 1107/2009 obliges the Council to include in the statutory management requirement referred to in Annex III to Council Regulation (EC) No 1782/2003 of 29 September 2003 establishing common rules for direct support schemes under the Common Agricultural Policy and establishing certain support schemes for farmers, the principles of integrated pest management, including good plant protection practice and non-chemical methods of plant protection and pest and crop management;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 69 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Is concerned by the fact that the National Action Plans (NAPs) are notoriously inconsistent as regards the establishment of quantitative objectives, targets, measurements and timetables for the various action areas, making it impossible to assess the progress made; regrets the fact that just two Member States have produced a revised NAP to date;. Horizontal cooperation among Member States should be promoted and help the process of harmonization of the European approach towards sustainable use of pesticides.
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 78 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Notes that an increased uptake of IPM serves the dual purpose of strengthening the protection of the environment and biodiversity as well as reducing costs for farmers to switch to more sustainable alternatives and reduce the use of conventional pesticides;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 123 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7 a. Deplores the fact that the Commission proposal on the new post- 2020 CAP does not incorporate the principle of Integrated Pest Management in the statutory management requirements referred to in Annex III of that proposal; stresses that lack of cross- compliance between this Directive and the new CAP model will effectively hamper reducing pesticide dependency;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 141 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Emphasises the fundamental importance of biodiversity and robust ecosystems, most notably bees and other pollinating insects, for ensuring a healthy and sustainable agricultural sector; underlines that the protection of biodiversity is not exclusively a matter of protecting the environment but also a means to ensure Europe’s sustained food security in the future;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 161 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 a (new)
12 a. Notes that agriculture is the main source that causes groundwater to fail to achieve good chemical status, as it leads to pollution by nitrates and pesticides; welcomes the progress made by Member States in tackling priority substances, which has led to fewer water bodies failing to meet standards for substances, such as cadmium, lead and nickel, as well as pesticides;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 163 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 b (new)
12 b. Welcomes that several Member States and many regional and local governments have taken action to restrict or prohibit pesticide use in areas used by the public or vulnerable groups; notes however the absence of measurable targets in the majority of Member States;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 165 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 c (new)
12 c. Notes Member States’ continued support for organic agriculture as a low pesticide input system; welcomes that the number of organic farms has continued to increase in the Union but notes that progress still varies much between one Member States and another;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 166 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 d (new)
12 d. Notes the potential in using intelligent technology and precision farming as means to better administer and reduce the overall use of pesticides; stresses that the uptake of such solutions could be improved in Member States if better incorporated into training courses and certification schemes for pesticides users in the National Action Plans;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 194 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16 a (new)
16 a. Calls on the Commission to without any further delay deliver on its commitment under the 7th Environment Action Programme to put forth a Union strategy for a non-toxic environment that is conducive to innovation and the development of sustainable substitutes including non-chemical solutions, and expects the Commission to take particular account of the impacts of pesticides on the environment and human health in this strategy;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 199 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 e (new)
21 e. Calls on the Commission and Member States to ensure that the polluter- pays principle is fully implemented and effectively enforced as regards the protection of water resources;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 203 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Calls on the Commission and the Member States, while building upon the existing national indicators set under Directive and the work of the OECD, to move forward with the development of harmonised risk indicators in order to properly monitor the reduction impacts of pesticides; stresses that the harmonised risk indicators must contain different categories of pesticides, enabling comparisons and analyses not only on the basis of the quantity but also on the load of pesticides;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 206 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 a (new)
17 a. Calls on the Member States to acknowledge that Europe must act without delay to transition to a more sustainable use of pesticides and that the main responsibility for implementing such practices lies with the Member States; emphasises that swift action is essential;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 215 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18
18. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to take all the requisite measures to promote low-risk pesticides and to prioritise non-chemical options and methods which cause the least harm to health and nature; stresses that for this to be successful, the economic incentives for farmers to choose such options must be strengthened;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 260 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 a (new)
21 a. Calls on the Commission to take vigorous action against Member States that are systematically abusing derogations against banned pesticides containing neonicotinoids;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 261 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 b (new)
21 b. Calls on the Member States to take action concerning pesticide use in urban areas and provide support and information to local governments wishing to restrict and prohibit the use of pesticides in areas used by the public or vulnerable groups;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 262 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 c (new)
21 c. Calls on the Commission to set up a pan-European Platform on Sustainable Pesticides Use bringing together sectorial stakeholders and representatives at local and regional level so as to facilitate information sharing and exchange of best practices in reducing pesticides use;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 263 #

2017/2284(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 d (new)
21 d. Calls on the Commission and Member States to work towards the establishment of quantifiable national targets as well as a cumulative EU target for organic farming;
2018/11/21
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 4 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 11 a (new)
– having regard to the general interest paper Volume 38, Issue 1 from January 2018: "The Role of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) in the Fight against Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR)";
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 5 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 11 b (new)
– having regard of the Roadmap for a Strategic approach to pharmaceuticals in the environment and the current draft for a Strategic approach to pharmaceuticals in the environment1a _________________ 1a https://ec.europa.eu/info/consultations/pu blic-consultation-pharmaceuticals- environment_en#add-info
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 6 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 13 a (new)
– having regard to the proposal of a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on veterinary medicinal products (COM(2014)558 final)
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 7 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 14 a (new)
– having regard to the January 2017, EFSA and EMA Joint Scientific Opinion on the measures to reduce the use of antimicrobials and the need to use antimicrobials in food producing animals ('RONAFA' opinion);
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 9 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 14 b (new)
– having regard to the ECDC- EFSA-EMA publication which investigates the association between consumption of antimicrobials and occurrence of AMR in food-producing animals and in humans; first Joint report 2015 (JIACRA I) and second 2017 (JIACRA II);
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 12 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 16 a (new)
– having regard to ECDC Report 2016 on Antimicrobial resistance surveillance in Europe;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 14 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 16 b (new)
– having regard to the EFSA and ECDC Scientific report from February 2018, entitled “The European Union summary report on antimicrobial resistance in zoonotic and indicator bacteria from humans, animals and food in 2016”1a _________________ 1a http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/press/news/ 180227
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 26 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A a (new)
Aa. whereas at least 20% of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are estimated to be preventable by sustained and multifaceted infection prevention and control programmes1a; _________________ 1a https://ecdc.europa.eu/sites/portal/files/me dia/en/publications/Publications/healthca re-associated-infections-antimicrobial- use-PPS.pdf
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 31 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A b (new)
Ab. whereas prudent antibiotic use and infection prevention and control in all healthcare sectors are cornerstones for effectively preventing the development and transmission of antibiotic-resistant bacteria;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 39 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B a (new)
Ba. whereas vaccinations and rapid diagnostic tools (RDT) have the potential to limit antibiotic abuse; whereas RDT allow healthcare professionals to quickly diagnose a patient with a bacterial or viral infection and, consequently, to reduce the misuse of antibiotics and the risk of resistance developing1a; _________________ 1aWHO Global guidelines on the prevention of surgical site infection (2016), available at: http://www.who.int/gpsc/ssi-guidelines/en/
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 45 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C
C. whereas healthcare-associated infections (HAI) are often dueoccur due to lacking prevention measures which lead to antibiotic-resistant bacteria; whereas the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) estimates that approximately 4 million patients acquire a HAI each year in the EU and that approximately 37 000 deaths result directly from these infections;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 49 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C a (new)
Ca. whereas active screening programs with RDT have been proven to significantly contribute to the control of HAI and the reduction of the spread within hospitals and between patients1a _________________ 1aCelsus Academie voor Betaalbare zorg. Cost-effectiveness of policies to limit antimicrobial resistance in dutch healthcare organisations. Research report. January 2016. Available at: https://goo.gl/wAeN3L
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 52 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C b (new)
Cb. whereas the use of medical devices can prevent Surgical Site Infections and therefore prevent and control the development of AMR1a; _________________ 1aWHO Global guidelines on the prevention of surgical site infection (2016), available at: http://www.who.int/gpsc/ssi-guidelines/en/
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 56 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D a (new)
Da. whereas drug-resistant TB is the leading cause of death from AMR;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 66 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E a (new)
Ea. whereas ECDC/EFSA/EMA are currently working on a joint mandate to provide outcome indicators for consumption of antimicrobials and AMR in food-producing animals and in humans;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 85 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Believes that in order to take sufficient steps to tackle AMR, the One Health principle must play a central role, reflecting the fact that the health of people and animals and the environment are interconnected and that diseases are transmitted from people to animals and vice versa; stresses, therefore, that diseases have to be tackled in both people and animals, while also taking into special consideration the environment, which can be another source of resistant microorganisms;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 135 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to align surveillance, monitoring and reporting of AMR patterns and pathogens; calls on the Commission to draft, in consultation with EMA, EFSA, ECDC and other key stakeholders, an EU priority pathogen list (PPL) for both humans and animals, thereby clearly setting future R&D priorities;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 137 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to align surveillance, monitoring and reporting of AMR patterns and pathogens; calls on the Commission to encourage and support Member States to put in place and monitor national targets for the surveillance and reduction of AMR/HAIs;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 156 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. Urges the Commission to expand the role and funding of the ECDC, EFSA and EMA in the fight against AMR; believes that close collaboration between these EU agencies is paramount;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 169 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Emphasises that infection prevention, biosecurity measures, active screening programs, and control practices are critical in the control of all infectious microorganisms as they reduce the need for antimicrobials and consequently opportunities for microorganisms to develop and spread resistance;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 172 #

2017/2254(INI)

6a. Stresses that compliance to infection control guidelines, integrating targets for infection rate reductions and supporting best practice all help address patient safety in the hospital environment;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 176 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 b (new)
6b. Encourages Member States to prevent the spread of infection by resistant bacteria by implementing active screening programs with rapid diagnostic technologies in order to quickly identify patients infected with multi-drug resistant bacteria and to put in place appropriate infection control measures (e.g. patient isolation, cohorting and reinforced hygiene measures);
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 193 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Urges the Commission and Member States to create harmonised quality standards in EU-wide curriculafollowing the One Health approach in EU-wide curricula, to foster interdisciplinary education and proper stewardship for health professionals in relation to prescribing, dosage, use, and disposal of antimicrobials and AMR contaminated materials;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 243 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 a (new)
11 a. Recommends that the newly- created “One Health Network”, as well as the EU Joint Action on AMR and Healthcare-Associated Infections (EU- JAMRAI) should also involve other key relevant stakeholders apart from member states;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 263 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 a (new)
12 a. Calls on the European Commission to explore how best to leverage the potential of the European Reference Networks for rare diseases and to assess their possible role in AMR research;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 279 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 a (new)
13 a. Stresses that release of pharmaceuticals into the environment is an important factor in the emergence of AMR both on a European and an international level;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 283 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 b (new)
13 b. Calls on the Commission to appropriately address the release of pharmaceuticals into the environment and the emergence of AMR in its strategic approach to pharmaceuticals in the environment;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 297 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14 a (new)
14 a. Calls on the Commission to ensure that aspects of environmental protection related to antibiotic products fall within the scope of the EU Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) to address the release of antibiotics into the environment;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 305 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14 b (new)
14 b. Calls on the Commission and Member States to revise their Codes of Good Agricultural Practice and revise relevant best available techniques under the Industrial Emissions Directive (IED) to include provisions for the handling of manure containing antibiotics/AMR microorganisms;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 311 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14 c (new)
14 c. Calls on the Commission to review and revise Best Available Techniques Reference (BREF) documents under the Industrial Emissions Directive (IED) relevant to emissions from the manufacturing plants of antibiotics;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 312 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14 d (new)
14 d. Calls on the Commission to include pharmaceuticals in the watch lists for monitoring surface and groundwater under the Water Framework Directive (WFD) along with AMR in relevant microorganisms;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 317 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14 e (new)
14 e. Calls on the Commission and Member States to ensure that environmental issues are introduced into the pharmacovigilance system for human pharmaceuticals and strengthened for veterinary pharmaceuticals particularly in relation to AMR;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 318 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14 f (new)
14 f. Calls on the Commission and Member States to set quality standards (threshold values) or risk assessment requirements to ensure that the concentrations of relevant antibiotics and AMR microorganisms in manure, sewage sludge and irrigation water are safe before they can be spread on agricultural fields;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 321 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15 a (new)
15 a. Welcomes that EFSA and EMA recently reviewed and discussed a number of alternatives to the use of antimicrobials in food-producing animals, some of which have been shown to yield promising results in the improvement of animal health parameters during experimental studies; recommends therefore to give new impetus to scientific research on alternatives and design an EU legislative framework that would stimulate their development and clarify the pathway for their approval;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 328 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Welcomes recent research projects into alternative antibiotic therapies such as bacteriophage therapy, such as the EU- funded Phagoburn project; notes that no bacteriophage therapies have been authorised at EU level so far; calls on the Commission to propose a legislative framework for bacteriophage therapy;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 337 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Encourages the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in collaboration with EFSA and ECDC to review all available information on the benefits and risks of older antimicrobial agents and to consider whether any changes to their approved uses are required;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 347 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18 a (new)
18 a. Welcomes recent cross-border research projects into antimicrobial stewardship and the prevention of infection, such as the EU-funded i-4-1- Health Interreg project; calls on the Commission to increase research funding for measures to prevent healthcare- associated infections (HAI);
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 350 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18 b (new)
18 b. Calls on the Commission to further support its R&D effort on AMR, including global health infections defined in the Sustainable Development Goals, especially drug resistant TB as well as Malaria, HIV and NTDs, as part of the next EU Research Framework Programme, including by dedicating a specific mission in the Programme to the global fight against AMR;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 367 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21
21. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to support the implementation of new economic models, pilot projects and pull and push incentives to boost the development of new diagnostics, antibiotics, alternatives and vaccines;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 392 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23 a (new)
23 a. Acknowledges the key role of pharmacists in raising awareness around the appropriate use of antimicrobials, as well as in the prevention of AMR; encourages Member States to expand their responsibilities by allowing exact quantity dispensing and enabling the administration of certain vaccines and rapid diagnostic tests within pharmacies;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 441 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 28 a (new)
28 a. Notes the importance of universal access to existing antibiotics, in order to ensure targeted treatment with specific antibiotics, which should be available in order to avoid the misuse of unsuitable antibiotics and the overuse of broad- spectrum antibiotics;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 443 #

2017/2254(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 28 b (new)
28 b. Calls on the Commission to take the global lead in advocating for evidence-based best practice models for early diagnosis to tackle AMR;
2018/03/07
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 41 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 6
(6) Since its adoption and entry into force in January 2012, the Constitution of Hungary (the “Fundamental Law”) has been amended six times - having regard to the Fundamental Law of Hungary, adopted on 18 April 2011 by the National Assembly of the Hungarian Republic, which entered into force on 1 January 2012 (hereinafter referred to as ‘the Fundamental Law’), the Transitional Provisions of the Fundamental Law of Hungary, adopted on 30 December 2011 by the National Assembly, which also entered into force on 1 January 2012 (hereinafter referred to as ‘the Transitional Provisions’), the First Amendment to the Fundamental Law, tabled by the Minister for National Economy on 17 April 2012 and adopted by the Hungarian Parliament on 4 June 2012, establishing that the Transitional Provisions are part of the Fundamental Law, to the Second Amendment to the Fundamental Law, tabled on 18 September 2012 in the form of an individual member’s bill and adopted by the Hungarian Parliament on 29 October 2012, introducing the requirement of voter registration into the Transitional Provisions, the Third Amendment to the Fundamental Law, tabled on 7December 2012, adopted by the Hungarian Parliament on 21 December 2012 and establishing that the limits and conditions for acquisition of ownership and for use of arable land and forests and the rules concerning the organisation of integrated agricultural production are to be laid down by cardinal law, the Fourth Amendment of the Fundamental Law, tabled on 8 February 2013 in the form of an individual member’s bill and adopted by the Hungarian Parliament on 11 March 2013, which, among other provisions, integrates into the text of the Fundamental Law the Transitional Provisions (with some exceptions including the provision requiring voter registration) annulled by the Constitutional Court of Hungary on 28 December 2012 on procedural grounds (Decision No 45/2012), and remaining provisions of a genuinely transitional nature in this document. The Venice Commission expressed its concerns regarding the constitution-making process in Hungary on several occasions, both as regards the Fundamental Law and amendments thereto. The criticism focused on the lack of transparency of the process, the inadequate involvement of civil society, the absence of sincere consultation, the endangerment of the separation of powers and the weakening of the national system of checks and balances.
2018/05/17
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 60 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 10
(10) In recent years the Hungarian Government has extensively used national consultations. On 27 April 2017, the Commission pointed out that the national consultation “Let’s stop Brussels” contained several claims and allegations which were factually incorrect or highly misleading. Nevertheless, the Hungarian Government subsequently continued to have recourse to similar consultations.
2018/05/17
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 61 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – subheading 2 a (new)
having regard to Act CXI of 2012 on the Amendment of Act CLXI of 2011 on the organisation and administration of courts and Act CLXII of 2011 on the legal status and remuneration of judges in Hungary and to Act XX of 2013 on the legislative amendments relating to the upper age limit applicable in certain judicial legal relations.
2018/05/17
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 78 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 17 a (new)
(17a) The International Bar Association’s Human Rights Institute (IBAHRI) expresses in its Report 2015 deep concern that, following the significant legislative reform implemented during Hungary’s incumbent government’s first term in office, the independence and impartiality of the Hungarian judiciary can’t be guaranteed and the rule of law guarantees remain weakened.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 90 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 20 a (new)
(20a) Between 2012 and 2017, Hungary operated its highly disturbing residency bond program that offered residence permit to some 20 000 people according to reports of investigative journalism. Those who acquired such bonds could maintain a permanent residence permit without limitation. The foreigners did not invest in the residency government bonds directly, but did so through designated intermediary companies with opaque ownership structures. These companies charge 40 000- 60000 euro service fees for their operations, and were hand-picked by the Economic Committee of the Parliament without public tender or legal oversight. Such conditions have created a hotbed for corruption.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 99 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 20 c (new)
(20c) Several indicators signal high levels of misconduct regarding EU funds. The share of contracts awarded after public procurement procedures that received only a single bid remains high at 36% in 2016. Hungary has the highest percentage in the Union of financial recommendations from OLAF in the areas of Structural Funds and Agriculture for the 2013-2016 period at 4,16% (which is 900% higher than the EU average). Hungary decided not to participate in the establishment of the European Public Prosecutor’s Office.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 100 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 20 d (new)
(20d) According to the Global Competitiveness Report 2017-2018 the high level of corruption was one of the most problematic factors for doing businesses in Hungary. Since 2008 Hungary has fallen by 19 points in the Corruption Perception Index.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 103 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 21
(21) In its judgment of 12 January 2016, Szabó and Vissy v. Hungary, the ECtHR found that the right to respect for private life was violated on account of the insufficient legal guarantees against unlawful secret surveillance for national security purposes, including related to the use of telecommunications. The amendment of the relevant legislation is necessary as a general measure. A member of the European Union ought to adhere to the protection of its citizens’ right to privacy to the highest degree possible. This judgment suggest that Hungary is not fully upholding its obligations to its citizens. The execution of this judgment is, therefore, still pending.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 106 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 22
(22) In the concluding observations of 5 April 2018, the UN Human Rights Committee expressed concerns that Hungary’s legal framework on secret surveillance for national security purposes allows for mass interception of communications and contains insufficient safeguards against arbitrary interference with the right to privacy. It was also concerned by the lack of provisions to ensure effective remedies in cases of abuse, and notification to the person concerned as soon as possible, without endangering the purpose of the restriction, after the termination of the surveillance measure. In line with the UN Human Rights Committee findings, the Freedomhouse organisation has acknowledged some positive development in the area of surveillance and privacy in its 2017 Freedom on the Net report. However, many concerns in regards to privacy and data protection remain and are highlighted.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 109 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 23
(23) On 22 June 2015 the Venice Commission adopted its Opinion on Media Legislation (Act CLXXXV on Media Services and on the Mass Media, Act CIV on the Freedom of the Press, and the Legislation on Taxation of Advertisement Revenues of Mass Media) of Hungary, which called for several changes to the Press Act and the Media Act, in particular concerning the definition of “illegal media content”, the disclosure of journalistic sources and sanctions on media outlets. Similar concerns had been expressed in the analysis commissioned by the Office of the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media in February 2011,; by the previous Council of Europe’s Commissioner for Human Rights in his opinion on Hungary’s media legislation in light of Council of Europe standards on freedom of the media of 25 February 2011,; as well as by Council of Europe experts on Hungarian media legislation in their expertise of 11 May 2012. Thoese concerns had been shared by the Council of Europe’s Commissioner for Human Rights in the report following his visit to Hungary, which was published on 16 December 2014. The Commissioner also mentioned the issues of concentration of media ownership and self-censorship and indicated that the legal framework criminalising defamation should be repealed.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 121 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 26
(26) In its statement adopted on 9 April 2018, the limited election observation mission of the OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights for the 2018 Hungarian parliamentary elections concluded that access to information as well as the freedoms of the media and association have been restricted, including by recent legal changes and that media coverage of the campaign was extensive, yet highly polarised and lacking critical analysis. It further noted that politicisation of the ownership, coupled with a restrictive legal framework, had a chilling effect on editorial freedom, hindering voters’ access to pluralistic information. , which in turn contributed to a highly biased atmosphere, misleading the general population into favouring the ruling party. This has been concluded to be at odds with the international standards.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 130 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 29
(29) On 17 October 2017, the Hungarian Parliament extended the deadline for foreign universities operating in the country to meet the new criteria to 1 January 2019. Negotiations between the Hungarian Government and foreign higher education institutions affected, in particular, the Central European University, are still ongoing, while the legal limbo for foreign universities remains. Notes that the Central European University complied with the new requirements imposed by the Amendment of Act CCIV of 2011 on National Tertiary Education in due time, but the Hungarian Government is reluctant to sign the reached agreement.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 134 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 31
(31) In 2011, the Hungarian Parliament adopted Act CCVI of 2011 on the Right to Freedom of Conscience and Religion and the Legal Status of Churches, Denominations and Religious Communities of Hungary. The Act, which was adopted on 30 December 2011 and entered into force on 1 January 2012, deprived many religious organisations of legal personality and reduced the number of legally recognised churches in Hungary to 14. On 16 December 2011 the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights shared his concerns about this Act in a letter sent to the Hungarian authorities. In February 2012, responding to international pressure, the Hungarian Parliament expanded the number of recognised churches to 31. On 19 March 2012 the Venice Commission adopted its Opinion on Act CCVI of 2011 on the Right to Freedom of Conscience and Religion and the Legal Status of Churches, Denominations and Religious Communities of Hungary, where it indicated that the Act sets a range of requirements that are excessive and based on arbitrary criteria with regard to the recognition of a church, that the Act has led to a deregistration process of hundreds of previously lawfully recognised churches and that the Act induces, to some extent, an unequal and even discriminatory treatment of religious beliefs and communities, depending on whether they are recognised or not.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 135 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 31
(31) In 2011, the Hungarian Parliament adopted Act CCVI of 2011 on the Right to Freedom of Conscience and Religion and the Legal Status of Churches, Denominations and Religious Communities of Hungary. The Act deprived many religious organisations of legal personality and reduced the number of legally recognised churches in Hungary to 14. On 16 December 2011, the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights shared his concerns about this Act in a letter sent to the Hungarian authorities. In February 2012, responding to international pressure, the Hungarian Parliament expanded the number of recognised churches to 31. On 19 March 2012, the Venice Commission adopted its Opinion on Act CCVI of 2011 on the Right to Freedom of Conscience and Religion and the Legal Status of Churches, Denominations and Religious Communities of Hungary, where it indicated that the Act sets a range of requirements that are excessive and based on arbitrary criteria with regard to the recognition of a church,. Furthermore, it indicated that the Act has led to a deregistration process of hundreds of previously lawfully recognised churches and that the Act induces, to some extent, an unequal and even discriminatory treatment of religious beliefs and communities, depending on whether they are recognised or not.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 158 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 38
(38) In February 2018, a legislative package consisting of three draft laws, also known as the “Stop-Soros Package” (T/19776, T/19775, T/19774), was presented by the Hungarian Government. On 14 February 2018, the President of the Conference of INGOs of the Council of Europe and President of the Expert Council on NGO Law made a statement indicating that the package does not comply with the freedom of association, particularly for NGOs which deal with migrants. On 15 February 2018, the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights expressed similar concerns. On 3 March 2018, UN human rights experts warned that the bill would lead to undue restrictions on the freedom of association and the freedom of expression in Hungary. In its concluding observations of 5 April 2018, the UN Human Rights Committee expressed concerns that by alluding to the “survival of the nation” and protection of citizens and culture, and by linking the work of NGOs to an alleged international conspiracy, the legislative package would stigmatise NGOs and curb their ability to carry out their important activities in support of human rights and, in particular, the rights of refugees, asylum seekers and migrants. It was further concerned that imposing restrictions on foreign funding directed to NGOs might be used to apply illegitimate pressure on them and to unjustifiably interfere with their activities. The Committee on Legal Affairs and Human Rights of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe on 22 March 2018 requested an opinion of the Venice Commission on the compatibility of the “Stop Soros” draft legislative package with international human rights standards.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 160 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 38
(38) In February 2018, a legislative package consisting of three draft laws, also known as the “Stop-Soros Package” (T/19776, T/19775, T/19774), was presented by the Hungarian Government. On 14 February 2018, the President of the Conference of INGOs of the Council of Europe and President of the Expert Council on NGO Law made a statement indicating that the package does not comply with the freedom of association, particularly for NGOs which deal with migrants. On 15 February 2018, the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights expressed similar concerns. In its concluding observations of 5 April 2018, the UN Human Rights Committee expressed concerns that by alluding to the “survival of the nation” and protection of citizens and culture, and by linking the work of NGOs to an alleged international conspiracy, the legislative package would stigmatise NGOs and curb their ability to carry out their important activities in support of human rights and, in particular, the rights of refugees, asylum seekers and migrants. It was further concerned that imposing restrictions on foreign funding directed to NGOs might be used to apply illegitimate pressure on them and to unjustifiably interfere with their activities. Plurality of voices and the possibility of dissent by civil society is a necessary part of a modern European state.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 162 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 38 a (new)
(38a) Ensuring an enabling environment for civil society is an obligation under international human rights and EU law. The measures of the Hungarian government’s to obstruct the work of civil society organisations are contrary to the EU’s founding principles as enshrined in Article 2 TEU.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 166 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 39
(39) On 17-27 May 2016, the UN Working Group on discrimination against women in law and in practice visited Hungary. In its report, the Working Group indicated that a conservative form of family, whose protection is guaranteed as essential to national survival, should not be put in an uneven balance with women’s political, economic and social rights and the empowerment of women. The Working Group also pointed out that a woman’s right to equality cannot be seen merely in the light of protection of vulnerable groups alongside children, the elderly and the disabled, as they are an integral part of all such groups. The OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights for the 2018 Hungarian Parliamentary elections expressed on 9 April 2018 similar concerns as the UN Working Group, and especially noted a concerning underrepresentation of women in the political life, and also the absence of any instruments to promote the positive inclusion of females in this field.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 170 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 40
(40) In its concluding observations of 5 April 2018, the UN Human Rights Committee expressed regret that patriarchal stereotyped attitudes still prevail in Hungary with respect to the position of women in society, and noted with concern discriminatory comments made by political figures against women. These observations are furthermore underlined by the fact that Hungary is ranked as one of the worst performing countries in the Union when it comes to the representation of females in the national Parliament, with a consistent percentage of around 10% of seats held by women. It also noted that the Hungarian Criminal Code does not fully protect female victims of domestic violence.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 181 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 43
(43) In his report following his visit to Hungary, which was published on 16 December 2014, the Council of Europe’s Commissioner for Human Rights indicated that he was concerned about the deterioration of the situation as regards racism and intolerance in Hungary, with anti-Gypsyism being the most blatant form of intolerance, as illustrated by distinctively harsh, including violence targeting Roma people and paramilitary marches and patrolling in Roma-populated villages. He also pointed out that, despite positions taken by the Hungarian authorities to condemn anti-Semitic speech, anti-Semitism is a recurring problem, manifesting itself through hate speech and instances of violence against Jewish persons or property. In addition, he mentioned a recrudescence of xenophobia targeting migrants, including asylum seekers and refugees, and of intolerance affecting other social groups such as LGBTI persons, the poor and homeless persons. The European Commission against Racism and Xxenophobia mentioned similar concerns in its report on Hungary published on 9 June 2015. Protection of all minority rights has the utmost priority, and no discrimination of any particular group can be accepted by the Hungarian Government.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 185 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 44
(44) In its Fourth Opinion on Hungary adopted on 25 February 2016, the Advisory Committee on the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities noted that Roma continue to suffer systemic discrimination and inequality in all fields of life, including housing, employment, education, access to health and participation in social and political life. In its Resolution of 5 July 2017, the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe recommended the Hungarian authorities to make sustained and effective efforts to prevent, combat and sanction the inequality and discrimination suffered by Roma, improve, in close consultation with Roma representatives, the living conditions, access to health services and employment of Roma, take effective measures to end practices that lead to the continued segregation of Roma children at school and redouble efforts to remedy shortcomings faced by Roma children in the field of education, ensure that Roma children have equal opportunities for access to all levels of quality education, and continue to take measures to prevent children from being wrongfully placed in special schools and classes. It must be stressed that the inclusion of Roma children at an early age is vital for the overall long-term successful integration of the Roma community in Hungary.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 192 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 46
(46) On 26 May 2016, the Commission sent a letter of formal notice to the Hungarian authorities in relation to both Hungarian legislation and administrative practices which result in Roma children being disproportionately over-represented in special schools for mentally disabled children and subject to a considerable degree of segregated education in mainstream schools. The Hungarian authorities should prevent any such practices, as inclusive education has shown itself to be one of the best instruments to address segregation.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 198 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 48
(48) On 29 June - 1 July 2015, the OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights conducted a field assessment visit to Hungary, following reports about the actions taken by the local government of the city of Miskolc concerning forced evictions of Roma. On 26 January 2016 the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights sent a letter to the Hungarian authorities expressing concerns about the treatment of Roma in Miskolc. The Commissioner for Fundamental Rights and the Deputy- Commissioner for the Rights of National Minorities issued a joint opinion on 5 June 2015 about the fundamental rights violations against the Roma in Miskolc, the recommendations of which the local government failed to adopt.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 201 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 49
(49) In its Resolution of 5 July 2017, the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe recommended that the Hungarian authorities continue to improve the dialogue with the Jewish community, making it sustainable, and to give combatting anti-Semitism in public spaces the highest priority, to make sustained efforts to prevent, identify, investigate, prosecute and sanction effectively all racially and ethnically motivated or anti- Semitic acts, including acts of vandalism and hate speech, and to consider amending the law so as to ensure the widest possible legal protection against racist crime of any kind.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 211 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 51
(51) On 3 July 2015, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees expressed concerns about the fast-track procedure for amending asylum law. On 17 September 2015, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights expressed his opinion that Hungary violated international law by its treatment of refugees and migrants. On 27 November 2015, the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights made a statement that Hungary’s response to the refugee challenge falls short on human rights. On 21 December 2015, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, the Council of Europe and the OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights urged Hungary to refrain from policies and practices that promote intolerance and fear and fuel xenophobia against refugees and migrants. On 6 June 2016, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees expressed concerns about the increasing number of allegations of abuse in Hungary against asylum-seekers and migrants by border authorities, and the broader restrictive border and legislative measures, including access to asylum procedures. The Fundamental Rights Officer of the European Border and Coast Guard Agency visited Hungary in October 2016 as well as in March 2017, owing to the Officer’s concern that the Agency might be operating under conditions which do not commit to the respect, protection and fulfilment of the rights of persons crossing the Hungarian-Serbian border, that may put the Agency in situations that de facto violate the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. The Fundamental Rights Officer concluded in March2017 that the risk of shared responsibility of the Agency in the violation of fundamental rights in accordance with Article 34 of the European Border and Coast Guard Regulation remains very high.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 213 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 51
(51) On 3 July 2015, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees expressed concerns about the fast-track procedure for amending asylum law. On 17 September 2015, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights expressed his opinion that Hungary violated international law by its treatment of refugees and migrants. On 27 November 2015, the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights made a statement that Hungary’s response to the refugee challenge falls short on human rights. On 21 December 2015, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, the Council of Europe and the OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights urged Hungary to refrain from policies and practices that promote intolerance and fear and fuel xenophobia against refugees and migrants. On 6 June 2016, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees expressed concerns about the increasing number of allegations of abuse in Hungary against asylum-seekers and migrants by border authorities, and the broader restrictive border and legislative measures, including access to asylum procedures. Given the worsening situation of asylum-seekers in Hungary the UN Refugee Agency called on 10 April 2017 for a temporary suspension of all transfers of asylum-seekers to Hungary from other European States under the Dublin Regulation.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 217 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 52
(52) On 3 July 2014, the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention indicated that the situation of asylum seekers and migrants in irregular situations needs robust improvements and attention to ensure against arbitrary deprivation of liberty. Similar concerns about detention, in particular of unaccompanied minors, have been shared by the Council of Europe’s Commissioner for Human Rights in the report following his visit to Hungary, which was published on 16 December 2014. On 21-27 October 2015 the European Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CPT) visited Hungary and indicated in its report a considerable number of foreign nationals’ (including unaccompanied minors) claims that they had been subjected to physical ill- treatment by police officers and armed guards working in immigration or asylum detention facilities. On 7 March 2017, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees expressed his concerns about a new law voted in the Hungarian Parliament envisaging the mandatory detention of all asylum seekers, including children, for the entire length of the asylum procedure. On 8 March 2017, the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights issued a statement similarly expressing his concern about that law. On 31 March 2017, the UN Subcommittee on the Prevention of Torture urged Hungary to address immediately the excessive use of detention and explore alternatives. Coercive measures and use of force in the processing of migrants falls short of European standards and should be improved at the earliest possible opportunity. Furthermore, in case of insufficient capacity or lack of resources the appropriate authorities should seek assistance from European Boarder and Coast Guard Agency.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 222 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 53
(53) On 12-16 June 2017, the Special Representative of the Secretary General of the Council of Europe on migration and refugees visited Serbia and two transit zones in Hungary. In his report, the Special Representative made several recommendations, including a call on the Hungarian authorities to take the necessary measures, including by reviewing the relevant legislative framework and changing relevant practices, to ensure that all foreign nationals arriving at the border or who are on Hungarian territory are not deterred from making an application for international protection. In his report, the Special Representative stated that violent pushbacks of migrants and refugees from Hungary to Serbia raise concerns under Articles 2 (the right to life) and 3 (prohibition of torture) of the ECHR. The Special Representative also noted that the restrictive practices of admission of asylum-seekers into the transit zones of Röszke and Tompa often make asylum- seekers look for illegal ways of crossing the border, having to resort to smugglers and traffickers with all the risks that this entails. The Special Representative concluded that it is necessary that the Hungarian legislation and practices are brought in line with the requirements of the ECHR. On 5-7 July a delegation of the Council of Europe Lanzarote Committee (Committee of the Parties to the Council of Europe Convention on the protection of children against sexual exploitation and sexual abuse) also visited two transit zones and made a number of recommendations, including a call to treat all persons under the age of 18 years of age as children without discrimination on the ground of their age, to ensure that all children under Hungarian jurisdiction are protected against sexual exploitation and abuse, and to systematically place them in mainstream child protection institutions in order to prevent possible sexual exploitation or sexual abuse against them by adults and adolescents in the transit zones.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 228 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 54 a (new)
(54a) In its judgment of 6 September 2017 in Case C-643/15 and C-647/15, the Court dismisses in their entirety the actions brought by Slovakia and Hungary against the provisional mechanism for the mandatory relocation of asylum seekers. Slovakia and Hungary voted against the adoption of the contested decision in the Council and have asked the Court of Justice to annul the decision.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 239 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 56
(56) In its concluding observations of 5 April 2018, the UN Human Rights Committee expressed concerns that the Hungarian law adopted in March 2017, which allows for the automatic removal to transit zones of all asylum applicants for the duration of their asylum procedure, with the exception of unaccompanied children identified as being below the age of 14, does not meet the legal standards as a result of the lengthy and indefinite period of confinement allowed, the absence of any legal requirement to promptly examine the specific conditions of each affected individual, and the lack of procedural safeguards to meaningfully challenge removal to the transit zones. The Committee was particularly concerned about reports of the extensive use of automatic immigration detention in holding facilities inside Hungary and was concerned that restrictions on personal liberty have been used as a general deterrent against unlawful entry rather than in response to an individualised determination of risk. In addition, the Committee was concerned about allegations of poor conditions in some holding facilities. It noted with concern the push-back law, which was first introduced in June 2016, enabling summary expulsion by the police of anyone who crosses the border irregularly and was detained on Hungarian territory within 8 kilometres of the border, which was subsequently extended to the entire territory of Hungary, and decree 191/2015 designating Serbia as a “safe third country” allowing for push- backs at Hungary’s border with Serbia. The Committee noted with concern reports that push-backs have been applied indiscriminately and that individuals subjected to this measure have very limited opportunity to submit an asylum application or right to appeal. It also noted with concern reports of collective and violent expulsions, including allegations of heavy beatings, attacks by police dogs and shootings with rubber bullets, resulting in severe injuries and, at least in one case, in the loss of life of an asylum seeker. It was also concerned about reports that the age assessment of child asylum seekers and unaccompanied minors conducted in the transit zones is inadequatenot sufficiently thorough, relies heavily on visual examination by an expert and is inaccurate, and about reports alleging the lack of adequate access by such asylum seekers to education, social and psychological services and legal aid.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 242 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 56 a (new)
(56a) Is concerned about the mood in society which has been fuelled by the policies implemented in the recent years and the “tax financed” campaigns led by the government against refugees, minorities and other citizens.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 245 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 57
(57) In his report following his visit to Hungary, which was published on 16 December 2014, the Council of Europe’s Commissioner for Human Rights indicated his concern at measures taken to prohibit rough sleeping and the construction of huts and shacks, which have widely been described as criminalising homelessness in practice. The Commissioner urged the Hungarian authorities to investigate reported cases of forced evictions without alternative solutions and of children being taken away from their families on the grounds of poor socio-economic conditions. In its concluding observations of 5 April 2018, the UN Human Rights Committee expressed concerns about state and local legislation, based on the Fourth Amendment to the Fundamental Law, which designates many public areas as out- of-bounds for “sleeping rough” and effectively punishes homelessness. On 15 February 2012 and 11 December 2012 the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) called on Hungary to reconsider legislation allowing local authorities to punish homelessness and to uphold the Constitutional Court’s decision decriminalising homelessness.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 249 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 58
(58) The 2017 Conclusions of the European Committee of Social Rights stated that Hungary is not in compliance with the European Social Charter on the grounds that self-employed and domestic workers, as well as other categories of workers, are not protected enough by occupational health and safety regulations,; that measures taken to reduce the maternal mortality have been insufficient,; that the minimum amount of old-age pensions is inadequate,; that the minimum amount of jobseeker’s aid is inadequate,; that the maximum duration of payment of jobseeker’s allowance is too short; and that the minimum amount of rehabilitation and invalidity benefits, in certain cases, is inadequate. TFurthermore, the Committee also concluded that in Hungary is not in conformity with the European Social Charter on the grounds that the level of social assistance paid to a single person without resources, including elderly persons, is not adequate, on the ground; that equal access to social services is not guaranteed for lawfully resident nationals of all States Parties; and on the grounds that it has not been established that there is an adequate supply of housing for vulnerable families.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 250 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 58 a (new)
(58a) The UN Committee on the Rights of Children’s report on ‘Concluding observations on the combined third, fourth and fifth periodic reports of Hungary’, published in 14 October 2014, voiced concerns over an increasing number of cases where children are being taken away from their family based on poor socio economic condition. Parents may lose their child due to unemployment, lack of social housing and lack of space in temporary housing institutions. Based on a study by European Roma Right Centre, this practice disproportionately affects Roma families and children.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 252 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 58 b (new)
(58b) Hungary is not in compliance with the European Social Charter on the grounds that Hungary fails to protect its citizens against extreme poverty. Hungary’s workfare program pays less to citizens than the statutory minimum wage. The program creates dependencies and undermines democracy and the rule of law.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 253 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 58 c (new)
(58c) This winter, 149 people froze to death in Hungary by mid-February. This was reported by the Internet portal “24.hu” on Tuesday, citing the Hungarian Social Forum (MSZF), a network of independent aid organisations. 47 percent of the victims are people living in poverty and frozen to death in their unheated homes, the report said. The others died of frostbite they had suffered outdoors.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 254 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 58 d (new)
(58d) whereas Hungary signed the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence (the Istanbul Convention)in 2014, but has not yet ratified it. Calls on the Hungarian government to ratify the Istanbul Convention as soon as possible.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 255 #

2017/2131(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – point 58 e (new)
(58e) Recognises the efforts taken in the anti-human trafficking laws and encourages the government to continue and improve the services of victim support by strengthening victim- and women rights organisations.
2018/06/25
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 41 #

2017/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 7 a (new)
- having regard to the decisions and the case law of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) and of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR)
2017/11/20
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 300 #

2017/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8 a (new)
8a. Distinction must be drawn subject to the relevant international law treaties on migration and with full respect of the Common European Asylum System.
2017/11/20
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 350 #

2017/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 a (new)
11a. Stresses the need to uphold fundamental rights of migrants and citizens most affected by the overcrowded holding centers and calls on the parties concerned to uphold the rule of law and effectively discharge their duties.
2017/11/20
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 370 #

2017/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Stresses that integration is best achieved through schooling for young people and education in European citizenship for older people, that the EU should therefore promote a policy reception and integration in all the Member States, and that it is unacceptable that certain Member States should claim that the migration phenomenon is not their concern, stresses the humanitarian urgency created by the migratory flows and the risk posed to the tradition of respect for fundamental rights. Further, stressed that all member states ought to participate and propose reasonable solutions to the current and future challenges of migration phenomenon ;
2017/11/20
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 381 #

2017/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 a (new)
13a. Calls on the Member States to update the national syllabus with the aim of promoting respect for fundamental rights and rejecting xenophobia, racism and all forms of hatred.
2017/11/20
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 447 #

2017/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14 a (new)
14a. The current reaction to migratory flows challenge the principle of solidarity (Article 80 TFEU), which is an essential component of the EU history and identity, as well as the operating principle bringing together the EU Member States towards an ever closer union;
2017/11/20
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 470 #

2017/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Expresses concern atnd condemns the rhetoric of hatred and fear directed at migrants entering Europe and the upsurge in anti- Islamic, anti-Semitic and anti- African rhetoric;
2017/11/20
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 421 #

2017/0352(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 5 – paragraph 1
Processing of personal data for the purposes of this Regulation shall not result in discrimination against persons on any grounds such as sex, racial or ethnic origin, religion or belief, nationality, disability, age or sexual orientation. It shall fully respect human rights, dignity and, integrity. Particular attention shall be paid to children, the elderly and persons with a disability.
2018/07/24
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 761 #

2017/0351(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 47 – paragraph 1
1. In order to exercise their rights under Articles 13, 14, 15 and 16 of Regulation (EC) 45/2001 and, Articles 15, 16, 17 and 18 of Regulation (EU) 2016/679, and Articles 14 and 16 of Directive (EU) 2016/680, any person shall have the right to address him or herself to the Member State responsible for the manual verification of different identities or of any Member State, who shall examine and reply to the request.
2018/07/23
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 765 #

2017/0351(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 47 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Without prejudice to paragraph 1, and in order to facilitate and better enable the effective exercise of the rights of data subjects as described in paragraph 1 to access, rectify, erase or restrict the processing of their personal data under interoperability components, in particular for those third country nationals who may be outside the territory of the Member States, eu-LISA shall establish a web service, hosted in its technical site, which shall enable data subjects to make a request for access, correction, erasure or rectification of their personal data. The web service shall act as a single point of contact for those third country nationals outside the territory of the Member States. On the basis of such a request, the web service shall immediately transmit the request to the Member State responsible for manual verification of different identities in accordance with Article 29, or, where appropriate, to the Member State responsible for the entry of the data in the underlying information system which is the subject of the request.
2018/07/23
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 766 #

2017/0351(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 47 – paragraph 1 b (new)
1b. The Commission shall adopt implementing acts concerning the detailed rules on the conditions for the operation of the web service and the data protection and security rules applicable. Those implementing acts shall be adopted in accordance with the examination procedure referred to in Article 64.
2018/07/23
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 767 #

2017/0351(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 47 – paragraph 2
2. The Member State responsible for the manual verification of different identities as referred to in Article 29 or the Member State to which the request has been made, either directly from the data subject in accordance with paragraph 1 or via the web service established by eu- LISA in accordance with paragraph 2, shall reply to such requests at the latest within 145 days of receipt of the request.
2018/07/23
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 770 #

2017/0351(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 47 – paragraph 3
3. If a request for correction or erasure of personal data is made to a Member State other than the Member State responsible, the Member State to which the request has been made shall contact the authorities of the Member State responsible within seven days and the Member State responsible shall check the accuracy of the data and the lawfulness of the data processing within 3014 days of such contact. The person concerned shall be informed by the Member State which contacted the authority of the Member State responsible that his or her request was forwarded about the further procedure.
2018/07/23
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 775 #

2017/0351(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 47 – paragraph 4
4. Where, following an examination, it is found that the data stored in the multiple-identity detector (MID) are factually inaccurate or have been recorded unlawfully, the Member State responsible or, where applicable, the Member State to which the request has been made shall correct or delete these data. The person concerned shall be informed that his or her data was corrected or deleted.
2018/07/23
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 786 #

2017/0351(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 47 – paragraph 7
7. This decision shall also provide the person concerned with information explaining the possibility to challenge the decision taken in respect of the request referred in paragraph 3s 1 and 2, and, where relevant, information on how to bring an action or a complaint before the competent authorities or courts, and any assistance, including from the competent national supervisory authorities.
2018/07/23
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 787 #

2017/0351(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 47 – paragraph 8
8. Any request made pursuant to paragraph 3s 1 or 2 shall contain the necessary information to identify the person concerned. That information shall be used exclusively to enable the exercise of the rights referred to in paragraph 31 and shall be erased immediately afterwards.
2018/07/23
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 788 #

2017/0351(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 47 – paragraph 9
9. The responsible Member State or, where applicable, the Member State to which the request has been made shall keep a record in the form of a written document that a request referred to in paragraph 3s 1 and 2 was made and how it was addressed, and shall make that document available to competent data protection national supervisory authorities without delay.
2018/07/23
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 789 #

2017/0351(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 47 a (new)
Article 47 a Liability Without prejudice to the right to compensation from, and liability under Regulation (EU) 2016/679, Directive (EU) 2016/680 and Regulation (EC) No 45/2001: (a) any person who has suffered material or non-material damage as a result of an unlawful personal data processing operation through the use of interoperability components or any other act by a Member State which is incompatible with this Regulation shall be entitled to receive compensation from that Member State; (b) any person who has suffered material or non-material damage as a result of an unlawful personal data processing operation through the use of interoperability components or any other act by Europol or by the European Border and Coast Guard Agency which is incompatible with this Regulation shall be entitled to receive compensation from Europol or the European Border and Coast Guard as appropriate. The Member State, Europol or the European Border and Coast Guard Agency shall be exempted from liability, in whole or in part, if they prove that they are not responsible for the event which gave rise to the damage.
2018/07/23
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 790 #

2017/0351(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 47 b (new)
Article 47 b Penalties Member States shall ensure that any misuse of data, processing of data or exchange of data contrary to this Regulation is punishable in accordance with national law. The penalties provided shall be effective, proportionate and dissuasive and shall include the possibility for administrative and criminal penalties. Europol and the European Border and Coast Guard Agency shall ensure that members of their staff or members of their teams who misuse, process or exchange data contrary to this Regulation are subject to penalties. Those penalties shall be effective, proportionate and dissuasive.
2018/07/23
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 122 #

2017/0332(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 2
(2) Directive 98/83/EC set the legal framework to protect human health from the adverse effects of any contamination of water intended for human consumption by ensuring that it is wholesome and clean. This Directive should pursue the same objective. To that end, it is necessary to lay down at Union level the minimum requirements with which water intended for that purpose must comply. Member States should take theall necessary measures to ensure that water intended for human consumption is free from any micro- organisms and parasites and from substances which, in certain cases, constitute a potential danger to human health, and that it meets those minimum requirements.
2018/06/19
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 131 #

2017/0332(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 3
(3) It is necessary to exclude from the scope of this Directive natural mineral waters and waters which are medicinal products, since these waters are respectively covered by Directive 2009/54/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council68 and Directive 2001/83/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council69 . However, Directive 2009/54/EC deals with both natural mineral waters and spring waters, and only the former category should be exempted from the scope of this Directive. In accordance with the third subparagraph of Article 9(4) of Directive 2009/54/EC, spring waters should comply with the provisions of this Directive. In the case of water intended for human consumption put into bottles or containers intended for sale or used in the manufacture, preparation or treatment of food, the water should comply with the provisions of this Directive until the point of compliance (i.e. the tap), and should afterwards be considered as food, in accordance with the second subparagraph of Article 2 of Regulation (EC) No 178/2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council70 . Where applicable food safety requirements are met, national authorities should have the power to authorise the reuse of water in food processing industries. _________________ 68 Directive 2009/54/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 June 2009 on the exploitation and marketing of natural mineral waters (Recast) (OJ L 164, 26.6.2009, p. 45). 69 Directive 2001/83/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 6 November 2001 on the Community code relating to medicinal products for human use (OJ L 311, 28.11.2001, p. 67). 70 Regulation (EC) No 178/2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 28 January 2002 laying down the general principles and requirements of food law, establishing the European Food Safety Authority and laying down procedures in matters of food safety (OJ L 31, 1.2.2002, p. 1).
2018/06/19
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 134 #

2017/0332(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 4
(4) Following the conclusion of the European citizens' initiative on the right to water (Right2Water)71 , a Union-wide public consultation was launched and a Regulatory Fitness and Performance (REFIT) Evaluation of Directive 98/83/EC was performed72 . It became apparent from that exercise that certain provisions of Directive 98/83/EC needed to be updated. Four areas were identified as offering scope for improvement, namely the list of quality-based parametric values, the limited relianceinconsistent application onf a risk-based approach, the imprecise provisions on consumer information, and the disparities between approval systems for materials in contact with water intended for human consumption and the implications this has for human health. In addition, the European citizens' initiative on the right to water identified as a distinct problem the fact that part of the population, - especially amongst vulnerable and marginalised groups, - has no access to water intended for human consumption, which is alsoinconsistent with the recognition that access to water is a basic right essential for the realisation of all human rights. It is also inconsistent with a commitment made under Sustainable Development Goal 6 of UN Agenda 2030. A final issue identified is the general lack of awareness of water leakages, which are driven by underinvestment in maintenance and renewal of the water infrastructure, as also pointed out in the European Court of Auditors' Special Report on water infrastructure73 . _________________ 71 72COM(2014) 177 final COM(2014) 177 final 72 SWD(2016) 428 final SWD(2016) 428 final 73 Special report of the European Court of Auditors SR 12/2017: "Implementing the Drinking Water Directive: water quality and access to it improved in Bulgaria, Hungary and Romania, but investment needs remains substantial".
2018/06/19
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 157 #

2017/0332(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 7
(7) Where necessary to protect human health within their territories, Member States should be required to set values for additional parameters not included in Annex I in line with the full application of the precautionary principle. Member States should take such measures in cooperation with public health and environmental stakeholders, as well as with those responsible for the relevant sources or potential sources of pollution.
2018/06/19
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 162 #

2017/0332(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 8
(8) Preventive safety planning and risk- based elements were only considered to a limited extent in Directive 98/83/EC. The first elements of a risk-based approach were already introduced in 2015 with Directive (EU) 2015/1787, which amended Directive 98/83/EC so as to allow Member States to derogate from the monitoring programmes they have established, provided credible risk assessments are performed, which may be based on the WHO’s Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality76 . Those Guidelines, laying down the so-called "Water Safety Plan" approach, together with standard EN 15975-2 concerning security of drinking water supply, are internationally recognised principles on which the production, distribution, monitoring and analysis of parameters in water intended for human consumption are based. They should be maintained in this Directive. To ensure that those principles are not limited to monitoring aspects, to focus time and resources on risks that matter and on cost- effective source measures, and to avoid analyses and efforts on non-relevant issues, it is appropriate to introduce a complete risk-based approach, throughout the supply chain, from the abstraction area to distribution until the tap. That approach should consist of three components: first, an assessment by the Member State of theall potential hazards associated with the abstraction area ("hazard assessment"), in line with the WHO’s Guidelines and Water Safety Plan Manual77 ; second, a possibility for the water supplier to adapt monitoring to the main risks ("supply risk assessment"); and third, an assessment by the Member State of the possible risks stemming from the domestic distribution systems (e.g. Legionella or lead) ("domestic distribution risk assessment"). Those assessments should be regularly reviewed, inter alia, in response to threats from climate-related extreme weather events, known changes of human activity in the abstraction area or in response to source-related incidents. The risk-based approach ensuresshould be founded upon a continuous exchange of information between competent authorities and, public health and environmental stakeholders, those responsible for pollution sources, as well as water suppliers. _________________ 76 Guidelines for drinking water quality, Fourth Edition, World Health Organisation, 2011 http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_healt h/publications/2011/dwq_guidelines/en/ind ex.html 77 Water Safety Plan Manual: step-by-step risk management for drinking water suppliers, World Health Organisation, 2009, http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/75 141/1/9789241562638_eng.pdf
2018/06/19
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 168 #

2017/0332(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 9
(9) The hazard assessment should be geared towardstake a holistic approach to risk assessment, founded on the explicit aim of reducing the level of treatment required for the production of water intended for human consumption, for instance byprimarily via preventative measures which reducinge the pressures causing the pollution - or risks of pollution - of water bodies used for abstraction of water intended for human consumption. To that end, Member States should identify hazards and all possible pollution sources associated with those water bodies and monitor pollutants which they identify as relevant, for instance because of the hazards identified (e.g. microplastics, nitrates, pesticides or pharmaceuticals identified under Directive 2000/60/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council78 ), because of their natural presence in the abstraction area (e.g. arsenic), or because of information from the water suppliers (e.g. sudden increase of a specific parameter in raw water). TIn line with Directive 2000/60/CE, those parameters should be used as markers that trigger action by competent authorities to reduce the pressure on the water bodies, such as prevention or mitigating measures (including research to understand impacts on health where necessary), to protect those water bodies and address the pollution source, in cooperation with water suppliers and stakeholderpublic health and environmental stakeholders, as well as those responsible for pollutant or potential pollutant sources. _________________ 78 Directive 2000/60/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2000 establishing a framework for Community action in the field of water policy (OJ L 327, 22.12.2000, p. 1).
2018/06/19
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 173 #

2017/0332(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 10
(10) As regards the hazard assessment, Directive 2000/60/EC requires Member States to identify water bodies used for the abstraction of water intended for human consumption, monitor them, and take the necessary measures to avoid deterioration in their quality in order to reduce the level of purification treatment required in the production of water that is fit for human consumption, based on the principle that preventative measures should always be favoured over additional treatment. To avoid any duplication of obligations, Member States should, when carrying out the hazard assessment, clarify where responsibilities lie across the competent authorities and should make use of the monitoring carried out under Articles 7 and 8 of Directive 2000/60/EC and Annex V to that Directive and of the measures included in their programmes of measures pursuant to Article 11 of Directive 2000/60/EC.
2018/06/19
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 175 #

2017/0332(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 11
(11) The parametric values used to assess the quality of water intended for human consumption are to be complied with at the point where water intended for human consumption is made available to the appropriate user. However, the quality of water intended for human consumption can be influenced by the domestic distribution system. The WHO notes that, in the Union, Legionella causes the highest health burden of all waterborne pathogens. It is transmitted by warm water systems through inhalation, for instance during showering. It is therefore clearly linked to the domestic distribution system. Since imposing a unilateral obligation to monitor all private and public premises for this pathogen would lead to unreasonably high costs, a domestic distribution risk assessment is therefore more suited to address this issue. In addition, the potential risks stemming from products and materials in contact with water intended for human consumption should also be considered in the domestic distribution risk assessment. The domestic distribution risk assessment should therefore include, inter alia, focusing monitoring on priority premises, assessing the risks stemming from the domestic distribution system and related products and materials, and verifying the performance of construction products in contact with water intended for human consumption on the basis of their declaration of performance in accordance with Regulation (EU) No 305/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council79 in contact with drinking water. The information referred to in Articles 31 and 33 of Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council80 is also to be supplied together with the declaration of performance. On the basis of this assessment, Member States should take all necessary measures to ensure, inter alia, that appropriate control and management measures (e.g. in case of outbreaks) are in place, in line with the guidance of the WHO81 , and that the migration from construction products does not endanger human health. However, without prejudice to Regulation (EU) No 305/2011, where these measures would imply limits to the free movement of products and materials in the Union, these limits need to be duly justified and strictly proportionate, and not constitute a means of arbitrary discrimination or a disguised restriction on trade between Member States. _________________ 79 Regulation (EU) No 305/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 9 March 2011 laying down harmonised conditions for the marketing of construction products and repealing Council Directive 89/106/EEC (OJ L 88, 4.4.2011, p. 5). products and materials in contact with water does not endanger human health. _________________ 80 Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2006 concerning the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH), establishing a European Chemicals Agency, amending Directive 1999/45/EC and repealing Council Regulation (EEC) No 793/93 and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1488/94 as well as Council Directive 76/769/EEC and Commission Directives 91/155/EEC, 93/67/EEC, 93/105/EC and 2000/21/EC (OJ L 396, 30.12.2006, p. 1). 81 "Legionella and the prevention of Legionellosis", World Health Organisation, 2007, http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_healt h/emerging/legionella.pdf
2018/06/19
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 181 #

2017/0332(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 12
(12) The provisions of Directive 98/83/EC on quality assurance of treatment, equipment and materials did not succeed in addressing obstacles to the internal market when it comes to the free circulation of construction products in contact with water intended for human consumption or providing sufficient protections with regard to human health. National product approvals are still in place, with different requirements from one Member State to another. This renders it difficult and costly for manufacturers to market their products all over the Union. The removal of technical barriers may only be effectively achieved by establishing harmonised technical specifications for construction products in contact with water intended for human consumption under Regulation (EU) No 305/2011. That Regulation allows for the development of European standards harmonising the assessment methods for construction products in contact with water intended for human consumption and for threshold levels and classes to be set in relation to the performance level of an essential characteristic. To that end, a standardisation request specifically requiring standardisation work on hygiene and safety for products and materials in contact with water intended for human consumption under Regulation (EU) No 305/2011 has been included in the 2017 standardisation Work Programme82 , and a standard is to be issued by 2018. The publication of this harmonised standard in the Official Journal of the European Union will ensure a rational decision-making for placing or making available on the market safe construction products in contact with water intended for human consumption. As a consequence, the provisions on equipment and material in contact with water intended for human consumption should be deleted, partly replaced by provisions related to the domestic distribution risk assessment and complemented by relevant harmonised standards under Regulation (EU) No 305/2011. _________________ 82 and has serious implications in terms of ensuring satisfactory minimum standards of protection for human health. This situation stems from the fact that there are currently no minimum European hygiene standards for all products and materials in contact with water intended for human consumption, that being essential for fully ensuring mutual recognition between Member States. The removal of technical barriers and conformity of all products and materials in contact with water intended for human consumption at Union level may therefore only be effectively achieved by establishing minimum quality requirements at Union level. As a consequence, those provisions should be strengthened by means of a procedure for harmonisation of such products and materials. That work should draw on the experience gained and advances made by a number of Member States that have been working together for some years, in a concerted effort, to bring about regulatory convergence. SWD(2016) 185 final
2018/06/19
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 184 #

2017/0332(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 13
(13) Each Member State should ensure that monitoring programmes are established to check that water intended for human consumption meets the requirements of this Directive. Most of the monitoring carried out for the purposes of this Directive is performed by water suppliers, but where necessary, Member States should clarify where the obligations stemming from the transposition of this Directive lie amongst competent authorities. A certain flexibility should be granted to water suppliers as regards the parameters they monitor for the purposes of the supply risk assessment. If a parameter is not detected, water suppliers should be able to decrease the monitoring frequency or stop monitoring that parameter altogether. The supply risk assessment should be applied to most parameters. However, a core list of parameters should always be monitored with a certain minimum frequency. This Directive mainly sets provisions on monitoring frequency for the purposes of compliance checks and only limited provisions on monitoring for operational purposes. Additional monitoring for operational purposes may be necessary to ensure the correct functioning of water treatment, at the discretion of water suppliers. In that regard, the water suppliers may refer to the WHO's Guidelines and Water Safety Plan Manual.
2018/06/19
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 189 #

2017/0332(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 14
(14) The risk-based approach should gradually be applied by all water suppliers, including small water suppliers, as the evaluation of Directive 98/83/EC showed deficiencies in its implementation by those suppliers, which were sometimes due to the cost of performing unnecessary monitoring operations. When applying the risk-based approach, security concerns, as well as the precautionary, polluter pays, and cost recovery principles, should be taken into account.
2018/06/19
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 200 #

2017/0332(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 17
(17) The Commission, in its reply to the European citizens’ initiative ‘Right2Water’ in 201483 , invited Member States to ensure access to a minimum water supply for all citizens, in accordance with the WHO recommendations. It also committed to continue to "improve access to safe drinking water […] for the whole population through environmental policies"84 . This is in line with Articles 1 and 2 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. It is also founded upon Principle 20 of the European Pillar of Social Rights and UN General Assembly Resolutions No 64/292 and No 68/157, which explicitly recognise that access to drinking water is a basic right essential for the realisation of all human rights. This is also in line with UN Sustainable Development Goal 6 and the associated target to "achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all". The concept of equitable access covers a wide array of aspects such as availability (due for instance to geographic reasons,obstacles of geography, financial affordability, or a lack of infrastructure for the specific situation of certain parts of the populations), as well as quality, and acceptability, or. Concerning financial affordability. Concerning affordability of water, it is important to recall that, when setting water tariffs in accordance with the principle of recovery of costs and the polluter pays principle set out in Directive 2000/60/EC, Member States mayshould have regard to the variation in the economic and social conditions of the population and may thereforeshould either adopt social tariffs or take alternative measures to safeguarding populations at a socio- economic disadvantage. This Directive deal, such as through the provision of water banks, min particular,imum water quotas or water solidarity funds. This Directive deals with the aspects of access to water which are related to quality and availaccessibility. To address those aspects, as part of the reply to the European citizens' initiative and to contribute to the implementation of Principle 20 of the European Pillar of Social Rights85 that states that "everyone has the right to access essential services of good quality, including water", Member States should be required to tackle the issue of universal access to water at national level whilst enjoying some discretion as to the exact type of measures to be implemented. This can be done through actions aimed, inter alia, at improving access to water intended for human consumption for all, for instance with freely accessible fountaby ensuring a sufficient number of freely accessible designated refill points in cities, and towns and at promoting its use by encouraging the free provision of water intended for human consumption in public buildings and restaurants. _________________ 83 84awareness raising campaigns for the general public of the location of these refill points; at encouraging the free provision of water intended for human consumption in public buildings, restaurants, shopping and recreational centres, as well as, in particular, areas of transit and large footfall such as at train stations and airports. _________________ 83 COM(2014)177 final COM(2014)177 final 84 COM(2014)177 final, p. 12. COM(2014)177 final, p. 12. 85 Interinstitutional Proclamation on the European Pillar of Social Rights (2017/C 428/09) of 17 November 2017 (OJ C 428, 13.12.2017, p. 10).
2018/06/19
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 209 #

2017/0332(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 18
(18) The European Parliament, in its Resolution on the "follow-up to the European citizens’ initiative Right2Water"86 , "requested that Member States should pay special attention to the needs of vulnerable groups in society"87 . The specific situation of minority cultures, such as Roma, Sinti, and Travellers, Kalé, Gens du voyage etc., whether sedentary or not – in particular their lack of access to drinking water and sanitation – was also acknowledged in the Commission Report on the implementation of the EU Framework for National Roma Integration Strategies88 and the Council Recommendation on effective Roma integration measures in the Member States89 . The 2016 report from the Fundamental Rights Agency highlights that every third Roma household surveyed lives in a house without tap water and every other Roma family lives without a toilet, shower or bathroom inside their dwelling. A report from the European Roma Rights Centre shows that 40% of Roma surveyed have to climb over fences, cross highways or be confronted by stray dogs while trying to get daily water, which often has not been tested for safety and is exposed to contaminants. It is also of particular concern that a proportion of people in the EU in or facing poverty are at risk of losing access to water due to reasons of financial affordability. For example, the 2013 Report "Our Right to Water: Case Studies on Austerity and Privatisation in Europe"2a found that 5,000 people in Bulgaria are unable to afford their water bills, risking disconnection from the water supply. In light of that general context, it is appropriate that Member States pay particular attention to vulnerable and marginalised groups by taking the necessary measures to ensure that those groups have access to water. Without prejudice to the right of the Member States to define those groups, they should at least include people in or at risk of poverty, refugees, nomadic communities, homeless people and minority cultures such as Roma, Sinti, and Travellers, Kalé, Gens du voyage, etc., whether sedentary or not. Such measures to ensure access, left to the appreciation of the Member States, might for example include providing alternative supply systems (individual treatment devices), providing water via tankers (trucks and cisterns) and ensuring the necessary infrastructure for camps. _________________ 2aRight to Water for All: Case Studies on Austerity and Privatisation in Europe http://www.foodandwatereurope.org/wp- content/uploads/2010/06/FoodandWaterE uropeOurRightToWAter.pdf 86 P8_TA(2015)0294 87 P8_TA(2015)0294, paragraph 62. 88 COM(2014) 209 final 89 Council Recommendation (2013/C 378/01) of 9 December 2013 on effective Roma integration measures in the Member States (OJ C 378, 24.12.2013, p. 1).
2018/06/19
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 219 #

2017/0332(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 19
(19) The 7th Environment Action Programme to 2020 ‘Living well, within the limits of our planet’90 , requires that the public have access to clear environmental information at national level. Directive 98/83/EC only provided for passive access to information, meaning that Member States merely had to ensure that information was available. Those provisions should therefore be replaced to ensure that up-to-date information is easily accessible, for instance on a website and understandable by the public, for instance in a booklet, or on a website or smart application whose link should be actively distributed. The up- to- date information should not only include results from the monitoring programmes, but also additional information that the public may find useful, such as information on, where applicable, annual turnover and shareholder dividends, as well as indicators (iron, hardness, minerals, etc.), which often influence consumers' perception of tap water. To that end, the indicator parameters of Directive 98/83/EC that did not provide health-related information should be replaced by on-line information on those parameters. For very large water suppliers, additional information on, inter alia, energy efficiency, management, governance, cost structure, and treatment applied, should also be available on-line. It is assumed that bBetter consumer knowledge and improved transparency will contributehelp to increasinge citizens' confidence in the water supplied to them. This in turn is expected, and will help to lead to an increased use of tap water, thereby contributing to reduced plastic litter and greenhouse gas emissions, and a positive impact on climate change mitigation and the environment as a whole. _________________ 90 Decision No 1386/2013/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 November 2013 on a General Union Environment Action Programme to 2020 ‘Living well, within the limits of our planet’ (OJ L 354, 28.12.2013, p. 171).
2018/06/19
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 226 #

2017/0332(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 20
(20) For the same reasons, and in order to make consumers more aware of the implications of water consumption, they should also receive information (for instance on their invoice or by smart applications) on the volume consumed, the cost structure of the tariff charged by the water supplier, including variable and fixed costs, as well as on the price per litre of water intended for human consumption, thereby allowing afor an easy comparison with the price of bottled water. Information should also be provided on the overall performance of the water system, with particular regard to leakage rates, which should be expressed in terms of cubic metres of water produced/km of pipe per day.
2018/06/19
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 231 #

2017/0332(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 21
(21) The principles to be considered in the setting of water tariffs, namely recovery of costs for water services and polluter pays, are set out in Directive 2000/60/EC. However, the financial sustainability of the provision of water services is not always ensured, sometimes leading to under-investment in the maintenance of water infrastructure. With the improvement of monitoring techniques, leakage rates and low levels of energy efficiency – mainly due to such under- investment – have become increasingly apparent and reduction of water losses should be encouraged at Union level to improve the efficiency of water infrastructure. Current leakage rates in the EU are high, at 23% in public water suppliers1a. Reduction of water losses should be encouraged at Union level for three reasons. Firstly, such measures will reduce the risks to public health which come from potential contamination of water due to leakages and will also prevent the need for water suppliers to carry out additional treatment, in line with the risk-based approach established in Article 7. Secondly, given that 4% of global electricity is consumed by the water industry, a figure which is expected to double by 2040, such measures should also be encouraged to improve the efficiency of water infrastructure in line with the EU Action Plan for the Circular Economy. Finally, these measures will also contribute towards lowering unnecessary costs for the water supplier, local authorities, and consumers alike, in line with the objective of this Directive to improve universal access to water. In line with the principle of subsidiarity, thatis issue should be addressed by introducing measures to evaluate and set targets at Member State level for reducing the leakage rate of water suppliers on their territory, as well as increasing transparency and consumer information on leakage rates and energy efficiency. _________________ 1a SWD(2017)0449, p.9
2018/06/19
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 242 #

2017/0332(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 26
(26) This Directive respects the fundamental rights and observes the principles recognised by the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. In particular, this Directive seeks to promote universal access to safe drinking water and, as a result, uphold the principles relating to health care and sanitation, access to services of general economic interest, environmental protection and consumer protection.
2018/06/19
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 246 #

2017/0332(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 28
(28) In order to adapt this Directive to scientific and technical progress or to specify monitoring requirements for the purposes of the hazard and domestic distribution risk assessments, the power to adopt acts in accordance with Article 290 of the Treaty should be delegated to the Commission to amend Annexes I to IV to this Directive, and take measures necessary under the changes set out under Article 10. It is of particular importance that the Commission carry out appropriate consultations during its preparatory work, including at expert level, and that those consultations be conducted in accordance with the principles laid down in the Interinstitutional Agreement of 13 April 2016 on Better Law-Making. In particular, to ensure equal participation in the preparation of delegated acts, the European Parliament and the Council receive all documents at the same time as Member States' experts, and their experts systematically have access to meetings of Commission expert groups dealing with the preparation of delegated acts. In addition, the empowerment laid down in Annex I, part C, Note 10, of Directive 98/83/EC, to set monitoring frequencies and monitoring methods for radioactive substances has become obsolete due to the adoption of Council Directive 2013/51/Euratom96 and should therefore be deleted. The empowerment laid down in the second subparagraph of part A of Annex III to Di