BETA

2005 Amendments of Cristian-Silviu BUŞOI

Amendment 1 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 10 a (new)
— having regard to the Statement from the EIC Board for the discussion in the European Parliament ITRE committee on EIC implementation1a _________________ 1a https://eic.ec.europa.eu/news/statement- eic-board-discussion-european- parliament-itre-committee-eic- implementation-2022-08-16_en
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 2 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 10 b (new)
— having regard to the Statement by the EIC Board on the EIC Work Programme for 2022 and future of the EIC Fund1a _________________ 1a https://eic.ec.europa.eu/system/files/2022- 02/Statement%20by%20the%20EIC%20B oard%20on%20the%20EIC%20Work%20 Programme%20for%202022%20and%20f uture%20of%20the%20EIC%20Fund.pdf
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 3 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 10 c (new)
— having regard to the Commission Press Release of 5 August 2022 entitled 'EIC Accelerator implementation update'1a _________________ 1a https://eic.ec.europa.eu/news/eic- accelerator-implementation-update-2022- 08-05_en
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 6 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A a (new)
A a. whereas Regulation (EU) 2021/695 identifies the European Innovation Council (EIC) as “a centrally managed one-stop shop” which “shall focus mainly on breakthrough and disruptive innovation, targeting especially market-creating innovation, while also supporting all types of innovation, including incremental”;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 7 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A b (new)
A b. whereas Regulation (EU) 2021/695 stipulates that the EIC shall operate in accordance with the following principles: (a) clear Union added value; (b) autonomy; (c) ability to take risk; (d) efficiency; (e) effectiveness; (f) transparency; (g) accountability;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 8 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A c (new)
A c. whereas Council Decision (EU) 2021/764 stipulates that the EIC has two objectives. Firstly, to identify, develop and deploy high-risk innovations of all kinds, including incremental, with a strong focus on breakthrough, disruptive and deep-tech innovations that have the potential to become market-creating innovations. Secondly, to support the rapid scale-up of innovative companies (meaning mainly SMEs, including start- ups, and, in exceptional cases, small mid- caps) at Union and international levels along the pathway from ideas to market;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 9 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A d (new)
A d. whereas Council Decision (EU) 2021/764 sets out that the EIC shall 1) support high-risk innovations where the risks,whether financial, technological/scientific, market and/or regulatory, cannot be born by the market alone or yet supported by financial instruments under the Invest EU Programme; 2) focus mainly on high-risk breakthrough and/or deep-tech innovations, while also supporting other forms of innovation, including incremental, that have the potential to create new markets or contribute to resolving global challenges; 3) be mainly bottom-up, open to innovations from all fields of science, technology and applications in any sector, while also enabling targeted support for emerging breakthrough, market-creating and/or deep-tech technologies of potential strategic significance in terms of economic or social impact. The Commission services will evaluate this potential strategic impact on the basis of recommendations from the independent external experts, from the EIC programme managers and, where appropriate, from the EIC Advisory Board; 4) encourage innovations that cut across different scientific and technological (for example combining physical and digital) fields and sectors; 5) be centred on innovators, simplifying procedures and administrative requirements, making use of interviews to help assess applications, and ensuring fast decision-making; 6) implemented with the aim of significantly enhancing the European innovation ecosystem. Be managed pro-actively with milestones or other predefined criteria to gauge progress and the possibility to, after a thorough assessment with the possible use of independent external experts, reorient, reschedule or terminate the projects where needed;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 10 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A e (new)
A e. whereas the EIC should offer business advisory services, which include coaching and mentoring;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 12 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B a (new)
B a. whereas the Pathfinder provides grants to high-risk cutting-edge projects that explore new and deep-tech areas with the aim of developing potentially radical innovative technologies of the future and new market opportunities. The Pathfinder is supporting primarily collaborative projects in the range of TRL 1 to 4 and selected through bottom-up calls;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 13 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B b (new)
B b. whereas the Accelerator will provide financial support to: a. SMEs including start-ups and, in exceptional cases, small mid-caps that have the ambition to develop and deploy in Union and international markets their breakthrough innovations and to scale-up rapidly b. any type of high-risk innovation, including in particular breakthrough and deep-tech innovations that are key to Europe's future growth;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 14 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C
C. whereas the Accelerator is implemented by mainly usesing EIC blended finance of EIC loans and grants awarded through a single process and with a single decision, providing the supported innovator with a single global commitment to financial resources covering the various stages of innovation until market deployment, including pre- mass commercialisation. The support will be provided through one continuously open and bottom-up call;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 16 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C a (new)
C a. whereas the Horizon legislation allows for the Union to bear alone the initial risk of selected innovation and market deployment actions, while the aim is to de-risk these as well as to stimulate, from the outset and during the development of the action, co-investments from alternative sources and even substitute investors allowing the Union to exit the investment;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 17 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C b (new)
C b. whereas Council Decision (EU) 2021/764 requires the Commission to establish a special purpose vehicle for the implementation of EIC blended finance and for the Commission to manage all operational elements of Accelerator projects, including the grant or other non- repayable forms of support;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 18 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D
D. whereas the EIC Pilot and EIC Enhanced Pilot successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the EIC; as a fully-fledged programme as outlined in the general conclusions of the 2022 Evaluation Study published by the European Commission1a _________________ 1a “Evaluation study on the European Innovation Council (EIC) Pilot” (European Commission, 2022)
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 20 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D a (new)
D a. whereas the Pathfinder during the EIC Pilot constituted a rebranding of the FET Open and FET Launchpad programmes and generally, the novelties of the EIC Pathfinder, most notably portfolio management and Programme Managers, were introduced only late in the pilot. Under the pilot the implementation modalities of the Pathfinder were therefore largely the same as the general implementation modalities of Horizon 2020;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 21 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D b (new)
D b. whereas between 2018 and 2020, the EIC Pilot funded 330 Pathfinder projects. Furthermore, applications for the Pathfinder were numerous, with variable success rates (between 6 and 50%) depending on the different types of actions;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 22 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D c (new)
D c. whereas the geographical spread of participation and particularly coordination of the Pathfinder Pilot was concentrated in the EU15 and Associated Countries. Furthermore, a country’s position in the European Innovation Scoreboard seemed to be reflected in the success of its innovators in the Pathfinder Pilot - the Innovation Leaders had the highest success rate and Emerging Innovators had the lowest success rates;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 23 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D d (new)
D d. whereas blended finance was introduced successfully and the EIC Fund was incorporated during the Pilot. The effectiveness of the Accelerator Pilot was under pressure due to low success rates;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 24 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D e (new)
D e. whereas the Pathfinder under Horizon Europe largely has the same structure and features as under the Pilot, except that the Transition Activities are identified as a separate programme part under Horizon Europe;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 25 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E
E. whereas the EIC Fund under its original structure, as put in place in 2020 under the EIC Pilot, was functioning appropriately: 140 equity investment decisions were taken and these had a leverage of a factor 2.7, showing that the EIC Fund in its original structure was capable of establishing significant co- investment;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 27 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F a (new)
F a. whereas more than 50% of the blended finance investments under the pilot included a convertible loan as a way for the Union to take on the earliest initial risks;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 28 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F b (new)
F b. whereas the Evaluation Study concludes that “the EIC Fund is underpinned by well-justified public policy goals and market needs” and that “a contentious point on the Fund structure pivots around the interpretation of two eligibility rules: non-bank ability and co-investment”;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 29 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F c (new)
F c. whereas the due diligence procedure as established under the pilot has been particularly successful as it delivers high quality due diligence assessments as confirmed by the fact that several of these assessments were used to attract external investors, indicating that investors regard the due diligence of enough quality to base their investment decisions on;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 30 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F d (new)
F d. whereas the structured professional investment advice delivered by the Investment Committee and the EIB team embedded in the European Innovation Council and SMEs ExecutiveAgency (EISMEA) was able to deliver the high quality due diligence due to the unique cooperation between the EISMEA and the EIB in combination with investment expertise brought in by the external experts, including serial investors and VCs, on the Investment Committee;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 31 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F e (new)
F e. whereas the EIC Work Programme for 2021 was adopted already in March 2021, which enabled the EIC to start the implementation significantly earlier than Horizon Europe in general;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 32 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F f (new)
F f. whereas the Annotated Model Grant Agreement for Horizon Europe was published extremely late, which created significant uncertainty among applicants, including potential applicants under the EIC;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 33 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F g (new)
F g. whereas the introduction of Programme Managers has the potential to increase the effectiveness of the EIC in stimulating more strategic and break through innovation in Europe;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 34 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F h (new)
F h. whereas eight Programme Managers have been appointed, covering expertise in a wide range of fields and their role is to proactively review projects (and where necessary amend the direction of those projects) and built EIC Portfolios;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 35 #

2022/2063(INI)

F i. whereas the work of the Programme Managers still lacks visibility and is experienced as lacking transparency by stakeholders;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 36 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F j (new)
F j. whereas the EIC is a new type of Programme which carries more financial risk than normal Union spending, which requires a dedicated auditing strategy;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 37 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F k (new)
F k. whereas under the 2021 and 2022 Work Programmes 1.55 billion EUR and 1.71 billion EUR, respectively, was made available for the EIC; both years, roughly 430 millions EUR stemmed from the Next Generation EU budget, all of which was made available for grant components of the EIC; about 52% of the available budget was allocated to open, bottom-up calls under the Open calls; 65% of available funding was allocated to the grant components of the EIC, while 35% was allocated to investment components; nearly 70% of the available funding was allocated to the Accelerator, with 20% going to the Pathfinder;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 38 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F l (new)
F l. whereas under the 2021 and 2022 Work Programmes 13 calls topics were opened under the Pathfinder, of which 11 call topics for Challenges and 2 calls for Open;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 39 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F m (new)
F m. whereas under the Pathfinder Open Call of 2021, 868 proposals were submitted and 56 proposals were awarded, which means the success rate was 6.45%;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 40 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F n (new)
F n. whereas that under the Pathfinder Open Call of 2022, 863 proposals were submitted and it is expect that around 60 proposals will be awarded, which means the success rate will be around 7%;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 41 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F o (new)
F o. whereas under the Pathfinder Challenges Call of 2021, 403 proposals were submitted and 39 proposals were awarded, which means the success rate was 9.7%;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 42 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F p (new)
F p. whereas for the Accelerator there were two cut-off dates in 2021 and 2022 respectively;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 43 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F q (new)
F q. whereas the only funding transfered to Accelerator beneficiaries has been grant pre-payments and no funds have been transferred as part of (quazi) equity support with only one Investment Decision having been taken so far;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 44 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F r (new)
F r. whereas for EIC Blended Finance projects the time-to-grant has been 12 months under Horizon Europe;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 45 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph -1 (new)
-1. Is dismayed by the delays in the implementation of the blended finance actions under the Accelerator. Emphasises that the delays were completely and only the result of conflicts between different Directorates General of the European Commission about the management of the EIC Fund. Notes in this regard that the projects had been selected and that both the EIB and Investment Committee were ready to process the equity parts of the projects. Notes that conflicts only concerned the equity part of the project and should therefore not have affected the grant agreements. Deplores these internal Commission conflicts put at risk 96 European deep-tech companies. Welcomes that in late June 2022 the Commission seem to have been able to start moving forward with the implementation of these projects. Is dismayed that 51 beneficiaries selected following the October 2021 cut-off were informed in August 2022 that the Commission was not able sign their grant agreement in summer 2022 and that the Commission now hoped to sign in October 2022. Strongly condemns these intolerable delays leading to a time-to-grant of 12 months. Deeply concerned that, except for one exceptional Investment Decision, no decisions for actual investments have been taken by the EIC Fund. Notes that only in the summer of 2022 the Commisison started signing term sheets for beneficiaries selected in 2021 and that most will be signed after summer;1a _________________ 1a https://eic.ec.europa.eu/news/eic- accelerator-implementation-update-2022- 08-05_en
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 46 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph -1 a (new)
-1 a. Reminds that the EIC Fund is set up to support startups and SMEs developing deeptech innovations. Highlights that cash flows are crucial for startups and SMEs, and that long delays in receiving expected funding can bankrupt these kinds of companies. Emphasises therefore the importance of the EIC Fund being able to invest within market conform timeframes. Deplores the examples where the EIC Fund failed to achieve this objective and where the original investment decision of the EIC Fund was rendered irrelevant, due to the long time lag and the company’s development during that time;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 47 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph -1 b (new)
-1 b. Notes that under the EIC Pilot with the structure of the Fund in place at the time, the EIC managed to deliver professional investment decisions largely conforming to market norms. Stresses that this structure was at the time accepted by all services of the European Commission;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 48 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph -1 c (new)
-1 c. Recalls that EIC Blended Finance should be awarded through a single process and through a single decision covering both the grant and the financial instruments. Reminds that Commission should manage all operational elements of Accelerator projects;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 50 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. Recognises that the Commission expressed concerns about the management of EIC Fund regarding the staffing implications as well as the potential Commission reputational liability for the investments;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 51 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 b (new)
1 b. Acknowledges the staffing concerns raised by the Commission regarding the management of the EIC Fund investment portfolio. Appreciates that the representation of the EIC Fund needs to be appropriate and that this requires a significant number of persons with significant experience to represent the EIC Fund. Considers, however, that directly employing these persons is not the only solution. Points out that the original Investment Committee together with the EIB had developed an alternative plan to solve the staffing issue. Concludes therefore that the staffing challenge is not a reason for restructuring the Fund;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 52 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Reminds that the text of Article 11(3) was included in the Commission proposal for Horizon Europe and was never challenged during the legislative procedure. Highlights that this means that the Commisson ought to have been fully aware of this text when it set up the EIC Fund in 2020. Stresses that the Commission Decision to set up the EIC Fund, which included the original structure, was adopted by the College of Commissioners and had the support of all services of the Commission. Emphasises that the same is true for the 2021 EIC Work Programme, which made no mention of the need to restructure the EIC Fund. Concludes that the issue of compliance with Article 11(3) was raised internally in the Commission around the summer of 2021 after the programme already started. Considers that raising such a fundamental issue during a running programme after having missed several opportunities to raise the issue in the three years preceeding the start of the programme is at the very least a case of gross mismanagement and at worst a unacceptable attempt by a settled bureaucracy to undermine the creation of a new way of working as envisaged by the colegislators;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 53 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Highlights that Article 216(1) of the Financial Regulation expressly empowers the Commission to apply direct management of investments either by the Commission directly (Article 216(1b)) or through ‘a dedicated investment vehicle’ (Article 216(1a)); stresses that this form of implementation allows for more flexibility and more strategic consideration in investment decisions and portfolio management than indirect management; rejects the notion that transferring the management of the Fund to the European Investment Bank (EIB) and an external fund manager will allow for the flexibility and strategic consideration needed to make the EIC a success;deleted
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 55 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. Notes the importance of professional preparation of an investment decision and therefore highlights the role of the EIC Fund Investment Committee as well as the support for the due diligence provided by the EIB. Commends, in this context, the valuable work performed by the EIB team embedded in the EISMEA. Notes that the due diligence performed by the EIB leading to the first investment decision is broadly considered to be of high quality, which creates trust among investors. Regrets, however, that for further decisions of the EIC Fund, like joining an investment round after the initial investment decision or establishing a rationale for an investment, seem to take too long in part due to the time it takes the EIB to provide its input for that decision. Believes in this regard that the rationale and accompanying processes for these decisions need to reflect the nature of the EIC Fund as risk investor more strongly;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 56 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. Recalls that the EIC Fund under its original structure, as put in place in 2020 under the EIC Pilot, was functioning appropriately;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 57 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 b (new)
5 b. Takes note of the procedure for investment decisions under the original structure: a. The European Commission prepared Work Programmes with call definitions b. The EISMEA opened the calls and manages the evaluation and selection procedure, which included the initial decision for grant-based or (part) equity- based support c The final proposal selection was under there sponsibility of the European Commission d. Those proposals awarded an equity component were channelled to the EIC Fund e. The EIB Group, in its role of Investment Advisor, would undertake financial due diligence. In parallel, the EIC Fund would perform “Know Your Customer” compliance checks with the help of service providers duly contracted f. The EIC Fund would classify the proposals for investment into four types of scenarios, translated into the 4 ‘buckets’. This classification would not be static, as cases would be moved from one bucket to the other as the due diligence process evolved, based on its findings, or on the initiation of co-investment interest - resulting inter alia from the de-risking operated by the EIC Accelerator support, or at later stage as the operation unfolds and milestones are reached: i. Bucket 0: No Go Bucket 0 included cases for which initial assessment or due diligence, at any stage, reports substantial negative issues preventing any investment ii. Bucket 1: low maturity and failure to attract co-investment Bucket 1 included cases that were not sufficiently mature for regular investors, due to remaining very high risk despite the awarded EIC Accelerator support. The proposal could receive support through: a. Quasi-equity or a combination of quasi- equity and equity if the proposal concerned EU strategic interests or addressed a societal challenge” b. Grant-based support in all other cases iii. Bucket 2: Co-investment opportunities Bucket 2 included cases where potential investors show immediate interest in co- investing into EIC selected companies. EIC Fund could still co-invest in this company. iv. Bucket 3: Alternate investment opportunities Bucket 3 included cases where potential investors showed immediate interest inproviding the full investment into EIC candidate companies g. The EIB would negotiate draft financing terms with the beneficiary and co-investors (if any), or advise the company in case of alternate investors. h. The EIC Investment Committee appointed by the EC would examine the due diligence together with the structuring proposal from the EIB Group. i. The EIC Investment Committee would recommend financing operations to the EIC Fund Board. j. The EIC Fund Board would either approve (sometimes with conditions) or reject the operation. Provided that the EIC Fund Board approved the investment, the EIB would guide the work of the lawyers for each specific transaction leading to legal documents which would be signed by the EIC Fund Board;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 58 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 c (new)
5 c. Notes that the Commission has developed a 'transition arrangement' under which the EIC Fund remains in the ownership of the Commission while an external fund manager will take the Investment Decisions of the Fund; hihglights that the external fund manager will also staff the Investment Committee and that this means that there will no longer be independent experts on the Committee who delivered invaluable expertise nor will there be any representative of the Commission to ensure policy coherence; takes note of the description of this arrangement in the 2022 EIC Work Programme;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 59 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Notes with concern that undertil the transitional arrangement announced in the EIC 2022 work programme, substantia is in place, all Single Award Decisions and all iInvestment dDecisions need to be approved by the College of Commissioners and are thereby accompanied by another level of scrutiny; regards this as an unacceptable situationis dismayed by the prospect that, even when the external fund manager is responsible for Investment Decisions, the College will still need to approve the Single Award Decisions; regards this as an unacceptable situation because this makes the decision taking process even longer, complex and with more uncertainty for the applicants while the EIC investment decisions even without this extra layer fail to meet industry standards in terms of time or agility. Notes that this additional step also consolidates the direct involvement of the Commission rather than creating distance from the Commission in order to manage liability;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 61 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6 a. Notes with deep concern that even setting up the transition arrangement for the EIC Fund takes months due to continuous internal discussions between Commission services. Notes that the transition arrangement for the EIC Fund was agreed in principle within the Commission in late 2021 and incorporated in the 2022 EIC Work Programme published in February 2022 as well as finally confirmed by a Commission Decision in April 2022. Notes that in June 2022 the Commission started processing the grant components of the Accelerator projects selected in June 2021, indicating sufficient progress was made in setting up the transition arrangement of the EIC Fund to start implemented blended finance projects. Notes that for grantees selected under the June 2021 cut-off most of the grant agreements were signed in the summer of 2021. This results in a time-to-grant of more than a year. Notes that the Commission communicated in May 2022 that grant components for the October 2021 cut-off date EIC Blended Finance grantees would be finalised by the end of May or early June.1a Notes that the Commission had to inform these grantees over the summer of 2022 that the grants would not be ready by July and would likely have to wait untill October of 2022. Concludes that for this cut-off the time-to- grant will also be at least one year. Furthermore, notes that the Commission Decision confirming the details on restructuring of the EIC Fund was not take before summer 2022 and that all investment decisions of the Fund therefore still need to be approved by the College of Commissioners of the European Commission; _________________ 1a https://sciencebusiness.net/news/commissi on-says-european-innovation-council- grant-logjam-end-june
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 62 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 b (new)
6 b. Highlights that Article 216(1) of the Financial Regulation expressly empowers the Commission to apply direct management of investments either by the Commission directly (Article 216(1b)) or through “a dedicated investment vehicle” (Article 216(1a)). Stresses that this form of implementation allows for more flexibility and more strategic consideration in the investment decisions as well as portfolio management than indirect management. Rejects the notion that transferring the management of the Fund to the EIB and an external fund manager will allow for the flexibility and strategic consideration needed to make the EIC a success;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 63 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. Is dismayed by the delays in the implementation of the blended finance action under the EIC Accelerator, as a year after the first cut-off date, no equity or grant agreement had been signed; emphasises that the delays were completely and only the result of conflicts between different Directorates-General of the Commission about the management of the EIC Fund; deplores the fact that these inter-service conflicts put at risk 96 European deep tech companies;deleted
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 66 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Is deeply concerned about the apparent policy for the EIC Fund to never to be the lead investor in an equity round, in particular in combination with the requirement for companies to bring in matching co-investment from external investors; b. Believes this goes against the objective of the EIC. Highlights the fact that this was not the policy at the beginning of the EIC pilot and that this policy change was introduced with retroactive effect to applications submitted before the policy change. Is deeply concerned about the fact that this created cash flow problems for many applicants as well as to only a third of the committed equity investments actually taking place;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 68 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8 a (new)
8 a. Recalls that the EIC can be the sole investor, taking on all the risk of an investment, in line with Regulation (EU) 2021/695. Notes that this role seems to be implemented only by providing convertible loans, while requiring matching co-investment for any equity investments;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 69 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8 b (new)
8 b. Notes that the practice of requiring co-investment turns the EIC in a follower investment, which puts it at risk of either: a. offering free and partly exclusive access forprivate investors to excellent investment opportunities - which creates a riskof distorting the European venture capital market while at the same timereinforcing the relative risk-averse nature of the European market b. or, the EIC becoming redundant because the leadinvestor is setting the pace and standard for investment rounds, which put inquestion why startups would need the EIC at all;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 70 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8 c (new)
8 c. Highlights that one of the reasons for establishing the EIC was that Europe lacks risk capital investors and particularly risk capital investors with expertise in deeptech markets. Notes in that regard that a dysfunctional market cannot be fully relied on as an effective mechanism to steer EIC investment and exit decisions;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 71 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8 d (new)
8 d. Notes that risk investment comes in several forms and that all could potentially be of added value for deeptech companies. Recognises the specific benefits of venture capital funds as investors as well as highlights the potential of business angle investors. Considers both types of investors could be qualified investors and should be able to lead or be part of an investment round in which the EIC Fund is involved. Warns, in this regard, that a requirement of qualified co-investment could exacerbate the market failure the EIC was set up to address;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 72 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8 e (new)
8 e. Is alarmed by the practice of converting convertible loans for companies that did not manage to attract additional investment to equity based on a valuation established at the time of granting the loan rather than on a valuation at the time of converting the loan. Points out in this regard that the EIC was set up to facilitate development and scaling of startups exactly in the phase where valuations can go up at a high pace because the risk of a technology is brought down rapidly and market entry comes closer. Concludes, therefore, that relying on an old valuation goes squarely against the objectives of the EIC. Furthermore, points out that the EIC Fund is supposed to take risk but by using convertible loans, most of the risk is essentially moved to the applicant;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 73 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Recognises that an external lead investor brings added value because this lead investor maycan have highly specialised knowledge of the market segment relevant for a specific investment, and that the EIC Fund, owingdue to its size ands well as general nature, may not be able to match this specialised knowledgecannot match this specialised knowledge. Therefore, the specialised lead investor will be of more added value to the company’s development than the EIC Fund would be. Further recognises that having an external lead investor guarantees that the valuation as well as other terms of investment are set by the market;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 75 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. 1. Firmly rejects the notion that the EIC Fund cannot be the sole investor or the lead investor; e. Emphasises that the ability to invest even when the market is not ready to do so is one of the key justifications for the existence of the EIC; c. Concludes that the investment policy of the EIC Fund should reflect thisexplicitly allow for the possibility that: a. the EIC Fund is the sole investor through convertible loans or, in specific cases, through equity investments b. the EIC Fund can lead an investment round c. the EIC Fund can be the biggest investor while not being the lead investor;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 77 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10 a (new)
10 a. Notes that point 1.2.3 of Annex I of Council Decision (EU) 2021/764 requires the EIC Fund to define and implement an exit strategy for its investments. Observes that no such strategy seems to be in place;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 82 #
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 85 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 a (new)
11 a. 1. Is concerned about the apparent lack oftransparency in the management of the programme as reported by stakeholders.Highlights two main concerns of the stakeholders: a. Lack of transparency on how the topics forPathfinder Challenges are selected b. Lack of transparency on howthe Programme Managers implement the portfolio management, in particular in theproposal selection phase;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 88 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 b (new)
11 b. Stresses the importance of a reliable time-to-grant promise. Highlights in this regard that for the evaluation of the 2021 Pathfinder Open call took more than 5 months, while Article 31 of Regulation (EU) 2021/695 requires that applicantsare informed within 5 months about the outcome of the evaluation process;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 89 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 c (new)
11 c. Expresses its deep disappointment that the Commission limits the use of the Fast Track to Research and Innovation (FTRI) to the Transition Activities. Calls on the Commission to widen the use of FTRI as much as possible;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 90 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 d (new)
11 d. Regrets that the low success rates of the programme (6-10%) leads to too many highquality proposals not being funded. Highlights that low success rates represent a loss in terms of potentially deeply transformative innovations not being developed further as well as in lost time and money invested in preparation of proposals. In this regard calls for the use, where appropriate, of two-step applications to limit the loss of time and money invested in proposal preparation;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 91 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 e (new)
11 e. Emphasises the importance of an accessible and effective application procedure for a Programme that aims to attract the most ambitious innovators. Notes that the procedure can still be approved along the following lines: a. Both mono- and multi-beneficiary proposals should be facilitated in the application procedure - this requires a dedicated proposal template for both types of application. b. All information needed for a successful application should be available in a coherent manner. Currently, the information is spread across several documents which makes preparing the application unnecessarily cumbersome;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 92 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 f (new)
11 f. Appreciates, together with most stakeholders, the introduction of the rebuttal procedure as it potentially contributes to ensuring a better evaluation procedure. Notes however that improvements are needed as many stakeholders report that it is unclear what happens with rebuttal remarks provided by applicants as well as that applicants have very little time to prepare their rebuttal. Stresses that the introduction of the rebuttal procedure has been noted as one of the causes for the longer time-to- grant. Calls on the Commission to improve the rebuttal procedure to become more meaningful and to be completed in a shorter timeframe to maintain the time-to- grant while allowing sufficient time to prepare the rebuttal;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 93 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 g (new)
11 g. Recognises that in order to facilitate the agility and pace of the EIC and deeptech startup development, individuals employed by research organisations should be able to use the results of research projects to create startups. Welcomes in this regard the introduction of the concept of ‘EIC Inventor’ in the Model Grant Agreement and 2022 Work Programme. Regrets that this introduction is accompanied by uncertainty about the legal consequences of this concept for the research organisations;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 94 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 h (new)
11 h. Emphasises that the concept of ‘EIC Inventors’ should lead to fruitful use of research results to develop economic activities. Concludes therefore that it should not undermine the use of the results by other experts within the research organisation or by the research organisation itself to develop economic activities. Highlights, furthermore, that access rights is not sufficient for successful use of results and that many research organisations have a comprehensive and effective policy to allow use of research results. Notes that outstanding access rights, e.g. for an EIC Inventor, can be detrimental to those successful policies as it undermines the ability of research organisations to effectively support the use of the results, regardless of whether this is done by EIC Inventors;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 95 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 i (new)
11 i. Believes that broad access rights, without time limitation, for EIC Inventors is justified only in cases where the research organisations do not provide the support needed for individual researchers to use the results to develop economic activity. Therefore, these access rights should be granted to EIC Inventors on a case-by-case basis when it is evident that the Inventor lacks the support needed within the research organisation;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 96 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 j (new)
11 j. Notes that the EIC Transition is formally part of the EIC Pathfinder, while it is implemented as a separate programme part. Considers that the Transition calls represent less than 10% of the EIC budgets under the 2021 and 2022 Work Programmes. Points out that the Transition calls are the only ones to which the FTRI procedure is applied. Endorses the use of this procedure for the Transition call. Calls on the Commission to widen the use to more Pathfinder calls;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 97 #
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 98 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 k (new)
11 k. Considers that the submission and evaluation process for an innovator- centric EIC Accelerator should be easy to understand for entrepreneurs as well as scientists, minimal in terms of time needed to be invested, fair and transparent, and in line with industry standards;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 99 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 l (new)
11 l. Is deeply concerned about the functioning of the AI Platform. Notes in this regard that both applicants and evaluators voice concerns about the Platform;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 100 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 m (new)
11 m. Highlights that the online form is time consuming, has no flexibility in terms of presenting the information (no formatting or images possible) and uses jargon needlessly. Notes that the resulting ‘Business Plan’ does not seem to be according to industry standards nor is it a format which is user friendly for evaluators or project managers;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 101 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 n (new)
11 n. Draws particular attention to the increased number of pages, 120-200 pages, compared to the EIC Pilot, 50 pages, while considering that evaluators have 36 minutes to evaluate a full (second stage) proposal. Is concerned that this is one of the causes for dissatisfaction of stakeholders regarding the quality of evaluation;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 102 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 o (new)
11 o. Is concerned about the increasing need for applicants to hire consultants to manage the application procedure due to complexity;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 103 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 p (new)
11 p. Notes with concern that a single No-Go in the second stage of the evaluation process is sufficient for an application to fail. Regards this disproportional, considering that three evaluators assessing the proposal and all give a Go/No-Go on three separate evaluation criteria. Notes that it seems unreasonable that the assessment of one evaluator on one criterion outweighs eight other assessments. Highlights that this makes the system extremely vulnerable because a single mismatch between evaluator and project is sufficient to undermine a potential innovation for Europe. Additionally notes that this makes the system also extremely vulnerable for a corrupted procedure considering that a single conflict of interest can cause the unjustifiable failure of a project. Is particularly concerned about this system in conjuction with the flawed AI system and the very tight time limit for evaluators to consider a proposal. Notes in this regards several concrete examples received where the No-Go of an evaluator was clearly grounded in misreading of a proposal or overlooking information which was included in the proposal - in spite of the rebuttal comments made by the applicants highlighting the flawed assessment;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 105 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 q (new)
11 q. Points to the importance of the EIC Board as principle advisor to the European Commission regarding the implementation of the EIC as well as the development of broader innovation policy, particular with regards to improving the innovation ecosystem in Europe as well as identifying strategically relevant technologies. Stresses that the EIC Board should be fully and timely informed, both by the EISMEA and other Commission services involved, on all developments in the implementation of the EIC, as well as be presented with any and all information regarding the EIC it requests;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 106 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 r (new)
11 r. Emphasises that the Europe’s innovative capacity, economic growth and resilience is undermined because of the low participation of women in the startup and VC scene. Welcomes in this regard the efforts made by the EIC to promote woman leadership and participation in startups and VC. Regrets that this has not yet resulted in sufficient change. Points in this regard to the fact that of investments raised by European startups in 2021 only 1.8% was raised by all-women-founded startups and merely 9.3% was raised by mixed-gender founding teams1a _________________ 1a https://europeanwomeninvc.idcinteractive .net/
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 107 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 s (new)
11 s. Is alarmed by the fact that the EIC Work Programme requires any project to comply with the Do No Significant Harm principle as enshrined in Regulation (EU) 2020/852, known as the EU Taxonomy. Highlights that the 2022 Work Programme refers to the principle both as an evaluation criterion for the EIC Accelerator and as an eligibility criterion for the EIC in general. Recalls that the scope of Regulation (EU) 2020/852 is limited to financial markets. Recalls that the Horizon Europe legislation in no way requires compliance with the DNSH principle. Concludes therefore that there is no legal base for this additional eligibility criterion;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 108 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 t (new)
11 t. Welcomes the efforts within the EIC to develop a suitable framework for the evaluation of the EIC’s performance. Highlights that the unique nature of the EIC requires a tailor-made approach to monitoring the performance as well as the use of the outcome of the monitoring in order to ensure the EIC is a top performer in the market;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 111 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 – point a a (new)
(a a) Making full use of the added value of co-investment by external investors, while maintaining the possibility of the EIC Fund: 1. being the sole investor, including through taking equity without co- investment from external investors being required 2. being the major investor without leading the investment round 3. leading an investment round;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 113 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 – point b
(b) aAn investment strategy for equity investments based on milestones reflectingbased on the merits of the innovation as well as the strategic objectives of the Union; rather than solely on the willingness of other investors to join the investment round;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 115 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 – point c a (new)
(c a) maintain the construction that allows the EIB team to be embedded in the Agency to deliver the high quality due diligence. Requests the Commission to build on this successful collaboration and agree on an arrangement with the EIB to have the embedded EIB team represent the EIC Fund in board meetings of investees
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 121 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 a (new)
12 a. Calls on the Commission to refrain from the use of the DNSH principle as additional eligibility criterion for EIC projects;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 122 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 b (new)
12 b. Calls on the Commission to adept the Model Grant Agreement to include a clear definition of ‘EIC Inventor’ and to stipulate a clear policy on access rights for EIC Inventors which only provides broad access rights to EIC Inventors when a research organisation does not have an active policy and structure in place to support the use of research results for economic activities;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 123 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 c (new)
12 c. Calls on the Commission to instate a system of continuous and agile evaluation of the performance of the EIC and particularly the Accelerator;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 124 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 d (new)
12 d. Calls on the Commission to include a rigorous and continuous assessment of the evaluation procedure, taking into serious account complaints raised by applicants that can show clear inconsistencies in the evaluation of their proposal. Invites the Commission to inform the Parliament on how it handles individual complaints that demonstrate a clear failure by the evaluators;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 125 #

2022/2063(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 e (new)
12 e. Calls on the relevant Union bodies, including the European Court of Auditors and the EIC Board, to develop a dedicated auditing strategy for the EIC which reflects the particular nature of the EIC;
2022/09/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 2 #

2022/2053(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital A a (new)
A a. Whereas the London Protocol prohibits the cross-border transport of CO2by sea; whereas the 2009 amendment addressing this restriction has only been adopted by five EU Member States, seriously hampering the cross-border transport of CO2 for storage;
2022/07/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 11 #

2022/2053(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B a (new)
B a. whereas the EU climate-neutrality objective would require to capture between 300Mt and500 Mt of carbon dioxide by 2050 1a _________________ 1a SWD (2021) 450, Sustainable carbon cycles for a 2050 climate-neutral EU – Technical Assessment
2022/07/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 13 #

2022/2053(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B b (new)
B b. whereas Horizon Europe will continue to foster innovative approaches, in particular through a major R&I European mission to promote soil health: “A Soil Deal for Europe”, its thematic Clusters and the European Innovation Council;
2022/07/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 16 #

2022/2053(INI)

1 a. Calls on the Commission to adopt a Strategy for carbon capture and storage by the end of 2023, including a comprehensive plan and targets to ensure the deployment of these technologies in the timeframe required for the decarbonisation of Europe;
2022/07/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 17 #

2022/2053(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 b (new)
1 b. Calls on the Commission to develop a plan, with clear milestones, to develop the CO2 storage and transport infrastructure needed in Europe, as part of the Strategy for carbon capture and storage;
2022/07/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 20 #

2022/2053(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Reiterates that the European Climate Law sets the goal of climate neutrality by 2050, and recognises the need to drastically reduce carbon reliance and envisages new business models for carbon farming; recalls the importance of tackling carbon embedded in products;
2022/07/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 25 #

2022/2053(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Highlights the need to recycle carbon from waste streams, from sustainable sources of biomass or directly from the atmosphere;
2022/07/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 26 #

2022/2053(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 b (new)
2 b. Emphasises that many products in circulation represent altogether a major reservoir of carbon that is often released at the end-of-life phase; Calls on the Commission to support the industrial scaling up of the initiatives aiming to gradually replace fossil carbon with sustainable streams of renewable and recycled carbon through financial support and enabling regulation; welcomes the aspirational 20% target for plastics and chemicals coming from non-fossil carbon; emphasises that such target can only be achieved if EU legislation creates a supportive framework by differentiating the origin of the carbon; invites the Commission to establish a methodology for calculating the share of sustainable non-fossil carbon;
2022/07/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 30 #

2022/2053(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Reiterates the role of Horizon 3. Europe missions and the European Innovation Council in researching breakthrough technologies and game- changing innovations, including capture, transport, storing or reusing technologies as well as technical and nature based carbon removal and storage opportunities; supports the EIC Accelerator Challenge “Technologies for ‘Fit for 55’” for the development and scale up of sustainable agriculture to increase climate resilience, abate nitrogen and methane emissions an increase carbon stock in the soil;
2022/07/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 37 #

2022/2053(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Supports the increased size of the Innovation Fund for the deployment at scale of innovative low-carbon technologies to support industrial carbon removal and the possibility of carbon contracts for difference (CCfD) as a means of investment in innovative clean technologies as well as carbon removal and storage opportunities; calls on the Commission to better support industrial carbon removals with the Innovation Fund;
2022/07/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 43 #

2022/2053(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Highlights the importance of European leadership and the need for a competitive CCUS market with financial incentives including the consideration of linking negative emissions to the long term ETS;
2022/07/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 49 #

2022/2053(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. Supports the further promotion, including through financial incentives, of technological solutions for carbon capture and use (CCU) and the production of sustainable synthetic fuels or other non-fossil based carbon products;
2022/07/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 53 #

2022/2053(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 b (new)
5 b. Urges the Commission to encourage Member States to ratify the London Protocol amendment; calls on the Commission to develop guidelines for bilateral agreements on permits for the export and import of CO2 for storage;
2022/07/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 60 #

2022/2053(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Calls on the Commission to propose a framework for carbon removal, and storage from both ecosystems and industrial solutions with requirements on monitoring, reporting and verification based on life-cyclescientific criteria, life-cycle, circular and carbon supply chain considerations, that is sufficiently flexible to accommodate new technologies;
2022/07/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 64 #

2022/2053(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6 a. Highlights that an important element of any policy framework for carbon removals will be the development of new CO₂ transport and storage networks and infrastructures in the EU, connecting industrial emitters with CO₂ storage capacity, in order to achieve decarbonisation of hard-to-abate sectors as well as carbon removals in the context of bio-energy with CCS (BECCS) and direct air capture (DAC);
2022/07/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 76 #

2022/2053(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7 a. Looks forward to the Commission’s proposal for an EU regulatory framework for the accounting certification of carbon removals by the end of 2022; notes that the future establishment of a market for carbon certificates must be compatible and fully aligned with the EU ETS, should be cross border and consider the rules of Article 6 of the Paris Agreement;
2022/07/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 79 #

2022/2053(INI)

7 b. Highlights the importance of European leadership and the need for a competitive CCUS and CO2 removals market with financial incentives that support commercial deployment before 2030;
2022/07/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 80 #

2022/2053(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 c (new)
7 c. Calls on the Commission to provide enhanced certainty for companies purchasing carbon credits by means of a solid certification framework that ensures zero tolerance for greenwashing;
2022/07/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 81 #

2022/2053(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 d (new)
7 d. Calls on the Commission to clearly differentiate between short-cycle removal, with terrestrial sinks, and long-term removal, with geological sinks, in its upcoming proposal for the Certification of Carbon Removals; stresses that the certificates for these two different types of sinks should be separate and not exchangeable;
2022/07/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 27 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B a (new)
Ba. whereas the Russian war of aggression against Ukraine has shown once again that the EU is highly dependent on energy supply from third countries;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 29 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B b (new)
Bb. whereas a high level of energy supply dependency, such as on Russia, and high energy prices can be detrimental to the production capacities of European companies;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 116 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3a. Calls on the Commission to consider the impact of the Russian war of aggression against Ukraine on the European industry and its capacities in current and future initiatives and objectives;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 117 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 b (new)
3b. Calls on the Commission and Members States to ensure technology neutrality across the whole transition in order to secure competitiveness; stresses that the exclusion of certain technologies will only weaken the industries ability to pivot in times of crisis or when technologies prove themselves financially, economically or environmentally unsustainable; insists therefore that the most sustainable way of achieving the climate goals is a technological open and cost-efficient way, including all technologies that contribute to reach climate neutrality;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 155 #

2022/2008(INI)

6a. Calls on the Commission and Member States to adopt a holistic approach when it creates incentives to support strategic industrial sectors and their supply chains, such as food, pharmaceutics and others, which are facing a sharp increase of energy, transport and raw materials' costs due to the current conflict in Ukraine; stresses that ensuring sufficient access to affordable, secure and diversified clean energy throughout the single market is going to be key to continue with its integration and to pursue the European industry’s transformation plans, boost its green transition and its global competitiveness; underlines how the development of efficient and integrated logistics networks and infrastructures can ensure a smoother access to transport, energy and digital services increase competitiveness of businesses, reduce barriers in the single market and widen markets for products and jobs; reminds the importance of diversification of supplies and material circularity in particular to reduce reliance on third country imports and increase Union's energy and resources independence;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 175 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7a. Underlines the importance of a fully integrated circular economy to create an efficient and decarbonised industry; calls on the Commission to undertake analyses on how products can be recycled and reintroduced into the product cycle; calls on the Commission to give particular consideration when it comes to funding and tender opportunities of the European Union to projects of companies that are innovative frontrunners as regards building and advancing the circular economy;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 220 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10 a (new)
10a. Is concerned about the increasing level of administrative burden for companies; stresses that Europe is experiencing a turning point due to the Russian war of aggression against Ukraine and the consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic; calls on the Commission to introduce a moratorium on bureaucracy, as companies are already severely challenged by high industrial energy prices, in some cases insufficient energy infrastructure, complications in logistics and shortage of skilled workers;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 247 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 a (new)
12a. Underlines that the Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism (CBAM) intends to prevent the risk of carbon leakage on the EU market; states that it is essential to avoid the risk that products exported from the EU are replaced by more carbon intensive goods on the global market; calls on the Commission to present a legislative proposal to develop WTO- compatible solutions, such as an export adjustment mechanism, to be implemented to avoid carbon leakage on European exports, while preserving emission reduction targets; reiterates that in order for CBAM to be efficient in lowering carbon leakage, all possible circumvention practices should be addressed;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 252 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 b (new)
12b. Considers the roll out of the hydrogen economy for the success of the Fit For 55 goals essential; in this regard stresses the need for a broad-based strategy for the importation of renewable electricity, renewable hydrogen and low- carbon energy from as many naturally suitable regions as possible is necessary, also to reduce fossil dependencies;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 254 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 c (new)
12c. Calls on Member States to diversify their energy mix in order to increase the EUs energy security; the energy mix needs to continue to include sources such as LNG and nuclear in order to avoid energy crisis, market distortion, inflation and energy poverty; emphasizes the need for biomass as a renewable source, as well as support for sustainable forest and land management, needed for long-term storage, adaption and removal of carbon;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 262 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to bring down the time needed to issue permits substantially and create fast-track permitting procedures for infrastructure that supports industry in the energy transition; calls on Member States and the Commission to establish permitting procedures with a clear governance structure that establishes legal certainty in order to attract the necessary investors and lower the investment risk;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 4 #

2022/0212(BUD)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. Calls on the Council and Commission to make sufficient funding available to reach the objectives of RePowerEU Plan; reminds that these investments should not come at the expense of investments in the broader competitiveness and strategic autonomy of the Unio; considers that the solidarity and cohesion objectives of RePowerEU naturally align its investment needs with instruments like the RRF, ERDF and Cohesion Fund; supports the Commission proposal to use allowances from the Market Stability Reserve to auction up to a value of €20 billion and thereby finance the necessary infrastructure needed to make us less dependent on Russian gas and oil;
2022/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 18 #

2022/0212(BUD)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. Considering that the Commission has stated several times that there is no requirement for Horizon Europe projects to comply with the do-no-significant-harm principle and that referencing it is purely voluntary; consdering specifically the text in the Horizon Europe Programme guide: "evaluators will not score applications in relation to their compliance with the DNSH principle"; notes the text in the draft versions of the 2023/2024 Work Programmes for Horizon Europe that refer to the need for projects to comply with the do-no-significant-harm principle; concludes that this text in the 2023/2024 Work Programme is an incorrect reflection of the policy of the Commission with regards to the do-no-significant- harm principle in Horizon Europe. Recognises that this creates uncertainty among applicants about the role of the do- no-significant-harm principle in the evaluation and selection of project; demands, therefore, that the Commission changes the texts in the draft Work Programme to accurately reflect its policy on the do-no-significant-harm principle;
2022/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 24 #

2022/0212(BUD)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. Calls for sufficient funding and staffing for all agencies and Union bodies in the policy areas of industry, research and energy, in particular for the European Institute of Innovation and Technology, the EU Agency for the Space Programme and the EU Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators.
2022/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 106 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 4
(4) The EU adopted the GOVSATCOM component of Regulation (EU) 2021/696 on 28 April 2021, to ensure the long-term availability of reliable, secure and cost-effective satellite communications services for GOVSATCOM users. Regulation (EU) 2021/696 envisages that in a first phase, of the GOVSATCOM component until approximately 2025, existing capacity would be usedpooled and shared through the GOVSATCOM Hub. In that context, the Commission is to procure GOVSATCOM capacities from Member States with national systems and space capacities and from commercial satellite communication or service providers, taking into account the essential security interests of the Union. In that first phase, GOVSATCOM services are to be introduced by a step-by-step approach, also in light of the scaling up of the GOVSATCOM Hub infrastructure capabilities. It is also based on the premise that if in the course of the first phase a detailed analysis of future supply and demand reveals that this approach was insufficient to cover the evolving demand, willit may be necessary to move to a second phase and develop additional bespoke space infrastructure or capacities through cooperation with the private sector, e.g. with Union satellite operators.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 109 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 5
(5) It is now clear that the Union’s current satellite communication assets cannot meet new needs of then a rapidly evolving scenario, governmental users who are moving towards higher security solutions, low latency and global coverage. Although r to meet their new needs. Recent technical progress has allowed non- geostationary-orbit (NGSO) communications constellations to emerge and gradually offer high-speed and low- latency connectivity services. There is a window of opportunity for addressing the evolving needs of the governmental users by developing and deploying additional infrastructure as filings for the frequencies necessary to provide the required services are currently available within the European Union. If not used, these filings will become obsolete and be attributed to other players. As frequencies are an increasingly scarce resource, the EU may not get this opportunity againCommission may take the opportunity to conclude dedicated licensing agreements with those Member States providing the frequencies filings. This open and transparent process should take place for frequencies filings for the provision of governmental services based on the governmental infrastructure.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 116 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 10
(10) Therefore, it is important to establish a new, Union Secure Connectivity Programme (‘the Programme’) to provide for the Union satellite based communication infrastructure, which should be built upon the GOVSATCOM component of the Union Space Programme and which should alsorelated infrastructure, takeing advantage of additional national and European capacities, which exist at the time the from an infrastructure, communication capacition is being carried out and develop furtheres and service perspective, with gradual integration of the European Quantum Communication Infrastructure (EuroQCI) initiative.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 123 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 14
(14) In order to expand the Union satellite communication capacities, the Programme infrastructure should integratebe based on the infrastructure developed for the purposes of the of the GOVSATCOM component of the Union Space Programme. In particular, the Programme’s ground infrastructure should encompassbe based on the GOVSATCOM Hubs, and other ground segment assets progressively scaled up through other ground segment assets, on the basis of users and service needs.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 132 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 17
(17) It is vital for the security of the Union and its Member States and for ensuring the security and integrity of the governmental services, that, where possible,To ensure the security and integrity of the governmental services and the competitiveness of the Union in a rapidly evolving market, it is vital that the space assets of the Programme are launched from the territory of the Member StatesUnion. Furthermore, microlaunchers are able tomay provide additional flexibility to allow for a rapid deployment of the space assets.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 136 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 20
(20) Operational requirements for the governmental services should be based on the use-case analysineeds of governmental users, while also taking into account the capabilities of current market offerings. From those operational requirements, in combination with security requirements and evolving demand of governmental services, the portfolio of governmental services should be developed. The service portfolio should establish the applicable baseline for the governmental services. The service portfolio for the governmental services should take into accountbe based on the service portfolio of the GOVSATCOM services established within the framework of Regulation (EU) 2021/696. In order to maintain the best possible match between the demand and supplied services, the service portfolio for governmental services should be regularly updated.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 139 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 22
(22) The Programme should prioritise the delivery of governmental services and also allow for the provision of commercial services by the private sector. Such commercial services could in particular contribute to availability of high-speed broadband and seamless connectivity throughout Europe, removing communication dead zones and increasing cohesion across Member State territories, including rural, peripheral, remote and isolated areas and islands, and provide connectivity over geographical areas of strategic interest.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 144 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 25
(25) This Regulation lays down a financial envelope, which is to constitute the prime reference amount, within the meaning of point 18 of the Interinstitutional Agreement of 16 December 2020 between the European Parliament, the Council of the European Union and the European Commission on budgetary discipline, on cooperation in budgetary matters and on sound financial management, as well as on new own resources, including a roadmap towards the introduction of new own resources22 , for the European Parliament and the Council during the annual budgetary procedure. Since the Programme is a new initiative that was not part of the Multiannual Financial Framework for 2021-2027, new financial resources should be deployed. Priority should be given to unallocated margins under the MFF ceilings or mobilized through the non-thematic MFF special instruments, in order to limit cuts to other Union programmes. _________________ 22 OJ L 433 I, 22.12.2020, p. 28.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 148 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 27
(27) The Horizon Europe Programme will allocate a dedicated share of its Cluster 4 components to R&I activities related to development and validation of the secure connectivity system, including for the potential technologies that would be developed under New Space. The Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) will allocate a dedicated share of its Global Europe funds for activities related to the operation of the system and the worldwide provision of services that will allow to offer an array of services to international partners. The Union Space Programme will allocate a dedicated share of its GOVSATCOM component for the activities related to the development and completion of the GOVSATCOM Hub which will form part ofbe necessary for the ground infrastructure of the Secure Connectivity system. The funding stemming from these programmes should be implemented in accordance with the rules of these programmes. Since those rules may differ significantly from the rules under this Regulation, the need to achieve effectively the intended policy objectives should be taken into account when deciding to finance actions from both the allocated funds from Horizon Europe and NDICI and from the Union Secure Connectivity Programme.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 150 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 28
(28) Due to its inherent implications on the security of the Union and its Member States, the Programme also shares objectives and principles with the European Defence Fund established by Regulation (EU) 2021/697 of the European Parliament and of the Council28 . Therefore, part of the funding from that Programme should be provided to fund the activities under this Programme, particularly the actions related to the deployment of its governmental infrastructure. _________________ 28 Regulation (EU) 2021/697 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 29 April 2021 establishing the European Defence Fund and repealing Regulation (EU) 2018/1092 (OJ L 170, 12.5.2021, p. 149).
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 153 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 30 a (new)
(30 a) In the context of the mid-term review of the Multiannual Financial Framework 2021-2027, a solid budgetary assessment of the initiative should be carried out in order to provide adequate resources to the Programme.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 158 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 40 a (new)
(40 a) The results of the feasibility study for SMEs in the space industry “New Space Solutions for Long-term Availability of Reliable, Secure, Cost Effective Space Based Connectivity” are not yet available. The results of this study should be taken into account prior to the adoption of this legislative proposal and are crucial for the participation of SMEs in the secure connectivity initiative and its feasibility.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 159 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 40 b (new)
(40 b) Union-wide initiatives, such as the secure connectivity initiative, are shaped by the broad participation of innovative small, medium and large enterprises from all over Europe. The innovative potential in the Union vastly lies in small and medium sized “New Space” undertakings.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 176 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 64
(64) In principle, the governmental services should be provided free of charge to users of the governmental services. If, after analysis, the Commission concludes that there is a shortage of capacities, it should be permitted, however a pricing policy could be developed ex ante in order to dprevelop a pricing policy as part of those detailed rules on the service provision in order to avoid a distortion of the marketnt distortions of the market and to apply in case of shortage of capacities. The Commission should be conferred with implementing powers to adopt such pricing policy. Those powers should be exercised in accordance with Regulation (EU) No 182/2011.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 179 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 71 a (new)
(71 a) The Programme complements the existing Union Space Programme, by integrating and extending its objectives and actions to create a secure and space- based connectivity system for the Union. Therefore, in the future, this Programme should be integrated in the Union Space Programme.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 184 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 6
(6) ‘New Space industry’ means private companies,ecosystem’ means new business models where non-traditional space players, in particular small and medium- sized enterprises and start-ups that develop innovelative, market-driven space technologies and applications. Such ecosystem covers the whole space value chain, encompassing upstream, midstream and downstream segments;
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 186 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 9 a (new)
(9 a) ‘EU classified information’ means EU classified information as defined in Article 2(25) of Regulation (EU) 2021/696;
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 188 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 9 b (new)
(9 b) ‘sensitive non-classified information’ means sensitive non- classified information as defined in Article 2(26) of Regulation (EU) 2021/696.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 190 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
1. The general objective of the Programme is to establish a secure and autonomous space-based connectivity system for the provision of guaranteed and resilient satellite communication services, through the integration of the capacities of the GOVSATCOM component of the Union Space Programme, in particular to:
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 193 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) ensure the long-term availability of worldwide uninterrupted access to secure and cost-effective satellite governmental communication services to governmental users in accordance with paragraphs 1 to 3 of Article 7, which supports protection of critical infrastructures, surveillance, external actions, crisis management and applications that are critical for the economy, environment, security and defence, thereby increasing the resilience of Member States;
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 198 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point b
(b) allow forenable the provision of commercial services by the private sector in accordance with Article 7(4)or services offered to governmental users based on commercial infrastructure at market conditions by the private sector in line with applicable Union’s competition law.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 204 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point a
(a) improve the resilience of the Union communication services by developing, building and operating a multi-orbital connectivity infrastructure, continuously adapted to evolution of demand for satellite communications, while taking into accountbuilt on the exploitation of the existing and future assets and communication capacities of the Member States used in the frame of the GOVSATCOM component of the Union Space Programme established by Regulation (EU) 2021/69643 ; _________________ 43 Regulation (EU) 2021/696 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 28 April 2021 establishing the Union Space Programme and the European Union Agency for the Space Programme and repealing Regulations (EU) No 912/2010, (EU) No 1285/2013 and (EU) No 377/2014 and Decision No 541/2014/EU (OJ L 170, 12.5.2021, p. 69).
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 213 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point d
(d) incentivise the deployment of innovative and disruptive technologies, in particular by leveraging and new business models provided by the New Space industryecosystem; and
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 230 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 2
2. The exploitation activities referred to in paragraph 1, point (d), shall begin progressively with the provision of a preliminary set of services by 2024. Those early services shall be improved through the gradual, based on the exploitation of the GOVSATCOM Hub infrastructure. Those early services shall be improved through the gradual scaling up of the GOVSATCOM Hub infrastructure. They may be further improved through the deployment of the space and ground infrastructure leading to full operational capability aimed by 2027.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 235 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. The Programme implementation, infrastructure, exploitation, services provision and maintenance shall be in line with the Union space traffic management legislation.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 236 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 5 – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 1 – introductory part
The governmental infrastructure of the secure connectivity system shall includebe built upon the GOVSATCOM Hub ground segment infrastructure as set out in Article 67 of Regulation (EU) 2021/696 and include progressively all the related ground and space assets which are required for the provision of the governmental services, as set out in Article 7(1), including the following assets:
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 237 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 5 – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 1 – point e
(e) the GOVSATCOM ground segment infrastructure as set out in Article 67 of Regulation (EU) 2021/696, including the GOVSATCOM Hubs.deleted
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 245 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 5 – paragraph 4
4. The commercial infrastructure referred to in paragraph 1 shall include all space and ground assets other than those being part of the governmental infrastructure. The commercial infrastructure, and any related risk, shall be entirely financed by the contractor referred to in Article 15(2).
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 250 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 – paragraph 1
1. The Programme shall support an innovative and competitive Union space sector and stimulate the New Space industry in the Union, and in particular the initiatives and activities listed in Article 6 of Regulation (EU) 2021/696, including, where appropriate, support of commercial services.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 253 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 – paragraph 2 – introductory part
2. The Commission shall contribute to the activities referred to in paragraph 1stimulate the New Space ecosystem in the Union, by taking the following measures:
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 258 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 – paragraph 2 – point b
(b) require that the contractor referred to in Article 15(2) provides a plan onto maximise the integration of start-ups and SMEs from across the Union in the activities under the contracts referred to in Article 15;
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 266 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 1
1. The provision of governmental services shall be ensured as laid down in the service portfolio referred to in paragraph 3 and in accordance with the operational requirements set out in in paragraph 2services portfolio shall consist at least of the following categories of services: (a) services offered to governmental users based on the governmental infrastructure; (b) services offered to governmental users based on the commercial infrastructure; (c) quantum communication services. These categories complement the portfolio of GOVSATCOM services referred to in Article 63(3) of Regulation (EU) 2021/696.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 272 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 4
4. The provision of commercial services shall be financed entirely by the contractor referred to in Article 15(2). The terms and conditions for the provision of commercial services shall be determined in the contracts referred to in Article 15. They shall in particular specify how the Commission will assess and approve the provision of commercial services to ensure that the Union’s essential interests and the Programme’s general and specific objectives referred to in Article 3 are preserved. They shall also include adequate safeguards to prevent distortions of competition in the provision of commercial services, to avoid any conflict of interest, undue discrimination and any other hidden indirect advantages to the contractor referred to in Article 15(2). Such safeguards mayshall include the obligation of accounting separation between the provision of governmental services and the provision of commercial services, including the setting up of a structurally and legally separate entity from the vertically integrated operator for the provision of governmental services, and the provision of open, fair and non- discriminatory access to infrastructure necessary for the provision of commercial services.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 278 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 4 – subparagraph 2
By determining this pricing policy, the Commission shall ensure that the provision of the governmental services does not distort competition, that there is no shortage of the governmental services and that the price identified will not result in an overcompensation of the beneficiarcontractor. Any revenue from the pricing policy shall be used to increase capacity of the secure connectivity system or to procure additional capacity.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 290 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1
The financial envelope for the implementation of the Programme for the period from 1 January 2023 to 31 December 2027 and for covering the associated risks shall be EUR 1,600 billion in current prices. This amount shall be drawn primarily from unallocated margins under the MFF 2021-2027 ceilings or mobilized through the non- thematic MFF special instruments.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 295 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 2
2. The Programme shall be complemented by funding implemented under the Horizon Europe Programme, the Union Space Programme and the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) for a maximum indicative amount of EUR 0,430 billion, EUR 0,220 billion and EUR 0,150 billion respectively. This funding shall be implemented in accordance with Regulation (EU) No 2021/695, Regulation (EU) No 2021/696 and Regulation (EU) No. 2021/947 respectively, and with full respect for their objectives, criteria and implementation modalities.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 298 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. The amount referred to in paragraph 1 may not be used to cover any risk related to the commercial infrastructure.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 322 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 2 – point a
(a) to promote in all Member States throughout the Union and throughout the supply chain, the widest and most open participation possible by economic operators, in particular start-ups, new entrants and SMEs, including in the case of sub-contracting by the tendererors, by requiring, where appropriate, a minimum number of operators established in different Member States;
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 335 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 18 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. For contracts above EUR 10 million, the contracting authority shall ensure that at least 30 % of the value of the contract is subcontracted by competitive tendering at various levels of subcontracting to companies outside the group of the prime tenderer, particularly in order to enable the cross-border participation of SMEs.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 338 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 18 – paragraph 2
2. The tenderer shall duly justify any derogation from a request made under paragraphs 1 and 1a.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 350 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 24 – paragraph 2 – introductory part
2. The Commission mayshall entrust, by means of one or more contribution agreements, the following tasks to the Agency:
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 351 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 24 – paragraph 2 – point a
(a) management of the operation of the governmental infrastructure of the Programme;
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 355 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 24 – paragraph 2 – point c
(c) provision of the governmental services, in particular through the GOVSATCOM Hub;
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 359 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 24 – paragraph 4
4. Where activities are entrusted to the Agency, appropriate financial, human and administrative resources shall be ensured for their implementation. For this purpose, the Commission mayshall allocate part of the budget for the activities entrusted to the Agency for the funding of human resources necessary for their implementation.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 383 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 39 – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 1 – point b a (new)
(b a) the participation and leveraging of New Space, especially start-ups and SMEs, across the Union.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 385 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 39 – paragraph 3
3. The evaluation of the Programme shall take into consideration the results of the evaluation of the GOVSATCOM component of the Union Space Programme, carried out in accordance with Article 102 of Regulation (EU) 2021/696. If the Commission considers it appropriate, in view of the overall coherence of the Union space sector and in line with the Interinstitutional Agreement on Better Law-Making, the evaluation shall be accompanied by an appropriate proposal to integrate this Programme into the Union Space Programme.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 400 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 5 – introductory part
Specific objective 4: Incentivise the development of innovative and disruptive technologies, in particular by leveraging the New Space industryecosystem.
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 402 #

2022/0039(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 5 – subparagraph 1
Indicator 1: Number of start-up, SME and midcap companies participating in the development of the infrastructure and total value of the contracts allocated to them by their prime tenders
2022/06/24
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 77 #

2021/2255(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E
E. whereas building a better future starts with quality education and training; whereas access to quality education is a fundamental right; whereas a high-quality built environment is the result of the work of skilled professionals in the construction sector and creative and cultural industries;
2022/05/02
Committee: ITRECULT
Amendment 162 #

2021/2255(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. Acknowledges that, by translating the values of the original Bauhaus to today’s challenges, the NEB aspires to create a cultural movement that contributes to a smarter, more sustainable and more enjoyable living environment;
2022/05/02
Committee: ITRECULT
Amendment 206 #
2022/05/02
Committee: ITRECULT
Amendment 237 #

2021/2255(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8 – indent 1
- supporting the implementation of key policies; (e.g. Green Deal, environmental, industrial, social and cultural policies);
2022/05/02
Committee: ITRECULT
Amendment 246 #
2022/05/02
Committee: ITRECULT
Amendment 248 #
2022/05/02
Committee: ITRECULT
Amendment 249 #
2022/05/02
Committee: ITRECULT
Amendment 252 #
2022/05/02
Committee: ITRECULT
Amendment 257 #
2022/05/02
Committee: ITRECULT
Amendment 321 #

2021/2255(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Calls on the Commission to develop a clear plan for attracting public and private investment, with a particular focus on promoting female leadership in venture capital and start-ups; encourages the Member States to allocate adequate funding to the NEB through their recovery and resilience plans and the European structural and investment funds;
2022/05/02
Committee: ITRECULT
Amendment 346 #

2021/2255(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Believes that the NEB movement should promote more sustainable, socially inclusive and innovative ways of life based on new models of planning, constructing and inhabiting our built environment in order to suit emerging needs and help to ensure decentquality housing for all;
2022/05/02
Committee: ITRECULT
Amendment 384 #

2021/2255(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18
18. Highlights that the NEB could support energy security and efficiency by encouraging investment and incentivising low-tech, low-energy solutions and by focussing on low carbon materials and solutions, and could facilitate the digital transition by improving connectivity to mitigate the digital divide; underlines the importance of the NEB fighting energy poverty through innovative solutions for the building, construction, industrial and materials sectors;
2022/05/02
Committee: ITRECULT
Amendment 448 #

2021/2255(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 a (new)
21a. Supports the creation of an annual NEB festival and awards; calls for synergies with other relevant European awards and events;
2022/05/02
Committee: ITRECULT
Amendment 10 #

2021/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Stresses the need for ambitious policies to reduce transport’s reliance on fossil fuels without delayAcknowledges transport’s reliance on fossil fuels and stresses the need for ambitious policies to decarbonise all transport modes; calls on the Commission and Member States to adopt and implement a coherent long-term strategy for the transition towards a sustainable transport system, and to design a stable regulatory framework to ensure predictability for stakeholders, businesses, SMEs as well as citizens;
2021/05/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 16 #

2021/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. Points out the essential role played by transport in safeguarding the well- being and strengthening the competitiveness of the EU single market, while ensuring the free movement of people and goods within EU internal borders;
2021/05/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 18 #

2021/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 b (new)
1 b. Reiterates the importance to base the policy measures set out in the Sustainable and Smart Mobility Strategy on comprehensive impact assessments that take into account economic, environmental and social consequences as well as the diverse mobility needs of users;
2021/05/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 22 #

2021/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Believes that the challenges ahead are also, especially in the aftermath of the COVID- 19 pandemic, are an opportunity for the Union industrial leadership in clean technologies such as gaseous fuels, batteries or hydrogen, as well as in the related industrial ecosystems, for boosting jobs and supporting strategic value chains; stresses the need to avoid dependence from external suppliers in strategic sectors to achieve the strategic autonomy of our Union; welcomes the new European partnerships under Horizon Europe related to mobility; and the EU strategy for critical raw materials
2021/05/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 30 #

2021/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Stresses that a mobility system based on EU-wide digitalisation, data sharing and interoperable standards has the potential to make transport smarter and cleaner, cleaner and more efficient; highlights the potential of EU space data, space-based services and communication across all transport modes to increase their efficiency, sustainability and safety;
2021/05/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 52 #

2021/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Calls for a holistic approach based on the principle of technology neutrality and the life cycle assessment to increase the share of renewable and low-carbon energy in the transport sector, where the further development and deployment of low- and zero-emission vehicles should play a key role; the further development and deployment of electric vehicles should play a key role;
2021/05/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 65 #

2021/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Calls on Member States to implement the Clean Energy Package in order to facilitate the production and management of the increased renewable electricitnergy needed to decarbonise the transport sector;
2021/05/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 72 #

2021/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Calls for measures to unlock the potential of the energy efficiency first principle by boosting opportunities from digitalisation and electrificationdecarbonisation of the transport sector;;
2021/05/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 85 #

2021/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Calls on the Commission to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the possibilities for advanced biofuels and associated infrastructure development in the EU, such as options for the greater uptake of sustainable alternative fuels, in particular in the aviation and maritime sectors, as part of the review of RED II;
2021/05/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 91 #

2021/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7 a. Underlines that the technology for the production of renewable and low- carbon fuels is available and needs to be deployed on a large scale without delay. Welcomes in this regard the intention to establish a Renewable and Low-Carbon Fuels Value Chain Alliance, whose scope should cover all transport modes, with the aim to boost the supply and deployment of the most promising fuels;
2021/05/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 96 #

2021/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8
8. Calls for increased effortsWelcomes the European flagship “Recharge and Refuel” under the Recovery and Resilience Facility; calls for increased efforts in the upcoming review of the Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Directive to achieve a EU-wide roll-out of recharging and refuelling infrastructures and the adoption of harmonised standards to ensure interoperability.
2021/05/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 102 #

2021/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 a (new)
8 a. Highlights the importance of providing support to the research and development of the most promising and sustainable technologies, like gaseous fuels, hydrogen, hybrid and electric ones, following a technology neutral approach based on life-cycle GHG emissions, in order to accelerate the transition to the next generation of decarbonised transport systems.
2021/05/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 6 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital A
A. whereas the pandemic has revealed the strengths and limitations of the current set-up for managing value chains and accessibility to medicines and vaccines;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 23 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B
B. whereas universequal access toibility, affordability, and availability of medicines is a fuanda mental right the full realisation of which is incompatible with a pharmaceutical model based primarily on the pursuit of profitdicinal products is essential; whereas the EU can support this by applying a predictable policy framework that fosters public and private investments ensuring affordable patient access to medicines and benefit to society as a whole;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 33 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B a (new)
B a. whereas the disruption of the global supply chain ensuing from the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the EU’s dependency on third countries in the health sector; whereas the EU's open strategic autonomy and security of supply should be ensured by diversification of supply chains for essential medicines and medicinal products, including European manufacturing sites, as well as by applying public procurement rules that should not consider price as the sole criterion;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 47 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B b (new)
B b. whereas Europe’s pharmaceutical sector is a major contributor to the EU economy in terms of creation of highly skilled jobs and investment in innovation; whereas the pharmaceutical sector is a significant driver of trade and economic growth in the EU;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 52 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B c (new)
B c. whereas data sharing is key to applying artificial intelligence and machine learning tools to research, to enable the digital transformation of healthcare and to tackle disparities in prevention, diagnosis and treatment in Europe; considers that AI-based solutions can help boost the resilience and sustainability of EU’s healthcare systems and offer new solutions to patients via a better diagnosis and the use of real-world data;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 73 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Calls on the Commission to work towards a European public biomedical infrastructure covering the entire medicines value chain and to develop the prospective European Health Emergency Response Authority (HERA) along those lines; considers that HERA should closely collaborate with public and private entities to plan, coordinate and build an ecosystem of private and public capabilities which can provide suitable emergency frameworks for EU access to key raw materials in case of global supply chocks;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 108 #

2021/2013(INI)

2. Calls on the Commission to keep the results of Union-funded R&D in the public domain; points out that the protection of patents must not run counter to the right to healthPoints out that the protection of the social contract between European pharmaceutical companies, patients and society as a whole rests on the EU intellectual property framework; points out that the intellectual property framework acts as a driver of investments in research and development, which is essential to innovation;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 137 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Calls on the Commission to develop a new incentive model, look into decoupling mechanisms as an alternative to exclusive protections, and attach strict conditions to public funds in accordance with the principle of fair return on investmenttargeted incentives to ensure equitable access to medicines also in areas where the development of products would otherwise not be sustainable;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 139 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Welcomes the impact of the Regulation on orphan medicinal products (EC/141/2000) and the Regulation on medicinal products for paediatric use (EC/1901/2006); notes however that scientific progress and investment in research have not been sufficient for the unmet needs of patients with rare diseases, paediatric cancers and neurodegenerative diseases, to deal with antimicrobial resistance (AMR) or to prevent infectious diseases outbreaks; Calls on the Commission to support a regulatory framework which strengthens incentives for orphan medicines research and development in the EU to effectively address these shortcomings;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 151 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 b (new)
3 b. Calls on the Commission to incentivise child specific and first-in-child innovation and to facilitate the repositioning of medicines failing in adults when there is scientific and preclinical rationale;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 156 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Calls onWelcomes the Commission to develop a mandatory European licence in order to be able to respond rapidly to health's proposal to foster production and investment in Europe as well as to simplify and streamline relevant procedures in order to be able to respond rapidly to health crises; points out that a regulatory framework which supports the open strategic autonomy of the EU will benefit patients also outside times of crises;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 177 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Calls for public investment in R&D to be made transparent and for it to be reflected in product availability and pricingaffordability;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 182 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Calls on the Commission to support pricing models based on real production costs, innovation and value to patients; calls also on the Commission to investigate novel pricing and payment models and their possible impact on patient access to innovative medicines;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 203 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Calls ononsiders that the Commission to promoteand Member States could consider launching joint public procurement and apply most economically advantageous tender (MEAT) criteria more stringently- procedures in times of health crises, as has been done during the COVID-19 crisis, with simplified and transparent procedures in the interest of improved response times; highlights that joint public procurement should not hinder patient access, medical innovation or competition;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 220 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8
8. Regrets the excessive influence of industry interest groups, which is detrimental to public-health, patient and consumer associations and to trade unions.deleted
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 231 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 a (new)
8 a. Points out that small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) and mid-caps play a crucial role in the pharmaceutical value chain, often as first-movers and drivers of innovation; calls on the Commission to maintain a comprehensive and predictable regulatory framework that fosters the investment and innovation of especially European pharmaceutical SMEs and mid-caps;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 244 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 b (new)
8 b. Calls on the Commission to address unjustified trade restrictions; points out that trade barriers can harm the accessibility and affordability of medicinal products;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 246 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 c (new)
8 c. Calls on the Commission and Member States to fully implement the Clinical Trials Regulation; supports a new framework for the design of innovative trials, the simplification of the requirements for the conduct of clinical trials and additional support for the conduct of so-called pragmatic trials and the pilot project to adopt a framework for the reuse of off-patent medicines; welcomes the launch of a vaccine platform to monitor vaccine efficacy and safety, supported by an EU-wide clinical trials network;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 255 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 d (new)
8 d. Calls for the prudent implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) with regard to data minimisation, purpose limitation, the secondary use of data as well as on data transfer to third countries to avoid unnecessary restriction for health research and cross-border data sharing;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 260 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 e (new)
8 e. Urges the Commission, based on the experience with the authorisation of COVID-19 vaccines, to work with the EMA to consider extending the application of rolling reviews to other emergency medicines; further calls on the Commission to work with the EMA to develop the use of electronic product information for all medicines in the EU;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 265 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 f (new)
8 f. Calls on the Commission to develop new- and extend the scope of existing Mutual Recognition Agreements on Good manufacturing practice (GMP) certificates (most importantly on inspections and batch testing) with more countries who have high manufacturing standards; points out that this could make it easier to include sites in third countries in a production supply chain, without giving up European standards to allow for broadening the production capacity in times of crisis.
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 272 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 g (new)
8 g. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to screen foreign direct investment in pharmaceutical manufacturing plants, which are part of Europe’s critical health infrastructure;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 276 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 h (new)
8 h. Calls on the Commission to increase its involvement in supporting critical health infrastructure protection in Member States and to start applying the European Programme for Critical Infrastructure Protection to the health infrastructure sector;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 280 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 i (new)
8 i. Whereas the Horizon Europe programme provides essential support for research and innovation; whereas the programme is a key driver of job creation, industrial competitiveness, research and innovation also in the health and pharmaceutical sector;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 283 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 j (new)
8 j. Calls on the Commission to propose as soon as possible a legal framework to encourage innovation for new antibiotics with incentives either comparable to the area of orphan drugs or paediatrics or new innovative incentives to stimulate innovation to brings new antibiotics to the market;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 286 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 k (new)
8 k. Stresses that the EU has to build a stronger European Health Union in particular by supporting closer EU cooperation in research and development and by sharing health data;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 287 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 l (new)
8 l. Stresses that R&D is key for the development of innovative medicines, therapies and diagnosis;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 288 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 m (new)
8 m. Highlights that supporting the competitiveness and innovative capacity of the EU’s pharmaceutical industry is crucial;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 289 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 n (new)
8 n. Welcomes the Commission’s Action Plan on Intellectual Property which shall help companies, especially small and medium-sized companies (SMEs), to make the most of their inventions and creations and ensure they can benefit our economy and society and which aims at enabling the European innovative industry to remain a global leader;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 290 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 o (new)
8 o. Fully supports the IP Action Plans proposal to upgrade a series of existing IP tools and make them fit for the digital age, including improving the supplementary protection certificates (SPC) for patented medicinal products among other;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 292 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 q (new)
8 q. Recalls the Commission’s ‘Updating the 2020 New Industrial Strategy: Building a stronger Single Market for Europe’s recovery’ of May 2021 which states that the EU is strategically dependent on third countries regarding pharmaceutical ingredients and other health related products, which could lead to vulnerabilities for the EU and affect the EU’s core interests, and refers to the pharmaceutical strategy to address these issues;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 293 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 r (new)
8 r. Underlines the need to ensure a smart use of IP, and to better fight IP theft, as smart IP policies are essential to help companies to grow, to create jobs and to protect and develop what makes them unique and competitive;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 294 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 s (new)
8 s. Urges to make the IP systemmore effective for SMEs, through actions to simplify IP registration procedures(e.g. reforming EU legislation on industrial designs), to improve access to strategic IP advice (e.g. by making such advice available in all EU-level R&D funding), and to facilitate the use of IP as a lever to gain access to finance;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 295 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 t (new)
8 t. Stresses that investing in research and development is a costly, high-risk endeavour; underlines that patents are intended to offer some guarantee of a return on investment, but the patent system is also designed to balance the interests of inventors with those of the public; repeats therefore that pharmaceutical companies need intellectual property (IP) rights and thus patents to achieve profits and keep innovating also in the interest of the consumers and patients;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 296 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 u (new)
8 u. Underlines that the patent systems all over the world are drafted in a way that for a specific period of time, only for the duration of the patent, the inventor is allowed to commercially exploit its patent. Thereafter, the invention can be freely exploited by anyone;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1 #

2021/2006(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph -1 (new)
-1. Whereas methane emissions are the second-largest cause of global warming, with approximately one third of the global anthropogenic methane emissions coming from the energy sector; whereas the energy transition towards reaching climate neutrality by 2050 will require a substantial reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG)emissions from the energy sector, including in methane emissions;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 2 #

2021/2006(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph -1 a (new)
-1 a. Whereas the intensity of methane emissions varies widely between oil and gas producing countries; whereas oil and gas will continue to be part of the energy mix, in particular for the regions dependent on coal; taking into account the EU’s dependency on third countries for its energy supply;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 3 #

2021/2006(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph -1 b (new)
-1 b. Whereas the fact that methane emissions come from a wide range of sectors, like agriculture, waste and energy, and that, once in the atmosphere, methane blends well with other gases, makes it difficult to measure and report it, which leads to a lack of accurate data that gives methane emissions a relatively high uncertainty compared to CO2;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 4 #

2021/2006(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph -1 c (new)
-1 c. Whereas R&I, development, improvement and implementation of fit- for-purpose and appropriately targeted technologies and practices to improve MRV and to mitigate emissions are at the backbone of effective reduction of methane emissions;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 5 #

2021/2006(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph -1 d (new)
-1 d. Acknowledges the work done so far by the gas industry to reduce methane emissions through voluntary initiatives, such as the OGCI, the MGP and the OGMP 2.0, and underlines the commitment shown to undertake even stronger steps to further minimise methane emissions along the entire gas value chain;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 18 #

2021/2006(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. Agrees that an increased ambition of 55% GHG emission reduction by 2030 needs additional efforts to address all greenhouse gases; underlines that these efforts will mean that more investments are necessary.
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 65 #

2021/2006(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Welcomes the preparation of legislation for the energy sector with binding rules on monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) and leak detection and repair, and the consideration of rules on routine venting and flaring; Underlines that a well-structured, fit for purpose MRV system, as adequately outlined by the strategy, will be core for more accurate detecting and quantifying methane emissions along the value chains and will allow better evaluation of the results of mitigation measures in place;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 111 #

2021/2006(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. Calls the Commission to continue a close dialogue with regulators, as outlined in ACER’s Bridge beyond 2025 and the Commission’ methane strategy.
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 112 #

2021/2006(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Calls for a thorough assessment of the cost efficiency of the actions proposed in the energy sector, which should consider local conditions and the specific aspects of the various parts of the value chain and provide flexibility to the industry for their implementation; Calls on the Commission to consider the existing best practices in relation to LDAR as a starting point, allowing for flexible approaches across countries and within the value chain to take into consideration local conditions in order to ensure tailored action across the Union;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 119 #

2021/2006(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6 a. Supports the design and deployment of appropriate and cost- effective methane mitigation tools that take into account the necessary flexibility for the industry to implement them at the lowest cost and in the shortest time.
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 120 #

2021/2006(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 b (new)
6 b. Underlines that investments undertaken by infrastructure operators should be recognised within the scope of regulated activities, in order to allow the recovery of costs associated to the reduction of methane emissions, as a signal of the importance of safety and also sustainable activities, which should be incentivised by regulatory authorities; Draws attention to the case of non- regulated operators, which efforts and investments should be incentivised at national and European level;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 124 #

2021/2006(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Calls on the Commission to consider a target on renewable and decarbonised gases for 2030, as this would facilitate the development of biomethane and ensure the deployment of the most cost-efficient solutions across the Member States. Calls also for the revision of the gas market regulatory framework as soon as possible in 2021 to facilitate and incentivise the uptake of renewable and decarbonised gases;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 131 #

2021/2006(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7 a. Calls on the Commission to continue its active involvement in international initiatives, fostering cooperation with third countries to address methane emission reductions by disseminating best practices for cost- effective methane emission reductions across value chain segments and supports the EU’s diplomatic outreach campaign to fossil fuel producer countries and companies to become active in the OGMP.
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 139 #

2021/2006(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 b (new)
7 b. Calls for a reinforcement of research on measurement and possible uses of methane emissions in coalmines, promoting good practices and disseminating best available technologies of regulatory and fiscal frameworks to foster also the development of commercial collection facilitating the utilization of methane from abandoned sites.
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 300 #

2021/0426(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 6
(6) Buildings account for 40 % of final energy consumption in the Union and 36% of its energy-related greenhouse gas emissions . Therefore, reduction of energy consumption , in line with the energy efficiency first principle as laid down in Article 3 [revised EED] and defined in Article 2(18) of Regulation (EU) 2018/1999 of the European Parliament and of the Council32 and the use of energy from renewable sources in the buildings sector, the Commission Recommendation and guidelines on Energy Efficiency First (C(2021) 7014 final), and the use of energy from renewable sources in the buildings sector as part of an integrated systems’ approach to energy; stresses that energy efficiency and renewable energy use must be maximised across the entire energy value chain, across electricity, heat and gas, rather than just at individual building level, constitute important measures needed to reduce the Union’s greenhouse gas emissions. Reduced energy consumption and an increased use of energy from renewable sources also have an important part to play in reducing the Union’s energy dependency, promoting security of energy supply and, integrating the energy system, contributing to system efficiency, fostering technological developments and in creating opportunities for employment, job creation and regional development, in particular in islands and rural areas. _________________ 32 Regulation (EU) 2018/1999 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2018 on the Governance of the Energy Union and Climate Action, amending Regulations (EC) No 663/2009 and (EC) No 715/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Directives 94/22/EC, 98/70/EC, 2009/31/EC, 2009/73/EC, 2010/31/EU, 2012/27/EU and 2013/30/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council, Council Directives 2009/119/EC and (EU) 2015/652 and repealing Regulation (EU) No 525/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council (OJ L 328, 21.12.2018, p. 1), outermost regions and rural areas.
2022/07/06
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 320 #

2021/0426(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 11
(11) Measures to improve further the energy performance of buildings should take into account different climatic conditions, including adaptation to climate change, local conditions as well as indoor climate environment and cost- effectiveness. Those measures should not affect other requirements concerning buildings such as accessibility , fire safety and seismic safety and the intended use of the building.
2022/07/06
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 328 #

2021/0426(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 12
(12) The energy performance of buildings should be calculated on the basis of a methodology, which may be differentiated at national and regional and local level. That includes, in addition to thermal characteristics, other factors that play an increasingly important role such as heating and air-conditioning installations, application of energy from low carbon and renewable sources, building automation and control systems, smart solutions, passive heating and cooling elements, shading, indoor air- quality, adequate natural light and design of the building. The methodology for calculating energy performance should be based not only on the season in which heating or air- conditioning is required, but should cover the annual energy performance of a building. That methodology should take into account existing European standards. The methodology should ensure the representation of actual operating conditions and enable the use of metered energy to verify correctness and for comparability, and the methodology should be based on hourly or sub-hourly time- steps. In order to encourage the use of renewable energy on-site, and in addition to the common general framework, Member States should take the necessary measures so that the benefits of maximising the use of renewable energy on-site, including for other-uses (such as electric vehicle charging points), are recognised and accounted for in the calculation methodology.
2022/07/06
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 334 #

2021/0426(COD)

(14) Two-thirds of the energy used for heating and cooling of buildings still comes from fossil fuels. In order to decarbonise the building sector, it is of particular importance to phase out fossil fuel in heating and cooling. Therefore, Member States should indicate their national policies and measures to phase out fossil fuels in heating and cooling in their building renovation plans, and no financial incentives should be given for the installation of fossil fuelstand-alone heat-only boilers under the next Multiannual Financial Framework as of 2027, with the exception of those selected for investment, before 2027, under the European Regional Development Fund and on the Cohesion Fund, and of those that are part of hybrid heating solutions (hybrid heat pumps or cogeneration/fuel cells). A clear legal basis for the ban of heatstand-alone heat-only generators based on their greenhouse gas emissions or the type of fuel usedefficiency, and of heating system incompatible with the use of renewable and low-carbon fuels should support national phase-out policies and measures.
2022/07/06
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 350 #

2021/0426(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 19
(19) The enhanced climate and energy ambition of the Union requires a new vision for buildings: the zero-emission building, the very low energy demand of which is fully covered by energy from renewable sources where technically feasible, geographically feasible and taking into consideration the different climate conditions. All new buildings should be zero- emission buildings, and all existing buildings should be transformed into zero- emission buildings by 2050.
2022/07/06
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1415 #

2021/0426(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 26 – paragraph 3
3. Member States shall ensure that guidance and training are made available for those responsible for implementing this Directive. Such guidance and training shall address the importance of improving energy performance, and shall enable consideration of the optimal combination of improvements in energy efficiency, reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, use of energy from low carbon and renewable sources and use of district heating and cooling when planning, designing, building and renovating industrial or residential areas. Such guidance and training may also address structural improvements, adaptation to climate change, fire safety, risks related to intense seismic activity, the removal of hazardous substances including asbestos, air pollutant emissions (including fine particulate matter) and accessibility for persons with disabilities.
2022/07/06
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1417 #

2021/0426(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 26 – paragraph 4
4. The Commission is invited to continuously improve its information services, in particular the website that has been set up as a European portal for energy efficiency in buildings directed towards citizens, professionals and authorities, in order to assist Member States in their information and awareness-raising efforts. Information displayed on that website might include links to relevant European Union and national, regional and local legislation, links to Europa websites that display the National Energy Efficiency Action Plans, links to available financial instruments, as well as best practice examples at national, regional and local level. In the context of the European Regional Development Fund, the Cohesion Fund and the Just Transition Fund and the Social Climate Fund [amended SCF], the Commission shall continue and further intensify its information services with the aim of facilitating the use of available funds by providing assistance and information to interested stakeholders, including national, regional and local authorities, on funding possibilities, taking into account the latest changes in the regulatory framework.
2022/07/06
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1433 #

2021/0426(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Annex I – point 2 – paragraph 3
Primary energy factors or weighting factors shall be defined by Member States. The choices made and data sources shall be reported according to EN 17423 or any superseding document. Member States may opt for an average EU primary energy factor for electricity established pursuant to Directive (EU) …/… [recast EED] instead of a primary energy factor reflecting the electricitnergy mix in the country.
2022/07/06
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1450 #

2021/0426(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Annex III – point I – paragraph 3 – introductory part
The total annual primary energy use of a new or renovated zero-emission building shall be fully covered, to a very significant extent,on a net annual basis, by
2022/07/06
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1452 #

2021/0426(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Annex III – point I – paragraph 3 – indent 1
— energy from renewable sourcesand low carbon sources provided through the grid or generated on-site and fulfilling the criteria of Article 7 of Directive (EU) 2018/2001 [amended RED],
2022/07/06
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 122 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 8
(8) In line with the EU Hydrogen Strategy as well as EU REPowerEU Communication and Action Plan, renewable hydrogen is expected to be deployed on a large-scale from 2030 onwardsalready by 2030 for the purpose of increasing the flexibility of the electricity system, decarbonising certain sectors, ranging from aviation and shipping to hard-to-decarbonise industrial sectors as well as replacing Russian fossil fuels as swift as possible. All final customers connected to hydrogen systems will benefit from basic consumer rights applicable to final customers connected to the natural gas system such as the right to switch supplier and accurate billing information. In those instances where customers are connected to the hydrogen network, e.g. industrial customers, they will benefit from the same consumer protection rights applicable to natural gas customers. However, consumer provisions designed to encourage household participation on the market such as price comparison tools, active customers and citizen energy communities do not apply to the hydrogen system.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 130 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 9
(9) In line with the EU Hydrogen Strategy, the priority for the EU is to develop renewable hydrogen produced using mainly wind and solar energy. Renewable hydrogen is the mostand low carbon hydrogen are compatible option with the EU’s climate neutrality and zero pollution goal in the long term and the most coherent with an integrated energy system. However, renewable hydrogen production probably will not scale fast enough to meet the expected growth in demand for hydrogen in Europe. Therefore, low- carbon fuels (LCFs) such as low-carbon hydrogen (LCH) maywill play an important role in the energy transition, particularly in the short and medium term to rapidly reduce emissions of existing fuels, and support the uptake of renewable fuels such as renewable hydrogen. In order to support the transition, it is necessary to establish a threshold for greenhouse gas emission reductions for low-carbon hydrogen and synthetic gaseous fuels. Such threshold should become more stringent for hydrogen produced in installations starting operations from 1 January 2031 to take into account technological developments and better stimulate the dynamic progress towards the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from hydrogen production. The EU Energy System Integration strategy highlighted the need to deploy an EU–wide certification system to also cover low- carbon fuels with the aim to enable Member States to compare them with other decarbonisation options and consider them in their energy mix as a viable solution. In order to ensure that LCF have the same decarbonisation impact as compared to other renewable alternatives it is important that they are certified by applying a similar methodological approach based on a life cycle assessment of their total greenhouse gas (‘GHG’) emissions. This would allow deploying a comprehensive EU-wide certification system, covering the whole Union energy mix. Taking into consideration that LCF and LCH are not renewable fuels, their terminology and certification could not be included in the proposal for the revision of Directive (EU) 2018/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council8 . Therefore, their inclusion in this Directive fills in this gap. _________________ 8 Directive (EU) 2018/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2018 on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources (OJ L 328, 21.12.2018, p. 82).
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 137 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 9 a (new)
(9 a) In line with the EU Hydrogen Strategy and REPowerEU Communication and Action Plan, setting an indicative greenhouse gas intensity reduction target for gas consumed in the Union will provide a clear investor framework and pathway for the upscaling of renewable and low carbon gases across the Union. It will provide predictability to customers, in particular in hard-to- decarbonise sectors, to make the necessary investments to transform their operations. It will also enabling different technologies to contribute towards the Union indicative target and the overall Union decarbonisation commitments on a level playing field.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 140 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 9 a (new)
(9 a) The establishment of European hydrogen infrastructure targets related to hydrogen corridors identified in the REPowerEU Plan, including hydrogen networks, hydrogen storage and hydrogen import terminals, will help meeting the REPowerEU Plan targets for hydrogen production and imports by 2030.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 168 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 24
(24) The switch from fossil gas to renewable alternatives will concretise if energy from renewable sources becomes an attractive, non-discriminatory choice for consumers based on truly transparent information where the transition costs are fairly distributed among different groups of consumers and market players. Where final customers are required to switch fuels, it should be accompanied by measures that reduce adverse effects on final customers, especially vulnerable customers and people affected by or at risk of energy poverty, as well as measures that mitigate and resolve inequalities resulting from the energy transition.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 235 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 97
(97) Producers of renewable and low- carbon gases are often connected to the distribution grid. To facilitate their uptake and market integration, it is essential that they obtain unhindered access to the wholesale market and the relevant virtual trading points. Participation in the wholesale market is determined by the way in which the entry-exit systems are defined. In several Member States, producers connected to the distribution grid are not part of the entry-exit system. Therefore, the access of renewable and low-carbon gases to the wholesale market should be facilitated by providing a definition of an entry-exit system and ultimately ensuring that production facilities connected to the distribution system arcan be part of it. In addition, Regulation [the recast Gas regulation as proposed in COM(2021)xxx] provides that distribution system operators and transmission system operates are to work together to enable reverse flows from the distribution to the transmission network or alternative means to facilitate the market integration of renewable and low carbon gases.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 256 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 110
(110) When developing the network development plan, it is important that infrastructure operators take the energy efficiency first and system efficiency principles16 into account, in particular, the expected consumption used for the joint scenario development. _________________ 16 Commission Recommendation of 28.9/2021 on Energy Efficiency First: from principles to practice. Guidelines and examples for its implementation in decision-making in the energy sector and beyond, COM (2021) 7014 final
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 292 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. The rules for natural gas, including LNG, established by this Directive shall also apply in a non- discriminatory way to biogas, biomethane and gas from biomass or other types of gas, insofar as such gases can technically and safely be injected into, and transported through, the natural gas system. The rules for natural gas established by this Directive also apply to hydrogen insofar as it is injected into the natural gas system.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 365 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 24 a (new)
(24 a) ‘hydrogen supply undertaking’ means any natural or legal person who carries out the function of hydrogen supply;
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 375 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 53
(53) ‘entry-exit system’ means the aggregation of all transmission and distribution systems or all hydrogen networks to which one specific balancing regime applies;
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 376 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 54
(54) ‘balancing zone’ means an entry- exit system to which a specific balancing regime is appliescable and which may include distribution systems or part of them;
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 378 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 56
(56) ‘entry point’ means a point subject to booking procedures by network users or producers providing access to an entry-exit system., enabling gas flows in the entry- exit system;
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 379 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 57
(57) ‘exit point’ means a point subject to booking procedures by network users or final customers providing access to an entry-exit system, enabling gas flows out of the entry exit system .;
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 417 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 3 – paragraph 4
4. Member States shall ensure that energy undertakings are subject to transparent, proportionate and non- discriminatory rules, fees and treatment, in particular with respect to connection to the network, access to wholesale markets, access to data, switching processes and billing regimes and, where applicable, licensing.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 420 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 3 a (new)
Article 3 a EU indicative greenhouse gas intensity reduction target of the 2030 gas supply 1. In order to promote the production of renewable and low carbon gaseous energy the European Commission shall define by 31 December 2023 by means of a Delegated Act, an indicative EU level target for the reduction of the greenhouse gas intensity of gas consumed in the EU by 2030 compared to 2018 level. The Delegated Act should also specify the methodology for calculating the achievement of the target. 2. When setting the indicative target, the Commission shall take into account the combined ambition of the Renewable Energy Directive and REPowerEU as well as requirements of security of supplies and quality requirements for cross-border transmission of natural gas. 3. Member States shall collectively aim at ensuring that the EU indicative greenhouse gas intensity reduction target is met and define by August 2024 their individual national contribution towards the achievement of the target in their National Energy and Climate Plan. 4. When setting their individual national contribution towards the EU level, Member States may do so, by mean of measures such as volumes, energy content or greenhouse gas emissions and shall establish differentiated sectorial approaches. They shall also take into account necessary quality requirements.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 428 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 4 – paragraph 3
3. By way of derogation from paragraphs 1 and 2, Member States may apply public interventions in the price setting for the supply of natural gas to energy poor or vulnerable household customers or protected customers as defined in Regulation(EU) 2017/1938. Such public interventions shall be subject to the conditions set out in paragraphs 4 and 5. In the event of unprecedented price increase, interventions that comply with the criteria set out in paragraphs 4 and 5 could be expanded to other limited number of customer groups in order to avoid significant impact on the society.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 479 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 7 – paragraph 7
7. Member States shall ensure that authorisations under national law for the construction and operation of natural gas pipelines and other network assets used for the transport of natural gas shall apply also to pipelines and network assets for the transport ofatural gas infrastructure assets, including network assets, shall apply also to pipelines and other infrastructure assets, including network assets, for hydrogen.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 483 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 7 – paragraph 8
8. Member States shall ensure that existing contractual land-use rights for the construction and operation of natural gas pipelines and other assets, including network assets, shall be understood as encompassing alsapplied to pipelines and other assets, including network assets, for the transport of hydrogen.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 505 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 4
4. The obligations laid down in paragraph 2 shall apply regardless of whether low carbon fuels are produced within the Union or are imported. Information about the geographic origin and feedstock type of low carbon fuels or low carbon hydrogen per fuel supplier shall be made available to consumers on the websites of operators, suppliers or the relevant competent authorities and shall be updated on an annual basis. Information on the level of the GHG emissions reduction achieved by the low-carbon hydrogen may be made available to consumers on the websites of operators, suppliers or the relevant competent authorities and may be updated on an annual basis.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 513 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 5
5. By 31 December 2024month after the entry into force of this Directive, the Commission shall adopt delegated acts in accordance with Article 83 to supplement this Directive by specifying the methodology for assessing greenhouse gas emissions savings from low carbon fuels. The methodology shall ensure that credit for avoided emissions is not given for carbon dioxide the capture of which has already received an emission credit under other provisions of law and that it is designed in a technology neutral manner, taking into consideration also a positive impact of carbon capture technologies.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 542 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 11 a (new)
Article 11 a Fuel switch 1. Where governments or local heating and cooling plans laid out in Article 52a require final customers to switch from individual fossil fuel heating installations to alternative individual heat sources or district heating, Member States shall ensure that final customers are fully informed by the initiating organisation of any fuel switches, and shall ensure that the initiating organisation provides that information sufficiently in advance of any planned switch. 2. The initiating organisation shall provide final customers with a roadmap for the transfer from individual fossil fuel heating installations to alternative individual heat sources or district heating, including the procedure and the relevant timeline. 3. Member States shall ensure that final customers receive information on options to prepare or adapt their homes and on any support available to manage the costs associated with the planned fuel switch or a district heating connection. 4. Discrimination and cross-subsidisation between different categories of customers and between energy carriers shall be avoided when carrying out a fuel switch or a district heating connection. 5. Member States shall ensure that measures are put in place to mitigate and resolve any inequities resulting from policies to decarbonise the energy system. 6. Member States shall take all measures necessary to ensure that fuel switches or a district heating connections implemented pursuant to this Article have no adverse effect on final customers, vulnerable customers, people affected by or at risk of energy poverty and people living in social housing. Where applicable, Member States shall make the best possible use of funding, including public funding and funding facilities established at Union level, with the aim of removing adverse effects and ensuring a just and inclusive energy transition.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 626 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 20 – paragraph 1
1. Where final natural gas customers do not have smart meters, Member States shall ensure that, insofar as it is technically possible, financially reasonable and proportionate to the potential energy savings, final customers are provided with individual conventional meters that accurately measure their actual consumption.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 639 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 25 – paragraph 2 a (new)
For final customers who are not connected to the natural gas or hydrogen systems due to the lack of infrastructure capacity or due to the fact that they are vulnerable or are affected or at risk of energy poverty, Member States shall, without delay, adopt measures to ensure their energy security, including by providing connection to the grid or alternative and comparable heating and cooling options, preferably to the district heating and cooling system.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 641 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 26 – paragraph 1 a (new)
Member States shall ensure that grid access costs to distribution, transmission and hydrogen transport for renewable gas production do not create an economic barrier for renewable gas project developers. For this purpose, these costs shall be shared between project developers and the appropriate transmission or distribution system operators. The regulatory authority shall define the level of costs that these operators must cover and are allowed to cover. It shall set out rules to ensure that, in the case one grid connection is expected to be used for several renewable gas production facilities with different timeframe of commissioning, the costs of such grid connection is not borne only by the first renewable gas production facility connected to it.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 646 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 27 – paragraph 1
1. Member States shall ensure the implementation of a system of third party access to the transmission and distribution system, and LNG facilities based on published tariffs, applicable to all customers, including supply undertakings, and applied objectively and without discrimination between system users. Member States shall ensure that those tariffs, or the methodologies underlying their calculation, are approved prior to their entry into force in accordance with Article 72 by a regulatory authority referred to in Article 70 and that those tariffs — and the methodologies, where only methodologies are approved — are published prior to their entry into force. Tariff discounts can be granted only if so provided so by Union or Member States' legislation.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 666 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 33 – paragraph 1
Member States shall ensure the implementation of a system of regulated third partyFor the organisation of access to hydrogen storage, and line pack when technically and/or economically necessary for providing efficient access to the system for the supply of customers, as well as for the organisation of access to ancillary services, based on published tariffs and applied objectively and without discrimination between any hydrogen system users., Member States may choose either a negotiated or regulated access regime, or both. Member States shall base their decision on the applicable access regime on an assessment of the level of competition in the hydrogen storage market, taking into account the technical characteristics of hydrogen storage. In case of a regulated access regime, Member States shall ensure that those tariffs, or the methodologies underlying their calculation, are approved prior to their entry into force in accordance with Article 72 by the regulatory authority.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 667 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 33 – paragraph 1
Member States shall ensure the implementation of a system of negotiated or regulated third party access to hydrogen storage, and line pack when technically and/or economically necessary for providing efficient access to the system for the supply of customers, as well as for the organisation of access to ancillary services, based on published tariffs and applied objectively and without discrimination between any hydrogen system users. Member States shall ensure if there is not a contractual basis that those tariffs, or the methodologies underlying their calculation, are approved prior to their entry into force in accordance with Article 72 by the regulatory authority.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 699 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 38 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. For the purpose of swift implementation of grid connection of renewable gas production, including biomethane production, Member States shall ensure that: (a) the transmission system operator and the hydrogen network operator comply with time limits to assess the requests for injection of renewable gases, make an offer and implement the connection, with monitoring of the national regulatory authority in line with Article 72(t); (b) permitting procedures for the implementation of the connection are not hampered by lack of administrative capacity and that do not create a hurdle to the achievement of the national renewable energy target.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 716 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 41 – paragraph 1 a (new)
For the purpose of swift implementation of grid connection of renewable gas production, including biomethane production, Member States shall ensure that: a) the distribution system operator comply with time limits to assess the requests for injection of renewable gases, make an offer and implement the connection, with monitoring of the national regulatory authority in line with Article 72(t); b) permitting procedures for the implementation of the connection are not hampered by lack of administrative capacity and that do not create a hurdle to the achievement of the national renewable energy target.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 724 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 45 – paragraph 1
Article 44 (1)This Directive shall not prevent the operation of a combined transmission, LNG, system, hydrogen network, LNG system, hydrogen terminal, natural gas and hydrogen storage and distribution system operator provided that the operator complies with Article 54 (1), or Articles 55 and 56, or Chapter IX .
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 758 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 49 – paragraph 3
3. Such intergovernmental agreement may contain, as appropriate, rules specifying the implementation of the requirements of third-party access, tariff regulation and on the unbundling of the operator of the hydrogen interconnector, as well as rules on the certification of renewable and low-carbon hydrogen, including rules ensuring the collection of required data and the application of the criteria for accounting hydrogen produced from electricity as renewable hydrogen or for accounting low-carbon hydrogen.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 774 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 51 – paragraph 1
1. At least every two years , all transmission system operators and all hydrogen transmission network operators shall submit to the relevant regulatory authority a ten- year network development plan based on existing and forecast supply and demand after having consulted all relevant stakeholders. There shall be at least one single network development plan for gas and hydrogen per Member State. Infrastructure operators, including LNG terminal operators, storage operators, distribution system operators as well as hydrogen, district heating infrastructure and electricity operators shall be required to provide and exchange all relevant information to the transmission system operators required for developing the single plan. That network development plan shall contain efficient measures in order to guarantee the adequacy of the natural gas system and the hydrogen networks as well as the security of supply , in particular the compliance with the infrastructure standards under Regulation (EU) 2017/1938. The ten-year network development plan shall be published and accessible on a website .
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 781 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 51 – paragraph 2 – point a
(a) contain the main infrastructure that needs to be built or upgraded over the next ten years, including infrastructure developed by distribution system operators to enable reverse flows to the transmission network;
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 793 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 51 – paragraph 2 – point c
(c) include information on infrastructure that can or will be decommissioned; andrepurposed for the transport of hydrogen;
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 809 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 51 – paragraph 2 – point e
(e) be based on a joint scenario framework developed between the relevant infrastructure operators, including relevant distribution system operators, of at least gas, hydrogen and electricity;
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 821 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 51 – paragraph 3
3. When elaborating the ten-year network development plan, the transmission system operators and the hydrogen transmission network operators shall fully take into account the potential for alternatives to system expansion, for instancein particular, repurposing of infrastructure as well as the use of demand response, as well asnd expected consumption following the application of the energy efficiency first principle, trade with other countries and the Union-wide network development plan. The transmission system operators and the hydrogen transmission network operators shall assess how to address, where possible, a need across electricity and gases systems including information on the optimal location and size of energy storage and power to gas assets . The transmission system operator shall also make reasonable assumptions about the evolution of the production, supply, consumption and exchanges with other countries.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 834 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 51 – paragraph 5 – introductory part
5. The regulatory authority shall examine whether the ten-year network development plan covers all investment needs identified during the consultation process, and whether it is consistent with the most recent Union wide simulation of disruption scenarios carried out by the ENTSO for GasG&H under Article 7 of Regulation (EU) 2017/1938, with the regional and national risk assessments and the non-binding Union -wide ten-year network development plan ( Union -wide network development plan) referred to in Article 30(1), point (b), of Regulation (EU) 2019/943 . If any doubt arises as to the consistency with the Union -wide network development plan, the regulatory authority shall consult ACER . The regulatory authority may require the transmission system operator or the hydrogen transmission network operator to amend its ten-year network development plan.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 839 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 51 – paragraph 7 – introductory part
7. In circumstances where the independenttransmission system operator or independthe hydrogent transmission network operator , other than for overriding reasons beyond its control, does not execute an investment, which, under the ten-year network development plan, was to be executed in the following three years, Member States shall ensure that the regulatory authority is required to take at least one of the following measures to ensure that the investment in question is made if such investment is still relevant on the basis of the most recent ten-year network development plan:
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 841 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 51 – paragraph 7 – point a
(a) to require the transmission system operator or the hydrogen transmission network operator to execute the investments in question;
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 844 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 51 – paragraph 7 – point c
(c) to oblige the transmission system operator or the hydrogen transmission network operator to accept a capital increase to finance the necessary investments and allow independent investors to participate in the capital.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 847 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 51 – paragraph 7 – subparagraph 1 – introductory part
Where the regulatory authority has made use of its powers under point (b) the first subparagraph, it may oblige the transmission system operator or the hydrogen transmission network operator to agree to one or more of the following:
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 851 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 51 – paragraph 7 – subparagraph 2
The transmission system operator or the hydrogen transmission network operator shall provide the investors with all information needed to realise the investment, shall connect new assets to the transmission network and shall generally make its best efforts to facilitate the implementation of the investment project.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 863 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 52 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
1. HydrogeUntil no later than 1 January 2031, hydrogen transmission network operators shall submit to the regulatory authority, at regular intervals as determined by that authority, an overview of the hydrogen network infrastructure they aim to develop. That overview shall in particular:
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 871 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 52 – paragraph 1 – point b a (new)
(b a) include informationon the location of industrial customers and hydrogen production units;
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 873 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 52 – paragraph 1 – point c
(c) be in line with the integrated national energy and climate plan and its updates, and with the integrated national energy and climate reports submitted in accordance with Regulation (EU) 2018/1999 and support the climate- neutrality objective set out in Article 2(1) of Regulation (EU) 2021/1119 and be consistent with the Union-wide ten-year network development plan for gas and hydrogen as set out in Article 23[recast Gas Regulation as proposed in COM(2021) xxx].
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 881 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 52 – paragraph 5
5. Hydrogen network operators shall publish on a regular basiat least every two years a joint report on the development of the hydrogen system based on the overview submitted to the regulatory authority. They shall take the examination of the regulatory authority under paragraph 4 into account. The regulatory authority may issue an opinion on the report, assess its consistency with the Union-wide ten-year-development plan, and recommend amendments.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 882 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 52 – paragraph 6
6. Member States may decide to apply the requirements pursuant to Article 51 to hydrogen network operators. As from 1 January 2031 an integrated network development plan for gas and hydrogen pursuant to the process set out in Article 51 shall be mandatory for hydrogen transmission network operators and transmission system operators. If Member States opt for a system of regulated third party access to hydrogen networks in accordance with Article 31, the requirements pursuant to Article 51 shall apply immediately.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 885 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 52 a (new)
Article 52 a European Hydrogen Infrastructure Targets The European Commission shall identify, togetherwith the Member States, and after having consulted the gas infrastructureoperators, the High-Level Regional Groups and other relevant stakeholders, anumber of European hydrogen infrastructure targets (including those related tohydrogen networks, hydrogen storage and hydrogen import terminals) toensure that the hydrogen corridors identified in the REPowerEU Plan are putinto operation not later than 2030.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 893 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 53 – paragraph 5
5. After 31 December 2030, all affected hydrogen network operators shall negotiate a system of financial compensation to ensure financing for cross-border hydrogen infrastructure. While developing that, hydrogen network operators shall conduct an extensive consultation process involving all relevant market participants.deleted
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 895 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 53 – paragraph 6
6. The hydrogen network operators concerned shall agree on the system of financial compensation within 3 years and by 31 December 2033. If no agreement is reached within that period, the involved regulatory authorities shall decide jointly within 2 years. Where the relevant regulatory authorities cannot reach a joint agreement within 2 years, ACER shall take a decision, following the process pursuant to Article 6(10) in Regulation (EU) 2019/942.deleted
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 899 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 53 – paragraph 7
7. The system of financial compensation shall be implemented in line with Article 72(1), point (b).deleted
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 902 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 53 – paragraph 8
8. For the transition to a system of financial compensation mechanism, existing capacity contracts shall not be affected by the established financial compensation mechanism.deleted
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 903 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 53 – paragraph 9
9. Further details required to implement the process set out in this Article, including required processes and time frames, process for reviewing and if necessary amending the compensation mechanism allowing taking into account tariff evolution and the development of the hydrogen networks, shall be set in a network code established on the basis of Article 54 of [recast Gas Regulation as proposed in COM(2021)xxx].deleted
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 949 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 66 – paragraph 8 a (new)
8 a. Adoption of the final decision on the certification of a transmission system operator for the transmission line between a Member State and a third country located in territorial sea of that Member State shall take place no later than 2 years from the date on which certification was requested by a transmission system owner or a transmission system operator or from the date of the opening of the procedure on the basis of paragraphs 1 and 2. The deadline for the final decision remains binding, also in spite of any formal defects in the request. Where two or more requests in respect to the same transmission line or its sections were submitted, the deadline set out in the first subparagraph runs from the day of submitting the first request.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 950 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 66 – paragraph 10 a (new)
10 a. Where final decision on the certification of a transmission system operator for the transmission line between a Member State and a third country was not adopted within the period referred to in paragraph 8a, owner of the transmission line between a Member State and a third country in territorial sea of that Member State or its section in territorial sea of that Member State, is obliged to decommissioning of the transmission line or its section within six months from the deadline referred to in paragraph 8a.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 951 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 66 – paragraph 11 a (new)
11 a Where the obligation referred in paragraph 11 was not fulfilled, the regulatory authority of the Member State where territorial sea transmission line or its section is located, obliges the owner to decommission the infrastructure within six months from the decommissioning deadline referred to in paragraph 11. In the event of failure to meet this deadline, the regulatory authority of the relevant Member State shall, in cooperation with the competent national authorities, decommission the gas transmission line or its section.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 952 #

2021/0425(COD)

11 b Where the transmission line concerned is located in the territorial sea of more than one Member State, the obligations in paragraph 11 and 12 are performed in the territory of the Member State where the first connection point of such transmission line with a Member State’s network is located. The necessary decisions and actions in this regard shall be taken by the regulatory authority of the Member State where the first connection point with the Member State’s network is located.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 961 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 71 – paragraph 1 – point e
(e) promoting connection and facilitating access to the network for new production capacity, in particular removing barriers that could prevent connection and access for new market entrants and of gas and hydrogen from renewable sources;
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1010 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 74 – paragraph 6 a (new)
6 a. Regulatory authorities shall cooperate with transmission system operators and with ENTSOG for the purpose of sharing information in case of suspect breach of a legal obligation by network users in accordance with Article 2(5) of Regulation (EU) 312/2014.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1024 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 89 – paragraph 1
This Directive shall enter into force on the twentieth day following that of its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union. The provisions of this Directive as amended shall apply to certification procedures initiated and not completed before the date of entry into force of this Directive.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1031 #

2021/0425(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Annex I – point 5 – paragraph 4
The disclosure of the share of renewable and low-carbon gas purchased by the final customers shall be done by using guarantees of origin.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 143 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 14 a (new)
(14 a) In order to allow renewable and low-carbon gases to play their important role towards achieving the EU’s 2030 climate objectives and climate neutrality in 2050, it is of utmost importance that the targets set by the REPowerEU Plan for the production of biomethane (35 bcm by 2030), for the domestic production of renewable hydrogen (10 mio to by 2030), for the imports of renewable hydrogen (10 mio to by 2030), for the industrial usage of renewable fuels of non-biological origin, notably renewable hydrogen (75% of the overall hydrogen consumption in industry) and for the usage of renewable fuels of non-biological origin in transport (5% of transport fuels) are effectively accomplished by 2030. For this to happen not only must the market integration of renewable and low- carbon gases be fostered but also the necessary infrastructure must be developed in due time. For biomethane this means to develop a strategic approach to overcome existing technical barriers to trade biomethane within the EU and to fully integrate biomethane into the current gas system. For renewable and low-carbon hydrogen this requires an urgent implementation of the plan for an European hydrogen network guaranteeing a sufficient level of cross- border interconnection capacity.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 220 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 a (new)
Article 3 a Upscaling renewable gases and low- carbon gases in coal and carbon-intensive regions The Commission shall support and provide incentives to encourage the penetration of renewable gases and low- carbon gases, in particular hydrogen and biomethane, into the Union energy system, in particular in coal and carbon- intensive regions pursuant to Regulation (EU) 2021/1056 through an enabling framework that includes: (a) additional financial resources, including Union funds, to facilitate a just transition of these regions with the aim of increasing the share of renewable gases and low-carbon gases, in particular in industrial processes, district heating and energy storage for enhancing flexibility of the energy system; (b) effective support measures to accelerate the phase out of solid fossil fuels in industrial and district heating sectors through investments in their modernisation, innovation and development as well as to decarbonise existing fossil-based hydrogen production sites; (c) upskilling and reskilling programmes and projects aiming to create and strengthen a hydrogen-ready and biomethane-ready workforce; (d) the fast-track implementation of hydrogen valleys and Important Projects of Common European Interests (IPCEI), in particular innovation projects enabling the conversion from fossil fuels to renewable hydrogen and biomethane.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 342 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 a (new)
Article 17 a Facilitating biomethane connections and potential analysis 1. 1 year after the entry into force of the Regulation, Member States shall establish regional maps, identifying the areas with the highest potential for sustainable biogas and biomethane production and that fulfil the Union sustainability criteria within the meaning of Directive (EU) 2018/2001 due to the availability of raw materials, such as waste or residues, and existing operating biogas or biomethane plants. 2. Distribution system operators and transmission system operators shall be obliged to map connection potentials based on existing and expected capacity to facilitate connection requests, taking into consideration the potential for an increase of sustainable biogas and biomethane production provided on the basis of paragraph 1.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 477 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 36 – paragraph 1
Distribution system operators operating a natural gas system or hydrogen network shall cooperate at Union level through the European entity for distribution system operators (‘EU DSO entity’) set up in accordance with Articles 52 to 57 of Regulation (EU) 2019/943 of the European Parliament and of the Council12 , in order to promote the completion and functioning of the internal market for natural gas and hydrogen and to promote optimal management and a coordinated operation of distribution and transmission systems. . _________________ 12 Regulation (EU) 2019/943 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 June 2019 on the internal market for electricity (OJ L 158, 14.6.2019, p. 54).
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 488 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 37 – paragraph 1
1. The rules and procedures on the participation of distribution system operators in the EU DSO entity pursuant to Article 54 of Regulation (EU) 2019/942 shall also apply to distribution system operators operating a natural gas system or hydrogen network.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 490 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 37 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. The governance rules and structures of the EU DSO Entity shall guarantee a fair and balanced representation for gas and hydrogen distribution system operators.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 493 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 37 – paragraph 2
2. The Strategic Advisory Group pursuant to Article 54(2), point (f), of Regulation (EU) 2019/942 shall also consist of representatives of associations representing European distribution system operators solely operating a natural gas system or hydrogen network.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 494 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 37 – paragraph 3 – introductory part
3. By [one year after entry into force] the EU DSO entity shall submit to the Commission and to ACER draft updated statutes, including a code of conduct, a list of registered members, draft updated rules of procedure, including rules of procedures on the consultation with the ENTSO for Electricity, the ENTSO for GasG&H and other stakeholders, and draft updated financing rules. .
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 497 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 37 – paragraph 3 – subparagraph 1
The draft updated rules of procedure of the EU DSO entity shall ensure balanced representation of all participating distribution system operators, including those solely owning or operating natural gas systems or hydrogen network.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 502 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 38 – paragraph 1
1. The EU DSO entity shall exercise the tasks listed in Article 55(1) points (a) to (e) of Regulation (EU) 2019/943 and undertake the activities listed in Article 55(2) points (c) to (e) of that Regulation also as regards those distribution networks which are part of the natural gas system. or hydrogen network.
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 514 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 38 – paragraph 3 – point a
(a) cooperate with the ENTSO for GasG&H on the monitoring of the implementation of the network codes and guidelines adopted pursuant to this Regulation which are relevant to the operation and planning of distribution grids and the coordinated operation of the transmission networks and distribution networks;
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 515 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 38 – paragraph 3 – point b
(b) cooperate with the ENTSO for GasG&H and adopt best practices on the coordinated operation and planning of transmission and distribution systems including issues such as exchange of data between operators and coordination of distributed energy resources;
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 517 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 38 – paragraph 3 – point c
(c) work on identifying best practices for the implementation of the results of the assessments pursuant to Article 23(1a) [proposal for REDIII] and Article 23 [proposal for revised EED] and for the cooperation between operators of electricity distribution networksystems, of natural gas distribution systems, of hydrogen distribution networks and of district heating and cooling systems including for the purpose of the assessment pursuant to Article 24(8) [proposal for REDIII].
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 626 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 67 – paragraph 1 – point 3 a (new)
Regulation (EU) 2017/1938
Article 3 – paragraph 5
"5. The Commission shall coordinate the action of the competent authorities at regional and Union levels, pursuant to this Regulation, inter alia, through the GCG or, in particular, in the event of a regional or Union emergency pursuant to Article 12(1), through the crisis management group referred to in Article 12(4). (https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32017R1938&from=EN)4(1a)." Or. en
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 627 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 67 – paragraph 1 – point 3 b (new)
Regulation (EU) 2017/1938
Article 3 – paragraph 6
"6. In the event of a regional or Union emergency, the transmission system operators shall cooperate and exchange information using the ReCo System for Gas established by ENTSOG. ENTSOG shall inform the Commission, the crisis group and the competent authorities of the Member States concerned accordingly. (https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32017R1938&from=EN)" Or. en
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 628 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 67 – paragraph 1 – point 3 c (new)
Regulation (EU) 2017/1938
Article 4
"1. A Gas Coordination Group (GCG) shall be established to facilitate the coordination of measures concerning the security of gas supply. The GCG shall be composed of representatives of the Member States, in particular representatives of their competent authorities, as well as the Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators (the ‘Agency’), ENTSOG and representative bodies of the industry concerned and those of relevant customers. The Commission shall, in consultation with the Member States, decide on the composition of the GCG, ensuring it is fully representative. The Commission shall chair the GCG. The GCG shall adopt its rules of procedure. (https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32017R1938&from=EN)1a. A crisis group, chaired by the Commission, shall be established as a permanent sub-group of the GCG in order to facilitate the coordination of relevant actors and resolve security of supply crises. The crisis group shall be composed of representatives of the Member States, of the Agency and of ENTSOG. Where necessary, the Commission may also invite other relevant stakeholders. The members of the crisis group shall be expert in gas infrastructure, they shall be reachable and shall be able to be convened at any moment. The crisis group shall be able to act in the event of a crisis as long as half its members are present. It shall be equipped with the necessary tools in order to exercise a crisis coordination role. The Commission shall be empowered to specify, via a delegated act adopted in accordance with Article 19, the list of tools necessary to the crisis group to exercise its coordination role. 1b. The crisis group shall: (a) maintain channels of communications open with all relevant actors of the security of supply in natural gas including, Member States’ competent authorities, representatives of the Energy Community, TSOs, the risk groups listed in Annex I, Regional Coordination (ReCo) teams; (b) receive a copy of all national definitions of protected customers established pursuant to Article 6, common risk assessment carried out pursuant to Article 7, national emergency and preventative actions plans drafted pursuant to Article 8, lists of critical gas- fired power plants established pursuant to Article 11, and solidarity agreements concluded pursuant to Article 13, as well as any other relevant documents drafted pursuant to this Regulation; (c) cooperate with the Commission and, where relevant, the Member States or their relevant authorities in order to address and mitigate any crisis." Or. en
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 633 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 67 – paragraph 1 – point 7 a (new)
Regulation (EU) 2017/1938
Article 8 – paragraph 4 – subparagraph 1
"4. The competent authorities shall report regularly to the GCG and the crisis group on the progress achieved on the preparation and adoption of the preventive action plans and the emergency plans, in particular the regional chapters. In particular, competent authorities shall agree on a cooperation mechanism for the preparation of the preventive action plan and the emergency plan, including the exchange of draft plans. They shall report to the GCG and the crisis group on such agreed cooperation mechanism 16 months before the deadline for agreement of those plans and the updates of those plans. (https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32017R1938&from=EN)" Or. en
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 660 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 67 – paragraph 1 – point 12 – point a – point iii a (new)
Regulation (EU) 2017/1938
Article 11 – paragraph 2
"2. When the competent authority declares one of the crisis levels referred to in paragraph 1, it shall immediately inform the Commission, the crisis group, as well as the competent authorities of the Member States with which the Member State of that competent authority is directly connected and provide them with all the necessary information, in particular with information on the action it intends to take. In the event of an emergency which may result in a call for assistance from the Union and its Member States, the competent authority of the Member State concerned shall without delay notify the Commission's Emergency Response Coordination Centre (ERCC). (https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32017R1938&from=EN) and the crisis group." Or. en
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 661 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 67 – paragraph 1 – point 13 a (new)
Regulation (EU) 2017/1938
Article 12 – paragraph 2
"2. The Commission shall convene the GCG and the crisis group as soon as it declares a regional or Union emergency (https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32017R1938&from=EN)" Or. en
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 662 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 67 – paragraph 1 – point 13 b (new)
Regulation (EU) 2017/1938
Article 12 – paragraph 3 – introductory part
"3. In a regional or Union emergency, the Commission shall coordinate together with the crisis group the action of the competent authorities, taking full account of relevant information from, and the. The Commission shall ensure that the GCG is informed resgults of, the consultation of the GCG. In particular, the Commission shall: (https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32017R1938&from=EN)arly about the work undertaken by the crisis group. In particular, the Commission shall:" Or. en
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 663 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 67 – paragraph 1 – point 13 c (new)
Regulation (EU) 2017/1938
Article 12 – paragraph 4
4. The Commission may convene a crisis management group composed of the crisis managers referred to in point (g) of Article 10(1), of the Member States concerned by the emergency. The Commission, in agreement with the crisis managers, may invite other relevant stakeholders to participate. The Commission shall ensure that the GCG is informed regularly about the work undertaken by the crisis management group. (https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32017R1938&from=EN)"deleted" Or. en
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 664 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 67 – paragraph 1 – point 15 a (new)
Regulation (EU) 2017/1938
Article 14 – paragraph 2 – introductory part
"2. In the event of a regional or Union emergency, the Commission may request that the competent authority referred to in paragraph 1 provide it and the crisis group without delay with at least: (https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32017R1938&from=EN)" Or. en
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 665 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 67 – paragraph 1 – point 15 b (new)
Regulation (EU) 2017/1938
Article 14 – paragraph 3 – subparagraph 2
"The Commission shall analyse the assessments of the competent authorities and shall inform the crisis group, the Member States, the European Parliament and the GCG of the results of its analysis in an aggregated form. (https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32017R1938&from=EN)" Or. en
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 666 #

2021/0424(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 67 – paragraph 1 – point 15 c (new)
Regulation (EU) 2017/1938
Article 14– paragraph 6 – subparagraph 2
"The competent authority shall notify the data listed in point (a) of the first subparagraph to the Commission and to the crisis group in an anonymised form. In the event of new contracts being concluded or changes being made to existing contracts, the whole set of data shall be notified by the end of September of the relevant year. Where the competent authority has doubts whether a given contract obtained under point (b) of the first subparagraph puts the security of gas supply of a Member State or a region at risk, it shall notify the contract to the Commission. (https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32017R1938&from=EN)" Or. en
2022/07/15
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 52 #

2021/0277(BUD)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7a. Considers that sufficient resources should be secured in the 2022 EU budget for the implementation of the Health Union proposals, as amended during the legislative process; calls, therefore, on the Commission to revise the Financial Statements for the extended mandates of the European Medicines Agency and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control to take into account the additional tasks set out in the revised proposals.
2021/07/15
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 185 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 3
(3) Regulation (EU) 2019/631 of the European Parliament and of the Council46 and Regulation (EU) 2019/1242 of the European Parliament and of the Council47 already set CO2 emission performance standards for new passenger cars and for new light commercial vehicles as well as for certain heavy-duty vehicles. Those instruments should accelerate the uptake in particular of low- and zero-emission vehicles and alternative fuels and thereby create demand for recharging and refuelling infrastructure. _________________ 46Regulation (EU) 2019/631 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 April 2019 setting CO2 emission performance standards for new passenger cars and for new light commercial vehicles, and repealing Regulations (EC) No 443/2009 and (EU) No 510/2011 (OJ L 111, 25.4.2019, p. 13). 47Regulation (EU) 2019/1242 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 June 2019 setting CO2 emission performance standards for new heavy-duty vehicles and amending Regulations (EC) No 595/2009 and (EU) 2018/956 of the European Parliament and of the Council and Council Directive 96/53/EC (OJ L 198, 25.7.2019, p. 202).
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 188 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 4
(4) The initiatives on ReFuelEU aviation48 and FuelEU maritime49 should boost the production and uptake of sustainable alternative fuels in aviation and maritime transport. While the fuel use requirements for the sustainable aviation fuels can largely rely on the existing refuelling infrastructure, investments are needed for the electricity supply of stationary aircraft. The FuelEU maritime initiative sets requirements in particular for the use of on shore power that can only be fulfilled if an adequate level of on shore power supply is deployed in TEN-T ports. However those initiatives do not contain any provisions on the required fuel infrastructure which are a prerequisite that the targets can be met. Moreover the infrastructure for renewable fuels bunkering of ships should gain special attention throughout the ports of Europe to fast track the decarbonisation of ships. The heavy-duty vehicle renewable fuels infrastructure should focus on available renewable fuel technology and increase the level of ambition in the (bio-) LNG infrastructure throughout Europe to allow fast decarbonisation of heavy-duty vehicles, whilst new technology for these vehicles can be further developed. _________________ 48 COM(2021) 561. 49 COM(2021) 562.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 192 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 5
(5) Therefore all modes of transport should be addressed in one instrument which should take into account a variety of alternative fuels, the development of their market share and particularly their affordability. The use of zero-emission powertrain technologies and alternative fuels is at different stages of maturity in the different modes of transport and in different Member States and regions. In particular, in the road sector, a rapid uptake of battery-electric and plug-in hybrid passenger cars and light commercial vehicles is taking place. Hydrogen fuel-cell road vehicles are available to markets, as well. In addition, smaller hydrogen and battery electric vessels and, hydrogen fuel-cell trains and solar-electric vehicles are currently being deployed in different projects and in first commercial operations, with full commercial roll out expected in the next years. In contrast, the aviation and waterborne sectors, as well as heavy-duty road transport continue to be dependent on liquid and gaseous fuels, as zero- and low- emission powertrain solutions are expected to enter the market only around 2030 and in particular for the aviation sector even later, with full commercialisation taking its time. The use of fossil gaseous or liquid fuels is only possible if it is clearly embedded into a clear decarbonisation pathway that is in line with the long-term objective of climate neutrality in the Union, requiring increasing blending with or replacement by renewable fuels such as bio-methane, advanced biofuelsgaseous or liquid bio-methane, biomass fuels, biofuels, advanced biofuels, recycled carbonfuels, renewable fuels of non- biological origin or renewable and low- carbon synthetic gaseous and liquid fuels.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 196 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 5 a (new)
(5 a) Therefore, the general principle of technological neutrality should be maintained and market competition between the different alternative technologies should be promoted and protected on Union and national levels, thus providing for the best technological solutions and affordable prices. Targets and milestones should be set on Union and national levels, depending on the market development of different technologies, while taking into account the different starting point of Member States.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 197 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 6
(6) Such biofuels, advanced biofuels and synthetic fuels, substituting diesel, petrol and jet fuel, can be produced from different feedstock and can be blended into fossil fuels at very high blending ratios. They can be technically used with the current vehicle technology with minor or no adaptations. Renewable and bio-LNG can be used for heavy-duty transport, both road and maritime, as demonstrated by the fact that already 20% of gas used in road transport is bio-methane. Renewable methanol can also be used for inland navigation and short-sea shipping. Synthetic and paraffinic fuels have a potential to reduce the use of fossil fuel sources in the energy supply to transport. All of these fuels can be distributed, stored and used with the existing infrastructure or where necessary with infrastructure of the same kind. The potential of biogas as a renewable source should be taken into account and included in the definition of gas in the regulation.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 201 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 7
(7) LNG is likely to play a continued role in maritime transport, where there is currently no economically viable zero- emission powertrain technology available. The Communication on the Smart and Sustainable Mobility Strategy points to zero-emission seagoing ships becoming market ready by 2030. Fleet conversion based on relevant, affordable and viable new technologies should take place gradually due to the long lifetime of the ships. Contrary to maritime transport, for inland waterways, with normally smaller vessels and shorter distances, low and zero-emission powertrain technologies, such as hydrogen and, electricity, sh and other alternative fuels, could enter the markets more quickly. LNG is expected to no longer play a significant role in that sector. Transport fuels such as LNG, CNG and LPG need increasingly to be decarbonised by blending/substituting with liquefied biomethane (bio-LNG) or renewable and low-carbon synthetic gaseous e-fuels (e- gas) for instance. Those decarbonised fuels can be used in the same infrastructure as gaseous fossil fuels thereby allowing for a gradual shift towards decarbonised fuels.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 203 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 8
(8) In the heavy-duty road transport sector, LNG trucks are fully mature and can run on a high blend of bio-LNG. On the one hand, the common scenarios underpinning the Sustainable and Smart Mobility Strategy and the Climate Target Plan as well as the revised “Fit for 55” modelling scenarios suggest some limited role of gaseous fuels that will increasingly be decarbonised in heavy-duty road transport especially in the long haul segment. On the other hand, LNG and bio-LNG are readily available and competitive solutions to cut GHG emissions of the heavy-duty sector, and LNG stations network in Europe remains insufficient in relation to the minimum requirements to match the demand and decarbonization needs of the sector towards 2030 and beyond. Furthermore, LPG and CNG vehicles for which already a sufficientsome infrastructure network exists across the Union are expected to gradually be replaced by zero emission drivetrains and therefore only a limitclimate-neutral alternative fuels, despite this is not being a existing market tendency yet. Therefore an extended targeted policy for LNG infrastructure deployment that can equally supply decarbonised fuels is considered necessary to close remaining gaps in the main networks. As the market for decarbonized heavy-duty vehicles is still developing, a variety of alternative technologies should be incentivized, including via infrastructure planning and adaptation, while taking into account market shares and traffic data.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 209 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 9
(9) The deployment of publicly accessible recharging infrastructure for light-duty electric vehicles has been uneven across the Union. Continued uneven distribution would jeopardize the uptake of such vehicles, limiting connectivity across the Union. Continuing divergence in policy ambitions and approaches at national level will not create the long-term certainty needed for substantive market investment. Mandatory minimum targets for Member States at national level should therefore provide policy orientations and complement National Policy Frameworks. That approach should combine national fleet based targets with distance-based targets for the trans-European network for transport (TEN-T), taking into account the need for flexibility in sparsely populated areas. National fleet based targets should ensure that vehicle uptake in each Member State is matched with the deployment of sufficient publicly accessible recharging infrastructure. A special attention and higher fleet based targets for centres of relatively higher population density and higher electric vehicles market-share is also needed. Distance-based targets for the TEN-T network should ensure full coverage of electric recharging points along the Union’s main road networks and thereby ensure easy and seamless travel throughout the Union.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 220 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 10
(10) National fleet based targets should be established on the basis of the total number of registered electric vehicles in that Member State following a common methodology that accounts for technological developments such as the increased driving range of electric vehicles or the increasing market penetration of fast-charging points which can recharge a greater number of vehicles per recharging point than at a normal recharging point. The methodology also has to take into account the different recharging patterns of battery electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles., as well as demographical density and market shares of electric vehicles A methodology that norms national fleet based targets on the total maximum power output of the publicly accessible recharging infrastructure should allow flexibility for the implementation of different recharging technologies in Member States.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 223 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 11
(11) Implementation in Member States should ensure that a sufficient number of publicly accessible recharging points is installed, in particular at public transport stations, such as port passenger terminals, airports or railway stations. A sufficient number of publicly accessible fast recharging points dedicated to light-duty vehicles should also be deployed to increase consumer convenience in particular across the TEN-T network and in urban areas, to ensure full cross-border connectivity and allow electric vehicles to circulate throughout the Union.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 228 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 14
(14) A sufficient number of publicly accessible fast recharging points dedicated to heavy-duty vehicles should also be deployed along the TEN-T network to ensure full connectivity throughout the Union. That infrastructure should have sufficient power output to allow the recharge of the vehicle within the driver’s legal break time. In addition to fast recharging points along the network, heavy-duty vehicles should also be able to use publicly accessible recharging infrastructure for overnight recharging along the main transport network to specifically support the electrification of the long haul sector.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 233 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 21
(21) The increasing number of electric vehicles in road, rail, maritime and other transport modes will require that recharging operations are optimised and managed in a way that does not cause congestion and takes full advantage of the availability of renewable electricity and low electricity prices in the system. Smart recharging in particular can facilitate the integration of electric vehicles into the electricity system further as it enables demand response through aggregation and through price based demand response. System integration can further be facilitated through bi-directional recharging (vehicle-to-grid). All normal recharging points at which vehicles are typically parked for a longer period should therefore support smart recharging.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 241 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 27
(27) Hydrogen fuelled vehicles should be able to refuel at or close to the destination, which is usually located in an urban area. To ensure that publicly accessible destination refuelling is possible at least in the main urban areas, all urban nodes as defined in Regulation (EU) No 1315/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council55 should provide such refuelling stations. Within the urban nodes, public authorities should consider to deploy the stations within multimodal freight centres in case they are not developed market-based, as those are not only the typical destination for heavy-duty vehicles but could also serve hydrogen to other transport modes, such as rail and inland shipping. _________________ 55 Regulation (EU) No 1315/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2013 on Union guidelines for the development of the trans-European transport network and repealing Decision No 661/2010/EU (OJ L 348, 20.12.2013, p. 1).
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 242 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 28
(28) At the early stage of market deployment there is still a degree of uncertainty with regard to the kind of vehicles that will come into the market and to the kind of technologies that are going to be widely used. As outlined in the Commission’s communication ‘A hydrogen strategy for a climate-neutral Europe’56 the heavy-duty segment was identified as the most likely segment for the early mass deployment of hydrogen vehicles. Therefore, hydrogen refuelling infrastructure should preliminarily focus on that segment while also allowing light-duty vehicles to fuel at publicly accessible hydrogen refuelling stations. To ensure interoperability, all publicly accessible hydrogen stations should at least serve gaseous hydrogen at 700 bar. The infrastructure roll out should also take into account the emergence of new technologies, such as liquid hydrogen, that allow a larger range for heavy-duty vehicles and are the preferred technology choice of some vehicle manufacturers. To that end, a minimum number of hydrogen refuelling stations should serve also liquid hydrogen in addition to gaseous hydrogen at 700 bar. _________________ 56 COM(2020) 301 final
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 245 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 29
(29) A number of LNG refuelling points are established in the Union, already providing a backbone for the circulation of LNG driven heavy-duty vehicles. The TEN-T core network should remain the basis for the deployment of LNG infrastructure, and progressively for bio- LNG, as it covers the main traffic flows and allows cross border connectivity throughout the Union. It had been recommended in Directive 2014/94/EU that such refuelling points be installed every 400 km on the TEN-T core network, but certain limitedsome important gaps in the network remain across the EU to reach that objective. Member States should by 2025 reach that objective and fill the remaining gaps, after which the target should cease to applyLNG stations are insufficient especially in Eastern Europe and in third countries, situated on international transport corridors, including corridors linking different Member States. Member States should by 2025 reach that objective and fill the remaining gaps, after which the target should be adapted to different market scenarios in line with EU and national decarbonization targets and with the penetration of alternative fuels.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 264 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 35
(35) A core network of refuelling points for LNG at maritime ports should be available by 2025. Refuelling points for LNG include LNG terminals, tanks, mobile containers, bunker vessels and barges. Additions to the network are still to be made by 2030 in Member States with increased minimum requirements after 2025. An extra effort should be put to increase the share of bio-LNG stations and bunkering facilities across Europe with a higher density.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 274 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 41
(41) Member States should make use of a wide range of market based, regulatory and non- regulatory incentives and measures to reach the mandatory targets and implement their national policy frameworks, in close cooperation with private sector actors, who should play a key role in supporting the development of alternative fuels infrastructure.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 282 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 54
(54) The market for alternative fuels and in particular for low and zero emission fuels is still in the early stages of development and technology is evolving fastevolving fast and technology is already there. This market should be further supported through the introduction of a voluntary crediting mechanism to increase the offer of alternative fuels while accelerating the decarbonization of the transport sector. This shwould likely affect the demand for alternative fuels and consequently for alternative fuels infrastructure across the modes. The Commission should thereforeprepare two years after the entry into force of this Regulation a technology-readiness report, analyzing the market readiness and availability of key zero- and low-emission powertrains and fuel technologies and their dedicated infrastructure. Based on this report, the Commission should review this Regulation by the end of 2026 in particular as regards the targets setting for electric recharging points for HDV as well as targets for infrastructure for alternative fuels for low- and zero-emission vessels and aircraft in waterborne transport and aviationtransport. The review should include all alternative fuels and infrastructural demand should be matched with the potential speed of the uptake.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 290 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 3 – introductory part
(3) ‘alternative fuels’ means fuels or power sources which serve, at least partly, as a substitute for fossil oil sources in the energy supply to transport and which have the potential to contribute, on a permanent basis or for transitional phase, to its decarbonisation and enhance the environmental performance of the transport sector, including:
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 294 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 3 – point a – introductory part
(a) ‘alternative fuels for low- and zero- emission vehicles’:
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 295 #
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 296 #
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 298 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 3 – point b – indent 1
– biomass fuels, andvanced biofuels as defined in Article 2, points (27) and (33) of Directive (EU) 2018/2001, biogas and biofuels, such as bio-hydrogen, bio-ammonia, bio-methane, bio-LNG, bio- CNG, bio-LPG, RCF,
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 301 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 3 – point b – indent 2
– synthetic and paraffinic fuels, including ammoniae-hydrogen, e-ammonia, e- methanol, e-methane, e-LNG, rDME, RFNBO, produced from renewable energy,
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 303 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 3 – point c – introductory part
(c) ‘alternative fossil fuels’ for a transitional phaseprogressively blended with renewable fuels:
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 307 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 18 a (new)
(18 a) ‘solar-electric vehicle’ means a motor vehicle equipped with a powertrain containing at least one non-peripheral electric machine as energy converter with an electric rechargeable energy storage system, which can be recharged externally, and equipped with vehicle- integrated photovoltaic (VIPV) panels.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 308 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 33
(33) ‘operator of a recharging point’ means the entity responsible for the management and operation of a recharging point, which provides a recharging service to end users, including in the name and on behalf of a mobility service providmobility service providers, who in turn provide recharging services to an end user, or to end users;
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 309 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 38
(38) ‘publicly accessible’ alternative fuels infrastructure, means an alternative fuels infrastructure which is located at a site or premise that is open to the general public, irrespective of whetherwith unlimited and unconditional access to the alternative fuels infrastructure, irrespective of whether it is located on public or on private property, whether limitations or conditions apply in terms of access to the site or premise and irrespective of the applicable use conditions of the alternative fuels infrastructure;
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 312 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 46
(46) ‘recharging service’ means the sale ora service consisting of multiple elements including the provision of electricity and, including related services, through a publicly accessible recharging point;
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 317 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 57
(57) ‘ship at berth’ means ship at berth as defined in Article 3, point (n) of Regulation (EU) 2015/757means a ship which is securely moored or anchored along a quay in a port falling under the jurisdiction of a Member State while it is loading, unloading or hotelling, including the time spent when not engaged in cargo operations;
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 318 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 58
(58) ‘shore-side electricity supply’ means a provision of a service consisting of multiple elements including the provision of shore-side electrical power through a standardised interface to seagoing ships or inland waterway vessels at berth;
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 321 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 59
(59) ‘smart recharging’ means a recharging operation in which the intensity of electricity delivered to the battery is adjusted in real-time, based on information received through electronica standardized communication protocol;
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 326 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – indent 2 a (new)
- areas with high population density and regional uptake in light-duty electric vehicles are taken into account with priority development of the network and higher targets;
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 328 #
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 333 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 – point a
(a) for each battery electric light-duty vehicle registered in their territory, a total power output of at least 13 kW is provided through publicly accessible recharging stations; and
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 335 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 – point b
(b) for each plug-in hybrid light-duty vehicle registered in their territory, a total power output of at least 0.662 kW is provided through publicly accessible recharging stations.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 342 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point a – introductory part
(a) along the TEN-T core network, publicly accessible recharging pools dedicated to light-duty vehicles and meeting the following requirements are deployed in each direction of travel with a maximum distance of 640 km in-between them:
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 344 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point a – point i
(i) by 31 December 2025, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 3600 kW and include at least onetwo recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 15300 kW;
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 348 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point a – point ii
(ii) by 31 December 2030, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 61200 kW and include at least twofour recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 15300 kW;
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 354 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point b – introductory part
(b) along the TEN-T comprehensive network, publicly accessible recharging pools dedicated to light-duty vehicles and meeting the following requirements are deployed in each direction of travel with a maximum distance of 640 km in-between them:
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 355 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point b – point i
(i) by 31 December 2030, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 3600 kW and include at least one recharging station with an individual power output of at least 15300 kW;
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 356 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point b – point ii
(ii) by 31 December 2035, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 61200 kW and include at least two recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 15300 kW.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 363 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. In case of rapid market uptake in any relevant reporting period, Member States should shorten the deadlines under points (a) and (b) accordingly and increase the targets for recharging pools accordingly.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 364 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 3
3. Neighbouring Member States shall ensure that the maximum distances referred to in points (a) and (b) are not exceeded for cross-border sections of the TEN-T core and, unless economically unfeasible, of the TEN-T comprehensive network.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 367 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Paragraph 1 and 2 shall not apply to the outermost regions and islands, if the costs are disproportionate to the benefits, including environmental ones. In such a case, Member States shall reasonably explain their decision and shall make available that information on their national policy frameworks.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 371 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 3 b (new)
3 b. Member States shall ensure that targets in densely populated areas and regions with high uptake in registered light-duty electricity vehicles are increased accordingly in order to provide the necessary infrastructure and support the market development.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 372 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 3 c (new)
3 c. The Commission should take the necessary measures to ensure the cooperation with third-countries, especially candidates for membership in the EU and those third countries, in which transit corridors, connecting Member Stats, are situated.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 373 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 3 d (new)
3 d. Where a recharging pool is serving both light and heavy-duty vehicles, the recharging pool and the recharging stations within shall be regarded as publicly accessible recharging infrastructure for both light duty and heavy duty road vehicles, provided that the total installed capacity and type of chargers are as required for both light and heavy-duty vehicles.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 383 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point a – point i
(i) by 31 December 2025, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 142800 kW and include at least onetwo recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 350 kW;
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 387 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point a – point ii
(ii) by 31 December 2030, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 35000 kW and include at least twofour recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 350 kW;
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 395 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point b – point i
(i) by 31 December 2030, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 1400 kW and include at least onetwo recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 350 kW;
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 401 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point b – point ii
(ii) by 1 December 2035, each recharging pool shall offer a power output of at least 3500 kW and include at least two recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 35700 kW;
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 407 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point c
(c) by 31 December 203027, in each safe and secure parking area, , situated on the TEN-T core network, at least onetwo recharging stations dedicated to heavy- duty vehicles with a power output of at least 100 kW isare installed;
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 410 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point c a (new)
(c a) by 31 December 2030, in each safe and secure parking area, situated on the TEN-T comprehensive network, at least one recharging stations dedicated to heavy-duty vehicles with a power output of at least 100 kW is installed;
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 412 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point d
(d) by 31 December 2025, in each urban node publicly accessible recharging points dedicated to heavy-duty vehicles providing an aggregated power output of at least 61200 kW are deployed, provided by recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 15300 kW;
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 414 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point e
(e) by 31 December 2030, in each urban node publicly accessible recharging points dedicated to heavy-duty vehicles providing an aggregated power output of at least 12400 kW are deployed, provided by recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 150 kW. and at least two recharging stations with an individual power output of at least 350 kW.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 417 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point e a (new)
(e a) Member States shall ensure that the grid connection and the grid capacity necessary is provided;
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 418 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point e b (new)
(e b) On roads with a traffic density that is less than (2000) heavy-duty vehicles per day, and where the infrastructure cannot be justified in socio-economic cost-benefit terms, Member States may extend the required distances regarding the heavy- duty road transport vehicles in paragraph 2 of this Article, so that the total distances in-between charging pools on average meet the distance requirements
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 419 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – point e c (new)
(e c) If the publicly accessible recharging infrastructure for heavy-duty road transport vehicles does not develop market-based on roads with traffic density that is less than (800) heavy-duty vehicles per day, Member States may exempt from the requirements set in paragraph 2 of this Article.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 422 #

2021/0223(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Paragraph 1 shall not apply to the outermost regions and islands, if the costs are disproportionate to the benefits, including environmental benefits. In such a case, Member States shall reasonably explain their decision and shall make available that information on their national policy frameworks.
2022/02/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 180 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 19
(19) Distributed storage assets, such as domestichousehold and community batteries and batteries of electric vehicles and energy conversion assets, such as grid-connected electrolysers, have the potential to offer considerable flexibility and balancing services to the grid through aggregation. In order to facilitate the development of such services, the regulatory provisions concerning connection and operation of the storage assets, such as tariffs, commitment times and connection specifications, should be designed in a way that does not hamper the potential of all storage assets, including small and mobile ones, to offer flexibility and balancing services to the system and to contribute to the further penetration renewable electricity, in comparison with larger, stationary storage assets.
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 183 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 20
(20) Recharging points where electric vehicles typically park for extended periods of time, such as where people park for reasons of residence or employment, are highly relevant to energy system integration, therefore smart charging functionalities need to be ensured. In this regard, the operation of non-publicly accessible normal charging infrastructure, for instance through smart metering systems, is particularly important for the integration of electric vehicles in the electricity system as it is located where electric vehicles are parked repeatedly for long periods of time, such as in buildings with restricted access, employee parking or parking facilities rented out to natural or legal persons.
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 202 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 25 a (new)
(25a) Member States should avoid distortive situations resulting in the extensive importation of resources from third countries. A life-cycle approach should be considered and promoted in that respect.
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 351 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 1 – point c a (new)
(ca) ‘new (36b)‘renewable hydrogen’ means hydrogen: (i) the energy content of which is derived from renewable sources, (ii) the greenhouse gas emissions savings from the use of which are at least 70%, and (iii) any biomass feedstock utilised in the production of which complies with the sustainability criterial set out in Article 29 is listed in Part A of Annex IX.’
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 362 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 1 a (new)
Directive (EU) 2018/2001
Article 2
(1a) Article 2, (12) is replaced by the following: "(12) ‘guarantee of origin’ means an electronic document which has the sole function of providing evidence to a final customer that a given share or quantity of energy was produced from renewable sources; . The same applies to low-carbon sources that are clearly labelled as such.; " Or. en (Directive (EU) 2018/2001)
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 394 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2 – point a a (new)

Article 3– paragraph 1bis (new)
(aa) Member States shall collectively ensure that the share of gaseous renewable energy– including renewable fuels of non-biological origin, biofuels, bioliquids and biogas - in the Union's gross final consumption of gas in 2030 is at least 13 %. Member States shall set national contributions to meet, collectively, this binding overall Union target no later than June 2024.
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 457 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2 – point b
Directive (EU) 2018/2001
Article 3 – Paragraph 3 – (b) (iii)
(iia) (iii) it is produced in an installation that contributes to the EU objective to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels in line with the Joint European Action for more affordable, secure and sustainable energy set out in the Commission communication of 8 March 2022.
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 509 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2 – point c a (new)
Directive (EU) 2018/2001
Article 3 – paragraph 4 b (new)
(ca) 4b. Member States shall establish a framework, which may include support schemes and facilitating the uptake of renewable hydrogen and low-carbon hydrogen including through renewable hydrogen and low-carbon hydrogen purchase agreements, for tackling remaining barriers to the deployment of renewable electricity, including those related to permitting procedures. (The change from "low-carbon hydrogen" to "renewable hydrogen and low-carbon hydrogen" applies to all amendments in the rapporteur's draft report.)
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 530 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 3 a (new)
Directive (EU) 2018/2001
Article 7 – Paragraph 1 – Subparagraph 1
(3a) "1. The gross final consumption of energy from renewable sources in each Member State shall be calculated as the sum of: (a) gross final consumption of electricity from renewable sources; (b) gross final consumption of energy from renewable sources in the heating and cooling sector; and (c) final consumption of energy from renewable sources and fuels in the transport sector. " Or. en (Directive (EU) 2018/2001)
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 537 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 4 – point a
(EU) 2018/2001
Article 9– paragraph 1a
1a. By 31 December 2025, each Member State shallmay agree to establish at least one joint project with one or more other Member States for the production of renewable energy. The Commission shall be notified of such an agreement, including the date on which the project is expected to become operational. Projects financed by national contributions under the Union renewable energy financing mechanism established by Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2020/129425 shall be deemed to satisfy this obligation for the Member States involved.; __________________ 25 Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2020/1294 of 15 September 2020 on the Union renewable energy financing mechanism (OJ L 303, 17.9.2020, p. 1).
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 574 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 5 – point c b (new)
(cb) Member States shall ensure that applicants are allowed to submit all relevant documents also in digital form. If an applicant makes use of the digital application option, the entire permitting process including the administrative internal processes needs to be carried out digitally. Member States shall further ensure the digitalization of the public hearings and the participation procedures.
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 618 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 6
(EU) 2018/2001
Article 15a– Paragraph 2– subparagraph 1
2. Member States shall introduce measures in their building regulations and codes and, where applicable, in their support schemes, to increase the share of electricity and heating and cooling from renewable sources in the building stock, including national measures relating to substantial increases in renewables self- consumption, renewable energy communities and local energy storage, in combination with energy efficiency improvements relating to cogeneration and passive, nearly zero-energy and zero- energy buildings.
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 700 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 8 – point a b (new)
(EU) 2018/2001
Article 19– paragraph 7– point b–
(ab) Point (b) is amended as follows : "(b) whether it relates to : (i) electricity; (ii) gas, including (iii) hydrogen; or (iii(iv) heating or cooling; " Or. en ((EU) 2018/2001)
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 722 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 9 a (new)
Directive (EU) 2018/2001
Article 20 – Paragraph 1
(9a) Article 20 - Paragraph 1 is replaced by the following: "1. Where relevant, Member States shall assess the need to extend existing gas network infrastructure to facilitate the integration of gas from renewable sources. , or to reduce the reliance on gas in line with the Joint European Action for more affordable, secure and sustainable energy set out in Commission communication of 8 March 2022, in particular if that infrastructure contributes significantly to the interconnection between at least two Member States or between a Member State and a third country. " Or. en (Directive (EU) 2018/2001)
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 723 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 9 b (new)
(9b) Article 20 - new paragraph 4 Member States shall, where relevant, take the necessary actions to integrate intermittent renewable electricity in the grid while ensuring grid stability and security of supply. Such actions can relate to the development of solutions such as storage facilities and grid-balancing power plants and cogeneration plants, that participate in grid-balancing in support of intermittent renewable electricity.
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 749 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 10
(UE) 2018/2001
Article 20a– Paragraph 3
3. In addition to the requirements in [the proposal for a Regulation concerning the deployment of alternative fuel infrastructure, repealing Directive 2014/94/EU], Member States shall ensure that non–publicly accessible normal power recharging points installed in their territory from [the transposition deadline of this amending Directive] can support smart charging functionalities and, interface with smart metering systems, and where appropriate based on assessment by the regulatory authority, bidirectional charging functionalities.
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 756 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 10
(EU) 2018/2001
Article 20a– paragraph 4
4. Member States shall ensure that all means of electricity generation, including units producing electricity from renewable sources, shall be involved in providing system and balancing services. Moreover, Member States shall ensure that the national regulatory framework does not discriminate against participation in the electricity markets, including congestion management and the provision of flexibility and balancing services, of small or mobile systems such as domestic batteries and electric vehicles, both directly and through aggregation.;
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 927 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 13 – point c
(EU) 2018/2001
Article 24
4a. Member States shall ensure that operators of district heating or cooling systems above 25 MWth capacity are obligincentivized to connect third party suppliers of energy from renewable sources and from waste heat and cold or are obligincentivized to offer to connect and purchase heat or cold from renewable sources and from waste heat and cold from third-party suppliers based on non- discriminatory criteria set by the competent authority of the Member State concerned, where such operators need to do one or more of the following:
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 945 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 13 – point e
(EU) 2018/2001
Article 24– paragraph 8– subparagraph 2
Member States shall ensure that electricity transmission and distribution system operators take due account of the results of the assessment required under the first subparagraph in grid planning, grid investment and infrastructure development in their respective territories, while ensuring this does not bring additional constraints in grid planning.
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 946 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 13 – point e
(EU) 2018/2001
Article 24– Paragraph 8
Member States shall ensure that electricity transmission and distribution system operators take due account of the results of the assessment required under the first subparagraph in grid planning, grid investment and infrastructure development in their respective territories.
2022/03/17
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 79 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 8
(8) As long as a significant number of the Union’s international partners have policy approaches that do not result indo not achieve the same level of climate ambition, there is a risk of carbon leakage, which would undermine the Union’s competitiveness on global markets. Carbon leakage occurs if, for reasons of costs related to climate policies, businesses in certain industry sectors or subsectors were to transfer production to other countries or imports from those countries would replace equivalent but less GHG emissions intensive products-intensive products on the internal market, as well as export markets, or investment into such sectors and subsectors would predominantly flow to such countries and not the Union. That cwould lead to an increase in their total emissions globally, thus jeopardising the reduction of GHG emissions that is urgently needed if the world is to keep the global average temperature to well below 2 °C above pre- industrial levels.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 100 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 9
(9) The initiative for a carbon border adjustment mechanism (‘CBAM’) is a part of the ‘Fit for 55 Package’. That mechanism is to serve as an essential element of the EU toolbox to meet the objective of a climate-neutral Union by 2050 in line with the Paris Agreement by addressing risks ofpreventing carbon leakage resulting from the increased Union climate ambition.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 108 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 10
(10) Existing mechanisms to address the risk of carbon leakage in sectors or sub- sectors at risk of carbon leakage are the transitional free allocation of EU ETS allowances and financial measures to compensate for indirect emission costs incurred from GHG emission costs passed on in electricity prices respectively laid down in Articles 10a(6) and 10b of Directive 2003/87/EC. However, free allocation under the EU ETS weakens the price signal that the system provides for the installations receiving it compared to full auctioning and thus affects the incentives for investment into further abatement of emissions.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 109 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 10
(10) Existing mechanisms to address the risk of carbon leakage in sectors or sub- sectors at risk of carbon leakage are the transitional free allocation of EU ETS allowances and financial measures to compensate for indirect emission costs incurred from GHG emission costs passed on in electricity prices respectively laid down in Articles 10a(6) and 10b of Directive 2003/87/EC. However, free allocation under the EU ETS weakens the price signal that the system provides for the installations receiving it compared to full auctioning and thus affects the incentives for investment into further abatement of emissions. Free allocation at the level of best performers has been an adequate policy instrument for certain industrial sectors to address the risk of carbon leakage in the absence of a fair level playing field.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 117 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 11
(11) The CBAM seeks tointends to complement and progressively replace these existing mechanisms by addressing the risk of carbon leakage in a different way, namely by ensuring equivalent carbon pricing for imports and domestic products. To ensure a gradual transition from the current system of free allowances to the CBAM, the CBAM should be progressively phased in while free allowances in sectors covered by the CBAM are phased out. The combined and transitional application of EU ETS allowances allocated free of charge and of the CBAMshould be phased out only after a comprehensive transitional period between 2026 and 2030 and once the CBAM has proven to be efficient, fit for purpose, operational and tested to mitigate the risk of carbon leakage. The combined application of EU ETS allowances allocated free of charge and of the CBAM is needed to allow producers, importers and traders to adjust to the new regime and to assess the effective implementation of the CBAM but should in no case result in more favourable treatment for Union goods compared to goods imported into the customs territory of the Union as continuous trade with third countries are essential for the Union and its diversified supply chains.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 129 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 11 a (new)
(11 a) To prevent carbon leakage both in the Union and in third country markets, goods of Union origin that are subject to the Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism of this Regulation and that are exported to third countries and territories should benefit from an export adjustment. This export adjustment must continue to incentivize Union producers to reduce their emissions and should apply until third countries adopt carbon prices and equivalent measures that are comparable to those in the Union, with special attention to interrelated carbon leakage protection measures, taking into account the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities, in the light of different national circumstances.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 134 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 12
(12) While the objective of the CBAM is to prevent the risk of carbon leakage, this Regulation would also encourage the use of more GHG emissions-efficient technologies by producers from third countries, so that less emissions per unit of output are generated. The CBAM hence might be an effective measure to lower emissions in third countries while ensuring European industry competitiveness. Reducing emissions in the Union as well as in third countries is an effective way to reduce the risk of carbon leakage. The CBAM should be seen as a step towards global pricing on carbon emissions which would further reduce the risk of carbon leakage globally.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 142 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 12 a (new)
(12 a) While the surrendering of CBAM certificates for EU importers addresses the risk of carbon leakage on the EU market, it is essential that the CBAM would also seek to reduce the possibility of European low-carbon exports being replaced by carbon-intensive items on third country markets or by goods that are not subject to equivalent climate policy and carbon costs, undermining the goal of lowering global emissions. It is therefore necessary to continue addressing the risk of carbon leakage associated with European exports to third countries that have not yet limited or priced GHG emissions at the same levels as the EU.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 149 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 13
(13) As an instrument to prevent carbon leakage and reduce GHG emissions the CBAM should ensure that imported products are subject to a regulatory system that applies carbon costs equivalent to the ones that otherwise would have been borne under the EU ETS. The CBAM is a climate measure which should prevent the risk of carbon leakage and support the Union’s increased ambition on climate mitigation, while ensuring WTO compatibility and industrial competitiveness.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 151 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 13 a (new)
(13 a) As CBAM is a mechanism that addresses the risk of carbon leakage on the EU market for EU imports, it is essential to avoid the risk that EU exports are replaced by more carbon intensive goods on the global market. Hence, the Commission shall analyse its implementation and effectiveness throughout the administrative transitional period and shall by the end of this period submit a report to the European Parliament and Council that specifies the carbon leakage risk on export markets accompanied with a proposal preventing the carbon leakage risk on export markets with safeguards of products intended for exports, such as export rebates.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 166 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 17
(17) The GHG emissions to be regulated by the CBAM should correspond to those GHG emissions covered by Annex I to the EU ETS in Directive 2003/87/EC, namely carbon dioxide (‘CO2’) as well as, where relevant, nitrous oxide (‘N2O’) and perfluorocarbons (‘PFCs’). The CBAM should initially apply to direct emissions of those GHG from the production of goods up to the time of import into the customs territory of the Union, and after the end of athe administrative transitional period and upon further assessment on the impact on carbon leakage for energy-intensive sectors with a withdrawal of EU ETS compensation, as well to indirect emissions, mirroring the scope of the EU ETS.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 173 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 19
(19) However, while the EU ETS sets an absolute cap on the GHG emissions from the activities under its scope and allows tradability of allowances (so called ‘cap and trade system’), the CBAM shouldmust not establish quantitative limits to import, so as to ensure that trade flows are not restricted or disrupted. Moreover, while the EU ETS applies to installations based in the Union, the CBAM should be applied to certain goods imported into the customs territory of the Union to ensure a level playing field and prevent the risk of carbon leakage while ensuring compatibility with WTO.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 189 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 24
(24) In terms of sanctions, Member States should apply penalties to infringements or circumvention practises of this Regulation and ensure that they are implemented. The amount of those penalties should be identical to penalties currently applied within the Union in case of infringement of EU ETS according to Article 16(3) and (4) of Directive 2003/87/EC.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 193 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 28
(28) Whilst the ultimate objective of the CBAM is a broader product coverage, it would beis prudent to start with a selected number of sectors with relatively homogeneous products where there is a risk of carbon leakage. The Commission should consider to further extend the scope of included goods, when CBAM is proven efficient to reduce carbon leakage for the sectors included in Annex I of this Regulation. A proposal of the inclusion of finished goods shall be presented by the Commission before the comprehensive transitional period. Union sectors deemed at risk of carbon leakage are listed in Commission Delegated Decision 2019/70842 . __________________ 42Commission Delegated Decision (EU) 2019/708 of 15 February 2019 supplementing Directive 2003/87/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council concerning the determination of sectors and subsectors deemed at risk of carbon leakage for the period 2021 to 2030 (OJ L 120, 8.5.2019, p. 2).
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 200 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 29
(29) The goods under this Regulation should be selected after a careful analysis of their relevance in terms of cumulated GHG emissions and risk of carbon leakage in the corresponding EU ETS sectors while limiting complexity and administrative burden for European industry, affected authorities, companies and SMEs. In particular, the actual selection should take into account basic materials and basic products covered by the EU ETS with the objective of ensuring that imports of energy intensive products into the Union are on equal footing with EU products in terms of EU ETS carbon pricing, and to mitigate risks of carbon leakage. Other relevant criteria to narrow the selection should be: firstly, relevance of sectors in terms of emissions, namely whether the sector is one of the largest aggregate emitters of GHG emissions; secondly, sector’s exposure to significant risk of carbon leakage, as defined pursuant to Directive 2003/87/EC; thirdly, the need to balance broad coverage in terms of GHG emissions while limiting complexity and administrative effort.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 212 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 34
(34) However, aluminium products should be included in the CBAM as they are highly exposed to carbon leakage. Moreover, in several industrial applications they are in direct competition with steel products because of characteristics closely resembling those of steel products. Inclusion of aluminium is also relevant as the scope of the CBAM may be extended to cover also indirect emissions in the future. Including indirect emissions and pricing them in the CBAM could be considered only once the mismatch between indirect carbon costs and indirect carbon emissions has been reduced to a minimum, as the European electricity grid decarbonises, and the downstream impacts in terms of carbon leakage across the full aluminium value chain have been assessed. Indirect carbon costs will still be relevant in the period from 2021 to 2030,also considering the increased climate ambitions and the revised ETS Directive2003/87/EC. If after the initial transitional period, the data collected by the Commission shows that the CBAM cannot effectively protect against carbon leakage and incentivise the reduction global emissions, further phase-in of CBAM and phase-out of free allocation of emission allowances should be paused until an effective solution can be found.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 219 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 11 a (new)
(11a) To prevent carbon leakage both in the Union and in third country markets, goods of Union origin that are subject to the CBAM and that are exported to third countries and territories should benefit from an export adjustment. That export adjustment should continue to incentivise Union producers to reduce their emissions and should apply until third countries adopt carbon prices and equivalent measures that are comparable to those in the Union, with special attention to interrelated carbon leakage protection measures, taking into account the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities, in the light of different national circumstances.
2022/02/15
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 236 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 46
(46) To avoid risks of circumvention and improve the traceability of actual CO2 emissions from import of electricity and its use in goods, the calculation of actual emissions should only be permitted through a number of strict conditions. In particular, it should be necessary to demonstrate a firm nomination of the allocated interconnection capacity and that there is a direct contractual relation between the purchaser and the producer of the renewable and low carbon electricity, or between the purchaser and the producer of electricity having lower than default value emissions. .
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 238 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 46 a (new)
(46 a) To reduce the risk of carbon leakage as well as to ensure a level playing field for European industry, all practices of circumvention shall be prohibited. The Commission shall evaluate the risk of circumvention practices, especially the likelihood of modified trade patterns towards downstream products, as well as resource shuffling, cost absorption, manipulation of emissions data, wrongful labelling of goods and slight modifications of the product so as to import a product under a different customs code of all sectors included in Annex I of this Regulation. The Commission shall be empowered to adopt delegated acts to strengthen anti- circumvention measures when appropriate.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 243 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 48
(48) Integration of third countries into the Union electricity market is an important drive for those countries to accelerate their transition to energy systems with high shares of renewable energies. Market coupling for electricity, as set out in Commission Regulation (EU) 2015/122246 , enables third countries to better integrate electricity from renewable and low carbon energies into the electricity market, to exchange such electricity in an efficient manner within a wider area, balancing supply and demand with the larger Union market, and reduce the carbon intensity of their electricity generation. Integration of third countries into the Union electricity market also contributes to the security of electricity supplies in those countries and in the neighbouring Member States. __________________ 46Commission Regulation (EU) 2015/1222 of 24 July 2015 establishing a guideline on capacity allocation and congestion management (OJ L 197, 25.7.2015, p. 24).
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 247 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 49 a (new)
(49 a) This Regulation shall progressively enter into force in two steps. Between 2023 and 2025 an administrative transitional period where Articles set out in Article 36 (a) and (c) of this Regulation shall apply. Between 2026 and 2030 a comprehensive transitional period where all Articles set out in Article 36 of this Regulation shall apply. During this period free allocation should remain in place.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 250 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 50
(50) An administrative transitional period without financial adjustment should apply during the period 2023 until 2025. A CBAM without financial adjustment should applyto 2025, with the objective to facilitate a smooth roll out of the mechanism hence reducing the risk of disruptive impacts on trade and European industry. Declarants should have to report on a quarterly basis the actual embedded emissions in goods imported during the administrative transitional period, detailing direct and indirect emissions as well as any carbon price paid abroad.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 257 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 50 a (new)
(50 a) A comprehensive transitional period with financial adjustment should apply during the period 2026 to 2030, with the objective to facilitate a smooth roll out of the mechanism hence reducing the risk of disproportionate impacts on European industry.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 258 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 50 b (new)
(50 b) A temporary Carbon Leakage Protection Reserve should be established between 2031 to 2035, linked to the reduction of free allocation. Each year, the free allocation no longer provided to the CBAM sectors, based on the free allocation phase-out calculation, should be placed into the temporary Carbon Leakage Reserve. To this purpose the Commission shall every year, from 2031 to 2035, present to the parliament and Council a report on the effectiveness of this Regulation in lowering carbon leakage. By 28 February, the following year the Commission shall report to the Parliament and the Council on the entry into force of CBAM and its effectiveness during the preceding year. If the assessment is positive, the allowances placed in the reserve should automatically be auctioned. If the assessment proves negative impact on lowering carbon leakage, the allowances placed in the reserve should automatically be returned to industry, to mitigate the risk of carbon leakage.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 265 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 52
(52) The Commission should evaluate the application of this Regulation before the end of the administrative transitional period and report to the European Parliament and the Council. The report of the Commission should in particular focus on possibilities to enhance climate actions towards the objective of a climate neutral Union by 2050. The Commission should, as part of that evaluation, initiate collection of information necessary to possibly extend the scope of Annex I to indirect emissions, as well as to other goods and services at risk of carbon leakage, such as finished goods, and to develop methods of calculating embedded emissions based on the environmental footprint methods47 .. The Commission should in particular focus on: (a) the impact on competitiveness of European industry and downstream industry, impact on SMEs, possible disproportionate administrative burden, possible circumvention practices, distortion in trade patterns and possibilities to enhance climate actions towards a climate neutral Union by 2050. Accompanied by proposals to avoid negative impact on such sectors; (b) a proposal to avoid possible carbon leakage in export markets; (c) a proposal to extend the scope of this Regulation to finished goods containing goods listed in Annex I; to ensure competitiveness of European manufacturing industry and prevent carbon leakage; __________________ 47Commission Recommendation 2013/179/EU of 9 April 2013 on the use of common methods to measure and communicate the life cycle environmental performance of products and organisations (OJ L 124, 4.5.2013, p. 1).
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 275 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 52 a (new)
(52 a) During the comprehensive transitional period, biannual between 2025-2030 and every year thereafter until 2035, the Commission shall evaluate the application of this Regulation and report to the European parliament and the Council. The Commission should in particular focus on: (a) the impact on European industry and downstream industry of sectors listed in Annex I, and possible additional administrative burden; (b) the effectiveness of this Regulation in reducing carbon leakage and possible circumvention practices; and (c) the impact of CBAM on Union trade of goods listed in Annex I and possible distortion in trade patterns;
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 279 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 52 b (new)
(52 b) In case the CBAM is proven not to be efficient in lowering carbon leakage, creates disproportionate disadvantages for European industry or severe shortcomings appear in the implementation of this Regulation during the comprehensive transitional period, the Commission shall present a new or revised legislative proposal aiming at lowering carbon leakage in order for the Union to reach its goal of climate neutrality 2050.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 280 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 52 c (new)
(52 c) If the CBAM is challenged by WTO and as an effect not implemented, the Commission shall present a revised legislative proposal aiming at lowering carbon leakage.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 282 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 53
(53) In light of the above, a dialogue with third countries should continue and there should be space for cooperation and solutions that could inform the specific choices that will be made on the details of the design of the measure during the implementation, in particular during the transitional periods.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 286 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 54
(54) The Commission should strive to engage in an even handed manner and in line with the international obligations of the EU, with the third countries whose trade to the EU is affected by this Regulation, to explore possibilities for dialogue and cooperation with regard to the implementation of specific elements of the Mechanism set out this Regulation and related implementing acts. It should also explore possibilities for concluding agreements to take into account their carbon pricing mechanism, provided that they deliver equivalent GHG emissions reductions and carbon costs constraints.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 293 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 58
(58) In order for CBAM to be efficient in lowering carbon leakage, all possible circumvention practices should be addressed by this Regulation. In order to remedy circumvention of the provisions of this Regulation, the power to adopt acts in accordance with Article 290 of TFEU should be delegated to the Commission in respect of supplementing the list of goods in Annex I.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 299 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 17
(17) The GHG emissions to be regulated by the CBAM should correspond to those GHG emissions covered by Annex I to the EU ETS in Directive 2003/87/EC, namely carbon dioxide (‘CO2’) as well as, where relevant, nitrous oxide (‘N2O’) and perfluorocarbons (‘PFCs’). The CBAM should initially apply to direct emissions of those GHG from the production of goods up to the time of import into the customs territory of the Union, and after the end of athe administrative transitional period and upon further assessment on the impact on carbon leakage for energy-intensive sectors, as well to indirect emissions, mirroring the scope of the EU ETS. Including indirect emissions and pricing them in the CBAM should only be considered if and when the mismatch between indirect carbon costs and indirect carbon emissions has been reduced to a minimum, as the European electricity grid decarbonises, and the downstream impacts across the sectors concerned have been assessed. The financial measures to compensate for indirect emission costs incurred from GHG emission costs passed on in electricity prices respectively laid down in Articles 10a(6) and 10b of Directive 2003/87/EC should coexist with the CBAM and be phased out only when a robust system pricing indirect emissions of imports fully mirrors and is equal to the indirect emission costs borne by European producers.
2022/02/15
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 302 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1
1. This Regulation establishes a carbon border adjustment mechanism (the ‘CBAM’) for addressing greenhouse gas emissions embedded in the goods referred to in Annex I, upon their importation into the customs territory of the Union, in order to prevent the risk of carbon leakage from the EU and contribute to the reduction of global carbon emissions.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 318 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 3
3. The mechanism will progressiveintends to complement and gradually become an alternative to the mechanisms established under Directive 2003/87/EC to prevent the risk of carbon leakage, notably the allocation of allowances free of charge in accordance with Article 10a of that Directive.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 321 #
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 411 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 3 – introductory part
3. The Commission is empowered to adopt implementing acts concerning the principles of verification referred to in paragraph 1 as regards the possibility to waive the obligation for the verifier to visit the installation where relevant goods are produced and the obligation to set thresholds for deciding whether misstatements or non-conformities are material and concerning the supporting documentation needed for the verification report. Provisions laid down in such implementing acts shall be equivalent to the provisions set in Regulation 2018/2067.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 418 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 2
2. The authorised declarant shall keep records of the documentation, certified by an independent person, verifier accredited pursuant to art. 18and in line with the competences established in art.8(1) concerning the verification of embedded emissions. The accredited verifier is required to demonstrate that the declared embedded emissions were subject to a carbon price in the country of origin of the goods and keep evidence of the proof of the actual payment for that carbon price which should not have been subject to an export rebate or any other form of compensation on exportation.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 425 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 1
1. The Commission shall, upon request by a register the information on operators of an installations located in a third country, register the information on that operator and on itsies and on those installation in a central database referred to in Article 14(4).
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 432 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 8
8. The operator may, at any timefter 10 years, ask to be deregistered from the database.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 434 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 a (new)
Article 10 a Export adjustment to reduce the risk of carbon leakage and associated increases in global emissions 1. An export adjustment shall be granted to operators of installations subject to Directive 2003/87 for goods manufactured in the EU listed in Annex I and that are exported to third countries and territories other than those listed in Annex II, Section A. 2. The amount of the export adjustment shall be equal to the Euro value of the CBAM certificates published in accordance with Article 22(2) during the calendar week of export of the exported goods, multiplied by default values based on the average emission intensity of the 10 percent best performing EU installations for that type of good, multiplied by tons of goods falling within the scope of paragraph 1. This calculation shall take also into account ETS benchmarking methodologies already established for which the denominator is not expressed in tons of goods (e.g., for refined products and steam-cracking),as well as other alternative methodologies, to the extent applicable. 3. Notwithstanding paragraph 2, where goods within the scope of paragraph 1 are produced in EU installations with an emission intensity that is lower than the default value for that type of product as set pursuant to paragraph 2, the amount of the export adjustment shall be calculated based on the actual embedded emissions per ton of product calculated in accordance with the methodology of points 2 and 3 of Annex III. 4.The export adjustment shall be reduced to reflect the extent to which EU ETS allowances continue to be allocated free of charge in accordance with Article 10a of Directive 2003/87 to operators of installations producing the goods listed in Annex I in the Union. 5. The European Commission is empowered to adopt implementing acts, in accordance with the examination procedure referred to in Article 29(2), establishing methodologies to define the amount of the export adjustment in accordance with paragraph 2 and 3. 6. The European Commission is empowered to adopt delegated acts, in accordance with Article 28, defining the procedures and requirements to grant an export adjustment under paragraph 1 in accordance with paragraphs 2, 3, and 4 and the methodologies defined in accordance with paragraph 5. 7. When drafting the implementing and delegated acts of paragraphs 5 and 6 above, the Commission shall give all interested parties and third countries an opportunity to comment. 8. The European Commission shall regularly assess, on a third country or group of countries basis, whether EU producers continue to require the export adjustment of paragraph 1 in order to prevent the risk of carbon leakage. In doing so, the Commission shall monitor and consult with third countries on the extent to which they adopt carbon prices and equivalent measures comparable to that in the Union, with special attention to interrelated carbon leakage protection measures, taking into account the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities, in the light of different national circumstances. On the basis of this assessment, by December 2025 [i.e., end of transitional period] and every five years thereafter, the Commission shall present a report on the progress made by third countries and the extent to which a Union export adjustment continues to be necessary. Where justified, the European Commission shall present to the European Parliament and Council a legislative proposal suspending the export adjustment or introducing any necessary modifications.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 479 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 14 – paragraph 3
3. The information in the database referred to in paragraph 2 shall be confidentialmade available to the public, unless it is proven that it is business confidential according to the relevant EU legislation. Confidential information shall include meaningful non-confidential summaries. Information equivalent to the one made publicly available for EU producers under the EU ETS central data base shall be made public.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 486 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 14 – paragraph 4
4. The Commission shall establish a central database accessible to the public containing the names, addresses and contact details of the operators and the location of installations in third countries in accordance with Article 10(2). An operator may choose not to have its name, address and contact details accessible to the public.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 494 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 15 – paragraph 3
3. If irregularities are identified as a result of the controls carried out under paragraph 2, the Commission shall inform the Member State or Member States concerned for further investigation in order to correct the identified irregularities. Identified irregularities shall be corrected at the latest within one month from the day where they were identified, and, where appropriate, penalties pursuant to article 27 shall apply.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 510 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) the declarant hasand the operators of installations located in third countries from whom the declarants sources goods have respectively not been involved in a serious infringement or repeated infringements of customs legislation, circumvention of antidumping or antisubsidy duties taxation rules and market abuse rules and has no record of serious criminal offences relating to its economic activity during the five years preceding the application;
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 540 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 18 – paragraph 2
2. In addition to paragraph 1, a national accreditation body may on request accredit a person as a verifier under this Regulation after checking the documentation attesting its capacity to apply the verification principles referred to Annex V to perform the obligations of control of the embedded emissions established in Articles 8, 10 and 38.deleted
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 543 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 18 – paragraph 3
3. The Commission is empowered to adopt delegated acts in accordance with Article 28 for the accreditation referred to in paragraph 2, specifying conditions for the control and oversight of accredited verifiers, for the withdrawal of accreditation and for mutual recognition and peer evaluation of the accreditation bodies.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 547 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 19 – paragraph 1
1. The competent authority may review the CBAM declaration within the period ending with the fourth year after the year in which the declaration should have been submitted. The review may consist in verifying the information provided in the CBAM declaration on the basis of the information communicated by the customs authorities in accordance with Article 25(2) and any other relevant evidence, and on the basis of any audit deemed necessary, including at the premises of the authorised declarant.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 554 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 19 – paragraph 2
2. Where a CBAM declaration in accordance with Article 6 has not been submitted, the competent authority of the Member State of establishment of the authorised declarant shall assess the CBAM obligations of that declarant on the basis of the information at its disposal and calculate the total number of CBAM certificates due at the latest by the 31 December of the fourth year following that when the CBAM declaration should have been submitted.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 616 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 27 – paragraph 2
2. Practices of circumvention include situations where a change in the pattern of trade in relation to goods included in the scope of this Regulation, whether slightly modified or not, stems from a practice, process or work that have has insufficient due cause or economic justification other than avoiding obligations as laid down in this Regulation and consist in replacing those goods with slightly modified products, which are not included in the list of goods in Annex I but belong to a sector included in the scope of this Regulation, or undermining their effects, including on overall GHG emissions and on prices of the like products.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 618 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 27 – paragraph 2 – point 1 (new)
(1) The practice, processor work referred to in the first subparagraph include, inter alia:
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 619 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 27 – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 1 (new)
(a) the slight modification of a product to make it fall under another customs code which are not subject to the obligations of this Regulation; b) false declarations regarding identity of the producer, the product concerned, the nature of the product concerned or the production process; (c) the consignment of the product concerned via third countries where no or more favourable obligations apply; (d) the reorganisation by exporters or producers of their patterns and channels of sales in order to avoid obligations of this Regulation, or undermine their effects, for instance via practices of resource shuffling. Resource shuffling shall be defined as any practice, process or work that that have insufficient due cause or economic justification other than avoiding obligations as laid down in this Regulation, or undermining their effects, without delivering environmental benefits on global GHG emissions; (e) in the circumstances indicated in paragraph 2, the assembly of parts by an assembly operation in the Union or a third country.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 652 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 30 – paragraph 2
2. Before the end of the transitional 2. period, the Commission shall present a report to the European Parliament and the Council on the application of this Regulation. The report shall contaThe Commission should evaluate the application of this Regulation before the end of the administrative transitional period and report to the European Parliament and the Council. The first report of the Commission should in particular focus on possibilities to enhance climate actions towards the objective of a climate neutral Union by 2050. The Commission should, as part of that evaluation, initiate collection of information necessary to possibly extend the scope of Annex I to indirect emissions, as well as to other goods and services at risk of carbon leakage, such as finished goods, and to develop methods of calculating embedded emissions based on the environmental footprint methods: (a) the impact on competitiveness of European industry and downstream industry, impact on SMEs, possible disproportionate administrative burden, possible circumvention practices, distortion in trade patterns and possibilities to enhance climate actions towards a climate neutral Union by 2050. Accompanied by proposals to avoid negative impact on such sectors; (b) a proposal to avoid possible carbon leakage in export markets; (c) a proposal to extend the scope of this Regulation to finished goods containing goods listed in Annex I; to ensure competitiveness of European manufacturin,g in particular,dustry and prevent carbon leakage; (d) the assessment of the possibilities to further extend the scope of embedded emissions to indirect emissions and to other goods at risk of carbon leakage than those already covered by this Regulation, as well as an assessment of the governance system. It shall also contain the assessment of the possibility to further extend the scope to embedded emissions of transportation services as well as to goods further down the value chain and services that may be subject to the risk of carbon leakage in the future.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 667 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 30 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. During the comprehensive transitional period, biannual between 2025-2030 and every year thereafter until 2035 the Commission shall evaluate the application of this Regulation and report to the European parliament and the Council. The Commission should in particular focus on: (a) the impact on European industry and downstream industry of sectors listed in Annex I, as well as on SMEs and possible additional administrative burden for SMEs; (b) the effectiveness of this Regulation in reducing carbon leakage and possible circumvention practices; and (c) the impact of CBAM on Union trade of goods listed in Annex I and possible distortion in trade patterns;
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 674 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 30 – paragraph 3 a (new)
3a. In case the CBAM is proven not to be efficient in lowering carbon leakage, the Commission shall present a new or revised legislative proposal aiming at lowering carbon leakage. Once the CBAM has fully demonstrated its WTO- compatibility, its effectiveness in equalising CO2 costs between imported and domestic products and in protecting the competitiveness of European exports, the free allocation received by these sectors should be gradually phased out, however not prior to 2030. This phase-out of free allocation should be kept under review in light of the entry into force and effective implementation of the Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 676 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 30 – paragraph 3 b (new)
3b. In the event that the Commission in its annual report between 2031-2035 concludes that, the CBAM has been effectively implemented in a way that leads to a level of carbon leakage protection at least equivalent to that of the free allocation system which it replaces under this Article, the allowances placed in the Carbon Border Adjustment Reserve for the preceding calendar year shall be made available to support innovation in accordance with Article 10a(8) of Directive 2003/87/EC.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 677 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 30 – paragraph 3 c (new)
3c. In the event that the Commission in its report concludes that the CBAM has not been effectively implemented in a way that leads to a level of carbon leakage protection at least equivalent to that of the free allocation system which it replaces, the allowances placed in the Carbon Border Adjustment Reserve for the preceding calendar year shall be reallocated to installations in accordance with Article10a(1) of Directive 2003/87/EC.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 695 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 31 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. For the first years of operation of this Regulation, the production of products listed in Annex I shall benefit from free allocation in reduced amounts. A factor reducing the free allocation for the production of those products shall be applied (CBAM factor). The CBAM factor shall be equal to 100 % for the period between 2026 and the end of 2030, 80 % in 2031 and shall be reduced by 20 percentage points each year to reach 0 % by the fifth year.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 700 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 32 – paragraph 1
During the administrative transitional period of this Regulation, the CBAM mechanism shall apply as a reporting obligation as set out in Articles 33 to 35.
2022/02/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 710 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 6
6. The Commission is empowered to adopt implementing acts concerning detailed rules regarding the elements of the calculation methods set out in Annex III, including determining system boundaries of production processes, emission factors, installation-specific values of actual emissions and default values and their respective application to individual goods as well as laying down methods to ensure the reliability of data on the basis of which the default values shall be determined, including the level of detail and the verification of the data. Where necessary, those acts shall provide that the default values can be adapted to particular areas, regions or countries to take into account specific objective factors such as geography, natural resources, market conditions, prevailing energy sources, or industrial processes. The implementing acts shall build upon existing legislation for the verification of emissions and activity data for installations covered by Directive 2003/87/EC, in particular Implementing Regulation (EU) No 2018/2067.
2022/02/15
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 776 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 1
1. The Commission shall, upon request by an operator of an installation located in a third country, register the information on that operator and on its installation in a central databaseCBAM registry referred to in Article 14(4).
2022/02/15
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 786 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 7
7. An operator may disclose tThe information on the verification ofed embedded emissions referred to in paragraph 5 to an authorised declarantshall be publicly accessible via the CBAM registry. The authorised declarant shall be entitled to avail itself of that disclosed information to fulfil the obligation referred to in Article 8.
2022/02/15
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 794 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 a (new)
Article 10a Export adjustment to reduce the risk of carbon leakage and associated increases in global emissions 1. An export adjustment shall be granted to operators of installations subject to Directive 2003/87/EC for goods manufactured in the EU listed in Annex I and that are exported to third countries and territories other than those listed in Annex II, Section A. 2. The amount of the export adjustment shall be equal to the Euro value of the CBAM certificates published in accordance with Article 22(2) during the calendar week of export of the exported goods, multiplied by default values based on the average emission intensity of the 10 percent best performing Union installations for that type of good, multiplied by tons of goods falling within the scope of paragraph 1 of this Article. That calculation shall take also into account EU ETS benchmarking methodologies already established for which the denominator is not expressed in tons of goods, for example refined products and steam-cracking, as well as other alternative methodologies, to the extent applicable. 3. Notwithstanding paragraph 2, where goods within the scope of paragraph 1 are produced in Union installations with an emission intensity that is lower than the default value for that type of product as set pursuant to paragraph 2, the amount of the export adjustment shall be calculated based on the actual embedded emissions per tonne of product calculated in accordance with the methodology of points 2 and 3 of Annex III. 4.The export adjustment shall be reduced to reflect the extent to which EU ETS allowances continue to be allocated free of charge in accordance with Article 10a of Directive 2003/87/EC to operators of installations producing the goods listed in Annex I in the Union. 5. The Commission is empowered to adopt implementing acts, in accordance with the examination procedure referred to in Article 29(2), establishing methodologies to define the amount of the export adjustment in accordance with paragraph 2 and 3 of this Article. 6. The Commission is empowered to adopt delegated acts, in accordance with Article 28, defining the procedures and requirements to grant an export adjustment under paragraph 1 of this Article in accordance with paragraphs 2, 3, and 4 of this Article and the methodologies defined in accordance with paragraph 5 of this Article. 7. When drafting the implementing and delegated acts referred to in paragraphs 5 and 6 respectively, the Commission shall give all interested parties and third countries an opportunity to comment. 8. The Commission shall regularly assess, on a third country or group of countries basis, whether Union producers continue to require the export adjustment of paragraph 1 in order to prevent the risk of carbon leakage. In doing so, the Commission shall monitor and consult with third countries on the extent to which they adopt carbon prices and equivalent measures comparable to that in the Union, with special attention to interrelated carbon leakage protection measures, taking into account the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities, in the light of different national circumstances. On the basis of this assessment, by [ end of transitional period] and every five years thereafter, the Commission shall present a report on the progress made by third countries and the extent to which a Union export adjustment continues to be necessary. Where appropriate, the Commission shall present to the European Parliament and to the Council a legislative proposal suspending the export adjustment or introducing any necessary modifications.
2022/02/15
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 1079 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 27 a (new)
Article 27 a Absorption 1. Where any party submits sufficient information showing that, after the entry into force of this Regulation, an Authorised Declarant has been absorbing the cost of the CBAM Certificates, such that there has been no movement, or insufficient movement, in the resale prices or subsequent selling prices of the imported product in the Union, and that such situation has insufficient due cause or economic justification other than undermining the effects of the obligations under this Regulation, the Commission shall open an investigation. The Commission shall provide information to the Member States once a party has submitted sufficient information justifying the opening of the investigation and the Commission has completed its analysis thereof. The Commission may also open, at its own request or at the request of a Member State, an investigation , under the conditions specified in the first subparagraph. 2. The Commission shall provide all interested parties with an opportunity to clarify the situation with regard to resale prices and subsequent selling prices. 3. While carrying out an investigation the Commission may be assisted by customs authorities. The Commission shall conclude an investigation in due time. 4. If the Commission concludes that the obligations under this Regulation would have led to movements in such prices, the Commission shall take appropriate measures to re-establish the effectiveness of those obligations, including the application of the mark up calculated pursuing to Article 5. Any measures imposed by the Commission pursuant to this Article shall not exceed the amount of the penalties set out in Article 26.
2022/03/16
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 1279 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex III – point 4 – paragraph 2
For the purpose of determining default values, only actual values shall be used for the determination of embedded emissions. In the absence of actual data, or when the use of actual data would lead to low default values favouring freeriding behaviour, literature values may be used. The Commission shall publish guidance for the approach taken to correct for waste gases or greenhouse gases used as process input, before collecting the data required to determine the relevant default values for each type of goods listed in Annex I. Default values shall be determined based on the best available data. They shall be revised periodically through implementing acts based on the most up-to-date and reliable information, including on the basis of information provided by a third country or group of third countries.
2022/03/16
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 1284 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex III – point 4 – point 4.1 – paragraph 1
When actual emissions cannot be adequately determined by the authorised declarant, default values shall be used. Default values shall represent the highest known carbon intensity of the relevant good in order to avoid carbon leakage and any freeriding behaviour. These values shall be set at the average emission intensity of each exporting country and for each of the goods listed in Annex I other than electricity, increased by a mark-up, the latter to be determined in the implementing acts of this Regulation. When reliable data for the exporting country cannot be applied for a type of goods, the default values shall be based on the average emission intensity of the 10 per cent worst performing EU installations for that type of goodsAverage country data shall be consistent with rules on calculations of embedded emissions pursuant to article 7 and Annex III and be verified by verifiers accredited pursuant to article 18. When reliable and verified data for the exporting country cannot be applied for a type of goods, the default values shall be based on the average emission intensity of the 10 per cent worst performing EU installations for that type of goods, increased by a mark- up, the latter to be determined in the implementing acts of this Regulation. The mark-up to be applied pursuant this point shall ensure that the default values reflect the highest known carbon intensity of the relevant good in order to avoid carbon leakage from any free riding behaviour.
2022/03/16
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 1308 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex III – point 6
6. Adaptation of default values based on region specific features Default values can be adapted to particular areas, regions of countries where specific characteristics prevail in terms of objective factors such as geography, natural resources, market conditions, energy mix, or industrial production. When data adapted to those specific local characteristics are available and can define more targeted default values, the latter may be used instead of default values based on EU installations. Where declarants for goods originating in a third country, or a group of third countries can demonstrate, on the basis of reliable data, that alternative region specific adaptation of default values are lower than the default values defined by the Commission the former can be used.deleted
2022/03/16
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 28 #

2021/0213(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 2
(2) Directive 2003/96/EC was adopted in order to ensure the proper functioning of the internal market as regards the taxation of energy products and electricity. Directive 2003/96 also integrated environmental protection requirements, in particular, in the light of the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate ChangeParis Agreement from 2015.
2022/03/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 33 #

2021/0213(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 3
(3) It is necessary to ensure that clear taxation rules for energy products and electricity continue to contribute to the smooth functioning of the internal market while at the same time tackling the climate and environmental-related challenges in the context of the Communication from the Commission ‘The European Green Deal’28 . Energy taxation can contribute to the ambition of at least 55 % reduction in net greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 compared to 1990, as well as to the objective of zero pollution through the implementation of the polluter-pays principle, by ensuring that the taxation of motor fuels, heating fuels and electricity better reflects the impact they have on the environment and on health. The contribution of energy taxation to those objectives has been endorsed by the Council Conclusions on the EU energy taxation framework29 . __________________ 28COM(2019) 640 final of 11 December 2019. 29 14861/19 of 5 December 2019.
2022/03/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 41 #

2021/0213(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 4
(4) Environmental taxation can be a cost-effective mean for Member States to achieve the targetedimprovements in environmental footprint and contribute to the reductions of greenhouse gasse emissions. The proper functioning of the internal market requires common rules on that taxation.
2022/03/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 44 #

2021/0213(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 5
(5) Member States should, however, be able to use the energy taxation of motor fuels, heating fuels and electricity for a variety of purposes not necessarily nor specifically or exclusively related to the reduction of environmental footprint and contribution to the reduction of greenhouse gase emissions.
2022/03/09
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 47 #