BETA

Activities of Michèle RIVASI

Plenary speeches (28)

Clean air zone in EU cities (debate)
2019/07/17
The situation of EU forests (debate)
2019/09/16
Dossiers: 2019/2800(RSP)
Fight against cancer (topical debate)
2019/09/18
EU Pollinators Initiative (debate)
2019/12/17
Dossiers: 2019/2803(RSP)
COP15 to the Convention on Biological Diversity (Kunming 2020) (debate)
2020/01/15
Dossiers: 2019/2824(RSP)
Coronavirus outbreak (debate)
2020/01/29
Coronavirus outbreak, state of play and ensuring a coordinated European response to the health, economic and social impact (debate)
2020/03/10
Covid-19: EU coordination of health assessments and risk classification and the consequences on Schengen and the single market (debate)
2020/09/15
Dossiers: 2020/2780(RSP)
Eritrea, the case of Dawit Isaak
2020/10/08
Dossiers: 2020/2813(RSP)
Programme for the Union's action in the field of health for the period 2021-2027 (“EU4Health Programme”) (debate)
2020/11/12
Dossiers: 2020/0102(COD)
Transparency of the Purchase as well as the Access to COVID-19 vaccinations (debate)
2020/11/12
EU global strategy on COVID-19 vaccinations (debate)
2021/01/19
The state of play of the EU’s COVID-19 Vaccination Strategy (debate)
2021/02/10
Programme for the Union’s action in the field of health for the period 2021-2027 (‘EU4Health programme’) (debate)
2021/03/09
Dossiers: 2020/0102(COD)
2019 Discharge (debate)
2021/04/27
Dossiers: 2020/2141(DEC)
Digital Green Certificate - Union citizens - Digital Green Certificate - third country nationals - The accessibility and affordability of Covid-testing (debate)
2021/04/28
Dossiers: 2021/2654(RSP)
EU Digital COVID Certificate - Union citizens – EU Digital COVID Certificate - third-country nationals (debate)
2021/06/08
Situation in Tigray, Ethiopia (debate)
2021/07/06
The role of development policy in the response to biodiversity loss in developing countries, in the context of the achievement of the 2030 Agenda (debate)
2021/10/04
Dossiers: 2020/2274(INI)
The role of development policy in the response to biodiversity loss in developing countries, in the context of the achievement of the 2030 Agenda (debate)
2021/10/04
Dossiers: 2020/2274(INI)
EU Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Authority: ensuring a coordinated EU approach for future health crises and the role of the European Parliament in this (debate)
2021/10/05
Humanitarian situation in Tigray (debate)
2021/10/05
Dossiers: 2021/2902(RSP)
The EU's role in combating the COVID-19 pandemic: how to vaccinate the world (topical debate)
2021/11/24
Health technology assessment (debate)
2021/12/13
Avoiding corruption, irregular spending and misuse of EU and national funds in case of emergency funds and crisis related spending areas (short presentation)
2021/12/13
Dossiers: 2020/2222(INI)
Discharge 2020 (debate)
2022/05/04
Dossiers: 2021/2107(DEC)
Objection pursuant to Rule 111(3): Amending the Taxonomy Climate Delegated Act and the Taxonomy Disclosures Delegated Act (debate)
2022/07/05
Dossiers: 2021/2245(INI)
Violations of human rights in Uganda and Tanzania linked to the investments in fossil fuels projects
2022/09/14
Dossiers: 2022/2826(RSP)

Reports (3)

REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the eighth, ninth, tenth and eleventh European Development Funds for the financial year 2018
2020/03/03
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2019/2065(DEC)
Documents: PDF(231 KB) DOC(88 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Michèle RIVASI', 'mepid': 96743}]
REPORT on the role of development policy in the response to biodiversity loss in developing countries, in the context of the achievement of the 2030 Agenda
2021/07/27
Committee: DEVE
Dossiers: 2020/2274(INI)
Documents: PDF(210 KB) DOC(77 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Michèle RIVASI', 'mepid': 96743}]
REPORT on the evaluation of preventive measures for avoiding corruption, irregular spending and misuse of EU and national funds in case of emergency funds and crisis-related spending areas
2021/11/11
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2020/2222(INI)
Documents: PDF(201 KB) DOC(80 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Michèle RIVASI', 'mepid': 96743}]

Shadow reports (32)

REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the Fuel Cells and Hydrogen 2 Joint Undertaking for the financial year 2018
2020/02/28
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2019/2104(DEC)
Documents: PDF(182 KB) DOC(63 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Joachim Stanisław BRUDZIŃSKI', 'mepid': 197501}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the Innovative Medicines Initiative 2 Joint Undertaking for the financial year 2018
2020/03/02
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2019/2103(DEC)
Documents: PDF(176 KB) DOC(64 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard Antoni LEGUTKO', 'mepid': 96796}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the ECSEL Joint Undertaking for the financial year 2018
2020/03/02
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2019/2106(DEC)
Documents: PDF(176 KB) DOC(61 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard Antoni LEGUTKO', 'mepid': 96796}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the SESAR Joint Undertaking for the financial year 2018
2020/03/02
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2019/2100(DEC)
Documents: PDF(203 KB) DOC(71 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Joachim Stanisław BRUDZIŃSKI', 'mepid': 197501}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the Bio-based Industries Joint Undertaking for the financial year 2018
2020/03/02
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2019/2102(DEC)
Documents: PDF(178 KB) DOC(61 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard Antoni LEGUTKO', 'mepid': 96796}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the Clean Sky 2 Joint Undertaking for the financial year 2018
2020/03/02
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2019/2101(DEC)
Documents: PDF(204 KB) DOC(66 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard Antoni LEGUTKO', 'mepid': 96796}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the Shift2Rail Joint Undertaking for the financial year 2018
2020/03/03
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2019/2105(DEC)
Documents: PDF(201 KB) DOC(74 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Joachim Stanisław BRUDZIŃSKI', 'mepid': 197501}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy for the financial year 2018
2020/03/03
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2019/2099(DEC)
Documents: PDF(183 KB) DOC(61 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard Antoni LEGUTKO', 'mepid': 96796}]
REPORT on the shortage of medicines – how to address an emerging problem
2020/07/22
Committee: ENVI
Dossiers: 2020/2071(INI)
Documents: PDF(389 KB) DOC(159 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Nathalie COLIN-OESTERLÉ', 'mepid': 197536}]
REPORT on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the establishment of a Programme for the Union's action in the field of health –for the period 2021-2027 and repealing Regulation (EU) No 282/2014 (“EU4Health Programme”)
2020/10/20
Committee: ENVI
Dossiers: 2020/0102(COD)
Documents: PDF(553 KB) DOC(255 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Cristian-Silviu BUŞOI', 'mepid': 38420}]
RECOMMENDATION FOR SECOND READING on the Council position at first reading with a view to the adoption of a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 883/2013, as regards cooperation with the European Public Prosecutor's Office and the effectiveness of the European Anti-Fraud Office investigations
2020/12/14
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2018/0170(COD)
Documents: PDF(166 KB) DOC(50 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Marian-Jean MARINESCU', 'mepid': 33982}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the eighth, ninth, tenth and eleventh European Development Funds for the financial year 2019
2021/03/30
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2020/2190(DEC)
Documents: PDF(227 KB) DOC(82 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard CZARNECKI', 'mepid': 28372}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the ECSEL Joint Undertaking for the financial year 2019
2021/03/31
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2020/2189(DEC)
Documents: PDF(183 KB) DOC(62 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard CZARNECKI', 'mepid': 28372}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the Fuel Cells and Hydrogen 2 Joint Undertaking for the financial year 2019
2021/03/31
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2020/2187(DEC)
Documents: PDF(180 KB) DOC(60 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard CZARNECKI', 'mepid': 28372}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the SESAR Joint Undertaking for the financial year 2019
2021/03/31
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2020/2183(DEC)
Documents: PDF(196 KB) DOC(69 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard CZARNECKI', 'mepid': 28372}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the Bio-based Industries Joint Undertaking for the financial year 2019
2021/03/31
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2020/2185(DEC)
Documents: PDF(187 KB) DOC(64 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard CZARNECKI', 'mepid': 28372}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the Shift2Rail Joint Undertaking for the financial year 2019
2021/04/06
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2020/2188(DEC)
Documents: PDF(195 KB) DOC(69 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard CZARNECKI', 'mepid': 28372}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy for the financial year 2019
2021/04/06
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2020/2182(DEC)
Documents: PDF(188 KB) DOC(63 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard CZARNECKI', 'mepid': 28372}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the Clean Sky 2 Joint Undertaking for the financial year 2019
2021/04/06
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2020/2184(DEC)
Documents: PDF(193 KB) DOC(68 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard CZARNECKI', 'mepid': 28372}]
RECOMMENDATION FOR SECOND READING on the Council position at first reading with a view to the adoption of a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council establishing the Union Anti-Fraud Programme and repealing Regulation (EU) No 250/2014
2021/04/19
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2018/0211(COD)
Documents: PDF(165 KB) DOC(49 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Monika HOHLMEIER', 'mepid': 96780}]
RECOMMENDATION FOR SECOND READING on the Council position at first reading with a view to the adoption of a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on health technology assessment and amending Directive 2011/24/EU
2021/12/01
Committee: ENVI
Dossiers: 2018/0018(COD)
Documents: PDF(170 KB) DOC(55 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Tiemo WÖLKEN', 'mepid': 185619}]
REPORT on strengthening Europe in the fight against cancer – towards a comprehensive and coordinated strategy
2022/02/03
Committee: BECA
Documents: PDF(320 KB) DOC(123 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Véronique TRILLET-LENOIR', 'mepid': 197593}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the Clean Sky 2 Joint Undertaking (now the Clean Aviation Joint Undertaking) for the financial year 2020
2022/03/28
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2021/2149(DEC)
Documents: PDF(203 KB) DOC(72 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Joachim Stanisław BRUDZIŃSKI', 'mepid': 197501}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the Shift2Rail Joint Undertaking (now the Europe’s Rail Joint Undertaking) for the financial year 2020
2022/03/28
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2021/2156(DEC)
Documents: PDF(210 KB) DOC(72 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard CZARNECKI', 'mepid': 28372}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy for the financial year 2020
2022/03/29
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2021/2152(DEC)
Documents: PDF(190 KB) DOC(62 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard CZARNECKI', 'mepid': 28372}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the Fuel Cells and Hydrogen 2 Joint Undertaking (now the Clean Hydrogen Joint Undertaking) for the financial year 2020
2022/03/29
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2021/2153(DEC)
Documents: PDF(183 KB) DOC(60 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard CZARNECKI', 'mepid': 28372}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the Bio-based Industries Joint Undertaking (now the Circular Bio-based Europe Joint Undertaking) for the financial year 2020
2022/03/29
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2021/2148(DEC)
Documents: PDF(186 KB) DOC(63 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Joachim Stanisław BRUDZIŃSKI', 'mepid': 197501}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the SESAR Joint Undertaking (now the Single European Sky ATM Research 3 Joint Undertaking) for the financial year 2020
2022/03/29
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2021/2155(DEC)
Documents: PDF(199 KB) DOC(72 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard CZARNECKI', 'mepid': 28372}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the Innovative Medicines Initiative 2 Joint Undertaking (now the Innovative Health Initiative Joint Undertaking) for the financial year 2020
2022/03/29
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2021/2154(DEC)
Documents: PDF(187 KB) DOC(64 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard CZARNECKI', 'mepid': 28372}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the European High Performance Computing Joint Undertaking for the financial year 2020
2022/03/30
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2021/2151(DEC)
Documents: PDF(180 KB) DOC(58 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard CZARNECKI', 'mepid': 28372}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the ECSEL Joint Undertaking (now the Key Digital Technologies Joint Undertaking) for the financial year 2020
2022/03/30
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2021/2150(DEC)
Documents: PDF(183 KB) DOC(61 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Ryszard CZARNECKI', 'mepid': 28372}]
REPORT on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the eighth, ninth, tenth and eleventh European Development Funds for the financial year 2020
2022/04/08
Committee: CONT
Dossiers: 2021/2158(DEC)
Documents: PDF(254 KB) DOC(97 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Younous OMARJEE', 'mepid': 30482}]

Opinions (2)

OPINION with recommendations to the Commission on an EU legal framework to halt and reverse EU-driven global deforestation
2020/07/20
Committee: DEVE
Dossiers: 2020/2006(INL)
Documents: PDF(136 KB) DOC(54 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Michèle RIVASI', 'mepid': 96743}]
OPINION on a new EU forest strategy for 2030 – sustainable forest management in Europe
2022/06/15
Committee: DEVE
Dossiers: 2022/2016(INI)
Documents: PDF(151 KB) DOC(73 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Michèle RIVASI', 'mepid': 96743}]

Shadow opinions (18)

OPINION on the proposal for a decision of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Decision No 1313/2013/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council on a Union Civil Protection Mechanism
2020/02/19
Committee: DEVE
Dossiers: 2019/0070(COD)
Documents: PDF(178 KB) DOC(160 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Lukas MANDL', 'mepid': 190713}]
OPINION on Shortage of medicines – how to address an emerging problem
2020/06/17
Committee: DEVE
Dossiers: 2020/2071(INI)
Documents: PDF(156 KB) DOC(73 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Beata KEMPA', 'mepid': 197519}]
OPINION on the EU’s role in protecting and restoring the world’s forests
2020/07/02
Committee: DEVE
Dossiers: 2019/2156(INI)
Documents: PDF(139 KB) DOC(73 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Hildegard BENTELE', 'mepid': 197408}]
OPINION with recommendations to the Commission on corporate due diligence and corporate accountability
2020/11/18
Committee: DEVE
Dossiers: 2020/2129(INL)
Documents: PDF(152 KB) DOC(59 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Marc TARABELLA', 'mepid': 29579}]
OPINION on the effects of climate change on human rights and the role of environmental defenders on this matter
2021/01/18
Committee: DEVE
Dossiers: 2020/2134(INI)
Documents: PDF(139 KB) DOC(52 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Miguel URBÁN CRESPO', 'mepid': 131507}]
OPINION on a motion for a non-legislative resolution on the draft Council decision on the conclusion of the Voluntary Partnership Agreement between the European Union and the Republic of Honduras on forest law enforcement, governance and trade in timber products to the European Union
2021/01/27
Committee: DEVE
Dossiers: 2020/0157M(NLE)
Documents: PDF(130 KB) DOC(70 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Hildegard BENTELE', 'mepid': 197408}]
OPINION on the proposal for a Council decision on the conclusion of the Voluntary Partnership Agreement between the European Union and the Republic of Honduras on forest law enforcement, governance and trade in timber products to the European Union
2021/01/27
Committee: DEVE
Dossiers: 2020/0157(NLE)
Documents: PDF(127 KB) DOC(50 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Hildegard BENTELE', 'mepid': 197408}]
OPINION on an intellectual property action plan to support the EU’s recovery and resilience
2021/07/15
Committee: DEVE
Dossiers: 2021/2007(INI)
Documents: PDF(144 KB) DOC(48 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Patrizia TOIA', 'mepid': 28340}]
OPINION on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the European Medicines Agency for the financial year 2020
2022/01/17
Committee: ENVI
Dossiers: 2021/2132(DEC)
Documents: PDF(145 KB) DOC(75 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Pascal CANFIN', 'mepid': 96711}]
OPINION on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the European Environment Agency for the financial year 2020
2022/01/17
Committee: ENVI
Dossiers: 2021/2126(DEC)
Documents: PDF(135 KB) DOC(73 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Pascal CANFIN', 'mepid': 96711}]
OPINION on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the European Chemicals Agency for the financial year 2020
2022/01/17
Committee: ENVI
Dossiers: 2021/2125(DEC)
Documents: PDF(142 KB) DOC(75 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Pascal CANFIN', 'mepid': 96711}]
OPINION on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the European Food Safety Authority for the financial year 2020
2022/01/17
Committee: ENVI
Dossiers: 2021/2128(DEC)
Documents: PDF(147 KB) DOC(71 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Pascal CANFIN', 'mepid': 96711}]
OPINION on discharge in respect of the implementation of the general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020 – Section III, Commission and executive agencies
2022/01/17
Committee: ENVI
Dossiers: 2021/2106(DEC)
Documents: PDF(161 KB) DOC(75 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Pascal CANFIN', 'mepid': 96711}]
OPINION on discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control for the financial year 2020
2022/01/19
Committee: ENVI
Dossiers: 2021/2124(DEC)
Documents: PDF(140 KB) DOC(66 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Pascal CANFIN', 'mepid': 96711}]
OPINION Towards an EU strategy to promote education for children in the world: mitigating the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic
2022/03/04
Committee: DEVE
Dossiers: 2021/2209(INI)
Documents: PDF(151 KB) DOC(51 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'György HÖLVÉNYI', 'mepid': 124715}]
OPINION on Better regulation: Joining forces to make better laws
2022/03/23
Committee: DEVE
Dossiers: 2021/2166(INI)
Documents: PDF(133 KB) DOC(44 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Christian SAGARTZ', 'mepid': 204368}]
OPINION on the proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Directive (EU) 2018/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Regulation (EU) 2018/1999 of the European Parliament and of the Council and Directive 98/70/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council as regards the promotion of energy from renewable sources, and repealing Council Directive (EU) 2015/652
2022/05/24
Committee: DEVE
Dossiers: 2021/0218(COD)
Documents: PDF(193 KB) DOC(126 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Hildegard BENTELE', 'mepid': 197408}]
OPINION on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the making available on the Union market as well as export from the Union of certain commodities and products associated with deforestation and forest degradation and repealing Regulation (EU) No 995/2010
2022/06/28
Committee: DEVE
Dossiers: 2021/0366(COD)
Documents: PDF(317 KB) DOC(217 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Rosa ESTARÀS FERRAGUT', 'mepid': 96811}]

Institutional motions (35)

MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on The proposed new Criminal Code of Indonesia
2019/10/21
Dossiers: 2019/2881(RSP)
Documents: PDF(143 KB) DOC(46 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Egypt
2019/10/21
Dossiers: 2019/2880(RSP)
Documents: PDF(160 KB) DOC(51 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION On Uganda, notably the proposed bill to impose capital punishment of homosexual acts
2019/10/21
Dossiers: 2019/2879(RSP)
Documents: PDF(192 KB) DOC(48 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the Turkish military operation in northeast Syria and its consequences
2019/10/22
Dossiers: 2019/2886(RSP)
Documents: PDF(169 KB) DOC(58 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the climate and environment emergency
2019/11/25
Dossiers: 2019/2930(RSP)
Documents: PDF(136 KB) DOC(44 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on ongoing hearings under Article 7(1) of the TEU regarding Poland and Hungary
2020/01/09
Dossiers: 2020/2513(RSP)
Documents: PDF(144 KB) DOC(48 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Nigeria, notably the recent terrorist attacks
2020/01/13
Dossiers: 2020/2503(RSP)
Documents: PDF(167 KB) DOC(54 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Burundi, notably freedom of expression
2020/01/13
Dossiers: 2020/2502(RSP)
Documents: PDF(180 KB) DOC(50 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on India’s Citizenship (Amendment) Act, 2019
2020/01/28
Dossiers: 2020/2519(RSP)
Documents: PDF(149 KB) DOC(50 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Guinea Conakry, notably violence towards protesters
2020/02/10
Dossiers: 2020/2551(RSP)
Documents: PDF(153 KB) DOC(47 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Child labour in mines in Madagascar
2020/02/10
Dossiers: 2020/2552(RSP)
Documents: PDF(159 KB) DOC(50 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the draft Commission regulation amending Annexes II, III and IV to Regulation (EC) No 396/2005 of the European Parliament and of the Council as regards maximum residue levels for cycloxydim, flonicamid, haloxyfop, mandestrobin, mepiquat, Metschnikowia fructicola strain NRRL Y-27328 and prohexadione in or on certain products
2020/09/09
Committee: ENVI
Dossiers: 2020/2734(RPS)
Documents: PDF(172 KB) DOC(70 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on a strategic approach to pharmaceuticals in the environment
2020/09/09
Committee: ENVI
Dossiers: 2019/2816(RSP)
Documents: PDF(175 KB) DOC(58 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the case of Dr. Denis Mukwege in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)
2020/09/14
Dossiers: 2020/2783(RSP)
Documents: PDF(149 KB) DOC(46 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the draft Commission regulation amending the Annex to Regulation (EU) No 231/2012 laying down specifications for food additives listed in Annexes II and III to Regulation (EC) No 1333/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council as regards specifications for titanium dioxide (E 171)
2020/09/30
Committee: ENVI
Dossiers: 2020/2795(RPS)
Documents: PDF(158 KB) DOC(49 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Eritrea, the case Dawit Isaak
2020/10/05
Dossiers: 2020/2813(RSP)
Documents: PDF(152 KB) DOC(52 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Eritrea, notably the case of Dawit Isaak
2020/10/07
Dossiers: 2020/2813(RSP)
Documents: PDF(176 KB) DOC(54 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the draft Commission implementing regulation approving carbendazim as an existing active substance for use in biocidal products of product-types 7 and 10
2020/11/18
Committee: ENVI
Dossiers: 2020/2852(RSP)
Documents: PDF(175 KB) DOC(52 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation in Ethiopia
2020/11/23
Dossiers: 2020/2881(RSP)
Documents: PDF(149 KB) DOC(47 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the draft Commission regulation amending Annexes II, III and IV to Regulation (EC) No 396/2005 of the European Parliament and of the Council as regards maximum residue levels for acequinocyl, acibenzolar-S-methyl, Bacillus subtilis strain IAB/BS03, emamectin, flonicamid, flutolanil, fosetyl, imazamox and oxathiapiprolin in or on certain products
2021/04/22
Committee: ENVI
Dossiers: 2021/2608(RPS)
Documents: PDF(158 KB) DOC(48 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the COVID 19 pandemic situation in Latin America
2021/04/26
Dossiers: 2021/2645(RSP)
Documents: PDF(165 KB) DOC(52 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the current situation in Chad
2021/05/17
Dossiers: 2021/2695(RSP)
Documents: PDF(145 KB) DOC(47 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation in Haiti
2021/05/17
Dossiers: 2021/2694(RSP)
Documents: PDF(147 KB) DOC(49 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Chinese countersanctions on EU entities and MEPs and MPs
2021/05/18
Dossiers: 2021/2644(RSP)
Documents: PDF(168 KB) DOC(55 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation in Chad
2021/05/19
Dossiers: 2021/2695(RSP)
Documents: PDF(156 KB) DOC(50 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the breach of the UN Convention of the Rights of the Child and the use of minors by the Moroccan authorities in the migratory crisis in Ceuta
2021/06/07
Dossiers: 2021/2747(RSP)
Documents: PDF(150 KB) DOC(49 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION On the situation in Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya
2021/09/13
Dossiers: 2021/2874(RSP)
Documents: PDF(155 KB) DOC(49 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the humanitarian situation in Tigray
2021/10/04
Dossiers: 2021/2902(RSP)
Documents: PDF(152 KB) DOC(52 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the humanitarian situation in Tigray
2021/10/06
Dossiers: 2021/2902(RSP)
Documents: PDF(173 KB) DOC(58 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on human rights violations by private military and security companies, particularly the Wagner Group
2021/11/22
Dossiers: 2021/2982(RSP)
Documents: PDF(163 KB) DOC(52 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the Destruction of cultural heritage in Nagorno-Karabakh
2022/03/07
Dossiers: 2022/2582(RSP)
Documents: PDF(170 KB) DOC(46 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the conclusions of the European Council meeting of 24-25 March 2022, including the latest developments of the war against Ukraine and the EU sanctions against Russia and their implementation
2022/04/05
Dossiers: 2022/2560(RSP)
Documents: PDF(150 KB) DOC(50 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION the rule of law and the potential approval of the Polish national Recovery Plan (RRF)
2022/06/07
Documents: PDF(144 KB) DOC(49 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation of indigenous and environmental defenders in Brazil, including the killing of Dom Phillips and Bruno Pereira
2022/07/04
Dossiers: 2022/2752(RSP)
Documents: PDF(149 KB) DOC(46 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Violations of human rights in Uganda and Tanzania linked to the investments in fossil fuels projects
2022/09/12
Dossiers: 2022/2826(RSP)
Documents: PDF(161 KB) DOC(52 KB)

Oral questions (8)

Facial recognition and identification in publicly accessible spaces
2020/03/01
Documents: PDF(49 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Strategic approach to pharmaceuticals in the environment
2020/03/06
Documents: PDF(45 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Strategic approach to pharmaceuticals in the environment
2020/03/06
Documents: PDF(46 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Strategic approach to pharmaceuticals in the environment
2020/06/04
Documents: PDF(45 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Strategic approach to pharmaceuticals in the environment
2020/06/04
Documents: PDF(46 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Imminent threat to the rule of law and democracy in Bulgaria
2020/08/14
Documents: PDF(55 KB) DOC(11 KB)
The EU’s responsibility to protect local staff targeted due to their working relations with the EU
2021/09/23
Documents: PDF(51 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Enforcement of revolving door rules by the Commission
2021/10/15
Documents: PDF(53 KB) DOC(10 KB)

Written questions (88)

Chlorpyrifos
2019/08/28
Documents: PDF(44 KB) DOC(18 KB)
E-cigarettes and review of the Tobacco Directive
2019/09/25
Documents: PDF(41 KB) DOC(18 KB)
EU support for the African amendment on dental amalgam
2019/10/09
Documents: PDF(41 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Level of exposure to 5G waves
2019/10/09
Documents: PDF(42 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Removal of non-compliant mobile phones from the European market (PhoneGate)
2019/10/09
Documents: PDF(42 KB) DOC(9 KB)
EU cooperation agreements with the tobacco industry
2019/10/09
Documents: PDF(40 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Emergency Trust Fund in Eritrea project
2019/11/04
Documents: PDF(43 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Human rights situation in Eritrea
2019/11/04
Documents: PDF(39 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Regulation (EU) 2017/745 on medical devices and the shortage of notified bodies in 2020
2019/11/13
Documents: PDF(41 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Making the Nutri-Score food label mandatory: a public health issue
2019/12/20
Documents: PDF(47 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Subject: 5G, International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) and the independence of the Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks (SCENIHR)
2020/01/15
Documents: PDF(44 KB) DOC(11 KB)
Fukushima – proposed release of contaminated water into the Pacific Ocean
2020/01/23
Documents: PDF(42 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Conformity of the traceability system for tobacco products in force in the EU with obligations under the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control
2020/03/11
Documents: PDF(43 KB) DOC(10 KB)
5G, the virus and the immune-repressing effect of long-term exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic waves
2020/04/24
Documents: PDF(62 KB) DOC(11 KB)
Risk assessment and infection prevention measures for children and in educational institutions
2020/05/07
Documents: PDF(40 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Influence of the tobacco industry and political funding in Europe
2020/05/15
Documents: PDF(41 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Ban on advertising targeting children and the young
2020/05/25
Documents: PDF(41 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Invasion of desert locusts in East Africa and COVID-19
2020/05/28
Documents: PDF(40 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Farm to Fork Strategy: exclusion of meat and dairy-related measures from the final roadmap
2020/06/08
Documents: PDF(46 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Food fraud, mislabelling and modification of food in the EU
2020/06/10
Documents: PDF(43 KB) DOC(9 KB)
The World Wide Fund for Nature and protection of indigenous peoples
2020/06/15
Documents: PDF(40 KB) DOC(9 KB)
BBI and its industrial bioeconomy factories - a threat to the climate and biodiversity
2020/06/16
Documents: PDF(40 KB) DOC(9 KB)
The EU Biodiversity Strategy for 2030 and protection of indigenous peoples
2020/06/16
Documents: PDF(41 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Green Deal compatibility criteria for Projects of Common Interest
2020/06/18
Documents: PDF(49 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Budget allocation for development projects in Eritrea
2020/06/24
Documents: PDF(41 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Internal procurement for Eritrea road project
2020/06/24
Documents: PDF(40 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Transparency of clinical data for the EU strategy on COVID-19 vaccines
2020/06/29
Documents: PDF(41 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Ethics and safety of GMO and non-GMO vaccines against COVID-19
2020/07/01
Documents: PDF(42 KB) DOC(10 KB)
The future of the Instrument for Nuclear Safety Cooperation
2020/08/04
Documents: PDF(39 KB) DOC(9 KB)
EU funding for the promotion of nuclear power in Africa endangering a World Heritage Site
2020/08/28
Documents: PDF(43 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Mass arrest of LGBTI activists in Poland
2020/09/01
Documents: PDF(58 KB) DOC(11 KB)
5G and health risk of EMF: Commission is deliberately confusing SCENIHR and SCHEER opinions
2020/09/24
Documents: PDF(51 KB) DOC(11 KB)
CETA and hormone-treated beef: ‘failures’ in checking Canadian beef imports to Europe
2020/09/24
Documents: PDF(45 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Position of EMA and Commission regarding the non-compliant placebo in AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials
2020/09/25
Documents: PDF(44 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Prosecution of NGOs in Greece
2020/10/07
Documents: PDF(49 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Energy Charter Treaty renegotiation: the EU’s position regarding fossil fuels protection, the Investor-State Dispute Settlement mechanism and public information
2020/10/12
Documents: PDF(51 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Support for the proposed waiver on some sections of the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights to facilitate the prevention, containment and treatment of COVID‑19
2020/10/13
Documents: PDF(46 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Efficacy of remdesivir and transparency with regard to the conditions of the recent Joint Procurement Agreement
2020/10/23
Documents: PDF(43 KB) DOC(9 KB)
French compliance with the Natura 2000 directives
2020/11/04
Documents: PDF(45 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Health issues of people living next to large-scale animal farms
2020/11/04
Documents: PDF(44 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Lack of human resources at the EMA for the rapid evaluation of COVID-19 vaccines and therapeutics
2020/11/12
Documents: PDF(45 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Criteria and minimum efficacy levels for evaluating COVID-19 vaccines
2020/11/19
Documents: PDF(54 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Transparency of contracts for COVID-19 vaccines
2020/12/04
Documents: PDF(53 KB) DOC(11 KB)
Suspension of budgetary aid to Ethiopia
2020/12/17
Documents: PDF(39 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Decision of the European Ombudsman regarding the Commission’s decision to award a contract to BlackRock for a study on integrating environmental, social and governance (ESG) objectives into EU banking rules
2020/12/18
Documents: PDF(50 KB) DOC(11 KB)
Cross-border EIA procedure in connection with the extended operation of nuclear reactors in the EU
2020/12/23
Documents: PDF(52 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Bias in EFSA’s toxicological assessment of aspartame
2021/01/12
Documents: PDF(44 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Lack of mandatory labelling of technical enzymes in food processing
2021/02/19
Documents: PDF(47 KB) DOC(10 KB)
The contribution of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project to climate action
2021/03/25
Documents: PDF(46 KB) DOC(10 KB)
AstraZeneca vaccine production and black market in vaccines
2021/03/30
Documents: PDF(51 KB) DOC(11 KB)
Maximum amplification cycle threshold recommended by the ECDC for RT-PCR tests to detect SARS-CoV-2
2021/04/01
Documents: PDF(40 KB) DOC(9 KB)
New data requested for authorisation of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine in the US and Switzerland
2021/04/01
Documents: PDF(42 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Earthquake risk in connection with the Paks II nuclear plant
2021/04/28
Documents: PDF(45 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Information for consumers about the presence of ingredients, additives and pesticide residues in alcoholic beverages
2021/05/12
Documents: PDF(40 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Pesticide residue from veterinary medicine and the new Transparency Regulation
2021/05/12
Documents: PDF(43 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Costs of nuclear power stations and risks for the energy systems reliant on them
2021/05/19
Documents: PDF(50 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Safety of nuclear power installations
2021/05/19
Documents: PDF(48 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Ending the export of banned pesticides: concrete actions
2021/06/03
Documents: PDF(48 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Promotion of nature‑based solutions in the EU: what are the consequences for developing countries?
2021/06/08
Documents: PDF(42 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Investigation into the contamination of Moderna COVID-19 vaccine doses in Japan
2021/09/08
Documents: PDF(42 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Renewal of the conditional marketing authorisation for the four COVID-19 vaccines evaluated by the EMA
2021/10/14
Documents: PDF(42 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) and the Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Regulation
2021/10/19
Documents: PDF(39 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs)
2021/10/19
Documents: PDF(40 KB) DOC(9 KB)
New Implementing Protocol to the EU-Gabon Fisheries Partnership (2021-2026): concerns for marine ecosystems and coastal communities in Gabon
2021/11/03
Documents: PDF(47 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Environmental risk assessments of investigational medicinal genetically modified organism products intended to treat or prevent COVID‑19
2021/11/12
Documents: PDF(43 KB) DOC(9 KB)
The application of Regulation 536/2014 to COVID-19 vaccines
2021/12/07
Documents: PDF(42 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Failure to carry out a transboundary environmental impact assessment of the extension of the life of the Tricastin nuclear power station
2021/12/14
Documents: PDF(46 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Extra/booster doses of mRNA vaccines and risk of autoimmune reactions
2021/12/16
Documents: PDF(43 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Health check on the EUTR, FLEGT and VPAs
2022/01/05
Documents: PDF(38 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Assessment of the long-term carcinogenicity and toxicity of plant protection products
2022/01/06
Documents: PDF(45 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Extending the conditional marketing authorisation for the Comirnaty vaccine to children aged 5 to 11 – compatibility with European regulations
2022/01/10
Documents: PDF(40 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Shortcomings in cumulative risk assessment for pesticide residues and implementation of a horizontal mixture assessment factor across chemical regulations
2022/01/10
Documents: PDF(39 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Strategy to protect European citizens from the cumulative effects and cocktail effects of pesticides
2022/01/10
Documents: PDF(39 KB) DOC(9 KB)
COVID-19 vaccines – application of the rules on informed consent laid down in Regulation (EU) No 536/2014
2022/02/01
Documents: PDF(40 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Mobilising the EU budget to purchase 200 million vaccine doses for donations (Draft amending budget No 6/2021)
2022/02/24
Documents: PDF(41 KB) DOC(10 KB)
France adding cholecalciferol (vitamin D) to the list of substances of very high concern as an endocrine disruptor
2022/03/03
Documents: PDF(43 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Availability and sufficiency of data on co-formulants in pesticide formulations
2022/03/04
Documents: PDF(42 KB) DOC(10 KB)
The truthfulness and relevance of the ‘zero toxic substances by 2030’ objective
2022/03/15
Documents: PDF(63 KB) DOC(11 KB)
The EU taxonomy and lack of transparency
2022/03/17
Documents: PDF(43 KB) DOC(9 KB)
The European Climate, Infrastructure and Environment Executive Agency’s refusal to grant full public access to a document related to the Lyon‑Turin base tunnel project, notably the grant agreement
2022/03/28
Documents: PDF(44 KB) DOC(10 KB)
McKinsey assignments for the Commission in 2020 and 2021
2022/04/21
Documents: PDF(40 KB) DOC(9 KB)
The illegal fishing activities of China’s fleet in foreign countries: the role of EU sustainable fisheries partnership agreements in ensuring transparency and a level playing field
2022/05/17
Documents: PDF(48 KB) DOC(10 KB)
COVID-19 vaccination status of children diagnosed with hepatitis of unknown aetiology
2022/05/19
Documents: PDF(42 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Renewable hydrogen – an added value for partner countries?
2022/05/20
Documents: PDF(43 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Inclusion of detailed rules on fish transport in the upcoming review of Council Regulation (EC) No 1/2005
2022/06/30
Documents: PDF(49 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Monitoring 20 000 children aged under 12 vaccinated against COVID-19 in France in 2020 and 2021
2022/07/06
Documents: PDF(57 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Human rights violations against Maasai communities living in the Loliondo division of Ngorongoro district in Tanzania
2022/07/06
Documents: PDF(48 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Renegotiation of COVID-19 vaccine contracts
2022/09/21
Documents: PDF(42 KB) DOC(10 KB)

Individual motions (2)

MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on banning the production of tea bags containing plastic
2020/12/15
Documents: PDF(136 KB) DOC(43 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the review of the Financial Regulation and the Commission’s guidelines on public procurement for policy-related service contracts
2021/06/04
Documents: PDF(134 KB) DOC(45 KB)

Amendments (3296)

Amendment 1 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Recalls the EU’s responsibility in the protection, restoration and resilience of the world’s forests, which should prioritise proforestation in forest management as a strategy for increasing carbon sequestration and biodiversity benefits, including as part of its external dimension, proforestation in forest management to increase carbon sequestration and biodiversity benefits; notes that sustainable forest management can play a key role in climate protection through a variety of measures and best practices; recalls that forests’ carbon dioxide storage capacities will make it possible to move towards carbon neutrality; underlines the importance, in this connection, of increasing tree cover, restoring damaged ecosystems and regenerating soils, including through reforestation, afforestation and resilience- building programmes based on clear ecological principles, while pursuing the achievement of the 2030 Agenda;
2022/06/14
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 2 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph -1 (new)
-1. Whereas forests have been cleared and degraded at an accelerating rate in recent decades mainly due to agricultural expansion, illegal or unsustainable logging and other activities like mining;
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 2 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. Recognises the key role of forests in protecting the climate and biodiversity; highlights that forests contribute to efforts to mitigate and adapt to the negative impacts of climate change such as extreme weather phenomena, including flooding, droughts, storms, soil erosion, heat waves and fires; recalls, in this regard, recalls that sustainable forest management can also ensure the protection of coastal areas and communities; stresses that forests provide a wide range of ecosystem services beyond carbon sequestration, such as the natural filtration of water; recalls the negative impacts of global warming on ecosystems and the migration of species due to climate change, which require specific monitoring and surveillance;
2022/06/14
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 3 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph -1 a (new)
-1 a. Whereas this deforestation has caused a massive loss of biodiversity due to the destruction of habitats, exacerbated climate change, with the release of vast amounts of carbon into the atmosphere, and increased risk of outbreaks of new viral diseases;
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 3 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Recognises the multifunctional role of forests, which encompasses a wide range of environmental, climate-related and socioeconomic activities, such as the conservation of biodiversity and the provision of renewable raw materials, helping to create jobs and boost economic growth in rural areas; stresses that policies that enhance the protection and restoration of biodiversity will help tackle climate change; calls on the EU tofor sustainable forest management in the implementation of climate goals, as it is key to reducing deforestation and forest degradation; notes that the EU forest strategy aims to boost the entire sustainable forest bioeconomy working in synergy with the EU’s increased climate and biodiversity ambitions; calls for the EU to help make forest more resilient by addressing the challenges and trade-offs resulting from the increasing demand for wood for materials, energy and the bioeconomy and the related rising risks of embodied deforestation imports, land grabbing, illegal logging and violation of indigenous peoples’ and local communities’ rights; is alarmed at Interpol's finding that forestry crimes, which are often perpetrated in conjunction with other crimes such as tax evasion, corruption, document fraud and money laundering, are the most lucrative of all environmental crimes; asks the Commission and the Member States to maintain their commitment to fighting illegal logging and the trade in illegal timber and forest-risk commodities;
2022/06/14
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 4 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph -1 b (new)
-1 b. Whereas large-scale deforestation for agriculture, mining and infrastructure development is causing severe human rights violations with devastating impacts on forest peoples, such as land grab, forced evictions, police harassment, arbitrary arrest, and criminalisation of community leaders, human rights defenders and activists;
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 4 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Stresses that EU bioenergy policy, notably the Renewable Energy Directive, must meet strict environmental and social criteria, reflecting the need to ensure effective recognition of and respect for customary land tenure rights of forest- dependent communities and of indigenous people, in accordance with international standards such as the International Labour Organisation Convention (No 169) on Indigenous and Tribal Peoples and the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation's Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Land Tenure and Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems; calls on the Commission to specifically address the human rights of indigenous peoples and local communities through voluntary partnership agreements in the area of forest law enforcement, governance and trade; recalls that indigenous peoples, local communities, small holder farmers and women are heavily reliant on their own indispensable knowledge of forests; stresses that preserving natural resources is not just a matter of protecting biodiversity, but also a question of social justice as part of a broader vision for an ecological restoration; stresses, furthermore, that priority should be given to developing knowledge on forestry and forest protection, including knowledge transfer;
2022/06/14
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 5 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph -1 c (new)
-1 c. Whereas the Renewable Energy Directive incentives the uses of biomass for energy purposes, including wood biomass;
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 5 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Calls on the Union and its Member StatesNotes the Commission's proposals for additional, more stringent sustainability criteria for bioenergy as part of the revision of the Renewable Energy Directive; recalls, however, that wood-based bioenergy is currently the main source of renewable energy for the EU, accounting for 60 % of it's renewable energy use, while compliance with the sustainable forest management criteria under the recast Renewable Energy Directive relies on the existence of national forest legislation or on management systems in the actual sourcing area; expresses concern, in this connection, about the environmental impact of increasing biomass imports, as they may increase deforestation abroad; insists that the wood-based bioeconomy should remain within the limits of sustainability and be compatible with the EU’s 2030 and 2050 climate targets and biodiversity objectives; calls for the EU and its Member States to use forest biomass in a sustainable manner and to exclude the burning forest biomass from any renewable energy targets; of primary woody biomass from any renewable energy targets or eligibility for public incentives; calls for the EU, moreover, to consider providing support to third countries which have the potential to switch to renewable energy sources other than wood, thereby reducing the pressure on deforestation caused by the use of wood as a fuel, and urges that action be taken to increase forest cover and other wooded land where relevant; stresses the need to apply the cascading principle to woody biomass and to respect the circular economy principles;
2022/06/14
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 6 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph -1 d (new)
-1 d. Whereas a recent Commission Report[1] on “The use of woody biomass for energy production in the EU” shows an increasing overall use of woody biomass in the EU in the past two decades (around 20% increase since 2000), which may be additionally impacted by the increased renewable energy target; [1] JRC Report “The use of woody biomass for energy production in the EU”, 2021.
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 6 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Recalls that the sustainability chapters of trade agreements must contain binding and enforceable forest-specific, human rights and responsible business conduct provisions; iterates that the EU's trade policy should be consistent with,and contribute to its international environmental commitments; highlights the strategic importance of robust, coherent and enforceable sustainability chapters in trade agreements, together with the effective implementation of multilateral environmental and climate agreements; calls for standards and certification schemes to be reinforced in line with World Trade Organisation rules; reiterates its call for binding and enforceable mechanisms for the implementation of trade and sustainable development chapters on social and environmental standards, with specific provisions on forests, human rights and responsible business conduct, including provisions to guarantee the free, prior and informed consent of indigenous peoples and local communities and the recognition of the land tenure rights of forest-dependent communities and indigenous peoples; calls on the Commission to conduct impact assessments on sustainability, with a particular focus on forests, natural ecosystems and human rights, on the basis of reliable data and evaluation methodologies; urges the Commission, moreover, to use anti-corruption chapters in free trade agreements to address deforestation and illegal logging;
2022/06/14
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 7 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph -1 e (new)
-1 e. Whereas harvesting trees to burn wood for bioenergy leads to a reduction in the carbon sinks of forests;
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 7 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Calls for the forestry sector to feature prominently in the 30 % spending target on climate of the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) – Global Europe, including financial or technical assistance for forest-producer partner countries. , with a view to achieving and promoting an integrated approach to the UN Sustainable Development Goals; calls on EU delegations in third countries to promote the exchange of best practices and disseminate European know-how; calls for the EU, in particular, to learn from innovative projects in certain third countries, such as the African-led Great Green Wall Initiative, which aims to restore 100 million hectares of degraded land throughout the Sahel by 2030 and facilitate the development of agro-ecology and regeneration projects; calls for the EU, more broadly, to support partner countries in developing sustainable forest management practices and strategies on the basis of reliable scientific evidence and to prioritise proforestation - allowing biodiverse natural forests to grow - accordingly;
2022/06/14
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 8 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph -1 f (new)
-1 f. Whereas various scientific studies from the IPCC and the Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC) conclude that the burning of most forest biomass produces more greenhouse gas emissions than coal, oil and gas[1]; [1] file:///C:/Users/itrepant/Downloads/jrc- forest-bioenergy-study-2021- final_online%20(2).pdf
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 9 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph -1 g (new)
-1 g. Whereas according to INTERPOL, the illegal timber industry accounts for up to 90% of tropical deforestation in some countries and attracts the world’s biggest organized crime groups;
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 18 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. Deplores that despite international commitments from governments and pledges from industry, forest destruction has continued on a large scale; welcomes, as a first step, the Commission proposal of Regulation on deforestation free- products; highlights its potential to trigger a paradigm shift that will minimise the EU’s contribution to forest and ecosystem destruction within and outside the borders, as well as the human rights abuses often associated with it, through the enactment of sustainability requirements and the application of due diligence obligation to all operators; takes the view that similar obligations for investors and banks should be taken to prevent and deter investments targeting activities linked to deforestation;
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 19 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 b (new)
1 b. Recalls that human rights, in particular rights of Indigenous People and local communities and land tenure rights are highly impacted by deforestation and ecosystem conversion; accordingly, believes that the EU regulation on deforestation-free products should i.e. i) explicitly require operators to ensure the respect and the observance of customary law and tenure rights, notably the Convention 169 of the International Labour Organisation, the UN Declaration on the rights of indigenous people and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Peasants and Other People Working in Rural Areas; ii) guarantee effective participation of all affected right holders and ensure that Free, Prior and Informed Consent of Indigenous Peoples, and other collective customary rights-holders, is obtained; more broadly, calls for the respect of international human rights law as a requirement to place products on the EU market;
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 20 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 c (new)
1 c. Recalls that stabilising global warming implies to put an end to deforestation and conversion of natural ecosystems; stresses the need to ensure that all commodities and products whose production has a detrimental impact on forests and other natural carbon-rich ecosystems threatened by EU consumption are included in the scope of the EU regulation on deforestation-free products; in addition, calls for the extension of its scope to include rubber, maize and livestock; recalls that the Regulation must provide a strong enforcement framework, with effective, dissuasive and proportionate penalties; ensure civil liability and access to justice;
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 21 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 d (new)
1 d. Recalls the commitment taken by the EU and China in September 2021 to “engage collaboratively in support of reducing global deforestation through enhancing cooperation in conservation and sustainable management of forests, making supply chain more sustainable, and combating illegal logging and associated trade[1]”;urges the EU and its Member States to take concrete actions to encourage China and third countries to adopt similar regulation on deforestation- free products; [1] https://ec.europa.eu/clima/news-your- voice/news/joint-press-communique- following-second-eu-china-high-level- environment-and-climate-dialogue-2021- 10-10_fr
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 25 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Recognises the multifunctional role of forests; stresses that policies that enhance biodiversity will help tackle climate change; notes that the EU Forest Strategy aims to boost the entire sustainable forest bioeconomy that works in synergy with the EU’s increased climate and biodiversity ambition; calls on the EU to address the challenges and trade- offs resulting from the increasing demand for wood for materials, energy and the bioeconomy and the related rising risks of embodied deforestation imports, land grabbing, illegal logging and violation of indigenous peoples’ and local communities’ rights;
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 35 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Stresses that EU bioenergy policy, notably the Renewable Energy Directive, must meet strict environmental and social criteria, excluding primary woody biomass as an eligible fuel to public incentives and reflecting the need to ensure effective recognition of and respect for customary land tenure rights of forest- dependent communities and of indigenous people, in line with international tenure rights standards (notably ILO Convention No 169 and FAO Voluntary Guidelines on Land Tenures and Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems);
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 42 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Calls on the Union and its Member States to exclude burning forest biomass from any renewable energy targetRecalls that wood based bioenergy is currently the main source of renewable energy, supplying 60% of EU’s renewable energy use; recalls that the compliance with the REDII criteria for sustainable forest management relies on the existence of national forest legislation or on management systems at the level of the sourcing area; against this background, is worried about the environmental impact of increasing imports of biomass triggering deforestation abroad; insists that wood-based bioeconomy should remain within the boundaries of sustainability and be compatible with the EU’s 2030 and 2050 climate targets and biodiversity objectives; Calls on the Union and its Member States to exclude burning forest biomass from any renewable energy targets; more broadly, stresses the need to apply the cascading principle for wood biomass and to respect the circular economy principles;
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 47 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. Is alarmed that according to INTERPOL, forestry crimes, which are often perpetrated in connection with other crimes such as tax evasion, corruption, document fraud and money laundering, is the most lucrative of environmental crimes;
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 48 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 b (new)
4 b. Recalls that illegal logging is responsible for deforestation, habitat loss, species extinction, and contributes to global warming;
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 49 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 c (new)
4 c. Calls on the EU and its Member States to strengthen the share of ODA to governance and judicial sector reform to combat and prevent environmental crime, notably forestry crimes, especially in LDCs;
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 50 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 d (new)
4 d. Urges the EU to make the fight against environmental crime an overriding strategic political priority in international judicial cooperation and at COP meetings, including through the promotion of the enlargement of the scope of the International Criminal Court to cover criminal acts that amount to ecocide;
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 51 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 e (new)
4 e. While poor forest governance lead to illegal logging, reiterates its support to FLEGT Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs), as an important tool to address the root causes of illegality, which include corruption, a lack of clarity over land rights, and the excessive influence of the timber industry over forest policies and legislation; calls on the EU to step up forest diplomacy, through FLEGT and Forest partnerships for forest protection and restoration, which uphold international human rights law, notably the rights of Indigenous Peoples and local communities with customary tenure systems;
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 52 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 f (new)
4 f. Reiterates that the EU trade policy should be consistent with, and contributes to, its international environmental commitments; calls on the Commission to ensure that the impact of trade on the state of forests, natural ecosystems and human rights is systematically evaluated in the framework of sustainability impact assessments; urges the Commission to use FTA anti-corruption chapters to address deforestation and illegal logging;
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 62 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Recalls that the sustainability chapters of trade agreements must contain binding and enforceable forest-specific, human rights, anti-corruption and responsible business conduct provisions, including provisions to guarantee Free, Prior and Informed consent of Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities and the recognition of land tenure rights of forest-dependent communities and of indigenous people;
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 69 #

2022/2016(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Calls for the forestry sector to feature prominently in the 30 % spending target on climate of the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) – Global Europe, including financial or technical assistance for forest-producer partner countries.; in particular, calls on the EU to support partner countries in developing sustainable forest management practices and strategies based on scientific evidence and to prioritise accordingly proforestation (allow the biodiverse natural forests to grow), which brings more immediate benefits to address the dual global crises of climate change and biodiversity loss than a strategy based on afforestation (planting new forests) or reforestation;
2022/04/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 13 #

2022/0142M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Recalls that sustainable and inclusive forest management and governance is essential to achieve the objectives set in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Paris Agreement; recalls the importance of mining as a major driver of tropical deforestation, resulting in substantial soil erosion and contamination, increased forest fragmentation and mercury pollution of rivers and streams; calls on the government of Guyana to take further steps in curbing illegal mining; underlines the risks posed by Guyana’s expanding oil, gas and mining industries; notes with concern the lack of coherence between regulation in the forest sector and that in the mining sector;
2022/09/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 15 #

2022/0142M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Recalls that sustainable and inclusive forest management and governance is essential to achieve the objectives set in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Paris Agreement, notably through the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs); underlines the risks posed by Guyana’s expanding oil, gas and mining industries; notes with concern the lack of coherence between regulation in the forest sector and that in the mining sector;
2022/09/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 18 #

2022/0142M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3a. Insists upon the full implementation of the principles of free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) of Indigenous People and Local Communities, notably in the context of mining; recalls that it shall be obtained as a condition of the purchase or the use of customary forest lands, in compliance with international human rights laws, namely the ILO Convention N°169 on Indigenous and Tribal Peoples and the standards set out in the FAO Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests;
2022/09/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 23 #

2022/0142M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Stresses that the success of the entire FLEGT initiative depends on, among other things, guaranteeing full recognition of the customary rights of local communities and indigenous people, notably Amerindian communities, protecting environmental human right defenders and whistle-blowers, and improving the capacity of small and medium-sized enterprises to conduct their activities legally; stresses that the EU should learn from inspirational projects on sustainable forest management from indigenous and other communities that have ancestral knowledge on forests;
2022/09/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 26 #

2022/0142M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5a. Reiterates its call on the Union to comply with the principle of policy coherence for development and to ensure consistency between its development, trade, agriculture, energy and climate policies;
2022/09/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 3 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Notes with deep concern that according to UNESCO, Covid-19 has wiped out 20 years of education gains; notes that the lack of adequate national regulations and strategies, as well as the lack of trained professionals, of the necessary infrastructure and of proper equipment and facilities, are barriers to quality education in several developing countries;
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 17 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. Is alarmed that according to the joint World Bank – UNESCO report, Education Finance Watch (EFW) of April 2021, two-thirds of low- and lower- middle-income countries have cut their public education budgets since the onset of the pandemic, at a time when they can least afford to;
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 25 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Emphasises that the COVID-19 pandemic has amplified the existing vulnerabilities in social services in Africa, in particular in the field of education; reiterates that education should be a key pillar of the Africa-EU partnership;
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 35 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. Notes with concern that according to the World Health Organisation and UNICEF, 2 out of 5 children without a basic drinking water service at school lived in Sub-Saharan Africa in 2019; stresses that access to water is intrinsically linked to health and education; accordingly, emphasises the importance of providing basic water, sanitation and waste management facilities in schools; to this effect, calls on the EU to step up its technical and financial support;
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 37 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 b (new)
4b. Highlights the findings of Human Rights Watch on the Impact of Covid-19 on Children’s Education in Africa (2020)1, which states that children learned less through distance education, and that schools closures exacerbated existing inequalities, notably for girls, who were disproportionally negatively more affected; 1https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/08/26/im pact-covid-19-childrens-education-africa
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 47 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5a. Stresses that governments should provide remedial education for children who were unable to follow distance education, particularly for children with disabilities, children living in poverty, refugee and migrant children, children who work, children in rural areas, paying particular attention to girls within these groups;
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 55 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. NRecalls that governments should ensure that all students have access to free primary and secondary education; but notes that the COVID-19 pandemic has aggravated education funding gaps, adding up to one third to the annual funding gap and reaching USD 200 billion1 ; urges governments to protect their education budgets and ensure public education systems are adequately resourced; __________________ 1 https://en.unesco.org/news/unesco-warns- funding-gap-reach-sdg4-poorer-countries- risks-increasing-us-200-billion-annually
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 62 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. CReminds that according to the UNESCO, there is a need to hire at least 15 million teachers to reach the education-related goals in Sub-Saharan Africa by 2030, in line with the No. 4 of the 2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs); considers that in the context of the recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, particular efforts must be undertaken to invest in well-trained teachers in order to equip children with skills which are relevant to the job market;
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 77 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8
8. CRecalls that current levels of government spending in low- and lower- middle-income countries fall short of the levels required to achieve the SDGs; reminds that external financing is key to support the education opportunities of the world’s poorest; yet some of donor countries have already begun to shift their budget away from aid to domestic priorities; calls on the Commission to establish a road map to provide technicand step up its technical and financial assistance in the education sector, together with Member States, to developing partner countries in order to draw up proper national regulations and strategies, and to share best practices in this context;
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 82 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 a (new)
8a. Calls on the EU to support governments of developing countries to ensure that any technology they recommend for online learning protects children’s privacy rights; in particular, stresses that governments and schools should include data privacy clauses in any contracts they sign with technology or “Ed Tech” providers;
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 85 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 9
9. Calls on the Commission to take the absorption capacities of partner countries into account in the context of increased funding for education; emphasises the need to engage with reliable local partners, particularly with local faith-based organisations, in the implementation of education funding.
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 20 #

2021/2208(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 23 c (new)
— having regard to the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) of 13 September 2007 and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Peasants and Other People Working in Rural Areas of 28 September 2018,
2022/04/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 25 #

2021/2208(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 23 a (new)
— having regard to the 2018 United Nations Security Council resolution 2417 condemning the starving of civilians as a method of warfare as well as the unlawful denial of humanitarian access to civilian populations,
2022/04/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 29 #

2021/2208(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 23 b (new)
— having regard to the CFS Voluntary Guidelines on the responsible governance of tenure of land, fisheries and forests in the context of national food security (2012) and the CFS Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems (2015),
2022/04/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 44 #

2021/2208(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G b (new)
Gb. whereas forty percent of wheat and corn exports from Ukraine go to the Middle East and Africa, which already face food insecurity, and whereas further food shortages or price increases could stoke social unrest;
2022/04/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 49 #

2021/2208(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G c (new)
G c. whereas Russia is a leading exporter of synthetic nitrogen fertilisers and its components, and Belarus is a significant exporter of potash-based fertilisers; whereas nitrogen fertiliser prices are heavily dependent on natural gas prices, a product for which Russia holds major market positions; whereas the Farm to Fork Strategy aims to reduce the use of farm inputs and notably to decrease the overall use of chemical pesticides by 50 %, of the most hazardous pesticides by 50 %, and of fertilisers by at least 20 % by 2030;
2022/04/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 51 #

2021/2208(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G a (new)
Ga. whereas according to the FAO, Food Price Index hit high record in February 2022; whereas it states that factors behind food inflation are not limited to crop conditions and export availabilities, but a much bigger push for food price inflation comes from outside food production, particularly the energy, fertilizer and feed sectors;
2022/04/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 70 #

2021/2208(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital K d (new)
Kd. whereas nearly one billion people, largely in developing countries, rely on fish and seafood as their primary source of animal protein; whereas small-scale fisheries account for more than 90% of the world’s capture fishers and fish workers;
2022/04/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 83 #

2021/2208(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E a (new)
Ea. whereas food crises can be provoked by speculation on food commodities, in addition to pressures on food supplies caused by demand for biofuels;
2022/04/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 84 #

2021/2208(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E b (new)
Eb. whereas according to the Sixth IPCC Report of 2022, climate change has reduced food and water security, hindering efforts to meet Sustainable Development Goals;
2022/04/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 88 #

2021/2208(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E c (new)
E c. whereas FAO estimates that about 75 % of plant genetic diversity has been lost worldwide; whereas wide-scale genetic erosion increases our vulnerability to climate change and to the appearance of new pests and diseases;
2022/04/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 89 #

2021/2208(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E d (new)
Ed. whereas biodiversity and its associated services – pollination, predators of pests, increased resilience of agroecosystems to erosion, droughts and flooding, soil formation and carbon sinking – are essential to provide sustainable food production;
2022/04/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 92 #

2021/2208(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E e (new)
Ee. whereas industrial agriculture and breeding are driving habitat loss and are creating conditions for viruses, such as Covid - 19, to emerge and spread;
2022/04/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 100 #

2021/2208(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F
F. whereas the number of people in need of urgent food, nutrition and livelihood assistance is on the rise15 ; whereas the major drivers of this are inequality, conflict, climate variability and climate extremes, environmental degradation, economic shocks, global population growth and failed governance; _________________ 15 Global Report on Food Crises 2021.
2022/04/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 115 #

2021/2208(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G e (new)
Ge. whereas the 1994 Marrakech Agreement and in particular the World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on Agriculture have contributed to the specialisation of agricultural regions; whereas this specialisation has led to regions with high levels of exports and others that are almost fully dependent on imports: whereas this situation is not resilient to crises, such as wars, and is one of the factors contributing to the current global food instability;
2022/04/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 118 #

2021/2208(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G d (new)
Gd. whereas food sovereignty is the right of people and countries to define their own agricultural and food policies; whereas this concept aims at enabling each country to feed its own population and to be self-sufficient and autonomous; whereas the Farm to Fork Strategy’s intention to reduce farmers’ dependency on external outputs is in line with this definition;
2022/04/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 119 #

2021/2208(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G f (new)
Gf. whereas the European Green Deal and the Farm to Fork Strategy adopt holistic approaches on agriculture not only to preventing a climatic and biodiversity crisis in Europe, but also to ensuring food security, improving nutrition and public health; whereas it shall serve as a template for investments in the remit of development finance, with the view to harness resilience and food self-sufficiency of developing countries;
2022/04/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 150 #

2021/2208(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital K a (new)
Ka. whereas family farms represent over 90 per cent of all farms globally, and produce 80 percent of the world's food in value terms;
2022/04/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 164 #

2021/2208(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital K b (new)
Kb. whereas on 20 December 2017, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a project through which it declared 2019- 2028 as the United Nations Decade of Family Farming;
2022/04/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 165 #

2021/2208(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital K c (new)
K c. whereas farmers’ rights were established under the FAO International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture in 2004, but whereas Intellectual Property rules have often worked in contradiction to them, putting local, traditional and indigenous seed systems at risk;
2022/04/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 1 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph -1 (new)
-1. Whereas African economies remain by and large heavily concentrated on natural resources-based products and commodities;
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 4 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Welcomes the positive shiftchange in EU- Africa relations towards a partnership on an equal footing, allowing both sides to pursue their own interests but also to identify common areas of cooperation; stresses that free, fair, and sustainable trade facilitates inclusive economic growth and, sustainable development, and contributes to poverty reduction; highlights, in this regard, highlights the importance of the new pPartnership aAgreement between the EU and the members of the Organisation of African, Caribbean and Pacific States, the upcoming summitneed to ensure coherence between theits African Union and the EU, and Protocol and the upcoming AU-EU Summit, as well as innovative initiatives such as the EU mMulti- stakeholder dDialogue for sSustainable cocoaCocoa; in this respect, calls on the EU to actively support policies to develop cocoa processing at the local, national and regional level;
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 10 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. Recalls that the Covid-19 pandemic highlighted the vulnerability of the global supply chain, while giving a new impetus to the need to build regional markets in Africa, fostering intra-African trade, investment and value chains, for greater economic autonomy of the continent;
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 16 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Calls on the EU to actively support the new African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA), which presents a major opportunity for African countries to boost inclusive growth, enable sustainable development, and reduce poverty and improve living standards; notes that the AfCFTA pavrovides the way for aability to fundamentally transformation of the continent’s development prospects; takes the view that EU support to the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) be parallel to the development of regulative frameworks, to prevent a “race to the bottom” of social and environmental norms resulting from the removal of trade barriers;
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 22 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Recalls the statement of the UN Economic Commission for Africa indicating that it believes the economic partnership agreements between the EU and African countries could have negative consequences for intra-African trade; points out that none of the EPAs in place today correspond to the existing 8 Regional Economic Communities (RECs) in Africa, thereby undermining their integration dynamics; stresses that a partnership of equals entails to take into account the concerns of African countries in terms of economic diversification, industrialisation, loss of government revenues and regional integration;
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 26 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 b (new)
2 b. Urges the EU to acknowledge diverging views on EPAs, to find concrete solutions to respond to African countries concerns and to refrain from launching or broadening EPA negotiations, including through the “rendez-vous” clauses unless ACP countries proactively make such demand; more broadly, reiterates its request to have an in-depth analysis on the impact of EPAs, and its compliance with the SDGs and the principle of Policy Coherence for Development;
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 30 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Emphasises that eEconomic pPartnership aAgreements (EPAs) need to support the various regional trade communities in Africa and the further development of the AfCFTA, and contribute to the building of resilient, and sustainable local and regional value chains, and help to boosting and diversifying intra- African trade; calls for chapters ensuring consistunderlines that the interim EPAs do not have a specific trade and sustainable development chapter; and accordingly, calls for the systematic and consistent inclusion and implementation of Trade and Sustainable Development chapters on human rights, labour and environmental standards in all currently negotiated and future EPAs, ensuring coherencye with development needs and policies and the UN sustainable development goals to always be included and implSDGs, especially with regard to their impact on deforestation, climate change and biodiversity loss and the ILO Decent work agenda; in addition, stresses the importance of including the objective of combating forced labour and child labour in TSD chapters of Union trade agreementeds;
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 42 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Welcomes the reform of the EU Generalised Scheme of Preferences (GSP) as one of the EU’s key trade instruments for supporting developing countries in their efforts to promote sustainable development and economic diversification, reduce poverty and ensure respect for human rights; welcomes, in particular, the aim to facilitate increased economic growth and job creation in developing countries on the African continent; stresses that enhanced social and environmental conditionality to benefit from preferential trade preferences should be embedded into the technical and financial assistance projects under the NDICI-Global Europe instrument. targeting notably those benefiting from the special arrangements given their vulnerability and lack of economic diversification; calls on the EU to make sure that European tTrade policy does not contradict efforts byfrom African partners to establish viable economic structures.; calls, accordingly, for the removal of the provisions in the GSP Regulation which are linked to EU interests only, namely those conditionalities linked to migration and access to raw materials; recalls that the GSP regime should support the regional integration process of the African continent;
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 53 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. Recalls that the Addis Ababa Action Agenda (AAAA) on financing for development highlighted the need to mobilise more domestic resources for achieving SDGs; recalls that one of the main objectives for African countries is to climb up the global value chain through economic diversification; but recalls that commodity dependence remains one of the main development challenges for poorer African economies, which failed by and large to diversify their export;
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 55 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 b (new)
4 b. Recalls that the EU request to ban export taxes on raw materials has been a long-lasting stumbling block in the negotiation process on EPAs; stresses that for those economies which almost exclusively base its revenues on the exploitation of natural resources, prohibition of such taxes may lock them in aid dependency, while hampering their economic diversification; stresses the right of African countries to regulate raw materials in their public interest and calls on the EU to refrain from adopting a trade policy that, as a general rule, prohibits African countries from levying export taxes on raw materials, insofar as it is WTO-compatible;
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 58 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 c (new)
4 c. Stresses the key role attributed to the EU External Investment Plan (EIP), and notably the European Fund for Sustainable Development as its first pillar, for shaping EU trade and investment policy towards Africa, in parallel with the EPAs; recalls its emphasis put on improving the investment climate in partner countries; stresses that the EU’s commitment to boost private sector investment for achieving the SDGs shall be tantamount to the definition of mandatory human rights, social rights and environmental due diligence obligations, based on the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human rights, which shall apply to the whole value chain and include provisions on access to justice;
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 62 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 d (new)
4 d. Urges the EU to better anchor its trade and investment engagement with Africa on African priorities and initiatives, notably the AU’s Agenda 2063 and the African Continental Free Trade Agreement, and supporting African institutions and trade stakeholders; more broadly, calls on the EU to fully commit to the principle of Policy Coherence for Development, especially in a context where the design of the EU External Investment Plan results in integrating EU aid with EU trade interests and private sector promotion to support geostrategic ambitions;
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 65 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 e (new)
4 e. Warns against developing a double standard policy regarding the rights and obligations of corporations in investment and trade treaties;notes with deep concern that international investment agreements (IIA) usually include the Investor-State Dispute Settlement mechanism (ISDS), which triggered off an unprecedented boom of claims against African countries between 2013 and 2018, with European investors initiating the majority of the lawsuits[1]; [1] “ISDS in numbers. Impacts of Investment Arbitration against African States”, Transnational Institute (October 2019)
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 68 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 f (new)
4 f. Stresses the need to shift the focus away from a system that prioritizes investor protection to one that emphasizes the advancement of national and global development goals through sustainable investment;
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 70 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 g (new)
4 g. Urges the EU to review its investment treaties, to ensure a fair balance between rights and obligations for investors to respect human rights, the environment, and refrain from illegal action, such as corruption and fraud; stresses the need to include obligations on home states to support sustainable investment and allow victims to seek justice in the home state of the investor;
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 72 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 h (new)
4 h. Calls on the Commission to promote sustainable investments to advance towards a carbon-free economy, in line with its pledge in the Glasgow Climate Pact, while ensuring a responsible and sustainable sourcing and management of natural resources and raw materials, as well as sustainable waste management in line with its Green Deal objectives;
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 73 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 i (new)
4 i. Encourages African countries, at a time when UNICA reports that many of the investments treaties concluded in the 1990s-early 2000s have recently expired or are about to expire, to review and reform its investment and double taxation treaties according to their development needs; to this effect, believes that the African Continental Free Trade Area and the ongoing regional integration efforts provide a good opportunity to rebalance the international investment regime so that it becomes responsible, equitable and conducive to sustainable development;
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 76 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 j (new)
4 j. Underlines that the disruptions triggered by COVID-19 have shone a spotlight on the vulnerabilities of the global food system; urges the Commission to develop a strategy to gradually shift away from trade-oriented agricultural policies to local and regional markets, which hold major potential to address current food system failures;
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 77 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 k (new)
4 k. Is worried about the high dependence of African states on food imports from the EU, particularly subsidised products that represent harmful competition for small-scale local agriculture; calls on the EU to ensure that its trade and investment policy respects inter alia the 2018 UN Declaration on the Rights of Peasants and Other People Working in Rural Areas; the FAO Voluntary Guidelines of Tenure, Land and Forests and for Securing Sustainable Small Scale Fisheries, the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and Free, Prior and Informed Consent, as set out in the ILO Convention 169;
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 79 #

2021/2178(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 l (new)
4 l. Underlines the trade-related impact of the digitisation of economic activities and its associated trade-in- services dynamics; reminds that African countries need to preserve and expand their policy space to undertake digital industrialisation; urges the EU to take on board African priorities and to refrain from negotiating digital clauses in investment agreements that would restrict their ability to regulate, redistribute the profits, improve their public services or hinder their local technological development strategy;
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 6 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 14 a (new)
— having regard to the UNSC Resolution 2286 on the protection of medical missions,
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 19 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated existing fragilities and inequalities, amplified humanitarian needs – notably a sharp increase in hunger and lack of food supply, with almost 300 million people at risk of becoming acutely food insecure and over 40 million facing emergency levels of food insecurity – and hampered the humanitarian response owing to border closures and other restrictions such as those attempted by parties to armed conflicts;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 21 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B a (new)
Ba. whereas in 2018, approximately 108 million people required international humanitarian assistance as a result of storms, floods, droughts and wildfires, whereas by 2050, over 200 million people could need humanitarian assistance every year as a result of climate-related disasters and the socioeconomic impact of climate change;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 22 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B b (new)
Bb. whereas women and girls are the hardest hit by emergencies. whereas adolescent girls in conflict zones are 90% more likely to be out of school, 70 % of women in humanitarian settings are more likely to experience Gender-Based Violence and as women represent more than 70% of people facing chronic hunger;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 25 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C
C. whereas the EU Humanitarian Air Bridge, which was set up in response to the transport constraints caused by the pandemic, has greatly helped to plug critical gaps in the humanitarian response by facilitating the transport of aid, emergency assistance and humanitarian staff;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 39 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G
G. whereas this funding gap makes it imperative to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the humanitarian system and to ensure that more countries contribute to the humanitarian effort so that aid meets the needs of the populations affected, as highlighted most recently by Grand Bargain 2.0, which focuses on localisation and quality financing as key enabling priorities;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 49 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital H a (new)
Ha. whereas the Commission proposes to launch a pilot project on blending to significantly increase the resource base for humanitarian action and thus calls for further involvement of the private sector;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 52 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital H b (new)
Hb. whereas consortium organisation is encouraged by donors in development cooperation and humanitarian aid; whereas, compared to other modalities, it is characterised by an often larger scale of objectives and means made available;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 56 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I
I. whereas addressing humanitarian crises requires not only more funding but also decisive political efforts to reduce needs by preventing and ending conflicts, countering climate change protecting basic human rights, promoting sustainable development and reducing risks and vulnerabilities;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 61 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I a (new)
Ia. whereas attacks against humanitarian personnel have dramatically increased in recent years;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 65 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Welcomes the Commission communication on the EU’s humanitarian action: new challenges, same principles and its concrete proposals to improve the provision of humanitarian aid, and calls for the swift implementation of these proposals in close consultation and cooperation with humanitarian partners – especially NGOs and frontline responders; reiterates that in accordance with the European Consensus, the EU’s humanitarian aid must always be provided solely on the basis of need, must be fully in line with the humanitarian principles of humanity, neutrality, impartiality and independence, and must pay particular attention to vulnerable groups;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 77 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. Calls for the EU to provide a robust annual budget for EU humanitarian aid to guarantee timely, predictable and flexible funding for humanitarian aid from the start of each financial year and to keep a ring-fenced envelope within the Solidarity and Emergency Aid Reserve (SEAR) for humanitarian crises outside the Union and maintaining the existing capacity to rapidly mobilise additional funds in the case of emerging, escalating or sudden onset emergencies;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 79 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2 b (new)
2b. Calls for an expansion of the circle of donor countries which contribute to humanitarian aid on a voluntary basis, to include the 100 countries that the World Bank identifies as high-income and richest countries in the world amounting to a gross national income (GNI) of $80 trillion in 2018; underlines that a contribution of these countries counting for 0.03% of their GNI should be compulsory and would allow to raise the $30 billion needed to address international humanitarian crises; stresses that the involvement of new countries would not only solve the question of the volume of aid, but contribute to depoliticising humanitarian aid and making it less exposed to divisions between major state powers as was the case over funding for the WHO during the Covid-19 crisis;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 80 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2 c (new)
2c. Calls on modalities for the distribution of the financial envelope for humanitarian aid to be entrusted to an independent body that is non-aligned in conflicts, in particular with regard to the members of the UN Security Council, and composed of representatives of the United Nations, the ICRC and international NGOs;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 82 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Is alarmed at the growing number of serious violations of international humanitarian law and calls for the establishment of an EU coordination mechanism in order to develop an EU coherent approach towards international humanitarian law, as well as monitor violations and advocate for ensuring that international humanitarian law is respected, including by using the relevant political, development aid, trade and economic levers in the EU’s external action;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 85 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3a. Is concerned about the risk of instrumentalisation of humanitarian aid via the EU humanitarian-development- peace nexus approach which may imply that the promotion of humanitarian principles and International Humanitarian Law will not necessarily prevail for humanitarian action but be side-lined by joint-up and coherent action between the 3 axes of the nexus in line with policy objectives set by the EU agenda; in this regard, stresses in particular that humanitarian action must urgently be dissociated from the security or stability agendas;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 89 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to closely monitor, notably through existing mechanisms such as the International Humanitarian Fact Finding Commission, and include international humanitarian law violations as a criterion for listing individuals or entities in the relevant EU sanctions regimes; notes that sanctions and restrictive measures must comply with international humanitarian law and must not hinder the provision of humanitarian assistance; underlines the need to consistently include humanitarian excemptions in regimes of restrictive measures and to provide the necessary support and guidance to partners to apply these excemptions effectively; recalls that protracted crises are still humanitarian contexts, and that a substantial part of ‘nexus funding’ is channelled through development envelopes which cannot provide the same flexibility as humanitarian support in the allocation of funding; calls on the EU and its Member States to envisage concrete solutions for effective allocation of funding for partners operating in these contexts;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 96 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. Given widespread violations of the right to food during conflicts, the recurring use of starvation as a method of warfare, and denial of humanitarian access, calls on the European Commission and the Member States to strengthen international humanitarian law and vigorously prosecute and sanction those who use starvation as a weapon of war;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 100 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. Calls for the EU and its Member States to swiftly fulfil the commitments made at the World Humanitarian Summit and as part of the Grand Bargain; highlights the importance of making humanitarian aid more efficient and effective by increasing multiannual and multi-country fundingflexible funding through unearmarked, softly earmarked, and multi-year funding, and by enhancing harmonisation and simplification of donor proposal and reporting requirements, reducing the administrative burden for humanitarian partners and promoting innovative solutions, among other endeavours;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 106 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5a. Given the concerns over development additionally of blending- guarantee mechanisms as assessed by the European Court of Auditors in the case of EFSD, calls on the Commission and financial institutions, including the EIB, to ensure that all humanitarian operations undertaken through blending are compliant with the external action goals of the EU as defined in Article 21 TEU, including respect and promotion of human rights, eradication of poverty, and the management of environmental risks; calls on the Commission to provide the European Parliament with more information as well as a written assessment on the implementation of the pilot project for blending for humanitarian action, assessing the alignment with external action objectives;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 109 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 b (new)
5b. Insists on the importance to preserve expertise and non interference into the neutrality principle of humanitarian actors; stresses that further engagement with the private sector requires: prior analysis of results achieved so far through this collaboration, and to promote exclusively partnerships which comply with international humanitarian principles, environment, social and human rights standards, and accountability to affected populations;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 110 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 c (new)
5c. Stresses that encouraging consortia is a concern for smaller NGOs which so far are left behind in a process which fits more the capacities of larger organisations; encourages the Commission to report on the advantages and risks of this mode of collaboration on partner country structures, local organisations and small-scale projects, but also for the donor organisations;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 111 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Stresses the particular importance of supporting local actors and urges the Commission to develop a localisation policy outlining how to provide more and better support for local respondents to enable them to make use of all the instruments available; calls on further development of a solid localisation policy, relying further on DG ECHO’s partners’ expertise and experience in strengthening local actors’ capacities as concrete elements for the EU to further implement its Grand Bargain commitments linked to localisation; calls on the Commission to ensure that women’s equal participation and empowerment is integrated explicitly into any new mechanisms to strengthen the role of local actors in humanitarian action;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 119 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6a. Stresses that in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, localisation allows a health response adapted to the context of developing countries in order to avoid, European biases, particularly with regard to containment protocols and prevention campaigns; calls on the prevalence of an eurocentric perspective over emergency situations to be adequately challenged through further localisation of humanitarian action;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 125 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. NotStresses the challenges posed by climate change and welcomes the commitments to further mainstream climate change impacts and environmental factors into humanitarian action and build resilience of vulnerable communities over climate change; insists on the importance of involving indigenous people and local communities in this process; welcomes also the commitments to strengthen the climate resilience of vulnerable regions through disaster preparedness and anticipatory action via a nexus approach; welcomes, in addition, the commitments to green the EU’s humanitarian aid and track climate- related spending; calls on the Commission to provide the necessary resources for climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction through the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument – Global Europe, among other tools, and to accelerate the implementation of the Sendai commitments in the EU’s external action;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 129 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7a. Regrets that the Communication of the Commission on humanitarian action presents the issue of gender equality as a tried and tested principle of humanitarian aid but not as a growing need to address; given the prominent role of women as victims of conflicts and disasters, calls on to assess on past experiences in humanitarian support in this field as well as to more concrete elements of gender mainstreaming in future humanitarian action, including specific expenditure, programmes, tracking and assessment methods oriented towards gender related activities;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 131 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Welcomes the concrete achievements of the EU Humanitarian Air Bridge and the idea of creating a European Humanitarian Response Capacity to plug the gaps in the EU’s humanitarian response; calls for the Member States and humanitarian partners to be consulted on any new Commission initiatives, which should build on – not duplicate – existing EU mechanisms such as the civil protection mechanism; stresses the importance to maintain a clear separation between the civil protection and humanitarian response in humanitarian contexts; is concerned with any considerations about combining the civil protection and humanitarian responses or using the same funding instruments for civil protection and humanitarian response as it mixes the mandates and presents an increased risk for principled humanitarian action;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 147 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 a (new)
9a. Calls for a more dedicated focus on health, access to public health services and efforts to reduce mortality and morbidity, as well as the need to strengthen epidemics/pandemic preparedness;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 149 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 b (new)
9b. Requires significant emphasis to be devoted to nutrition, as fundamental right for all, in order to ensure food security and allow greater resilience of food systems to economic, climatic and human shocks; calls on the EU to revise the EU Action Plan on Nutrition, to address all forms of malnutrition in humanitarian and development contexts, in line with the Council Conclusion of November 2018;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 152 #

2021/2163(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Welcomes the announcement on the first ever EU Humanitarian Forum, which is to be held in January 2022; stresses that the forum should be inclusive of humanitarian implementing partners and seek to increase the visibility of the EU’s humanitarian aid and the work of its partners in particular local ones, promote a strategic dialogue on the EU’s humanitarian policy, raising political support and awareness about the nature of principled and needs-based EU humanitarian assistance and advance the implementation of the key actions set out in the Commission communication;
2021/10/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 3 #

2021/2158(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Draws attention to the context in which official development assistance (ODA) is now provided, marked by a recurrent funding gap, the COVID pandemic, the aggravating climate and biodiversity crisis, the relentless growth of the needs of humanitarian aid, developing countries’ and lack of means to address them properly, developing countries’, notably the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) woefully inadequate financial and othertechnical resources to respond to the challenges they face, the reversal of the progress towards key Sustainable Development Goals, including those to eradicate poverty and hunger, and the continued global failure to scale up climate action to the urgent need of reaching the objectives of the Paris Agreement with a pathway compatible with the objective of limiting global warming to under 1,5°C as well as improving resilience to adverse climate change impacts;
2022/02/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 9 #

2021/2158(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Insists that the Union and its Member States scale up their ODA and climate finance so as to honour their commitments, that maximum efficiency of the spending be sought according to the principle of aid effectiveness and partner country ownership, that policy coherence for development (PCD) be practiced in a more convincingefficient and systematic way and that new efforts to create an enabling international environment for domestic resource mobilisation (DRM) be made; takes the view that well-functioning PCD and support for DRM should be considered part and parcel of sound financial management as these are means to increase the efficiency of EU action which do not need to imply significant additional costs to the Union budgetimply concrete initiatives, such as supporting the fight against corruption and the development of progressive tax systems, tackling tax avoidance and evasion;
2022/02/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 16 #

2021/2158(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Expresses disappointment about the continued absence of major action by the Commission on the recommendations of the external evaluation of the Union’s PCD1 , ordered by the Commission and received in 2018; _________________ 1 https://ec.europa.eu/international- partnerships/system/files/pcd-main- report_en.pdfstresses that more efforts must be undertaken to comply with PCD principles, especially for the Union trade, agricultural, fisheries, environment, climate, migration, foreign and security policies, in order to achieve aid effectiveness objectives; reiterates that PCD must be an important objective of the joined-up approach designed in NDICI-Global Europe; reiterates its call for an in-depth analysis on the impact of Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) on local economies and intra- regional trade to address concerns about their implementation in terms of regional integration and industrialisation;
2022/02/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 22 #

2021/2158(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Notes that the budgetary implementation of the EDF is now limited to payments on commitments made before the 31 December 2020 end date and that Global Europe - NDICI and general Union budget rules now apply; calls for strict implementation of the human rights based approach, with human rights being at the centre of all actions, in accordance with the Commission’s toolbox on this approach. ; in this regard, is particularly concerned about the possible misuse of development funds for mobility restriction and border control purposes, including those of the EU Emergency Trust Fund for Africa (EUTF), and the reported human rights violations linked to the EUTF in Libya, Ethiopia, Eritrea and Niger;
2022/02/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 24 #

2021/2158(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. Reiterates its calls for proper implementation of and reporting on all horizontal spending targets set in NDICI, in particular the biodiversity related target which is not a stand-alone target in the regulation but concerns contributing to the overall MFF biodiversity target of 7.5% of annual spending to biodiversity objectives in 2024 and 10% from 2026 onwards; expects the Commission to adopt as soon as possible an effective, transparent and comprehensive methodology for biodiversity tracking, developed with the full involvement of the European Parliament, and about which the European Parliament should be consulted before the publication of the 2023 draft budget;
2022/02/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 28 #

2021/2158(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 b (new)
4 b. Stresses that projects financed via NDICI-Global Europe shall be screened to determine if they have an environmental, climate or social impact and if so, shall be subject to climate, environmental and social sustainability proofing with a view to minimise detrimental impacts and maximise benefits on climate, environment and social dimensions; recalls that the Union and the Member States committed under Article2.1(c) of the Paris Agreement to align both public and private financial flows to a pathway compatible with the objective of limiting global warming to 1.5°C; stresses that this requires a phase out of all direct and indirect fossil fuel subsidies as soon as possible and by 2025 at the very latest;
2022/02/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 31 #

2021/2158(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 c (new)
4 c. Regrets the reported case of lack of transparency for the work contracts signed by the Commission to strengthen food security in Cameroon, for which the evaluation criteria used for the award differed from those published in the tender notice and therefore made the tender ineligible; calls on the Commission to prevent any lack of transparency in public procurement procedures;
2022/02/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 33 #

2021/2158(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 d (new)
4 d. Regrets that expenditures with international organisations recorded in 2020 under the 8th, 9th, 10th and 11th EDFs is particularly affected by errors; highlights that errors occur predominantly in transactions related to grants and to contribution and delegation agreements implemented by international organisations and that in the examined transactions of this type, 40.3 % contained quantifiable errors, which is substantial; underlines that the ECA1a indicated that for 13 of these cases with errors, the Commission had sufficient information to prevent, or to detect the error before accepting the expenditure; urges the Commission to produce detailed explanations in response to these findings and to submit a clear plan to European Parliament outlining the necessary steps in order to correct this seriously worrying situation; _________________ 1a https://www.eca.europa.eu/Lists/ECADoc uments/annualreports- 2020/annualreports-2020_EN.pdf
2022/02/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 35 #

2021/2158(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 e (new)
4 e. Calls on the Commission to take the necessary measures to ensure that international organisations provide the Court of Auditors with complete, unlimited and timely access to documents necessary to carry out its task in accordance with the TFEU1a, and not just in read-only format; _________________ 1a Article 287 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union: ‘Any natural or legal person in receipt of payments from the budget, shall forward to the Court of Auditors, at its request, any document or information necessary to carry out its task'.
2022/02/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 37 #

2021/2158(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 f (new)
4 f. Stresses the importance for donors to prioritise grant-based financing as the default option, especially to LDCs, and not favour blending, guarantee or any loans over grants, that could increase the burden of debt; is concerned therefore that the Commission has proposed more means and geographical expansion for blended finance for the future financing period 2021-2027 via EFSD+ in NDICI- Global Europe, and through the Global Gateway strategy, which makes of the blending-guarantee mechanism the main financial tool for mobilising investments; urges the Union and its Member States to develop, as a first step, and in addition to its pledges on debt moratorium, a new debt relief initiative regarding the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries; more broadly, calls for the creation of a multilateral debt workout mechanism to address both the impact of the crisis and the financing requirements of the Agenda 2030;
2022/02/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 78 #

2021/2158(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 64 a (new)
64 a. Is concerned that as a follow-up to the EDF’s 2018 discharge report the Commission hasn’t fully taken into consideration Parliament’s numerous recommendations related to the EUTF; observes with great concern that to the opposite of helping to address these causes of destabilisation, the EUTF funds are increasingly being spent to help close borders, stiffen migration and push for returns of migrants back to Africa;
2022/03/03
Committee: CONT
Amendment 83 #

2021/2158(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 66 a (new)
66 a. Is particularly alarmed that EDF funds are used by the Emergency Trust Fund for Africa (EUTF) to finance the development of biometric identity systems in African countries. These funds are used to train the authorities of these countries (Senegal, Ivory Coast) in controversial surveillance techniques, equipped with intrusive surveillance tools without any prior assessment of the risks and the impact on human rights, including any privacy or data protection assessment;
2022/03/03
Committee: CONT
Amendment 84 #

2021/2158(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 66 b (new)
66 b. Takes note that the European Ombudsman opened the investigation into the Emergency Trust Fund for Africa on 30 November 2021, following a complain filled by a coalition of the EU NGOs; notes also that the Ombudsman expects a response from the Commission by 10th March 2022 on her question whether the Commission has carried out human rights risk assessments before engaging in activities that help third countries to develop surveillance capacities under the EUTF and, if not, why the Commission considers that such assessments are not necessary;
2022/03/03
Committee: CONT
Amendment 91 #

2021/2158(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 71 a (new)
71 a. Reiterates its calls to the Commission to provide a solid risk assessment study on the human rights implication for all the projects designed to train and equip security forces of the African countries;
2022/03/03
Committee: CONT
Amendment 5 #

2021/2154(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Notes from the Court’s report that the IMI2 Joint Undertaking experiences long project durations due to the nature of its research and that this situation is an example of varying degrees of achievement of contribution targets set by the Joint Undertakings’ regulations in relation to Horizon 2020 activities, and that this presents the risk that the level of administrative resources needed to manage the Joint Undertaking’s funds in a timely manner, may not be sufficient, due to an increasing number of projects from multiple Multiannual Financial Framework programmes being implemented simultaneously; invites the IMI2 Joint Undertaking to review its organisational structure and staffing needs in order to ensure business continuity in periods of significantly increased workflows;
2022/02/03
Committee: CONT
Amendment 8 #

2021/2154(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Notes that the IMI2 Joint Undertaking launched a fast-track call for proposals on coronavirus treatments and diagnostics, resulting in 8 projects; notes, moreover, the launch of three additional calls for proposals featuring topics on rare diseases, infectious diseases, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and autoimmune diseases; notes, furthermore, the signing of 19 new grant agreements for projects with a total combined budget of over EUR 380 000 000, bringing the total IMI2 Joint Undertaking’s portfolio to 167 projects; notes that the new projects focus on cancer, diabetes, obesity, digital health, artificial intelligence, advanced therapies, drug discovery, and environmental issues; recalls that by selecting commercially interesting research topics for the pharmaceutical industry (such as diabetes or obesity) the IMI2 Joint Undertaking is not meeting the goals that justified its creation, namely improving the development and availability of health technologies for unmet medical needs; thus, considers that the interim evaluation of IMI2 Joint Undertaking realised in 2017 by the Commission and concluding that the added value of IMI2 Joint Undertaking for patients and for society in general is difficult to demonstrate is still valid;
2022/02/03
Committee: CONT
Amendment 9 #

2021/2154(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Notes that several new tools and processes generated by IMI2 Joint Undertaking projects have been implemented by the industry participants (examples of such implementation are animal models, standards, biomarkers, standard operating procedures, use of screening platforms, clinical trial networks, etc.). Data also shows that there were 176 implementation results in IMI2 Joint Undertaking (versus a target of 50) and 482 implementation results for the IMI Joint Undertaking and IMI2 Joint Undertaking programmes considered together; notes, in addition, that 60 % of the projects involve patient organisations and healthcare professionals' associations as consortium partners, members of advisory boards, members of stakeholder groups etc., and that this trend has remained stable during the course of the IMI2 Joint Undertaking programme; is concerned however that IMI2 Joint Undertaking projects still fail to guarantee affordability, accessibility and availability of publicly funded research results; calls in this regard the IMI2 Joint Undertaking successor Innovative Health Initiative Joint Undertaking to introduce immediately new requirements, according to which all beneficiaries of the Union public funding for research and innovation for treatment, prevention or diagnosis shall commit to access, effectiveness, affordability and availability principles;
2022/02/03
Committee: CONT
Amendment 1 #

2021/2152(DEC)

Proposal for a decision 1
Paragraph 1
1. Grants the Director of the European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy discharge in respect of the implementation of the Joint Undertaking’s budget for the financial year 2020 / Postpones its decision on discharge to the Director of the European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy in respect of the implementation of the Joint Undertaking’s budget for the financial year 2020;
2022/02/04
Committee: CONT
Amendment 2 #

2021/2152(DEC)

Proposal for a decision 2
Paragraph 1
1. Approves the closure of the accounts of the European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy for the financial year 2020 / Postpones the closure of the accounts of the European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy for the financial year 2020;
2022/02/04
Committee: CONT
Amendment 4 #

2021/2152(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Notes from the Court’s report the emphasis of matter drawing attention to the estimate of the total cost for completing its delivery obligations for the ITER project in 204235, assessed by the Joint Undertaking at EUR 17 968 050 000 (in 2020 values) and to the fact that changes in key assumptions concerning the estimate and the risk exposure could lead to significant costs increases and/or to further delays in the implementation of the ITER project; notes that among the key assumptions the ITER baseline approved in November 2016 by the Council of ITER Organization leading to First Plasma in December 2025, and the start of the Deuterium-Tritium phase in December 2035 is still maintained even if ITER organisation acknowledges significant delays resulting from the late delivery and quality problems of some components, and the world health pandemic; notes in contrast that the 2010 baseline estimated the achievement of the construction phase in 2020, and that the current ITER baseline approved in 2016 is considered to be the earliest possible technically achievable date; notes that ITER organisation is currently assessing the extent and impact of any delays and that ITER Council is planned to receive an updated baseline in June 2022; calls on the Joint Undertaking to report to the discharge authority of any development in that regard; notes that the Court’s report refers to in particular changes in nuclear safety requirements that are under the ultimate authority of the French Nuclear Safety Authority, the cost estimate for the Hot Cell Complex which has not been revised, as well as requirement changes;
2022/02/04
Committee: CONT
Amendment 7 #

2021/2152(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Is extremely alarmed that serious safety and radioprotection problems are identified by the French Nuclear Safety Authority (NSA) inspectors and that the ITER organisation refuses to follow their recommendations in this regard. Takes note that on 5 January 2022, the NSA has announced that the reactor assembly is no longer authorized, which means in practice a shutdown of the ITER project. Calls on the Joint Undertaking to report to the discharge authority of any development in that regard;
2022/02/04
Committee: CONT
Amendment 9 #

2021/2152(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Notes the ITER Council decided to maintain temporarily this baseline plan with First Plasma set in December 2025 despite the forecasted delay of 8 months due to the accumulation of delays in component deliveries, the start of the installation activities at the Cadarache site, and the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic; notes that the ITER Organization has acknowledged that there is an irreversible slippage of the schedule for First Plasma and; regrets that the delay is estimated in total at about 17 months and that that is not only driven by the health pandemic but also by the late delivery of some components, notably the Vacuum Vessel, and particularly its sectors under European responsibility, as well as the overall slower assembly works by the international organisation; calls the Joint Undertaking to report the discharge authority in that regard; notes, moreover, the lack of contingency in the schedule and that the suggestion of Commission and the United States Department of Energy were not retained and included at European level; notes from the 9th Annual Assessment report that the schedule Contingency reserve should be introduced in the concerned Joint Undertaking’s activities planning and that it should be part of the schedule baseline; notes, moreover, the recommendations made by the panel of assessors on Management Reserves; calls on the Joint Undertaking to report to the discharge authority in that regard;
2022/02/04
Committee: CONT
Amendment 10 #

2021/2152(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Points to the environmental hazards created by the ITER project, in particular in relation to the questionable quality and execution of the assembly and of the components of the project;
2022/02/04
Committee: CONT
Amendment 11 #

2021/2152(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Notes that the ITER Organization is expected to present an updated schedule on the construction of the ITER site in Spring 2022 with the view of its adoption in November 2022, subject to an assessment by a panel of independent experts; calls on the Joint Undertaking to urgently report any development in that regard and especially on the date of the starting of the Deuterium-Tritium phase;
2022/02/04
Committee: CONT
Amendment 12 #

2021/2152(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Is aware of the fact that in addition to the construction phase, the Joint Undertaking will have to contribute to the ITER operational phase after 2035 and to the subsequent ITER deactivation and decommissioning phases; notes that the contribution to the deactivation and decommissioning phases were estimated, respectively, at EUR 95 540 000 and EUR 180 200 000 (at 2001 values); is disappointed that the contribution of the Joint Undertaking to operation phase after 2035 is still not estimated; calls on the Joint Undertaking to report to the discharge authority of any development in that regard;
2022/02/04
Committee: CONT
Amendment 16 #

2021/2152(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Notes that the Joint Undertaking has achieved the ITER Council/Governing Board milestone for the crane access between the Assembly Hall and Tokamak Building which allowed for the start of ITER assembly in July 2020 and delivered first major components to ITER Organization; notes, moreover, from the progress report that in 2020 the ITER Organization announced that the overall project had reached 72.1 % of the total construction work scope to First Plasma against a planned value of 77.3 %, and that including all post First Plasma construction work to achieve Deuterium-Tritium the ITER project execution reached 57.7 %; is alarmed that serious safety problems are identified by the NSA inspectors related to the two main components of the vacuum chamber and detected leaks in the basins of the cooling towers of the vacuum chamber; is informed that these two main components of the vacuum chamber fell during handling at manufacturing sites, in South Korea in April 2021 and in Italy in May 2021; takes note additionally of the ITER organisation decision to lower the masterpieces into the pit without welding them;
2022/02/04
Committee: CONT
Amendment 17 #

2021/2152(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 a (new)
11 a. Is extremely worried about the radioprotection issue concerning the ‘bioshield’ two-metre thick concrete wall that surrounds the tokamak to protect workers and the environment. In fact, because of errors in the design and construction of the wall, the effective biological protection will be 30% lower than expected; is alarmed that the ITER organisation refuses to follow the French NSA recommendations and that on 5 January 2022 the NSA has announced that the reactor assembly is no longer authorized, which means in practice a shutdown of the ITER project; calls on the Joint Undertaking to report to the discharge authority of any development in that regard;
2022/02/04
Committee: CONT
Amendment 20 #

2021/2152(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14
14. Notes the Joint Undertaking’s Anti- Fraud Action Plan covering the period 2020 through 2023, following its strategy adopted in 2019, and the awareness raising events and trainings organised for staff and management; moreover, notes that in 2020, 33 anti-fraud actions have been implemented; calls on the Joint Undertaking to report to the discharge authority on the outcome of those actions;
2022/02/04
Committee: CONT
Amendment 21 #

2021/2152(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Notes that with a view to preventing and managing conflicts of interest, the Anti-Fraud and Ethics Officer organised a training for new staff and specific training for F4E managers; encourages the Joint Undertaking to introduce such training scheme on a permanent basis, with compulsory sessions for newly employed staff and regular reminder sessions for all staff; is concerned that while F4E has implemented actions plans, organised trainings for the F4E managers, the working situation in the organization has been constantly deteriorating; points that successive management assessments in 2019 and 2020 and several internal surveys highlighted repeatedly the enormous workload and pressure on staff, the disproportionate use of external resources undermining the long term sustainability of the organization, the lack of trust in the Director and the Senior Management, the dysfunctional and non- transparent internal decision-making, and the overall weak management practices;
2022/02/04
Committee: CONT
Amendment 23 #

2021/2152(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Notes with concern from the Court’s report that the Joint Undertaking's recruitment procedures made in 2020 lacked transparency in drawing up the final shortlist of candidates to be invited for the next assessment phase (interviews and written tests), and that it is not clear how the selection committee took account of the advantageous criteria for shortlisting candidates; notes the Joint Undertaking’s reply that in 2021 it started to include fully quantitative assessments of applications; calls on the Joint Undertaking to diligently review its recruitment policy with the aim of increasing transparency and fairness of the process and to report to the discharge authority any development in that regard;
2022/02/04
Committee: CONT
Amendment 30 #

2021/2152(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18 a (new)
18 a. Is extremely concerned that in May 2021 a F4E staff member committed suicide denouncing, in his last letter to his family, the work pressure and unhealthy working environment in F4E; is aware that a technical audit of the work of his team had been undergoing for more than 15 months accompanied by a far-reaching reorganization, and the F4E Governing Board and the Commission launched a preliminary assessment of the events that led to this dramatic event; is also aware that the staff of the F4E and trade unions openly disputed the findings of this preliminary assessment and organised a massive strike to denounce the insufficiency of the proposed measures to improve the working environment of the JUs;
2022/02/04
Committee: CONT
Amendment 32 #

2021/2152(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18 b (new)
18 b. Is aware that on the 17 January 2022, the heads of the three main trade unions sent a letter on behalf of the F4E staff to the Commissioner Hahn and Simson about the critical situation in F4E asking the Commission to support an OLAF inquiry into the F4E professional environment; notes that in addition they also ask that the Commission performs “an in-depth assessment of the current F4E Senior Management, in particular in relation to their credibility and capacity to implement, in the present context, a change programme capable to restore trust and to transform the F4E working environment and corporate culture”; calls on the Joint Undertaking to report to the discharge authority of any development in that regard;
2022/02/04
Committee: CONT
Amendment 5 #

2021/2149(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Notes from the Court’s report that although the Joint Undertaking’s statutory staff remained static at 42 from 2017 to 2020, during the same period, the Joint Undertaking significantly increased its use of interim staff from three to ten full-time equivalents, that is, from 8 % to 24 % of the Joint Undertaking’s statutory staff, that the tasks performed by the interim staff are however, not of a one-off or temporary nature, arising from an exceptional increase in workload or the performance of a one-off activity, but rather are permanent in nature (e.g. legal service assistant, secretarial support, communication assistant, and project officer assistant), and the Joint Undertaking’s practice creates de- facto permanent posts, in excess of those; notes the Joint Undertaking’s reply that it has been obliged to constantly enlarge the use of interim staff during the past years due to the limitations of the rigid staff establishment plan under the condition of increasing tasks and workload, and that this trend is expected to continue with the two programmes – the Clean Sky 2 and the new Clean Aviation programme running in parallel, and, moreover, that the Joint Undertaking has put in place mitigation measures (such as appropriate supervision mechanisms, limiting tasks for interims to non-core tasks and ensuring appropriate training and mentoring support), and that however, this situation is not optimal on a medium and long-term perspective and that the Joint Undertaking considers that the solution would be to provide more flexibility with regard to number of contract agents posts in the staff establishment plan; urges the Joint Undertaking to review its organisational structure and employment strategy and to identify key areas of operations where the human resources should be concentrated, in order to optimise their contribution to the workflow; calls on the Joint Undertaking to remedy the shortcomings identified concerning the engagement of interim staff in increasing numbers to perform what are, in fact, permanent duties, especially in the context of the Joint Undertaking’s transformation into Clean Aviation Joint Undertaking;
2022/02/03
Committee: CONT
Amendment 8 #

2021/2148(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. NoteRegrets that the design of the Joint Undertaking’s 2020 call for proposals did not ensure the fullest coverage of the four strategic demonstration topics, in line with its research agenda in the work plan; notes, in addition, that eligible and high-scored proposals for one of the demonstration topics had to be rejected for the benefit of another demonstration topic, for which several proposals were accepted for co- financing;
2022/02/03
Committee: CONT
Amendment 14 #

2021/2148(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21
21. NotDeplores that the European Anti- Fraud Office (OLAF) closed an investigation in the first half of 2020 that found evidence of irregularities and fraud in the activities of two beneficiaries involved in Horizon 2020 projects, including projects co-financed by the Joint Undertaking; notes, that in 2020 the Joint Undertaking has largely implemented the OLAF recommendations in respect of these beneficiaries, this includes processing recoveries, terminating the participation of affected beneficiaries in most grant agreements and actively looking at other potentially problematic beneficiaries; notes, moreover, that the OLAF report did not include any findings and conclusions linked to weaknesses in the internal control systems of the Joint Undertaking and that the financial impact of this case is below materiality levels; calls on the Joint Undertaking to report to the discharge authority on that regard;
2022/02/03
Committee: CONT
Amendment 15 #

2021/2148(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23
23. Notes that an anti-fraud strategy is in place covering the prevention and detection of potential fraud as well as the conditions for investigating it; notes that the anti-fraud strategy for grant management is developed and implemented in cooperation with services of the Commission, executive agencies and joint undertakings that implement the Horizon 2020 Framework Programme; notes, moreover, that the staff of the Joint Undertaking is continuously updated about the identification of fraud risks, and dedicated tools are made available for the prevention, detection and reporting of suspicious cases; invites the Joint Undertaking to consider implementation of a permanent and robust training scheme for its employees, especially those working directly with calls for proposals and grants, in order to strengthen ethical standards and minimise the risk of unethical behaviour occurring, having a negative impact on sound financial management;
2022/02/03
Committee: CONT
Amendment 1 #

2021/2132(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Emphasises the important role of the European Medicines Agency (‘the EMA') in protecting and promoting publichuman and animal health by making independent, science-based recommendations on the quality, safety and efficacy of medicines, and providing scientific advice and regulatory incentives to stimulate the development and improve the availability of innovative new medicines;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 4 #

2021/2132(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Notes that, owing to the global COVID-19 pandemic, 2020 was an extremely challenging year for the EMA, requiring a shift in its priorities and extreme agility and resilience to maintain the EMA’s activities while supporting enhanced collaboration between Member States to manage the supply of medicines and global efforts to combat the pandemic in a new and challenging environment;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 5 #

2021/2132(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5a. Stresses that despite the majority of funding coming from private sources, the EMA is a public authority; underlines that the perception of the EMA’s independence and integrity is crucial and therefore a high degree of transparency needs to be ensured through all its activities to avoid regulatory capture and ensure citizens maintain their faith in the marketing authorisation system in the Union;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 8 #

2021/2132(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 10
10. Welcomes the proposal to extend the EMA’s mandate but expresses concern that the addition of significant new tasks and its increasing workload over the years has not been accompanied by sufficient corresponding increases in the EMA's staff and resources, and that such a shortage of staff puts the continuity of its operations under significant pressure and threatens the quality of the EMA's work;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 11 #

2021/2132(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 11
11. AcknowledgWelcomes the revised policy on the handling of competing interests of the Management Board, which took effect from 1 July 2020 and the practice of systematic ex-ante controls on all declarations of interest submitted by Management Board members together with the requirement that those members undertake training before their declaration of interest can be submitted;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 12 #

2021/2132(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 11 a (new)
11a. Notes with satisfaction the exceptional transparency measures the EMA implemented with regard to medicines for COVID-19, including accelerated publication timelines for clinical data and providing more information to the general public such as publication of the product information with details of the conditions of use at the time of the positive opinion of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) on the marketing authorisation application; publication of the full European public assessment report (EPAR), within three days of authorisation by the Commission; publication of clinical data submitted to the EMA in support of the applications for COVID-19 medicines after the authorisation of a medicine and once personal data have been anonymised; and the publication of the full risk management plan for authorised COVID- 19 medicines; invites the EMA to apply the same transparency measures to all products regulated by the EMA;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 2 #

2021/2128(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Welcomes the contribution of the European Food Safety Authority (the 'Authority') to the safety of the Union food and feed chain, and its considerablebelieves that the Authority should increase its efforts in providing risk managers with comprehensive, independent and up-to- date scientific advice on questions linked to the food chain, communicating clearly to the public on its outputs and the information on which they are based, and cooperating with interested parties and institutional partners to promote coherence and trust in the food safety system;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 9 #

2021/2128(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Recalls that, in 2020, Parliament adopted nine objections to the import of genetically modified crops for food and feed; highlights that one reason for these objections are gaps in the risk assessment undertaken by the Authority's Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms; urges the Authority to address and close these gaps as a matter of urgency; highlights, furthermore, that the Parliament adopted numerous objections related to the renewal of active substances and to the extension of approvals of active substances; stresses that these objections have very regularly questioned the scientific conclusions of the Authority on the active substances concerned;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 12 #

2021/2128(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5a. Recalls the judgment of the Court of Justice of 1 October 2019 in Case C- 616/171a stating that “it is the duty of the competent authorities, in particular, to take account of the most reliable scientific data available and the most recent results of international research and not to give in all cases preponderant weight to the studies provided by the applicant.” _________________ 1aJudgment of the Court of Justice of 1 October 2019, Criminal proceedings against Mathieu Blaise and Others, C- 616/1, ECLI:EU:C:2019:800, paragraph 94
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 13 #

2021/2128(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 b (new)
5b. Deplores that, despite Regulation (EC) No 396/2005 of the European Parliament and of the Council1a and Regulation (EC) No 1107/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council1b providing that known cumulative and synergistic effects need to be taken into account, the Authority still does not have an operational and science- based methodology to assess and prevent such effects; insists that the assessment of cumulative and synergistic effects must be a precondition for any pesticide approval; underlines that the protection of European citizens and the environment from cocktail effects is a core commitment of the with the Chemical Strategy for Sustainability; further stresses that the strategy proposes the establishment of a Mix Assessment Factor (MAF) as the appropriate tool to assess these effects; calls for the immediate implementation of an MAF to pesticides; _________________ 1aRegulation (EC) No 396/2005 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 February 2005 on maximum residue levels of pesticides in or on food and feed of plant and animal origin and amending Council Directive 91/414/EEC (OJ L 70, 16.3.2005, p. 1). 1bRegulation (EC) No 1107/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 October 2009 concerning the placing of plant protection products on the market and repealing Council Directives 79/117/EEC and 91/414/EEC (OJ L 309, 24.11.2009, p. 1)
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 16 #

2021/2128(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 c (new)
5c. Considers that it is the role of the Authority to actively look for high-level experts and convince them to take part in its work, by acknowledging the relevance and reliability of their peer-reviewed research when conducting its own scientific analysis;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 17 #

2021/2128(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Invites the Commission to grant the Authority, in duly justified cases, the option of hiring contract agents in excess of the establishment plans, for a limited period of time and without exceeding the Authority’s agreed annual budget envelope; considers that such flexibility would speed up the reduction of the cumulated backlog of work that has arisen owing to a lack of human resources; insists that those contract agents obviously need to comply with the Authority’s independence rules;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 20 #

2021/2128(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6a. Regrets that the new independence policy has not led to any tangible change in the Authority’s policy to select experts and in the working groups composition; exposes for instance that in the context of the working group on the bee guidance revision, only 25% of the experts were scientists publishing on bees and pesticides and that among the experts heard by this working group, 50% of them presented an evident conflict of interest due to their affiliation to "contract research organisations”;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 21 #

2021/2128(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 b (new)
6b. Considers that, four years after the updating of the Authority’s independence policy, its limits in addressing properly the main independence loopholes have become evident; stresses that the Authority's scientific conclusions are sometimes openly contradicted by high- level scientists; notes with concern that these continuous controversies around conflicts of interest severely undermine the scientific reliability and credibility of the Authority; recalls that the Authority has under its mandate matters of crucial interest for the health of European citizens as well as the protection of the environment;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 23 #

2021/2128(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 c (new)
6c. Calls for a post 5-year independent review of the Authority's independence policy and for appropriate action to be taken on the basis of the conclusions drawn, including a comprehensive reform in 2022; recommends in this context the evaluation of all the industrial interests (in the remit of the Authority and beyond) of board members and experts, the extension of the cooling-off period to 10 years, the implementation of the 25 % threshold of tolerated research funding to expert’s all cumulated funding and for the extension of the scope of private funding to the public-private partnerships; considers the Authority’s independence policy should also apply to all hearing experts and speakers in open conferences;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 24 #

2021/2128(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 d (new)
6d. Asks the Authority to publicly commit to carry out an independent and transparent risk assessment of glyphosate, taking into account all available scientific evidence from peer-reviewed independent literature reporting adverse effects of the substance on human health and the environment; calls on the Authority to timely publish its risk assessment opinion over the course of 2022 to avoid any extension of the approval of the substance after its expiration mid-December 2022;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 25 #

2021/2128(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 e (new)
6e. Deplores the Authority's general lack of transparency towards stakeholders; calls for the creation of a public database to monitor the risk assessment of all substances, such as suspected endocrine disruptors;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 41 #

2021/2128(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 11
11. RecommendConditions, based on the facts available, that discharge be grantede grant of discharge to the Executive Director of the European Food Safety Authority in respect of the implementation of the Authority's budget for the financial year 2020, to new commitments in terms of independence policy and management of conflict of interests.
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 3 #

2021/2126(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Notes that in 2020, the EEA's total budget was EUR 63 229 066 (a 21,5% increase on 2019 although still below the 2018 figure), of which EUR 41 972 000 (representing an increase of 5,6 % compared to 2019) came from the general budget of the Union; notdeplores the unsatisfactory level of funding for the EEA which could have negative impacts on its performance; stresses that the EEA is expected to play a key role (monitoring, reporting and validating) in supporting the European Green Deal actions and the 8th General Union Environment Action Programme1 ; insists therefore that the staff budget for the EEA should be increased to meet these obligations and that the existing gaps between additional tasks and the funding of those obligations should be closed; insists that the increase in budget should not come at the expanse of the programmes, particularly the LIFE programme; notes that any future cuts will negatively impact the functioning of the EEA and the delivery of the European Green Deal; _________________ 1Proposal for a Decision of the European Parliament and of the Council on a General Union Environment Action Programme to 2030 (COM(2020)0652).
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 6 #

2021/2126(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5a. Deplores that the ratio between support staff responsible for administration as well as coordination and operational staff working on content, is out of balance; suggests that the EEA should receive more support staff, to guarantee the functioning of the agency;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 9 #

2021/2126(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Invites the EEA to continue promoting cooperation with other Union agencies and international organisations, and fostering dialogue with stakeholders and citizens; highlights that a perfect example of such cooperation would be a layperson/citizen science project around the COPERNICUS programme, as the existing data could be used, together with trained staff, to bring citizens and the institutions of the Union together;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 12 #

2021/2126(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7a. Encourages the EEA to work together with the other agencies of the Union in order to better assess the environmental impacts of human activity;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 6 #

2021/2124(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6 a. Welcomes the proposal to extend the Centre’s mandate but expresses concern that the addition of new tasks and its increasing workload has not been accompanied by sufficient corresponding increases in the Centre's staff and resources, and that such a shortage of staff puts the continuity of its operations under significant pressure and threatens the quality of the Centre’s work;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 7 #

2021/2124(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8
8. Welcomes the improvement in the percentage of management board members, advisory forum members and their alternates submitting the required annual declarations of interest in 2020 compared to the figures for 2019; calls on the Centre to ensure that this level of complianceappropriate experts are engaged in the Centre’s work and that a high level of compliance with conflict of interest rules is maintained;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 8 #

2021/2124(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 9 a (new)
9 a. Stresses the need for the Centre to ensure full transparency in publishing scientific studies and in enhancing its external communications capacity towards the general public, ensuring that all key information related to public health emergencies is available in all Union languages and easily accessible to Union citizens;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 3 #

2021/2106(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Notes that the replacement of the Development Cooperation Instrument with the Global Europe Instrument coincides with a dramatic reversal of the progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals and with rapid aggravation of the global climate and biodiversity crisies; insists that in the implementation of the Global Europe Instrument, maximum efficiency in the response to these incomparably important challenges must be sought; reiterates the importance of properly implementing the horizontal targets set in the Global Europe Regulation; expects to see the program- level targets published together with the draft budget 2023 as well as any legislative changes required in the programs effected to ensure the targets will be met;
2022/02/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 14 #

2021/2106(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Expects the Commission to adopt an effective, transparent and comprehensive methodology for biodiversity tracking as soon as possible, bearing in mind the MFF biodiversity target set for 2024 as well as how the target of 10% will be reached by 2026; stresses on the importance of such methodology for the screening of the biodiversity related target in Global Europe which is not a stand-alone target in the regulation, but concerns contributing to the overall MFF biodiversity target; calls for the full involvement of the European Parliament in the development of the methodologies as laid down in the MFF Interinstitutional Agreement1a (IIA); expects the Commission to consult the Parliament on biodiversity methodology before the publication of the draft budget 2023; _________________ 1a https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal- content/EN/TXT/?uri=uriserv%3AOJ.LI. 2020.433.01.0028.01.ENG&toc=OJ%3AL %3A2020%3A433I%3ATOC
2022/02/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 15 #

2021/2106(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 b (new)
2 b. Notes that the possibilities of mainstreaming migration policy in EU external policy are significantly broadened by the inclusion of migration in the thematic, geographical and rapid response component and the migration budgetary target of the Global Europe Regulation; notes with concern, however, that through the ‘rapid response’ component, cooperation with third countries on migration management can be funded without the need for the Commission to publish any programming documents or consult civil society actors, and without the involvement of Parliament; insists in this regard on the need to ensure that the 2021-2027 Multiannual Financial Framework and related financial instruments including Global Europe, is accompanied by a robust human rights framework for the identification, implementation and monitoring of future migration cooperation programmes;
2022/02/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 22 #

2021/2106(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 14 a (new)
14a. Notes that, in 2020, DG SANTE's expenditure in the field of health increased sevenfold compared to previous years, mainly to manage large parts of the Commission's health response to the COVID-19 pandemic: EUR 2,5 billion from the Emergency Support Instrument (ESI) were paid for the six Advanced Purchase Agreements (APA) for the COVID-19 vaccines; regrets that, despite its strong links to the EU budget, the activation of the ESI was done without full respect and observance of Parliament’s prerogatives as budgetary authority and final supervisor of the Union budget; criticises that despite several attempts to get a clear overview, the competent committees (Budgets, Budgetary Control and Environment, Public Health and Food Safety) are still not given access to relevant data on the EU funds spent under the ESI to finance the APA contracts;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 22 #

2021/2106(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. Urges to ensure that EU budget support, which has proven its efficiency in the field of education1a, remains the favoured modality to allow access to inclusive and quality education to all in developing countries; _________________ 1a European Commission, Budget Support -Trends and Results 2020: https://ec.europa.eu/international- partnerships/system/files/budget-support- trends-and-results_en.pdf
2022/02/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 24 #

2021/2106(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 14 b (new)
14b. Urges the Commission to apply a high degree of transparency to all joint procurement activities and related purchase agreements in the field of health; insists that its relevant DGs should put in place a solid and transparent EU public procurement framework, when funds from the EU budget are fully or partially involved, that would allow for comprehensive scrutiny by the Parliament, especially concerning major health crisis-related spending areas;
2021/12/08
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 28 #

2021/2106(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Stresses that choices of aid modalities should always be based on realistic and independent assessments of the likely efficiency of possible options, supported by evidence and made public; points to the salience of this in the rapidly expanding area of private sector cooperation, ,where the evidence base is limited and should carefully be broadened and deepened in order to facilitate optimal use of official development assistance (ODA);
2022/02/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 29 #

2021/2106(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. Recalls that the Union and the Member States committed under Article 2.1(c) of the Paris Agreement to align both public and private financial flows to a pathway compatible with the objective of limiting global warming to 1.5°C; stresses that this requires a phase out of all direct and indirect fossil fuel subsidies as soon as possible and by 2025 at the very latest;
2022/02/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 33 #

2021/2106(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 b (new)
5 b. Stresses that, given the shortcomings recently reported on blending and guarantee mechanisms to facilitate optimal use of ODA, contribute to SDGs and the Paris Climate Agreement and to demonstrate development additionality, widening the geographical scope and budget share of blending finance via EFSD+ in NDICI-GE, and through the Global Gateway strategy, making the blending-guarantee mechanism the main financial tool for mobilising investments is premature and unjustified; insists on the importance of the scrutiny of the European Parliament on the implementation of EFSD+, including its deployment through the Global Gateway and urges the Commission to provide all the necessary means to ensure the Global Gateway Strategy is aligned with the programming exercise;
2022/02/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 37 #

2021/2106(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 c (new)
5 c. Recalls that the EIB intends to strengthen its role in the implementation of European external policies and development role by creating a dedicated branch (‘EIB Global’) for this purpose, reiterates longstanding EP demands that the European Court of Auditors be empowered to audit all EIB operations, and that these audits be made public;
2022/02/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 1 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. WelcomesTakes note of the communication on an intellectual property action plan to support the EU’s recovery and resilience, but regrets that the focus on international cooperation and assistance to developing countries is poorly addressedonly addressed through the lens of technical cooperation programmes, with a view to promoting better generation and management of intellectual property (IP); deplores that it fails to address explicitly the need to promote technology transfer, notably to fight against the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change, which is of primary importance for developing countries, notably LDCs and low and middle-income countries;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 3 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. Highlights that, according to UNCTAD, while developed countries have been able to mobilise massively their monetary and fiscal resources to prop up their economy (estimated at between 20 and 25% of their GDP), the poorest countries have mobilised just 1% to mitigate the socio-economic damage caused by the pandemic crisis[1];emphasises that a diversified economy is a prerequisite for resilience to future shocks;underlines that the main barriers to the industrial upgrading of developing countries are production capacity constraints such as access to technology; [1] “Reforming the International Trading System for Recovery, Resilience and Inclusive Development”, UNCTAD Research Paper (n°65) of April 2021, p. 3.
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 4 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. CRecalls onthat the Commission to continue strengthening intellectual property rights (post-pandemic global recovery should be aligned with international commitments on climate change and Agenda 2030; accordingly, believes that the global green transition requires a balance between the rules on IPR) protection and enforcement in non-EU countries through EU-funded technical cooperation programmes; welcomes in particular the intention to promote better generation and management of intellectual property (IP) on the African continent as part of a joint partnership building on the current four- year cooperation programme for Africatechnology transfer; recalls the previous efforts in UNCTAD to develop a Cod eof Conduct on Technology Transfer;calls on the EU and its Member States to take initiatives to reinvigorate it; but urges the Commission to refrain from harnessing IP chapters in the context of FTA (FTAs), without addressing the concerns of LDCs and low and middle income countries in terms of technology transfer;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 12 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Recalls that one of the main challenges for developing countries is to climb up the global value chain through economic diversification, which necessitates fair and pro-development global trade rules;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 14 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 b (new)
2 b. Recalls that, while the Special and Differentiated Treatment of the WTO is meant to safeguard the policy space of developing countries to better align their trade policy with their developmental priorities, it has been insufficient to enable their economic diversification;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 15 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 c (new)
2 c. Points out that developing countries’ obligations under TRIPS are enforceable and can be challenged under the dispute settlement mechanism, while their rights to technology transfer are not enforceable; underlines that such asymmetry of rules is not coherent with the fulfilment of the Agenda 2030;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 18 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Strongly encourages the Commission to assist producers and their associations as well as local authorities in developing countries in unlocking the potential of IP and reaping the economic value of local innovations, geographical indications and traditional knowledge; reiterates its call, in this regard, to respect the progress achieved in the international protection of indigenous peoples’ rights over their genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge; more broadly, calls on the EU and its Member States to support regional projects such as the African Continental Free Trade Agreement, which should favour products of local enterprises and in this way support regional industrialisation processes;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 30 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. Stresses that a more equitable distribution of vaccines around the globe is essential to combat effectively the spread of COVID-19 and its mutations; recalls that, while COVAX, the vaccine pillar of the World Health Organisation (WHO) Access to Covid-19 Tools (ACT) is aiming to have two billion vaccine doses available by the end of 2021, it will neither be enough to respond to the vaccination needs of the poorest countries to reach herd immunity, nor does it constitute an appropriate integrated global approach for scaling up production capacities worldwide;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 32 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 b (new)
4 b. Recalls that the current multilateral framework protecting intellectual property rights has represented an obstacle for addressing the COVID-19 crisis and that the existing WTO-TRIPS flexibilities which are based on procedurally complex, country-by- country, product-by-product and prior negotiations with patent holders, were not fit for purpose for tackling previous global health emergencies and are not up to the challenge of the current one;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 33 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 c (new)
4 c. Points out, furthermore, that past experience regarding the implementation of existing TRIPS flexibilities shows that individual countries often felt fearful of either retaliatory action by developed countries or the reputational costs of issuing compulsory licenses; underlines that compulsory licensing only applies to patents as one category of intellectual property rights (IPR), but that other IPR categories, such as data protection and trade secrets, which represent potential hurdles to the scaling-up of production of needed medical products, are beyond the scope of compulsory licences;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 35 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Welcomes, as a positive step, the recently announced US support for a proposal the declarations of WTO Director-General Ngozi Okonjo- Iweala at the meeting of Parliament’s Committee on International Trade of 20 May 2021, according to which the existing TRIPS flexibilities are too temporarily waive certain provburdensome and more flexibility is needed; welcomes, in this context, the decisions of the Agreement on Trade- Related AspectsBiden- Harris Administration in the US to support the waiving of Iintellectual Pproperty Rights for the prevention, containment and treatment of COVID-19; urges the Commission, therefore, to follow through on its promise to engage in aprotections for COVID-19 vaccines; recalls the declaration of President Von Der Leyen according to which COVID-19 vaccines should be considered a global public good; accordingly, urges the EU to constructively and constructiveproactively engage in text-based negotiations at World Trade Organization level.for a temporary TRIPS waiver for all products and technologies including vaccines, treatments and diagnostics needed to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic and to issue, with that purpose, a negotiation mandate;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 42 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. Urges the EU to forswear any recourse to legal proceedings in the WTO or under free trade and investment agreements against countries that infringe TRIPS provisions when adopting policy measures to expand access to COVID-19 related medical products; requests the Commission, therefore, to propose, as an interim measure before agreeing on a COVID-19 related TRIPS waiver, an immediate WTO political declaration on a ‘standstill’ regarding any action relating to vaccines and other essential medical products to tackle the pandemic;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 46 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 b (new)
5 b. Insists upon the need to support global open access to COVID-19 vaccines to scale up global production through technology transfer; underlines that the Commission has so far solely focused on encouraging Western vaccine manufacturers to share technology and licences on a purely voluntary basis; notes with concern that there is evidence that current producers of authorised COVID- 19 vaccines have refused offers to expand production from several potential generic pharmaceutical producers in the EU and abroad;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 48 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 c (new)
5 c. Calls for binding technology transfers to scale up vaccine production; urges the Commission to take initiatives along this line and to proactively undertake efforts to make sure that vaccine manufacturers share IP and technology through the WHO C-TAP multilateral mechanism, particularly in low and middle-income countries;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 50 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 d (new)
5 d. Is of the opinion that the EU should urgently foster multilateral arrangements at WTO level, including a treaty on pandemics, as recently proposed by the President of the European Council, as part of the ‘Health and Trade Initiative’ to be adopted in November 2021 during the twelfth Ministerial Conference, as well as at the next WHO general assembly; underlines that this initiative is a complement to and not a substitute for a TRIPS waiver;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 52 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 e (new)
5 e. Encourages developing countries to strengthen regional value chains and intra-regional trade and investments in health and health related areas, notably through collective R&D efforts in medical research and regional pooling of resources;notes with concern that, according to the Global Trade Alert, as of 21 March 2021, 54 governments introduced export curbs on key medical supplies since the beginning of the year[1];stresses that regional trade pacts should be used to prevent export bans on key products in times of global and regional shortages, as in the case of the ongoing pandemic crisis; [1] “Reforming the International Trading System for Recovery, Resilience and Inclusive Development”, UNCTAD Research Paper (n°65) of April 2021, p. 20.
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 53 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 f (new)
5 f. Takes note of the Commission’s intention to evaluate and revise the Community Plant Variety Rights (CPRV); recalls the EU’s commitments to implement the Agenda 2030 and its objective to leave no one behind; stresses that Small-scale farmers (SSF)and agricultural biodiversity are critical to achieving the SDGs; accordingly, stresses the need to support a rights-based approach to implement the Declaration on the Rights of Peasants and Other People Working in Rural Areas adopted by the United Nations General Assembly at its 73rd Session in December 2018;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 54 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 g (new)
5 g. Highlights that small-scale farmers (SSF) and agricultural biodiversity have a critical role in healthy, nutritious diets and ensuring the resilience of agricultural production systems to cope with climate change; recalls equally that seed diversity is vital in building the resilience of farming to climate change; notes with concern that trade and Intellectual Property rules protecting plants, genetic information and biological process in the remit of TRIPS and the Union for Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV 1991) have a detrimental effect on SSF innovation and agricultural biodiversity, although being critical to supporting food and nutrition security;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 55 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 h (new)
5 h. Recalls that farm-saved seeds are estimated to account for over 80% of farmers’ total seed requirements in some African countries; calls for the EU to support intellectual property rights regimes that enhance the development of locally adapted seed varieties and farmer- saved seeds, in line with the provisions of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA), which safeguards the rights of farmers to maintain genetic resources for purposes of food security and climate change adaptation, and Article 19 of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Peasants and Other People Working in Rural Areas, according to which peasants have the right to maintain, control, protect and develop their own seeds and traditional knowledge;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 56 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 i (new)
5 i. Stresses that, while green technologies are predominantly held and protected by corporations of developed countries, the TRIPS Agreement and TRIPS Plus hamper the green technological upgrading in developing countries that must accompany any climate-friendly industrialisation process;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 57 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 j (new)
5 j. Stresses the need for coherence between the special and differential treatment (SDT) of the WTO and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) principle of “common but differentiated responsibilities”;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 58 #

2021/2007(INI)

5 k. Calls on the EU to take the lead in the identification of the salient barriers to the dissemination of technologies in developing countries to address climate change and to strive to promote the adoption of a Declaration on “IPR and Climate Change” comparable to the Doha Declaration of 2001 on the TRIPS Agreement and Public Health, to foster the legal transfer of climate-friendly technology in developing countries, in compliance with the Paris Agreement and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), notably the principle of Common But Differentiated Responsibilities (CBDR);along this line, takes the view that EU FTAs with developing countries should include provisions that promote technology transfer and enable Local Content Requirements in their public procurement and investment policies;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 59 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 l (new)
5 l. Stresses the need to account for the carbon “embodied” in imported goods and services; acknowledges, however, the adverse impact of Border Carbon Adjustment (BCA) on developing countries locked into carbon-intensive and extractive industrialisation;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 60 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 m (new)
5 m. Stresses that Least Developed Countries and Small Island Developing States should be given special treatment in order to take account of their specificities and the potential negative impact of the carbon border adjustment mechanism (CBAM) on their development; in light of this, insists that such initiative should be in line with the special and differential treatment (SDT) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) principle of “common but differentiated responsibilities” and accompanied by measures facilitating technology transfer both for climate adaptation and mitigation, to accommodate the needs of developing countries; to this end, stresses the need to develop are distributive mechanism that redirects new tariff revenue to ringfence financing for green transitions in developing countries, additional to ODA, to undergo an industrialisation process based on clean and decarbonised technologies;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 1 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 1
(1) Forests provide a broad variety of environmental, economic and social benefits, including timber and non-wood forest products and environmental services essential for humankind, as they harbour most of the Earth’s terrestrial biodiversity. They maintain ecosystem functions, help protect the climate system, provide clean air and play a vital role for the purification of waters and soils as well as for water retention. In addition, forests provide subsistence and income to about one third of the world’s population and their destruction has serious consequences for the livelihoods of the most vulnerable people, including indigenous peoples and local communities who heavily depend on forest ecosystems. 18Indigenous peoples inhabit and manage many forested territories globally, and 80% of the Earth’s biodiversity is located on indigenous peoples’ territories. Deforestation is significantly lower in territories where indigenous peoples are in control of their own lands, as compared to territories managed by governments or other entities. The recognition and respect of indigenous peoples’ land rights should be the primary tool to prevent deforestation. Furthermore, deforestation and forest degradation reduce essential carbon sinks and increase the likelihood of new diseases spreading from animals to humans. _________________ 18 Commission Communication of 27 July 2019 ’Stepping up EU Action to Protect and Restore the World’s Forests’, COM(2019) 352 final.
2022/05/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 7 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 3
(3) Deforestation, natural ecosystem conversion, ecosystem and forest degradation contribute to the global climate crisis in multiple ways. Most importantly, they increase greenhouse gas emissions through associated forest fires, permanently removing carbon sink capacities, decreasing climate change resilience of the affected area and substantially reducing its biodiversity. Deforestation alone accounts for 11 % of greenhouse gas emissions 20 . _________________ 20 IPCC, Climate Change and Land: an IPCC special report on climate change, desertification, land degradation, sustainable land management, food security, and greenhouse gas fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems, https://www.ipcc.ch/srccl/.
2022/05/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 10 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 4
(4) Climate breakdown induces the loss of biodiversity globally and biodiversity loss aggravates climate change, they are inextricably linked, as recent studies have confirmed. Biodiversity helps mitigate climate change. Insects, birds and mammals act as pollinators, seed dispersers and can help store carbon more efficiently, directly or indirectly. Forests also ensure a continuous replenishment of water resources and prevention of droughts and their deleterious effects to local communities, including indigenous peoples. Drastically reducing deforestation natural ecosystem conversion, ecosystem and forest degradation and systemically restoring forests and other ecosystems is the single largest nature-basedan opportunity for climate mitigation.
2022/05/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 14 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 1
(1) Forests provide a broad variety of environmental, economic and social benefits, including timber and non-wood forest products and environmental services essential for humankind, as they harbour most of the Earth’s terrestrial biodiversity. They maintain ecosystem functions, help protect the climate system, provide clean air and play a vital role for the purification of waters and soils as well as for water retention. In addition, forests provide subsistence and income to about one third of the world’s population and their destruction has serious consequences for the livelihoods of the most vulnerable people, including indigenous peoples and local communities who heavily depend on forest ecosystems. 18Indigenous peoples inhabit and manage many forested territories globally, and 80% of the Earth’s biodiversity is located on indigenous peoples’ territories. Deforestation is significantly lower in territories where indigenous peoples are in control of their own lands, as compared to territories managed by governments or other entities. The recognition and respect of indigenous peoples’ land rights should be the primary tool to prevent deforestation. Furthermore, deforestation and forest degradation reduce essential carbon sinks and increase the likelihood of new diseases spreading from animals to humans. _________________ 18 Commission Communication of 27 July 2019 ’Stepping up EU Action to Protect and Restore the World’s Forests’, COM(2019) 352 final.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 20 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 3
(3) Deforestation, natural ecosystem conversion, ecosystem and forest degradation contribute to the global climate crisis in multiple ways. Most importantly, they increase greenhouse gas emissions through associated forest fires, permanently removing carbon sink capacities, decreasing climate change resilience of the affected area and substantially reducing its biodiversity. Deforestation alone accounts for 11 % of greenhouse gas emissions 20 . _________________ 20 IPCC, Climate Change and Land: an IPCC special report on climate change, desertification, land degradation, sustainable land management, food security, and greenhouse gas fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems, https://www.ipcc.ch/srccl/.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 23 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 4
(4) Climate breakdown induces the loss of biodiversity globally and biodiversity loss aggravates climate change, they are inextricably linked, as recent studies have confirmed. Biodiversity helps mitigate climate change. Insects, birds and mammals act as pollinators, seed dispersers and can help store carbon more efficiently, directly or indirectly. Forests also ensure a continuous replenishment of water resources and prevention of droughts and their deleterious effects to local communities, including indigenous peoples. Drastically reducing deforestation natural ecosystem conversion, ecosystem and forest degradation and systemically restoring forests and other ecosystems is the single largest nature-basedan opportunity for climate mitigation.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 35 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 11
(11) The European Parliament highlighted that ongoing destruction and degradation of the world’s forests isand natural ecosystems, as well as human rights violations, are linked, to a large extent, to the expansion of agricultural production — in particular by converting forests to agricultural land dedicated to producing a number of high-demand products and commodities. The Parliament adopted on 22 October 2020 a resolution32 in accordance with Article 225 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) requesting the Commission to submit, on the basis of Article 192(1) TFEU, a proposal for an “EU legal framework to halt and reverse EU-driven global deforestation”. _________________ 32 European Parliament resolution of 22 October 2020 with recommendations to the Commission based on man EU legal framework to halt and reverse EU-driven global deforestation (2020/2006(INL) Available at https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/doc ument/TA-9-2020-0285_EN.htmldatory due diligence.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 56 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 21
(21) The Commission should continue to work in partnership with producer countries, and more generally in cooperation with international organisations and bodies, and should be reinforcing its support and incentives with regard to protecting forests and transition to deforestation-free production, acknowledging the role of indigenous people, improving governance and land tenure, increasing law enforcement and promoting sustainable forest management, climate-resilient agriculture, sustainable intensification and diversification, agro- ecology and agroforestry. In doing so it should acknowledge the role of indigenous people in protecting forests. Building upon the experience and lessons learned in the context of the already existing initiatives, the Union and the Member States should work in partnership with producer countries, upon their request, to exploit the multi-functionalities of forest, support them in the transition to sustainable forest management, and address global challenges while meeting local needs and paying attention to the challenges faced by smallholders in line with the Communication to Stepping up Action to Protect and Restore the World’s Forests. The partnership approach should help producer countries in protecting, restoring and sustainably using forest, hence contribu by pushing for and supporting the recognition of their collective land ownership rights as enshrined in ILO Convention 169 and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) and ensuring that their free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) is obtained prior to any project in their territories, improving governance and land tenure, increasing law enforcement and promoting sustainable forest management, climate-resilient agriculture, sustainable intensification and diversification, agro- ecology and agroforestry. In doing so it should acknowledge the role of indigenous people in protecting forests, ensure that any such project does not encroach on or lead to the land grab of indigenous peoples’ territories, and take active steps to support their work in protecting to the objective of this Regulation to reduce deforestation and forest degradationir forests against illegal logging.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 62 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 22
(22) Another important action announced in the Communication is the establishment of the EU Observatory on deforestation, forest degradation, changes in the world’s forest cover and associated drivers (“EU Observatory”) launched by the Commission in order to better monitor changes in the world’s forest cover and related drivers. Moreover, building on already existing monitoring tools, including Copernicus products, the EU Observatory will facilitate access to information on supply chains for public entities, consumers and business, providing easy-to-understand data and information linking deforestation, forest degradation, and changes in the world’s forest cover to EU demand/trade for commodities and products. The EU Observatory will thus directly support the implementation of this Regulation by providing scientific evidence in regard to global deforestation and forest degradation and related trade. The EU shall also examine how to integrate the monitoring of Indigenous land rights recognition into the EU observatory. The EU Observatory will cooperate closely with relevant international organisations, research institutes, non-governmental organizations and third countries.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 64 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 23
(23) The existing EU legislative frameworkforest framework is the EU Action Plan on forest law enforcement governance and trade that focuses on tackling illegal logging and associated trade and does not address deforestation directly. It consists of Regulation (EU) No 995/2010 of the European Parliament and of the Council, laying down the obligations of operators who place timber and timber products on the market40 , and Council Regulation (EC) No 2173/2005, on the establishment of a Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade licensing scheme for imports of timber into the European Community41 . Both Regulations were evaluated in which operationalises the Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs). The performance and implementation of the two Regulations underwent a Fitness Check which determinefound that, while the legislboth achieved some success, a number of implementation chas had a positive impact on forest governance,llenges have held back progress towards achieving fully their objectives of the two Regulations – namely to curb illegal logging and related trade, and to reduce the consumption of illegally harvested timber in the EU – have not been met42 and it was concluded that focusing solely on legality. The EUTR application and functioning of the due diligence scheme on the one hand, and the limited number of countries involved in the VPA process with only one having thus far an operating licensing system in place (Indonesia) ofn timber was not sufficient tohe other, curtailed effectiveness in meeting the set objectives. _________________ 40 OJ L 295, 12.11.2010, p. 23. 41 OJ L 347, 30.12.2005, p. 1. 42 https://ec.europa.eu/info/law/better- regulation/have-your-say/initiatives/11630- Illegal-logging-evaluation-of-EU-rules- fitness-check-_en of consumption of illegally harvested timber in the EU.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 90 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 57
(57) Regulation (EC) No 2173/2005 lays down Union procedures for the implementation of a FLEGT licensing scheme through bilateral Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) with timber-producing countries. To respect bilateral commitments that the European Union has entered into and to preserve the progress achieved with partner countries that have an operating system in place (FLEGT licensing stage), this Regulation should include a provision declaring wood and wood-based products covered by a valid FLEGT license as fulfilling the legality requirement under this Regulation. The Commission will engage with VPA partner countries on ways to address the deforestation and forest degradation requirements under this Regulation in the context of the VPAs and/or other partnership and cooperation mechanisms.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 94 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
This Regulation lays down rules regarding the placing and making available on the Union market, as well as the export from the Union market, of cattle, cocoa, coffee, oil palm, soya and woo, wood, rubber, oil, bauxite, nickel, copper, iron, and gold (“relevant commodities”) and all products, as listed in Annex I, that contain, have been fed with or have been made using relevant commodities or products deriving from them (“relevant products”), with a view to
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 96 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) minimisingHalt the Union’s contribution to deforestation and forest, forest degradation, ecosystem conversion and ecosystem degradation worldwide
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 99 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point b a (new)
(ba) preventing the violation of human rights linked to the production of relevant commodities and products.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 100 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 a (new)
This Regulation also lays out obligations for financial institutions operating in the Union that provide financial services to natural or legal persons whose economic activities consist, or are linked to, the production, supply, placing on or export from the EU market of relevant commodities and products.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 111 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 16 a (new)
(16a) ‘Meaningful engagement with stakeholders’ means understanding the concerns and interests of relevant stakeholders, in particular the most vulnerable groups such as smallholders, indigenous peoples and local communities as well as women, by consulting them directly in a manner that takes into account potential barriers to effective engagement. On indigenous peoples’ land, meaningful engagement includes their right to withhold consent, as enshrined in ILO Convention 169 and UNDRIP. Operators should engage with stakeholders prior to taking any decisions that may impact them. This involves the timely provision of all information needed by the potentially impacted stakeholders to be able to make an informed decision as to how the decision could affect their interests. It also means there is follow- through on implementation of agreed commitments, ensuring that adverse impacts to impacted and potentially impacted stakeholders are addressed.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 114 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 28
(28) ‘relevant legislation of the country of production’ means the rules applicable in the country of production concerning the legal status of the area of producaw means : a) the rules applicable in the country of production concerning the legal status of the area of production, land use rights, environmental protection, third parties’ rights, labour rights, and as well as relevant, tax, anti- corruption, trade, customs, payment and contract regulations under the legal framework applicable in the country of production (b) human rights protected under international law, in particular under any treaties and other instruments ratified or endorsed by the country of production. These include instruments protecting: customary tenure rights and the right to free, prior and informed consent (FPIC), as set out among others by the UN Declaration ion terms of land use rights, environmental protection, third parties’ rights and relevant trade and customs regulahe Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues and UN and regional treaty bodies, the right to water, the right to environmental protection and sustainable development, the right to defend human rights and the environment, free from any form of persecution and harassment, labour rights as enshrined in ILO fundamental conventions uander legislation framework applicable in the country of production; other internationally recognised human rights related to land use, access or ownership, as well as the human right to a healthy environment 1a, as defined in the Framework Principles on Human Rights and the Environment and the standards and good practices identified by the UN Special Rapporteur on human rights and the environment. Where national laws fall short of international standards, operators must ensure that the above-mentioned rights are complied with.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 119 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 28 a (new)
(28a) ‘free, prior and informed consent (FPIC)’ means a collective human right of indigenous peoples and local communities to give and withhold their consent prior to the commencement of any activity that may affect their rights, land, resources, territories, livelihoods, and food security. It is a right exercised through representatives of their own choosing and in a manner consistent with their own customs, values, and norms.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 120 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 28 b (new)
(28b) ‘Human rights defenders’ means individuals, groups and organs of society that promote and protect universally recognised human rights and fundamental freedoms. Human rights defenders seek the promotion and protection of civil and political rights as well as the promotion, protection and realisation of economic, social and cultural rights. Human rights defenders also promote and protect the rights of members of groups such as indigenous communities.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 124 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 28 c (new)
(28c) ‘Environmental human rights defenders’ means individuals and groups who, in their personal or professional capacity and in a peaceful manner, strive to protect and promote human rights relating to the environment, including water, air, land, flora and fauna.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 127 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 28 d (new)
(28d) remedial measures’ means any action, or combination of actions, to restore, rehabilitate or replace land that has been subject to deforestation, ecosystem conversion, or forest or ecosystem degradation;
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 129 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 28 e (new)
(28e) ‘affected peoples’ means indigenous peoples and local communities who own, inhabit, depend on, or have a special attachment to land that has been subject to deforestation, ecosystem conversion, or forest or ecosystem degradation, or whose rights have been impacted by the production of relevant commodities or products.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 133 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 2
2. Operators that by exercising due diligence as referred to in Article 8 have come to the conclusion that the relevant commodities and products comply with the requirements of this Regulation shall make available to the competent authorities via the information system referred to in Article 31 a due diligence statement before placing on the Union market or exporting the relevant commodities and products. That electronically available and transmittable and certified statement shall confirm that due diligence was carried out and disclose the steps that were taken in this regard to verify the compliance of the relevant commodities and products with this Regulation, and explain the assessment why no or only negligible risk was found and. It shall also contain the information set out in Annex II for the relevant commodities and products. Statements and certification shall be published and made publicly available.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 135 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 7 a (new)
7a. Operators should by all means support the compliance of their suppliers, including smallholders, with the regulation, including through investments and capacity building as well as pricing mechanisms that would enable a living income for the producers they source from.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 138 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. Operators shall ensure meaningful engagement and participation of all relevant stakeholder groups, in particular with potentially impacted stakeholders and rights holders such as indigenous peoples and local communities, women and smallholders, at all stages of the due diligence process. They shall engage with stakeholders and ensure that FPIC has been obtained, prior to taking any decisions that may impact them.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 144 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 1 – point h a (new)
(ha) where any arrangement concerns indigenous peoples, local communities or other groups with customary tenure rights, the arrangement was made with their free, prior and informed consent (FPIC);
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 145 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 1 – point h b (new)
(hb) adequate and verifiable information, obtained via independent audits and appropriate consultation processes, that the area used for the purpose of producing the relevant commodities and products is not subject to any claims on the basis of indigenous, customary or other legitimate tenure rights or subject to any dispute regarding their use, ownership or occupation;
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 147 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 1 – point h c (new)
(hc) adequate and verifiable information disclosing the views of any indigenous peoples, local communities and other groups that claim tenure rights in respect of the area used for the purpose of producing the relevant commodities and products regarding the production of the relevant commodities and products;
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 154 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 2 – point b a (new)
(ba) the existence of claims to or disputes regarding the use of, ownership of, or exercise of customary tenure rights on the area used for the purpose of producing the relevant commodities and products, whether formally registered or not;
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 155 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 2 – point b b (new)
(bb) the presence of vulnerable peoples, indigenous peoples, local communities and other customary tenure rights holders in the country and area of production of the relevant commodity or products;
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 159 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 2 – point e
(e) concerns in relation to the country of production and origin or part thereof, such as level of corruption, prevalence of document and data falsification, lack of law enforcement, violation of rights of, or violence against, Indigenous Peoples, local communities or other customary tenure rights holders, as well as human rights and environmental human rights defenders, armed conflict or presence of sanctions imposed by the United Nations Security Council or the Council of the European Union;.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 167 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. Where relevant, operators shall ensure that risk assessments and mitigation measures are adopted ensuring the participation and consultation and the free, prior and informed of Indigenous Peoples, local communities, and other customary tenure rights holders that are present in the area of production of the relevant commodities and products.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 169 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 2
2. Unless otherwoperators shall, on an annual basise, provided by other EU legislative instruments that lay down requirements regarding sustainability value chain due diligence, operators which are not SMEs shall, on an annual basis, publicly report as widely as possible, includingublicly report as widely as possible, including on the internet, on the following elements: a) their due diligence system and the steps taken by them to implement their obligations as set out in Article 8, including the meaningful engagement and participation of stakeholders and disclosure on disengagement, as referred to in Article 10; b) Evidences of consent of Indigenous Peoples, local communities, and other customary tenure rights holders that are present in the area of production onf the internet, on their due diligence system including on the steps taken by them to implement their obligations as serelevant commodities and products; c) the measures they have implemented to ensure that the costs of compliance with this Regulation are shared among all actors in the supply chains proportionally, and; d) the measures they have implemented to support the compliance of their suppliers, in particular smallholders, including investments and capacity building, as well as pricing mechanisms that wout in Article 8ld enable a living income for the producers they source from. Operators falling also within the scope of other EU legislative instruments that lay down requirements regarding value chain due diligence may fulfil their reporting obligations under this paragraph by including the required information when reporting in the context of other EU legislative instruments.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 180 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 12 a (new)
Article 12 a Obligations of financial institutions 1. Financial institutions shall provide financial services to customers only when they conclude that there is no more than a negligible risk that the services in question may provide support, directly or indirectly, to activities leading to, or linked with, deforestation, ecosystems conversion, forests and ecosystems degradation or that are taking place in violation of relevant legislation/law 2. In view of complying with paragraph 1, financial institutions, shall exercise due diligence, as described in paragraph 3, as soon as they establish a business relationship with, and prior to providing financial services to customers; 3. The due diligence shall include: (a) the collection of information and documents, as referred to in Article 12b needed to fulfil the requirement set out in paragraph 1; (b) Risk assessment and mitigation measures as described in Article 12c; 4. For customers with whom they have established an ongoing business relationship before the date of entry into force of this regulation, financial institutions shall complete the relevant due diligence within one year from the date in question.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 205 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 23 – paragraph 2 – point d a (new)
(da) criminal sanctions, in accordance with the "Proposal for a Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on the protection of the environment through criminal law and replacing Directive 2008/99/EC".
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 207 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 23 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. Without prejudice to Article 17, 85% of each amount obtained as a result of penalties imposed in line with paragraphs 2(a) and (c) of this Article shall be used for remedial measures or to benefit affected peoples.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 217 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 27 – paragraph 2 – point e
(e) agreements and other instruments, including partnership and cooperation mechanisms referred to in Article 28(1) concluded between the country concerned and the Union that address deforestation or forest degradation and facilitates compliance of relevant commodities and products with the requirements of this Regulation and their effective implementation;
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 219 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 27 – paragraph 2 – point f
(f) whether the country concerned has national or subnational laws in place, including in accordance with Article 5 of the Paris Agreement and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and takes effective enforcement measures to avoid and sanction activities leading to deforestation and forestrelated to the production of relevant commodities for export leading to deforestation forest conversion and forest and ecosystem degradation, and in particular whether sanctions of sufficient severity to deprive of the benefits accruing from deforestation or forest degradationforest conversion or forest and ecosystem degradation or non-compliance with the rules applicable in the country of production described in Article 2(28) are applied.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 224 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 27 – paragraph 2 – point f a (new)
(fa) whether the sub-national jurisdiction has developed jurisdictional approaches with the full participation of all stakeholders, including civil society, indigenous peoples and local communities, women, and the private sector including SMEs and smallholders, to tackle deforestation, forest degradation, land rights violations and illegal production;
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 225 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 27 – paragraph 2 – point f b (new)
(fb) whether the country concerned makes relevant data available transparently.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 228 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 27 – paragraph 3 – introductory part
3. The Commission shall notify the countries concerned of its intent to assign a change to the existing risk category and invite them to provide any information deemed useful in this regard. It shall also carry out a public consultation to gather information and views from all interested parties, including in particular vulnerable peoples, Indigenous Peoples, local communities small holders, women and civil society organisations. The Commission shall allow the countries and other interested parties adequate time to provide a response, which may include information on measures taken by the country to remedy the situation in case its status or the status of parts thereof might be changed to a higher risk category.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 236 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 28 – paragraph 1
1. The Commission shall engage with producer countries concerned by this Regulation to develop partnerships and cooperation to jointly address the local causes of deforestation and forest degradation. Such partnerships and cooperation mechanisms will focus on the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of forests, deforestation, forest degradation and the transition to sustainable commodity production, consumption processing and trade methods, cooperation with producer country customs authorities and other relevant law enforcement agencies, and securing the rights and livelihoods of forest-dependent communities including indigenous peoples, local communities and smallholders in ways that respect their culture, customs and ways of life. Partnerships and cooperation mechanisms may include structured dialogues, support programmes and actions, administrative arrangements and provisions in existing agreements or agreements as well as trade incentives that enable producer countries to make the transition to an agricultural production that facilitates the compliance of relevant commodities and products with the requirements of this regulation. They should be based on time bound milestones agreed with local stakeholders. Such agreements and their effective implementation will be taken into account as part of the benchmarking under Article 27 of this Regulation.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 244 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 28 – paragraph 2
2. Partnerships and cooperation should allow and monitor the full participation of all stakeholders, including civil society, indigenous peoples, local communities, women and the private sector including, SMEs and smallholders. Partnerships and cooperation should support – and, where not already present through existing agreements and dialogues such as FLEGT VPAs, initiate – inclusive and participatory dialogue toward national legal and governance reform processes to enhance forest governance and address domestic factors contributing to deforestation, natural ecosystem conversion and forest and ecosystem degradation.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 251 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 28 – paragraph 3
3. Partnerships and cooperation shall in consultation with Indigenous Peoples, Local Communities, civil society organisations and smallholders and through participatory multi-stakeholder processes promote the development of integrated land use planning processes, relevant legislations and legal reforms, fiscal incentives and other pertinent tools to improve governance, forest and biodiversity conservation, sustainable management and restoration of forests, tackle the conversion of forests and vulnerable ecosystems to other land uses, optimise gains for the landscape, tenure security, agriculture productivity including agroecology and competitiveness, transparent supply chains, strengthen the rights of forest dependent communities including smallholders, indigenous peoples and local communities, and ensure public access to forest management documents and other relevant information. seek the recognition and respect of their land rights and right to free, prior and informed consent, in accordance with international standards and ensure public access to forest management documents and other relevant information. Any project developed under these partnerships, including those focusing on conservation and restoration, must respect the rights of indigenous peoples, obtain their free, prior and informed consent regarding any project and/or development in their territories, and respect their land rights, as defined by international standards.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 259 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 28 – paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. The Commission shall secure sufficient resources to specifically support smallholders in third countries to comply with the requirements of this Regulation and facilitate their access to the EU market;
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 260 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 28 – paragraph 4 b (new)
4b. The Commission support countries to ensure that their FLEGT licensing systems fully conform to the deforestation-free requirements of this Regulation.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 262 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 30 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. (1) for the purposes of paragraph 6, projects must include a mechanism to monitor and avoid negative impacts on human rights and a locally accessible and transparent grievance mechanism. Special attention is to be given to projects in areas with specific needs or vulnerabilities, such as areas with specific environmental challenges or natural constraints and areas of high natural value; (2) projects must respect and promote the inherent rights of indigenous peoples, especially their rights to their lands, territories, resources and self- determination and their right to free, prior and informed consent (FPIC); (3) projects are to be technically and financially coherent. 10. In addition to the criteria set out in Article 186 of the Financial Regulation, costs relating to the purchase of land and other property shall be considered eligible for financing under paragraphs 6 and 7 if the following conditions are fulfilled: (a) the purchase serves to implement remedial measures or directly benefit affected peoples; and (b) the land or property purchased is reserved on a long-term basis for either the implementation of remedial measures or for the direct benefit of affected peoples. This article shall be applied without prejudice to any rights to compensation or other remedies any party may be entitled to independently of this Regulation.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 264 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 30 – paragraph 2 b (new)
2b. Operators failing to comply with the duties of this Regulation shall also be liable and obliged to compensate for the harm that the exercise of due diligence would have avoided. The action to establish liability shall be filed before the relevant jurisdiction by any natural or legal person with a legitimate interest to do so.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 265 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Chapter 6 a (new)
6a Chapter 6A (new) Remediation Article 30A European Fund for Forest and Ecosystem Remediation and Affected Peoples 1. A European Fund for Forest and Ecosystem Remediation and Affected Peoples is hereby established (the ‘Remediation Fund’). The Remediation Fund shall be maintained and managed, directly or indirectly, by the Commission. 2. Member States shall ensure that all amounts referred to in Article 23(3) are transferred directly to the Remediation Fund. In relation to each transfer, Member States shall submit to the Commission information in relation to the relevant commodities or products associated with the collection of the amounts concerned identifying the country of production and the geo- localisation coordinates, latitude and longitude of all plots of land where the relevant commodities and products were produced, as well as the date or time range of production. The Commission shall make this information publicly available on an openly accessible website. 3. Only projects implementing the objectives of completing remedial measures or directly benefiting affected peoples shall be eligible for funding under the Remediation Fund. Remediation, through ecosystem restoration and other forms of conservation projects, has long been responsible for the theft of Indigenous and local peoples’ land and has often lead to serious human rights violations. Remediation efforts must conform to the same strict rules as other types of land use covered under this bill, such as abiding by FPIC, close monitoring for human rights violations and include a locally accessible and transparent grievance mechanism. 4. Only applications made by, jointly with, on behalf of, or with the written support of, all relevant affected peoples shall be eligible for funding under the Remediation Fund. Applications that relate to land to which indigenous peoples or local communities hold customary tenure rights shall be accompanied by evidence that the free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) of the relevant indigenous peoples or local communities has been obtained. Such projects must respect the rights to land and self-determination of indigenous peoples and seek to promote these rights. 5. Grants under the Remediation Fund shall be awarded and managed in accordance with this Article and Title VIII of the Regulation (EU, Euratom) 2018/1046 of the European Parliament and of the Council (the ‘Financial Regulation’). 6. Legal entities may apply to the Commission for grants under the Remediation Fund to finance projects that will result in the implementation of remedial measures in relation to the land, forest or natural ecosystems where the relevant commodities or products associated with the collection of funds under paragraph 2 were produced. In assessing the proposed remedial measures, the Commission shall be guided by Annex II to Directive 2004/35/CE. 7. Legal entities may apply to the Commission for grants under the Remediation Fund to finance projects that will directly benefit affected peoples impacted by deforestation, ecosystem conversion, or forest or ecosystem degradation connected to the relevant commodities or products, or impacted by the production of the relevant commodities or products, associated with the collection of funds under paragraph 2. Such projects shall aim to address negative impacts experienced by the affected peoples that derive from the deforestation, ecosystem conversion, or forest or ecosystem degradation concerned and may consist of various measures, including monetary transfers, provision of goods or services, purchase of land or other property, and support programmes. Such projects must obtain the free, prior and informed consent of the impacted indigenous peoples and local communities, in accordance with international law. 8. To support an application, legal entities may refer to the information referred to in paragraph 2 and any other verifiable information. 9. By the date established in Article 36(2), the Commission shall adopt a delegated act in accordance with Article 33 to supplement this Article with detailed rules as to the operation of the Remediation Fund and award criteria to access funding under the Remediation Fund. These detailed rules and award criteria shall be based on the following principles: (a) projects financed by the Remediation Fund are to make a significant contribution to achieving the objectives set out in paragraph 3 and shall not undermine these objectives; (b) projects with the highest potential for contributing to the achievement of the objectives in paragraph 3 are to be given priority; (c) projects that provide co-benefits and promote synergies between the two objectives set out in paragraph 3 are to benefit from a bonus in their evaluation; (d) for the purposes of paragraph 6, projects must include a mechanism to monitor and avoid negative impacts on human rights and a locally accessible and transparent grievance mechanism. Special attention is to be given to projects in areas with specific needs or vulnerabilities, such as areas with specific environmental challenges or natural constraints and areas of high natural value; (e) for the purposes of paragraph 7, projects must respect and promote the inherent rights of indigenous peoples, especially their rights to their lands, territories, resources and self- determination, and their right to free, prior and informed consent(FPIC); (f) projects are to be technically and financially coherent. 10. In addition to the criteria set out in Article 186 of the Financial Regulation, costs relating to the purchase of land and other property shall be considered eligible for financing under paragraphs 6 and 7 if the following conditions are fulfilled: (a) the purchase serves to implement remedial measures or directly benefit affected peoples; and (b) the land or property purchased is reserved on a long-term basis for either the implementation of remedial measures or for the direct benefit of affected peoples. 11. This article shall be applied without prejudice to any rights to compensation or other remedies any party may be entitled to independently of this Regulation.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 267 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 31 – paragraph 5
5. In line with the EU’s Open Data Policy, and in particular the Directive (EU) 2019/102451 , the Commission shall provide access to the wider public to the complete anonymised datasets of the information system in an open format that can be machine-readable and that ensures interoperability, re-use and accessibility. _________________ 51 Directive (EU) 2019/1024 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 June 2019 on open data and the re-use of public sector information (OJ L 172, 26.6.2019, p. 56–83).
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 271 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 32 – paragraph 2 – introductory part
2. No later than fivetwo years after the entry into force and at least every five years thereafter, the Commission shall carry out a general review of this Regulation, and shall present a report to the European Parliament and the Council accompanied, if appropriate, by a legislative proposal. The first of the reports shall include in particular, based on specific studies, an evaluation of:
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 273 #

2021/0366(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 32 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. The Commission shall permanently monitor the impacts of this regulation on vulnerable stakeholders such as smallholders, indigenous peoples and local communities, especially in third countries, also paying particular regard to the situation of women. The monitoring shall be based on a scientific and transparent methodology and shall take into account information provided by the interested stakeholders taking particular care to respect the land practices and ways of life of Indigenous people. No later than three years from the date of application referred to in Article 36(2), the Commission shall propose measures, taking into account the outcomes of the monitoring process aiming at supporting these stakeholders, in particular to: a) Ensure that their production methods and scale are able to comply with the sustainability criteria set out in the regulation, and that their commodities and products are traceable and their origin transparent; b) Promote, when necessary, their transition from commodity production destined to export towards more socially and environmentally sustainable agricultural practices. c) Facilitate and support their inclusion in supply chains leading to the EU internal market by creating conditions and incentives that enable them to comply with the EU regulatory requirements; d) Provide support and incentives for them to conserve their forests and natural ecosystems on their lands that are used for commodity production destined to export; e) Guarantee that, in any case, the rights of Indigenous Peoples and other local communities with tenure rights are adequately protected in accordance with international law.
2022/05/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 53 #

2021/0277(BUD)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 b (new)
7b. Emphasises, furthermore, that appropriate resources should be secured in the 2022 EU budget for the implementation of the Health Union proposals, as amended during the legislative process; calls, therefore, on the Commission to revise the Financial Statements for the extended mandates of the European Medicines Agency and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control to take into account the additional tasks set out in the revised proposals;
2021/07/15
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 11 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 2 a (new)
(2 a) The growth of biofuel consumption in Member States is a driver of indirect land use change and food price volatility, posing a threat to global food security. This is because the majority of Union biofuel production and consumption comes from crops grown on land that could be used instead in the food and feed markets. In order to reduce indirect land use change emissions and limit the risk of food insecurity, it is appropriate to progressively phase-out biofuels, bioliquids as well as biomass fuels obtained from crops. In the meantime, in case of severe disruption on food markets, Member States should take rapid action to secure global food security, such as suspension measures on the production and blending of crop based biofuels.
2022/03/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 18 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 22 a (new)
(22 a) The Commission’s 2020Hydrogen Strategy for a Climate-Neutral Europe notes the importance of the EU actively promoting new opportunities for cooperation on renewable hydrogen with neighbouring countries and regions, as away to contribute to their energy transition and to foster sustainable growth and development. With this in mind, it is important that demand from the Union for RFNBOs do not drive unsustainable production models within and outside the Union. To mitigate this risk, RFNBOs, regardless of the country of production, should meet a set of minimum criteria including in relation to land and water use as well as to human rights and sustainable development in order to be eligible for support or to count towards the overall target and the related sub- targets of this Directive. The production of hydrogen should meet the highest environmental standards and must not be in competition with the needs of local communities provision for water, land and energy, in line with the objectives of the SDGs as well as the Paris Agreement and international agreements on biodiversity and the environment.
2022/03/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 20 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 1 – point a a (new)
(a a) point (37) is deleted.
2022/03/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 33 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 15 – point a – point i
Directive (EU) 2018/2001
Article 26 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1
For the calculation of a Member State's gross final consumption of energy from renewable sources referred to in Article 7 and of the greenhouse gas intensity reduction target referred to in Article 25(1), first subparagraph, point (a), the share of biofuels and bioliquids, as well as of biomass fuels consumed in transport, where produced from food and feed crops, shall be no more than one percentage point higher than the share of such fuels in the final consumption of energy in the road and rail transport sectors in 2020 in that Member State, with a maximum of 7 % of final consumption of energy in the road and rail transport sectors in that Member State.; This limit shall be reduced to 0% for food and feed crop based biodiesel by no later than 31 December 2025, and to 0% for all crop-based bioenergy by no later than 31 December 2030. In cases of severe disruption on food markets, Member States shall take temporary suspension measures on crop-based biofuels, bioliquids and biomass fuels in order to reduce energy demand for food commodities, secure additional food supply and stabilise global food commodity markets.
2022/03/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 34 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 15 – point b
Directive (EU) 2018/2001
Article 26 – paragraph 2
(b) in paragraph 2, first and fifth subparagraphs, ‘the minimum share referred to in the first subparagraph of Article 25(1)’ is replaced by ‘the greenhouse gas emission reduction target referred to in Article 25(1), first subparagraph, point (a)’; in paragraph 2, first subparagraph, after "with high-carbon stock is observed" add the following the words ", including palm and soy oil together with their co- products," and delete ", unless they are certified to be low indirect land-use change-risk biofuels, bioliquids or biomass fuels pursuant to this paragraph"
2022/03/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 35 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 15 – point b a (new)
(b a) Subparagraph 2 is replaced by the following: "That limit shall decrease to 0 % by 31 December 2023. By 31 June 2022, the Commission shall submit to the European Parliament and to the Council an update of the report on the status of worldwide production expansion of the relevant food and feed crops. This update shall include the most recent data from the last two years with regards to deforestation, particularly in South America, and shall address all high risk commodities in the category of high indirect land use change risk feedstocks (in particular soy and their by-products)."
2022/03/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 36 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 15 – point b b (new)
(b b) subparagraph 5 is replaced by the following: "Article 3 of Delegated Regulation 2019/807stipulates that, for the purpose of determining high indirect land-use change risk biofuels, bioliquids and biomass fuels produced from food and feed crops, an expansion of up to 10% into land with high-carbon stock is permitted. This expansion should be set at 0 %. By 31 December 2022, the Commission shall adopt a delegated act in accordance with Article 35 which lays down a trajectory to decrease the contribution to the Union target set in Article 3(1) and to the greenhouse gas emission reduction target referred to in Article 25(1), first subparagraph, point (a), of high indirect land-use change-risk biofuels,bioliquids and biomass fuels in line with the phase out date laid down in the second paragraph of this paragraph."
2022/03/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 41 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 19
Directive (EU) 2018/2001
Article 29 a – paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. To ensure a level playing field for RFNBOs, by [6 months from the entry into force of this amending Directive] the Commission shall draft a legislative proposal defining equivalent sustainability criteria for the production processes of hydrogen and other hydrogen derived synthetic fuels other than RFNBOs.
2022/03/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 42 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 20 – point c a (new)
(c a) subparagraph 2 is replaced by the following: "The Commission may decide that those schemes contain accurate information on measures taken for soil, water and air protection, or for the restoration of degraded land, for the avoidance of excessive water consumption in areas where water is scarce."
2022/03/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 43 #

2021/0218(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 20 – point d a (new)
Directive (EU) 2018/2001
Article 30 – paragraph 8 – subparagraph 1
(d a) Paragraph 8, subparagraph 1 is replaced by the following: "In order to ensure that compliance with the sustainability and greenhouse gas emissions saving criteria as well as with the provisions on high direct and indirect land-use change-risk biofuels, bioliquids and biomass fuels is verified in an efficient and harmonised manner and in particular to prevent fraud, the Commission shall adopt implementing acts specifying detailed implementing rules, including adequate standards of reliability, transparency and independent auditing and require all mandatory schemes to apply those standards. Those implementing acts shall be adopted in accordance with the examination procedure referred to in Article 34(3)."
2022/03/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 16 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 12
(12) While the objective of the CBAM is to prevent thelower global carbon emissions and support the implementation of the goals of the Paris Agreement, including by preventing any risk of carbon leakage, this Regulation would also encourage the use of more GHG emissions-efficient technologies by producers from third countries, so that less emissions per unit of output are generated.
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 21 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 13 a (new)
(13 a) Least developed countries (LDCs) are accountable for only 1.1% of the world CO2 emissions from fossil-fuels combustion and industrial processes[1].While LDCs and Small Islands Developing States bear the least historical responsibility for climate change, they are on the front lines of the climate crisis, worsening existing inequalities and creating extreme poverty.To avoid such negative effects, they should be given a special treatment concerning carbon pricing in the frame of the CBAM.LDCs, as defined by the UN, are granted an exemption period from CBAM to avoid any additional burden that would prevent them from efficiently and swiftly achieve their climate transition towards climate neutrality.This exemption should be carefully monitored through market surveillance by the Commission to avoid circumvention. [1] “Smallest footprints, largest impacts: Least developed countries need a just sustainable transition”, UNCTAD, 2019, https://unctad.org/fr/node/34943
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 22 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 14
(14) This Regulation should apply to goods imported into the customs territory of the Union from third countries, except where their production has already been subject to the EU ETS, whereby it applies to third countries or territories, or to a carbon pricing system fully linked with the EU ETS. This Regulation should also not apply to third countries classified as “least-developed” by the United Nations.
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 32 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 55
(55) As the CBAM aims to encourage cleaner production processes, the EU stands ready to work with low and middle- income countries towards the de- carbonisation of their manufacturing industries. Moreover, the Union should support less developed countries with the necessary technical assistance in order to facilitate their adaptation to the new obligations established by this regulation and provide them. with the necessary technical assistance and with the sharing or GHG-abating technology in order to facilitate their adaptation to the new obligations established by this regulation. Least Developed Countries have limited capacity to decarbonise their industries, and compliance with the CBAM obligations would be highly demanding for them. Moreover, manufacturing capacities and associated emissions in those countries are negligible on a global scale. In order not to place a disproportionate burden on those countries, and in line with the ‘common but differentiated responsibility’ principle, as stated in Art 2. 2. of the Paris agreement, the CBAM will not apply to them. However, to prevent risks of circumvention, the Commission will set up a market surveillance monitoring system and will take measures, where appropriate.
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 37 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 55 a (new)
(55 a) Revenues from the CBAM should flow into the general budget of the Union and should constitute internal assigned revenue for the purpose of Article 21(3) of the Financial Regulation. To further ensure that the aim of the CBAM is solely to reduce global carbon emission, those new resources should contribute to supporting the implementation of the Green Deal by stepping up the Union’s contribution to international climate finance and help to Least Developed Countries.
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 43 #

2021/0214(COD)

1. This Regulation establishes a carbon border adjustment mechanism (the ‘CBAM’) for addressing greenhouse gas emissions embedded in the goods referred to in Annex I, upon their importation into the customs territory of the Union, in order to prevent thereduce global carbon emissions and support the implementation of the goals of the Paris Agreement by preventing any risk of carbon leakage.
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 47 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 3
3. By way of derogation from paragraphs 1 and 2, this Regulation does not apply to goods originating in countries and territories listed in Annex II, Section A and in Least Developed Countries (LDCs) as designated by the United Nations.
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 48 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 24 – paragraph 1 a (new)
Article 24 a Use of revenues from the sale of the CBAM certificates and establishment of the European Fund for International Climate Action 1.Revenues generated from the sales of the CBAM certificates shall allow for greater support for climate action and the objectives of the Green Deal through the Union contribution to international climate finance in favour of LDCs, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, in those countries, to adapt to the impacts of climate change in those countries, and to fund research and development for mitigation and adaptation in those countries. 2.For the purpose of paragraph 1, the European Fund for International Climate Action is hereby established. 3.The European Fund for International Climate Action shall be endowed with resources generated by the CBAM certificates, which will predominantly contribute to international climate finance in favour of LDCs. 4.Resources provided for in paragraph 2 of this Article shall constitute internal assigned revenue in accordance with Article 21(3) of the Financial Regulation. 5.The resources of the European Fund of International Climate Action shall be used for the purpose of mitigation and adaptation the effects of climate change in Least Developed Countries as well as covering the cost of administering the CBAM. 6. To ensure transparency of the use of revenues generated from the sale of the CBAM certificates the Commission shall, on a yearly basis, report to the European Parliament and the Council on how the revenues from the sale of the CBAM certificates, from the previous year has been used and how this has contributed to tackling climate change.
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 52 #

2021/0214(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 27 – paragraph 5
5. Where the Commission, taking into account the relevant data, reports and statistics, including when provided by the customs authorities of Member States, has sufficient reasons to believe that the circumstances referred to in paragraph 32 are occurring in one or more Member States, it can proceed according to the following options: (a) it is empowered to adopt delegated acts in accordance with Article 28 to supplement the scope of this Regulation as necessary in order to include slightly modified products for anti-circumvention purposes. additional products for anti-circumvention purposes and if necessary it may adopt a new legislative proposal; (b) if in particular the practices of circumvention referred to in point (c) of paragraph 2 materialise in a Least Developed Country, the Commission may, if appropriate, temporarily remove the relevant exemption from the CBAM referred to in paragraph 3 of Article 2; (c) in particular for the practices of circumvention referred to in point (d) of paragraph 2, the Commission shall introduce a tariff-rate quota based on export levels during the three preceding years. Beyond the level set by the tariff- rate quota, the exemption from the CBAM for the country in question shall cease to apply.
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 19 #

2021/0211(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 9 a (new)
(9 a) Low income, lower-middle income and Least Developed Countries are the most vulnerable to the impact of climate change. Although their shares to the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere are very small or even negligible, they tend to be heavier exposed to impacts of climate change, notably in view of the state of their infrastructure and their peoples’ living conditions. Those countries are now in a calamitous situation by the combination of the global failure to curb GHG emissions, which raises their adaptation needs and costs ever higher, and the public finance crises caused by the COVID-pandemic and the associated ‘debt pandemic’.
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 20 #

2021/0211(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 9 b (new)
(9 b) Significant financial resources are needed to implement the Paris Agreement. The EU remains committed to contributing towards the developed countries’ goal of jointly mobilising from different sources USD 100 billion per year by 2020 to support developing countries. The goal was extended until 2025 before a new collective goal is set.The funding will come from a wide variety of sources – public and private, bilateral and multilateral, and alternative sources of finance. However, this goal remains unmet. The EU should step up its support for these countries including through the ETS in order to strengthen their ability to adapt and their resilience to climate change.
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 21 #

2021/0211(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 9 c (new)
(9 c) LDCs are especially vulnerable to the effects of climate change and are responsible only for a very low level of greenhouse gas emissions. Therefore, particular priority should be given to addressing the needs of LDCs through the use of EU ETS allowances to fund climate action, in particular adaptation to the impacts of climate change. Collective pledging by the EU would increase EU influence in the UNFCCC negotiations while contribution through the Green Climate Fund would also encourage others to contribute a portion of their own carbon pricing schemes to the Fund.
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 22 #

2021/0211(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 9 d (new)
(9 d) All revenues (or the equivalent in financial value) from EU ETS should be earmarked for climate action and 50% should be dedicated to EU’s collective contribution to international climate finance.
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 31 #

2021/0211(COD)

(11) Article 10 is amended as follows: All revenues (or the equivalent in financial value) from EU ETS should be earmarked for climate action and 50% should be dedicated to EU’s collective contribution to international climate finance, to support in priority adaptation to climate change, in particular for Least Developed Countries and Small Islands Developing States, as well as in low income and lower-income countries, and loss and damage, which are of peculiar importance for vulnerable developing countries.
2022/02/10
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 85 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 4
(4) In its resolution on sustainable finance of 29 May 201843 , the European Parliament called for the further development of non-financial reporting requirements in the framework of Directive 2013/34/EU. In its resolution on sustainable corporate governance of 17 December 202044 , the European Parliament welcomed the Commission’s commitment to review Directive 2013/34/EU and expressed the need to set up a comprehensive Union framework on non-financial reporting that contains mandatory Union non-financial reporting standards. The European Parliament called for the expansion of the scope of the reporting requirements to additional categories of undertakings for the identification of high-risk sectors of economic activity with a significant impact on sustainability matters that could justify the inclusion of small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs), and for the introduction of an audit requirement. _________________ 43 2018/2007(INI). 44 A9-0240/2020 (INI).
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 86 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 4 a (new)
(4 a) The list of high risk sector included in Annex IIa of Directive 2013/34/EU is based on and inspired by the NACE Codes and build on four types of sources and evidence, namely: (1) existing Union legislation, (2) scientific evidence and data about sectors that can create particularly high levels of environmental or social harm, (3) sectors that are already considered“high-risk” under international standards and (4) sectors that are already considered “high- risk” under market or business initiatives.
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 89 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 8
(8) The ultimate beneficiaries of better sustainability reporting by undertakings are individual citizens and savers. Savers who want to invest sustainably will have the opportunity to do so, while all citizens should benefit from a stable, sustainable and inclusive economic system. To realise these benefits, the sustainability information disclosed in undertaking’s annual reports first has to reach two primary groups (‘users’). The first group of users consists of investors, including asset managers, who want to better understand the risks and opportunities that sustainability issues pose to their investments and the impacts of those investments on people and the environment. The second group of users consists of organisationcivil society actors, including non- governmental organisations and, social partners, indigenous people and local communities that wish to better hold undertakings to account for their impacts on people and the environment. Other stakeholders may also make use of sustainability information disclosed in annual reports to foster the comparability across market sectors on the basis of environmental merits, corporate entities should disclose the degree to which they contribute to economic activities that qualify as environmentally sustainable pursuant to Article 3 of Regulation (EU) 2020/852 on Sustainable Finance Taxonomy and fully respect the ‘do no significant harm principle pursuant to Article 17 of Regulation (EU) 2020/852. The business partners of undertakings, including customers, may rely on this information to understand, and where necessary report on, the sustainability risks and impacts through their own supply and value chains. PExperts, policy makers and environmental agencies may use such information, in particular on an aggregate basis, to monitor, verify and compare environmental, climate and social data and trends, to contribute to environmental accounts, and to inform public policy. Few individual citizens and consumers directly consult undertaking’s reports, but they may use such information indirectly such as when considering the advice or opinions of financial advisers or non-governmental organisations. Many investors and asset managers purchase sustainability information from third party data providers, who collect information from various sources, including public corporate reports.
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 92 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 9
(9) There has been a very significant increase in demand for corporate sustainability information in recent years, especially on the part of the investment community and civil society. That increase in demand is driven by the changing nature of risks to undertakings and growing investor awareness of the financial implications of these risks. That is especially the case for climate-related financial risks. Awareness of the risks to undertakings and to investments resulting from other environmental issues, in particular related to climate and biodiversity, and from social issues, including health issues, is also growing. The increase in demand for sustainability information is also driven by the growth in investment products that explicitly seek to meet certain sustainability standards or achieve certain sustainability objectives, in line with international Union commitments, notably regarding the Paris Agreement on climate change and the Convention on Biological Diversity. Part of that increase is the logical consequence of previously adopted Union legislation, notably Regulation (EU) 2019/2088 and Regulation (EU) 2020/852. Some of the increase would have happened in any case, due to fast-changing citizen awareness, consumer preferences and market practices. The COVID-19 pandemic will further accelerate the increase in users’ information needs, in particular as it has exposed the vulnerabilities of workers and of undertaking’s due diligence along the whole supply and value chains. Information on environmental impacts is also relevant in the context of mitigating future pandemics with human disturbance of ecosystems increasingly linked to the occurrence and spread of diseases.
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 95 #

2021/0104(COD)

(11) The report on the review clause of the Non-Financial Reporting Directive (Directive 2014/95/EU), and its accompanying fitness check on corporate reporting, identified problems as to the effectiveness of that Directive48 . There is significant evidence that many undertakings do not disclose material information on all major sustainability- related topics, in particular regarding most exposed sectors to environmental criminality, such as timber, fishing and mining, including in their activities in third countries. The report also identified as significant problems the limited comparability and reliability of sustainability information. Additionally, many undertakings from which users need sustainability information are not obliged to report such information, which underlines the need for a robust and affordable monitoring, reporting and verification framework and effective auditing within corporate sustainability reporting to ensure the reliability of data and avoid off-setting, greenwashing and/or double accounting. _________________ 48 Publication office: please insert reference to Report from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council and the European Economic and Social Committee on the review clauses in Directives 2013/34/EU, 2014/95/EU, and 2013/50/EU, and accompanying SWD- Fitness Check.
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 97 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 12
(12) In the absence of policy action, the gap between users’ information needs and the sustainability information reported by undertakings is expected to grow. This gap has significant negative consequences. Investors are unable to take sufficient account of sustainability-related risks and opportunities in their investment decisions. The aggregation of multiple investment decisions that do not take adequate account of sustainability-related risks has the potential to create systemic risks that threaten financial stability. The European Central Bank and international organisations such as the Financial Stability Board have drawn attention to those systemic risks, in particular in the case of climate. Investors are also less able to channel financial resources to undertakings and economic activities that address and do not exacerbate social and environmental problems, which undermines the objectives of the European Green Deal and, the Action Plan on Financing Sustainable Growth, the objectives of the Paris Agreement on climate change and the Convention on Biological Diversity. Non- governmental organisations, social partners, communities affected by undertakings’ activities, and other stakeholders are less able to hold undertakings accountable for their impacts on people and the environment, including in their activities in third countries. This creates an accountability deficit, and may contribute to lower levels of citizen trust in businesses, which in turn may have negative impacts on the efficient functioning of the social market economy. The lack of generally accepted metrics and methods for measuring, valuing, and managing sustainability-related risks is also an obstacle to the efforts of undertakings to ensure that their business models and activities are sustainable. The lack of sustainability information also limits the ability of stakeholders, including civil society actors, trade unions, indigenous people and local communities, to enter into dialogue with undertakings on sustainability matters.
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 130 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 26
(26) Articles 19a(1) and 29a(1) of Directive 2013/34/EU require undertakings to disclose information about five reporting areas: business model, policies (including due diligence processes implemented), the outcome of those policies, risks and risk management, and key performance indicators relevant to the business. Article 19a(1) of Directive 2013/34/EU does not contain explicit references to other reporting areas that users of information consider relevant, some of which align with disclosures included in international frameworks, including the recommendations of the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures. Disclosure requirements should be specified in sufficient detail to ensure that undertakings report information on their resilience to risks related to sustainability matters. In addition to the reporting areas identified in Articles 19a(1) and 29a(1) of Directive 2013/34/EU, undertakings should therefore be required to disclose information about their business strategy and the resilience of the business model and strategy to risks related to sustainability matters, any plans they may have to ensure that their business model and strategy are compatible with the transition to a sustainable and climate- neutral economy; whether and how their business model and strategy take account of the interests of stakeholders and the preservation of biodiversity, in particular by delivering information in sectors causing most environmental impact, such as agriculture, fishing, logging, mining and large-scale infrastructure; whether and how their business model and strategy respect and safeguard the rights and the interests of stakeholders, including workers, indigenous people and local communities and the principle of prior and informed consent; any opportunities for the undertaking arising from sustainability matters; the implementation of the aspects of the business strategy which affect, or are affected by sustainability matters; any sustainability targets set by the undertaking and the progress made towards achieving them; the role of the board and management with regard to sustainability matters; the principal actual and potential adverse impacts connected with the undertaking’s activities; and how the undertaking has identified the information that they report on. Once the disclosure of elements such as targets and the progress towards achieving them is required, the separate requirement to disclose the outcomes of policies is no longer necessary.
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 134 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 27
(27) To ensure consistency with international instruments such as the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and the OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Business Conduct, the ILO Tripartite Declaration of Principles concerning Multinational enterprises and Social Policy (ILO Tripartite Declaration), the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) and its principle of Free, Prior and Informed Consent, the due diligence disclosure requirements should be specified in greater detail than is the case in Article 19a(1), point (b), and Article 29a(1), point (b) of Directive 2013/34/EU. Due diligence is the process that undertakings carry out to identify, prevent, mitigate and remediate the principal actual and potential adverse impacts connected with their activities and identifies how they address those adverse impacts. Impacts connected with an undertaking’s activities include impacts directly caused by the undertaking, impacts to which the undertaking contributes, and impacts which are otherwise linked to the undertaking’s value chain. The due diligence process concerns the whole value chain of the undertaking including its own operations, its products and services, its business relationships and its supply chains. In alignment with the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, an actual or potential adverse impact is to be considered principal where it measures among the greatest impacts connected with the undertaking’s activities based on: the gravity of the impact on people or the environment; the number of individuals that are or could be affected, or the scale of damage to the environment; and the ease with which the harm could be remediated, restoring the environment or affected people to their prior state.
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 147 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 36
(36) Sustainability reporting standards should take account of the Commission guidelines on non-financial reporting60 and the Commission guidelines on reporting climate-related information61 . They should also take account of other reporting requirements in Directive 2013/34/EU, including reporting on payments to governments by undertakings active i.e. in the extractive and logging industries, agriculture and fisheries, as well as other reporting requirements not directly related to sustainability, with the aim of providing the users of the reported information with a better understanding of the development, performance, position and environmental and social impact of the undertaking, by maximising the links between the sustainability information and other information reported in accordance with Directive 2013/34/EU. _________________ 60 2017/C 215/01. 61 2019/C 209/01.
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 153 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 39
(39) Sustainability reporting standards should also take account of internationally recognised principles and frameworks on responsible business conduct, corporate social responsibility, and sustainable development, including the UN Sustainable Development Goals, the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises, the OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Business Conduct and related sectoral guidelines, the UN Global Compact, the Tripartite Declaration of Principles of the International Labour Organisation concerning Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy, the ISO 26000 standard on social responsibility, and the UN Principles for Responsible Investment. Other frameworks such as the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) and its principle of Free, Prior and Informed Consent should equally be taken into account.
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 161 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 44
(44) Users need information about governance factors, including information on the role of an undertaking’s administrative, management and supervisory bodies, including with regard to sustainability matters, the composition of such bodies, and an undertaking’s internal control and risk management systems, including in relation to the reporting process. Users also need information about undertakings’ corporate culture and approach to business ethics, including anti-corruption and anti-bribery, and about their political engagements, including lobbying activities. The disclosure of these data aims at enabling investors to make better-informed decisions, improving corporate governance and accountability and contributing to containing tax evasion. Information about the management of the undertaking and the quality of relationships with business partners, including payment practices relating to the date or period for payment, the rate of interest for late payment or the compensation for recovery costs referred to in Directive 2011/7/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council62 on late payment in commercial transactions, helps users to understand an undertaking’s risks as well as its impacts on sustainability matters. Every year, thousands of businesses, especially SMEs, suffer administrative and financial burdens because they are paid late, or not at all. Ultimately, late payments lead to insolvency and bankruptcy, with destructive effects on entire value chains. Increasing information about payment practices should empower other undertakings to identify prompt and reliable payers, detect unfair payment practices, access information about the businesses they trade with, and negotiate fairer payment terms. _________________ 62Directive 2011/7/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 February 2011 on combating late payment in commercial transactions (OJ L 48, 23.2.2011, p. 1).
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 163 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 46
(46) Undertakings in the same sector are often exposed to similar sustainability- related risks, and they often have similar impacts on society and the environment. Comparisons between undertakings in the same sector are especially valuable to investors and other users of sustainability information. Sustainability reporting standards adopted by the Commission should therefore specify both information that undertakings in all sectors should disclose and information that undertakings should disclose depending on their sector of activity. Standards applicable to undertakings active, e.g. in the extractive industry and the logging of forests, should be consistent with reporting requirements of Chapter 10 of Directive 2013/34/EU and require sustainability disclosures to be made at project-level. Project-level disclosures are crucial for investors who need consistent and detailed information on projects to fully understand the impact of climate-related financial risk in the fossil fuels sector and regarding the supply of critical transition minerals. Project-level disclosure is equally crucial for communities affected by the extractive and logging industries and civil society organisations of resource-rich countries, to understand and scrutinize the benefits of the oil, gas, mining and logging industries and their environmental, social and governance impacts. Standards should also take account of the difficulties that undertakings may encounter in gathering information from actors throughout their value chain, especially from SME suppliers and from suppliers in emerging markets and economies.
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 168 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 47
(47) To meet the information needs from users in a timely manner, and in particular given the urgency to meet the information needs of financial market participants subject to the requirements laid down in the delegated acts adopted pursuant to Article 4, paragraphs 6 and 7 of Regulation (EU) 2019/2088, the Commission should adopt a first set of reporting standards by 31 October 2022. That set of reporting standards should specify the information that undertakings should disclose with regard to all reporting areas and sustainability matters, and that financial market participants need to comply with the disclosure obligations laid down in Regulation (EU) 2019/2088. The Commission should adopt a second set of reporting standards at the latest by 31 October 2023, specifying complementary information that undertakings should disclose about sustainability matters and reporting areas where necessary, and information that is specific to the sector in which an undertaking operates. Standards for high-impact undertakings active in sectors where sustainability risks are the most severe should be developed as a priority, in particular undertakings active in the extractive industry, the manufacture of wearing apparel, large- scale crop, animal production and seafood industry. The Commission should review the standards every 3 years to take account of relevant developments, including the development of international standards.
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 171 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 47 a (new)
(47 a) Undertakings in high-carbon sectors such as extractive and fossil fuel industry, should take into account the relevant sectoral guidance from the IPCC and the International Energy Agency. Undertakings active in the extractive industry as defined in Article 41(1) of Directive 2013/34/EU should thus be subject to additional sustainability disclosure requirements. Those undertakings have high market capitalization, drive economic growth across the world and are an important source of government revenues in many countries. They also have a huge ecological footprint in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, pollution, biodiversity loss and human health. Extractive activities can also fuel corruption, conflict and threaten human rights when safeguards are not met or if projects are poorly managed. While the fossil fuel industry is a major cause of climate change, the energy transition brings new environmental challenges in a global context of growing demand for raw materials due to population growth, industrialisation, decarbonisation of transport, energy systems and other industrial sectors, increasing demand from developing countries and new technological applications. Without addressing the resource implications of low-carbon technologies, there is a risk that shifting the burden of curbing emissions to other parts of the economic chain may simply cause new environmental and social problems, such as heavy metal pollution, habitat destruction, or resource depletion in third countries. European capital markets are particularly exposed to these climate- related risks, which will significantly impact upon extractive industry stakeholders in producing countries. While Union's future demand of primary critical raw materials will continue to be largely met by imports also in the medium to long term, the Union has a responsability to promote responsible and sustainable mining practices.
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 173 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 47 b (new)
(47 b) Undertakings active in the extractive industry should be required to publish the contracts and other documents upon which these projects are based. Given the changes that will be brought by the energy transition, availability of the terms governing resource extraction will be key to understanding how risks and benefits will be shared between companies, communities and governments. According to the International Monetary Fund, contract transparency in the extractive industries has become a global norm, and the practice was made a requirement under the 2019 Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative standard—the main global standard for transparency in the extractive industries. There are already over 49 countries around the world that have disclosed contracts and at least 30 with laws requiring them to do so. Contract disclosure is supported by leading extractives industry companies and has been endorsed by private sector forums including the International Council on Mining and Metals. Leading development finance institutions including the World Bank’s IFC and MIGA already require private sector clients developing extractive resources to publish contracts. The EBRD has the same requirements for hydrocarbons development. The IMF, the UN, the International Bar Association and the OECD have endorsed the practice.
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 184 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 70 a (new)
(70 a) Undertakings should be required to consistently report on projects which are based on ‘substantially interconnected’ legal agreements to address weaknesses, including identification of governments, project definition and joint ventures, identified by the Commission in its report on the review clause in Article 48 of Directive 2013/34/EU[1]. Reporting on each project varies across companies, making it difficult to have a complete and consistent overview of projects involving several companies. Investors managing risk and citizens holding governments to account require consistency in the identification of projects involving substantially interconnected legal agreements in order to progress sustainability objectives. Improved reporting on joint ventures is needed given the prevalence of such structures in the oil, gas and mining industry. Without improved joint venture reporting, major payments to governments risk being hidden from view. Payments to governments for the purchase of oil, gas and minerals by undertakings active in physical trading are now a commonly recognized payment stream within the EITI framework and should be added as a payment category. [1] REPORT FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL AND THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE on the review clauses in Directives 2013/34/EU, 2014/95/EU, and 2013/50/EU, COM/2021/199 final, 21 April 2021.
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 192 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 1
Directive 2013/34/EU
Article 1 – paragraph 3 (a) – new
3 a. A list of high-risk sectors is included in Annex IIa which shall be reviewed and modified by the Commission, as appropriate, through a delegated act every three years. This review shall take into account existing Union sector-specific legislation and sector-specific disclosures in recognised international reporting frameworks.
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 197 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2
Directive 2013/34/EU
Article 2 – point 20a (new)
(20 a) ‘high risk sectors’ are those sectors of economic activity likely to have severe impacts on the environment, human rights and the rule of law and good governance systems of countries, regions and territories where the undertaking or its supply chains operate and is listed in Annex IIa;
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 199 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2
Directive 2013/34/EU
Article 2 – point 20 b (new)
(20 b) 'high-risk undertaking' means an undertaking active in one or more of the high-impact sectors listed in Annex IIa;
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 203 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2
Directive 2013/34/EU
Article 2 – point 20 c (new)
(20 b) (20 c) 'severe impacts' are adverse impacts on people, their fundamental human rights and the environment connected to the undertaking's value chain by its own operations, its products and services, its business relationships, its subsidiaries, and its supply chain, based on the gravity of the impact on the sustainability matter, the number of individuals that are or could be affected, or the scale of the damage to the environment; the ease with which the harm could be remediated, restoring the environment or affected people to their prior state; and which cause the greatest harm relative to other impacts the undertaking has identified.
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 223 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 3
Directive 2013/34/EU
Article 19(a) – paragraph 2 – point b
(b) a description of the time-bound, short, medium and long-term targets related to sustainability matters set by the undertaking and of the progress the undertaking has made towards achieving those targets; with respect to the undertaking’s principle risks and opportunities, whether such targets are science-based alongside corresponding evidence, and of the progress the undertaking has made towards achieving those targets including: (i) a clearly defined path to reach the targets and corresponding timeframes; (ii) the methods, main data and rationale used in setting these targets which must uphold the principle of ‘do no significant harm’ within the meaning of Article 17 of Regulation(EU) 2020/852; (iii) targets to be reviewed by independent scientific reviewers, and made available to the general public including information on how and to what extent the undertaking is aligned with the broader strategy that qualify as 'environmentally sustainable' pursuant to Regulation (EU) 2020/852; (iv) the reasons explaining the impossibility or failure to reach intermediary and final targets;
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 227 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 3
Directive 2013/34/EU
Article 19(a) – paragraph 2 – point c
(c) a description of the role of the administrative, management and supervisory bodies with regard to sustainability matters;sustainability matters, including: (i) the extent to which these bodies shall take into consideration sustainability matters and, where appropriate, the resources at their disposal in order to do so; (ii) the consistency of the remuneration schemes of their members with the company's sustainability strategy; (iii) discussions on the results of the due diligence process implemented with regard to sustainability matters and on adverse effects, as well as involvement and exchanges with the different stakeholders affected by the identified impacts; (iv) discussions on the principal risks to the undertaking and opportunities for the undertaking with regard to sustainability matters; (v) the process set up to oversee the implementation of the undertaking’s strategy related to sustainability matters; (vi) expertise on sustainability matters of the members of the administrative, management and supervisory bodies; (vi) the matters addressed by these bodies during the reporting period
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 236 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 3
Directive 2013/34/EU
Article 19a – paragraph 2 – point e – sub–point ii
(ii) the principal actual or potential adverse impacts connected with the undertaking’s supply and value chain, in particular as identified through the due diligence process, including its own operations, its products and services, its business relationships and its supply chain, including with regard to: - all people affected by those impacts with particular attention to persons who frequently face discrimination or are in a vulnerable situation, such as women, children, minorities, indigenous people, persons experiencing poverty or social exclusion, LGBTIQ persons, persons with disabilities ; - the effect of the undertaking’s business policies, practices and decisions on the identified issues, including of the undertaking’s purchasing policies and practices ;
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 249 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 3
Directive 2013/34/EU
Article 19(a) – point 3
Where appropriate, tThe information referred to in paragraphs 1 and 2 shall contain information about the undertaking’s value chain, including the undertaking’s own operations, products and services, its business relationships and its supply chain, in particular in high-risk sectors referred to in Annex IIa.
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 295 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 4
Directive 2013/34/EU
Article 19b – paragraph 2
(iii) waterthe sustainable use and protection of water, soil and marine resources;
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 310 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 4
Directive 2013/34/EU
Article 19 b – point 2
(iii) respect for the human rights, fundamental freedoms, democratic principles and standards established in the International Bill of Human Rights and other core UN human rights conventions, the International Labour Organization’s Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work and the ILO fundamental conventions and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, the European Convention on Human Rights and its additional protocols, the UNECE Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation in Decision Making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters (Aarhus Convention) the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People (UNRIP ) and its principle of Free, Prior and Informed Consent, the ILO Indigenous and Tribal People Convention, 1989, and Resolution 48/13 adopted by the Human Rights Council on the 8 October 2021 on the human right to a clean, healthy environment.
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 361 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 7
(i) the due diligence process implemented with regard to sustainability matters including with regard to: - identification, assessment and prioritisation of actual and potential adverse impacts; - policies and measures for the prevention, cessation, mitigation or remediation of actual or potential adverse impacts; - tracking of the implementation of the process and its results; - identification and involvement of all adversely affected people; - alert mechanisms as well as complaints and grievances, including how they are received and used by different stakeholders and affected people; - the different actors involved in the development, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the process at different stages, and the human, informational and financial resources available to them; - how the due diligence process complies with international standards and duty of care of the company concerning all matter related to sustainability;
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 365 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 7
Directive 2013/34/EU
Article 29(a) – point 2
(ii) the principal actual or potential adverse impacts connected with the group’s value chain, including its own operations, its products and services, its business relationships and its supply chain; including with regard to: - all people affected by those impacts with particular attention to persons who frequently face discrimination or are in a vulnerable situation, such as women, children, minorities, indigenous people, persons experiencing poverty or social exclusion, LGBTIQ persons or persons with disabilities; - the effect of the undertaking’s business policies, practices and decisions on the identified issues, including of the undertaking’s purchasing policies and practices;
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 390 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 10 b (new) Directive 2013/34/EU
(10 b) Article 41 is amended as follows: (a) point (1) is replaced by the following: (1) ‘undertaking active in the extractive industry’ means an undertaking with any activity involving the exploration, prospection,discovery, development, extraction, or the physical trading of minerals, oil, natural gas, or other materials, within the economic activities listed in Section B, Divisions 05 to 08 and Section G, Divisions46.71 and 46.72 of Annex I to Regulation (EC)No 1893/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 December 2006establishing the statistical classification of economic activities NACE Revision 2.
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 412 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 12 a (new) Directive 2013/34/EU
(12 a) the following Annex is inserted: Annex II a: LIST OF SECTORS REFERRED TO IN POINT (21) OF ARTICLE 2 A- Agriculture B- Fishing C- Forestry D- Food E- Construction F- Mining and Quarrying G- Manufacturing and industrial production H- Logistics, Transportation and Storing I- Electricity, Gas, Steam, and Air Conditioning Supply J- Water supply, Sewerage and Waste Management K- Employment Activities L- Garment and Retail M- Health Care, Social Care and Elder Care N- Cleaning and Household Services 0-Hospitality P- Financial and Insurance Activities Q- Technology, Digital Activities and Online Platforms
2022/01/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 21 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A a (new)
A a. whereas the benefits that humans derive from ecosystems include i.e. purification of water and air, pest and disease control, crop pollination, soil fertility, genetic diversity, freshwater provisioning, flood protection and carbon sequestration and resilience to climate change;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 23 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A b (new)
A b. whereas biodiversity continues to remain a critical source for medicinal development;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 24 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A c (new)
A c. whereas the most comprehensive global estimate suggests that ecosystem services provide benefits of USD 125-140 trillion (US dollars) per year i.e. more than one and a half times the size of global GDP[1]; Sources: Biodiversity: Finance and the Economic and Business Case for Action. Executive Summary and Synthesis, OECD 2019 (p. 7).
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 25 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A d (new)
A d. whereas biodiversity is both affected by climate change and an important contribution to climate change mitigation and adaptation, through the ecosystems services it support;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 26 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A e (new)
A e. whereas biodiversity and ecosystem services are projected to decline over coming decades, while the supply and demand material of natural resources with current market value (food, feed, timber and bioenergy) are projected to increase;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 27 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A f (new)
A f. whereas key pressures on terrestrial, marine and other aquatic biodiversity include habitat loss and fragmentation (particularly from agricultural expansion and intensification), over-exploitation of natural resources (e.g. fish), pollution, invasive alien species and climate change;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 29 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B a (new)
B a. whereas World Economic Forum’s Global Risks Report 2020 identified environmental risks as the greatest systemic risks to our global economy;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 30 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B b (new)
B b. whereas the OECD estimates at USD 500 billion per year the financial flows potentially harmful to biodiversity (based on fossil-fuel and agricultural subsidies), an order of magnitude ten times higher than global finance flows for biodiversity conservation and sustainable use; and whereas the costs of inaction on biodiversity loss are high and are anticipated to increase[1]; Sources: Biodiversity: Finance and the Economic and Business Case for Action. Executive Summary and Synthesis, OECD 2019.
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 32 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C a (new)
C a. whereas recent studies show that between 1.65 and 1.87 billion Indigenous Peoples, local communities, and Afro- descendants live in the world’s important biodiversity conservation areas; whereas another finding shows that 56 percent of the people living in important biodiversity conservation areas are in low- and middle-income countries; whereas only 9 percent live in high-income countries. This underscores the disproportionate impact of conservation on the Global South (RRI);
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 39 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D a (new)
D a. whereas traditional indigenous territories encompass around 22 per cent of the world ’s land surface and they coincide with areas that hold 80 per cent of the planet’s biodiversity;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 43 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E a (new)
E a. whereas indigenous people remain amongst the poorest of the poor; and whereas one of the major difficulty that indigenous peoples face globally is to gain legal recognition of collective ownership over their ancestral lands, especially when these were declared protected territories;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 44 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E b (new)
E b. whereas it is estimated that 50 per cent of protected areas worldwide has been established on lands traditionally occupied and used by indigenous peoples and that this proportion is highest in the Americas, where it may exceed 90 per cent in Central America;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 45 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E c (new)
E c. whereas the lack of recognition of indigenous people’s and communities’ customary land rights generates risks of landgrabbing, thereby jeopardising their livelihoods and their ability to respond to climate change or biodiversity loss;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 46 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E d (new)
E d. whereas the UN Special Rapporteur on indigenous peoples has identified the extractive industries as a main source of conflict and violence on indigenous peoples’ territories;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 47 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E e (new)
E e. whereas according to Front Line Defenders’ Global Analysis 2020, at least 331 human rights defenders were murdered in 2020, two-thirds of whom worked to protect environmental, land and indigenous peoples’ rights;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 49 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E f (new)
E f. whereas the EU aims to push for a target of at least 30% biodiversity protection under the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD);
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 52 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F a (new)
F a. whereas the IPCC Special Report on Climate Change and Land (2019) demonstrates that indigenous peoples have a long record of adapting to climate variability, drawing on their traditional knowledge, which enhances their resilience;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 54 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F b (new)
F b. whereas the IPCC Special report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate gives equally evidence of the benefits of combining scientific with local and indigenous knowledge to enforce resilience;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 55 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F c (new)
F c. whereas Article 8 (j) of the Convention of Biological Diversity (CBD) commits States parties to respect and maintain the knowledge, innovations and practices of indigenous and local communities which are relevant for conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity; but whereas the Convention, however, fails to contain explicit recognition of the human rights of indigenous peoples;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 59 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G a (new)
G a. whereas the loss of genetic diversity, especially replacement of local, well-adapted breeds increases the vulnerability to pests, diseases and environmental changes, including climate change; whereas the market globalisation of agriculture has been a reinforcing driver of such agricultural biodiversity erosion, which means less capacity to innovate and adapt to climate change;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 61 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G b (new)
G b. whereas farmers’ rights were established under the FAO International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture in 2004, but whereas intellectual property rules have often worked in contradiction to them, putting local, traditional and indigenous seed systems at risk;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 62 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G c (new)
G c. whereas trade liberalisation triggers off the destruction of habitats, through infrastructure (such as mines, pipelines, roads, ports), which arise from exports of mineral and fossil products;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 65 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital H a (new)
H a. whereas the EU plays a significant role in biodiversity loss in third countries because of its imports of minerals, biomass and some agricultural products such as soybean and palm oil, whose crops constitute an important driver of tropical deforestation;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 66 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital H b (new)
H b. whereas current WTO rules limits the possibility of EU Member States of raising tariffs on products that have a negative impact on biodiversity;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 67 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital H c (new)
H c. whereas dispute settlement systems covering biodiversity and trade provisions in Multilateral Environment Agreements are not binding, unlike the WTO enforcement system, which de facto embodies the supremacy of commercial law over biodiversity;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 71 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I b (new)
I b. whereas environmental crimes, whose value has been estimated by the UN Environment and INTERPOL up to twice the global aid budget, accelerates and biodiversity loss and climate change, notably through forestry crimes;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 74 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I b (new)
I b. whereas the Republic of Maldives called, in its statement of 3 December 2019, to amend the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court to recognise criminal acts that would amount to Ecocide;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 75 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I c (new)
I c. whereas the IPBES reports that the international legal wildlife trade has increased 500% in value since 2005, and 2,000% since the 1980s[1]; Sources: IPBES workshop on biodiversity and pandemics. Workshop report (2020), p. 23
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 76 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I d (new)
I d. whereas the EU is one of the largest importers of wildlife and wildlife- related products globally;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 77 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I e (new)
I e. whereas global wildlife trafficking is one of the most profitable forms of organised cross-border criminal activity;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 78 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I f (new)
I f. whereas oceans are huge reservoirs of biodiversity and the primary regulator of the global climate; and whereas their conservation is critical to sustainable development and contributes to poverty eradication, providing sustainable livelihoods and food security for billions of people;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 79 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I g (new)
I g. whereas in a business-as-usual scenario, climate change is expected to reduce fish biomass by 30 to 40% in some tropical regions by 2100 and has a strong impact on marine biodiversity; whereas countries in these zones are highly dependent on fisheries, but lack social and financial resources to adapt and prepare for the future;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 80 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I h (new)
I h. whereas the IUCN advocates for the transformation of at least 30% of all marine habitats by 2020 into a network of highly protected marines protected areas (MPAs);
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 81 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I i (new)
I i. whereas Illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing threatens the sustainability of global marine resources by contributing to their overexploitation;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 83 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Is alarmed at the fact that the loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services will undermine progress in approximately 80 % of the assessed targets for the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs); calls for the EU to reduce its biodiversity footprint worldwide and to bring it within the ecological limits of ecosystems;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 87 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Calls for the EU to address the root causes of biodiversity loss and to mainstream obligations on conservation, restoration and the sustainable use of resources into broader development policies;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 93 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Recalls that the conservation, sustainable use and restoration of biodiversity is vital to achieve many other policy objectives, including human health, climate change mitigation and adaptation, disaster risk reduction, and water and food security; and recalls that the harmful effects of ecosystem degradation are being borne disproportionately by the poor, notably women, as well as indigenous people and other natural resource- dependent communities;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 97 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Emphasises the duty of states to protect and sustainably manage natural and biodiversity-rich ecosystems and safeguard the human and land rights of IPLC and Afro-descendants who depend on these ecosystems for their survival;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 102 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. Is deeply concerned by the major gap in data, indicators and the finance needed to halt biodiversity loss and inconsistencies in biodiversity finance reporting and tracking; recalls that establishing specific, measurable and quantitative targets and indicators for the post-2020 framework is essential to improving the ability to monitor progress;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 111 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. Underlines the fact that planning, scrutinising and monitoring the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) are key to the pursuit of the EU’s global biodiversity goals; calls for harnessing the reporting and monitoring framework of EU external biodiversity policy, through i.e. detailed provisions on biodiversity objectives and indicators;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 114 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Regrets the fact that the EU budget for supporting external biodiversity policy remains considerably low in comparison with that earmarked for climate change policies; highlights the need for new investments tools to support resource mobilisation for protecting the biodiversity (such as biodiversity-relevant taxes, fees and charges); in addition, stresses the need to track, report and reform harmful subsidies to channel them towards biodiversity-friendly activities;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 120 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Calls for the EU to pass a mandatory due diligence law to make companies and their financiers directly responsible for ensuring that their imports are not tainted by land grabs and deforestation; human rights abuses, such as land grabs and environmental degradation (including deforestation, biodiversity loss); more broadly, calls on the EU to require business and financial institutions to scale up their commitment to biodiversity i.e. through robust and mandatory provisions on impact assessment, risk management; disclosure and external reporting requirements; invites the OECD to develop a set of practical actions on due diligence and biodiversity to support efforts by business;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 125 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10 a (new)
10 a. Notes that the IPBES’ 2019 GA report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services shows the limits of the approach of the protection of biodiversity through the spatial extent of terrestrial and marine protected area, which account among the few Aichi Biodiversity Targets partially achieved;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 135 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Notes with deep concern that EU consumption accounts for around 10 % of the global share of deforestation, through its high import dependency of agricultural commodities such as palm oil, meat, soy, cocoa, maize, timber, rubber; reiterates its call for the Commission to submit a proposal in 2021 for an EU legal framework to halt and reverse EU-driven global deforestation, by ensuring that EU market and consumption patterns do not detrimentally affect forests and biodiversity;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 136 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Recalls that the EU’s growing demand for wood for use in materials, energy and the bioeconomy is exceeding the limits of its supply, which increases the risk of import-embodied deforestation, land grabbing, forced displacement and violations of indigenous peoples’ rightsIPLC’ rights; reiterates that EU bioenergy policy should respond to strict environmental and social criteria;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 138 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 a (new)
13 a. Calls on the EU to step up the implementation of its FLEGT Action Plan in particular the Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) so as to reduce the demand for illegal timber and the associated trade and to strengthen the rights of communities and Indigenous Peoples living affected by logging;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 145 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14 a (new)
14 a. Underlines that protecting biodiversity and mitigating climate change are not automatically mutually supportive; calls for the revision of the Renewable Energy Directive to make it consistent with EU’s international commitments on Agenda 2030, the Paris Agreement and the Convention of Biological Diversity, which entails i.e.: to introduce social sustainability criteria taking into account the risks of land- grabbing; to this end, RED II should comply with international tenure rights standards, i.e. ILO Convention No 169 and FAO Voluntary Guidelines on Land Tenures and Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 148 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Recalls that agricultural production both depends and has an impact on biodiversity; highlights that effective mainstreaming of biodiversity in agriculture requires i.e. to identify and phase out environmentally harmful subsidies; to enshrine the “polluter pays” principle within the regulatory framework (e.g. taxes on synthetic fertiliser and pesticide use) and to make ex-ante and ex- post Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) mandatory;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 155 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. IRecalls that agroecology’s unique capacity to reconcile the economic, environmental and social dimensions of sustainability has been recognised by landmark reports from IPCC and IPBES and the World Bank and FAO-led global agricultural assessment (IAASTD); insists that EU external funding for agriculture should be in line with the transformative nature of the 2030 Agenda, the Paris Climate Agreement and the UN CBD; considers that investment in agro- ecology, agroforestry and crop diversification should be prioritised accordingly;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 165 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18
18. Recalls that seed diversity is vital in building the resilience of farming to climate change; against this backdrop, notes with concern that EU FTAs require Parties to ensure the protection of plant varieties in accordance with the revised 1991 International Convention for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV), which is incompatible with the provisions of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA);
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 167 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19
19. CRecalls that TRIPS provision which request some form of protection for plant varieties don't force developing countries to adopt UPOV regime; calls for the EU to support intellectual property rights regimes that enhance the development of locally adapted seed varieties and farmer-saved seeds; and to ensure that the EU commitments made to farmers’ rights under the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture are reflected in all technical assistance and financial support for seed policy development;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 173 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20
20. Calls for the EU to put an end to the double standards towards pesticides whereby hazardous substances banned in the EU can be exported from the Union, in line with EU’s commitments towards PCD, the Green Deal, the “do-not-harm principle” and the Rotterdam Convention of 1998;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 176 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21
21. Calls for the EU to advocate at COP 15 of the UN CBD a global moratorium on gene drive research linked to the development of applications and on releases of gene drive organisms into nature, including field trials, and to uphold the precautionary principle, ass enshrined in the TFUE as well as the CBD;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 177 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 a (new)
21 a. Recalls that conservation, restoration and sustainable management of marine ecosystems is crucial for climate mitigation strategies while ensuring that the rights and livelihoods of small-scale fishers and coastal communities are respected; emphasises that the IPCC Special report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate gives evidence of the benefits of combining scientific with local and indigenous knowledge to enforce resilience; urges the EU to develop a Human Rights -based approach towards ocean governance;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 181 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 b (new)
21 b. Underlines that the excessive fishing capacity within the framework of international fish trade is threatening food security of coastal communities and marine ecosystems in developing countries; recalls EU’s commitment towards the Principle of Policy Coherence for Development; takes the view that progress still needs to be made for Sustainable Fisheries Partnership Agreements to become truly sustainable, highlights that these agreements must be in line with best available scientific advice and must neither undermine local food security nor threaten the small-scale fisheries sector in third countries by putting it in direct competition with EU vessels; more broadly, calls on the EU and its Member States to push for ambitious measures and financial resources to tackle the global issue of illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and the trade of illegal seafood products;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 183 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 c (new)
21 c. Emphasises that creating a sustainable maritime environment requires to tackle i.a. land-based pollution reaching the seas and oceans, marine pollution and eutrophication; urges the EU and its Member States to take all necessary measures to address holistically the root causes of marine pollution and fish depletion, and to reform accordingly its sectoral policy, notably its agricultural policy, to respond effectively to its international commitments on biodiversity and climate change;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 184 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 d (new)
21 d. Stresses the need to implement an integrated approach to all sectors of the Blue Economy based on science and an Ecosystem-based approach, which implies an understanding of the relationships between human society and the ecosystems that support it; emphasises accordingly the duty of states to refrain from taking measures, including large- scale development projects, that may adversely affect the livelihoods of inland and marine smallscale fishers, their territories or access rights, unless their free, prior and informed consent is obtained, and ensure that courts protect such rights; and conduct ex-ante assessments of extractive industry projects, operated by private entities in order to evaluate the possible negative human rights impacts on local fishing communities;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 194 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23
23. SDeplores that Trade and Sustainable Development chapter of EU FTAs are poorly effective in the implementation of biodiversity-related provisions; stresses that in order to be enforceable, the environmental objectives of the EU’s free trade agreements (FTAs) must be clear, quantifiable, verifiable and include sanctions for non-compliance;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 199 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24
24. Highlights that the biodiversity of cultivated crops and farmed animals has fallen as a result of international trade, in particular, recalls that specialisation in agriculture, resulting from trade liberalisation, has a downside negative effect for ecosystem, that are less diverse, and therefore less functional and less resilient; calls for a full assessment of the direct and indirect impact of EU FTAs on biodiversity;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 205 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 26
26. Recalls that the risk of pandemics is driven by anthropogenic changes, such as land-use change, agricultural expansion and intensification, the rise of global trade and consumption as well as demographic pressure, that brings wildlife, livestock and people into closer contact; in this context, recalls that ecological restoration is critical for the implementation of the ‘One Health’ approach;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 208 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 27
27. Recalls that the majority of drugs used for healthcare and the prevention of diseases are derived from biodiversity, while many important therapeutics are derived from indigenous knowledge and traditional medicine;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 211 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 29
29. Stresses the need to ensure that the benefits of nature’s genetic resources are shared fairly and equitably; underlines that regulations taken to protect GR and their associated TK must comply with international commitments taken on the promotion and respect of the rights of indigenous peoples as enshrined in the 2007 UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) and the 1989 ILO Convention on Indigenous and Tribal Peoples (No 169); in particular, insists that the WTO Agreement on Trade- Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) should be compatible with the Nagoya Protocol to the UN CBD; accordingly, considers it crucial to establish mandatory requirements on disclosing the origin of genetic resources during patent proceedings;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 213 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30
30. Underlines the fact that the IPBES global assessment demonstrated the importance of IPLC to global biodiversity conservation and ecosystem management; regrets that, in spite of this great potential, indigenous knowledge has not been effectively used, while the explicit recognition of indigenous or tribal peoples, and of their rights, remains absent from the legal, policy and institutional frameworks of many countries, and its implementation remains a major issue;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 217 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 31
31. Highlights the numerous allegations of large-scale violations of the rights of indigenous peoples reported by the UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, resulting i.e. from increased mineral extraction, the development of renewable energy projects, agribusiness expansion, mega- infrastructure development and conservation measures;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 218 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 31 a (new)
31 a. Recalls the legal duties of the State to recognise and protect the rights of indigenous people to own, develop, control and use their communal lands and to participate in the management and conservation of the natural resources;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 221 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 32
32. Calls for the EU to enhance the scrutiny of EU-funded projects in terms of human rights abuses, notably for the creation or expansion of existing protected areas and, where necessary, to terminate projects which violate human rights and evict IPLC from their homeland;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 225 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 33
33. Urges the EU to ensure that a rights-based approach is applied to all projects funded through Official Development Assistance (ODA), with particular regard to the rights of pastoralists and IPLC, including full recognition of the right to self- determination and land rights as enshrined in human rights treaties, notably the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP); compliance with the principle of Free, Prior and Informed consent as set out in the ILO Convention 169 in relation to decision-making of all aspects of protected areas; and the establishment of accountability, complaint and redress mechanisms for infringements on indigenous rights in the context of conservation activities;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 229 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 34
34. Urges the EU to ensure that the NaturAfrica Initiative promotes a rights- based approach to conservation and is developed in consultation withwith the free, prior and informed consent of the IPLC concerned, together with the civil society groups who support them and asks the EU to provide technical and financial assistance to this effect;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 234 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 35
35. Stresses that securing tenure rights is a prerequisite for effective biodiversity mainstreaming; notes, however, that the lack of collective land rights for indigenous peoples is a primary obstacle to ensuring that rights-based conservation becomes effective; reminds that frameworks such as the FAO Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests (VGGT) can help to provide legal certainty; accordingly, urges the EU to make the effective implementation of these guidelines a pre-condition of investment in the remit of NDICI; more broadly, urges Parties to the Convention of Biological Diversity to recognise the rights of indigenous peoples as a matter of priority, in a context where protected areas are to be expanded; and calls on the EU to undertake all necessary measures for the effective implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and ratification of the ILO Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention No. 169;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 235 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 35 a (new)
35 a. Recalls that the transition to a green and digital economy has huge implications for the mining sector and that there are growing concerns that mining will spread into sensitive forest landscapes, contributing to deforestation and forest degradation; reminds that 80% of forests worldwide constitute traditional lands and territories of indigenous people; calls on the EU and its Member States to step up its efforts to foster responsible and sustainable mining practices, while accelerating its transition towards a circular economy; in particular, calls on the EU to develop a region-wide framework for extractive industries which would sanction companies violating human rights and provide legal redress to indigenous peoples whose rights have been violated; and stresses the need to ban mineral exploration and exploitation in all protected areas including national parks and World Heritage Sites;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 236 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 35 b (new)
35 b. Regrets the serious shortcomings of the UN “Protect, Respect, Remedy” framework and the Guiding Principles on business and human rights with regard to both indigenous peoples’ rights and land rights; calls once again on the EU to engage constructively in the work of the UN Human Rights Council on an international legally binding instrument to regulate, in international human rights law, the activities of transnational corporations and other business enterprises, which should include specific standards for the protection of indigenous people;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 239 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 37
37. Stresses that wildlife trafficking should be classified as a serious crime in accordance with the UN Convention on Transnational Organised Crime in an effort to facilitate international cooperation, notably in a context where trade and consumption of wildlife represents an important risk for future pandemics;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 240 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 37 a (new)
37 a. Urges supply, transit and demand countries to deepen their levels of cooperation to combat illegal wildlife trade along the entire chain; in particular, urges governments of the supply countries to: i) improve the rule of law and create effective deterrents by strengthening criminal investigation, prosecution and sentencing; ii) enact stronger laws treating illicit wildlife trafficking as a "serious crime" deserving the same level of attention and gravity as other forms of transnational organised crime; iii) allocate more resources to combating wildlife crime, particularly to strengthen wildlife law enforcement, trade controls, monitoring, and customs detection and seizure; iv) to commit to a zero-tolerance policy on corruption;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 243 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 38
38. Urges the EU to make the fight against environmental crime an overriding strategic political priority in international judicial cooperation and at COP meetings, notably by promoting compliance with MEAs through the adoption of criminal sanctions, exchanges of best practices and by promoting the enlargement of the scope of the International Criminal Court to cover criminal acts that amount to ecocide; calls on the Commission and the Member States to allocate appropriate financial and human resources to preventing, investigating and prosecuting environmental crimes;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 248 #

2020/2274(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 39
39. SUnderlines that international law has evolved to embrace new concepts such as “the Common heritage of humanity”, “Sustainable Development”, “Future Generations”; but stresses that there is no permanent international mechanism to monitor and address environmental damage and destruction that alters the global commons or ecosystem services; calls for the EU and the Member States, to this end, to support a paradigm shift to include ecocide and the right of future generations in international environmental law;
2021/03/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 1 #

2020/2260(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph -1 (new)
-1. Whereas FAO estimates that about 75 % of plant genetic diversity has been lost worldwide; whereas wide-scale genetic erosion increases our vulnerability to climate change and to the appearance of new pests and diseases;
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 2 #

2020/2260(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph -1 a (new)
-1 a. Whereas industrial agriculture and breeding are driving habitat loss and creating conditions for viruses, such as Covid-19, to emerge and spread;
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 3 #

2020/2260(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph -1 b (new)
-1 b. Whereas consolidation of the food sector, including through patenting, is driving a reduction in seed and livestock genetic diversity;
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 4 #

2020/2260(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph -1 c (new)
-1 c. Whereas farmers’ rights were established under the FAO International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture in 2004, but whereas Intellectual Property rules have often worked in contradiction to them, putting local, traditional and indigenous seed systems at risk;
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 11 #

2020/2260(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Underlines that the disruptions triggered by COVID-19 have shone a spotlight on the vulnerabilities of the global food system; but recalls that family farmers and smallholders have demonstrated their ability to provide diversified products and to increase food production sustainably; accordingly, urges a shift away from trade- oriented agricultural policies and towards support for food sovereignty and local and regional markets; recalls that agroecology’s capacity to reconcile the economic, environmental and social dimensions of sustainability has been widely recognised in landmark reports, notably from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) and the World Bank and FAO-led global International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science and Technology for Development (IAASTD);
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 25 #

2020/2260(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Insists that EU funding for agriculture must be in line with Agenda 2030Stresses that short supply chains hold major potential to address current food system failures; and recalls that climate-friendly agriculture entails i.e. to reducing dependence on fossil fuel energy, including the use of chemical pesticides and fertilisers; but notes with concern that most agricultural development funding in Sub-Sahara Africa still supports Green Revolution approaches, where the use of public finances to unlock private investment opportunities (e.g. PPPs, blended finance models) mostly target export commodity production and agropoles, and is increasingly conductive to food system industrialisation, while smallholders, and particularly women, struggle in the meantime to access the credit and financial support[1]; insists that EU funding for agriculture must be in line with Agenda 2030, the Paris Climate Agreement and the Convention on Biological Diversity and prioritise investments in agroecology, agroforestry and crop diversification; stresses the importance of preserving agricultural biodiversity, local animal and plant breeds and local varieties;recalls that agricultural expansion and unsustainable agricultural intensification practises are major causes of biodiversity degradation worldwide, including genetic erosion of crop and livestock varieties; therefore, stresses the importance of preserving agricultural biodiversity, local animal and plant breeds and local varieties to secure nutritious, safe, affordable and high quality food throughout the year, preserve biodiversity and increase climate resilience; [1] Sources: International Panel of Experts on SustainableFood Systems - IPES Food, « The added value(s) of agroecology : Unlocking the potential for transition in West Africa”, July 2020.
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 36 #

2020/2260(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Recalls that the majority of smallholder farmers in developing countries are women, and that the promotion of a long term strategy of conservation, improvement and management of genetic resources diversity for food and agriculture requires the recognition of their role and knowledge as food providers and producers; urges the EU and its Member States to strive, notably through development aid, for their active participation as decision makers, and to help addressing the discriminations they face, notably regarding access of women farmers to land, productive resources and financial services;
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 44 #

2020/2260(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Regrets that increasing vertical and horizontal concentration in the agri-food sector, reinforces the industrial food and farming model; believes that the Green New Deal requires the creation of a new anti-trust environment; , at the expense of small farmers and breeders in Europe and abroad; highlights that industry consolidation enhances the risks of human rights abuses along their supply chains; reminds equally that while the livestock industry experiences further vertical integration, zoonotic and food- borne disease risks to proliferate; in contrast, stresses that development and dissemination of livestock species are maintained by small-scale producers and pastoralists; against this backdrop, believes that the Green New Deal requires the creation of a new anti-trust environment, where the impacts of concentration on production and processing activities are assessed and monitored, including on social, environmental and public health;
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 50 #

2020/2260(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Recalls that seed diversity is vital in building resilience of farming to climate change; calls for the EU to support intellectual property rights regimes that enhance the development of locally adapted seed varieties and farmer- saved seeds;
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 51 #

2020/2260(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 b (new)
3 b. Notes with concern that EU free trade agreements (FTAs) require Parties to ensure the protection of plant varieties in accordance with the revised 1991 International Convention for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV), which is incompatible with the provisions of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA), which safeguards the rights of farmers to maintain genetic resources for purposes of food security and climate change adaptation; reminds that farm-saved seeds are estimated to account for over 80% of farmers’ total seed requirements in some African countries; therefore, urges the EU to refrain from influencing seed law reform, notably in Africa, through the adoption of 1991 UPOV provisions;
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 53 #

2020/2260(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 c (new)
3 c. Calls on the EU to support developing countries to adopt appropriate national legislation with the view to protect threatened genetic resources for food and agriculture, guarantee their continued use and management by local communities, indigenous peoples, men and women, and ensure the fair and equitable sharing of benefits from their use;
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 54 #

2020/2260(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 d (new)
3 d. Highlights the risks relating to the development of genome editing on small farmers and breeders; calls for a global moratorium on gene drive research linked to the development of applications and on releases of gene drive organisms into nature, including field trials, and to uphold the precautionary principle, as enshrined in the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) as well as the Convention on Biological Diversity;
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 55 #

2020/2260(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 e (new)
3 e. Recalls Europe’s dependence on overseas land for its livestock and aquaculture production; acknowledges the devastating environmental impact of genetically modified (GM) soya for animal feed; stresses that transgenic crops are not compatible with agro-ecological and organic agriculture, as they are, almost without exception, either herbicide tolerant (including to glyphosate) or produce their own toxic insecticides, or both; but recalls that more diverse farming systems based on agro-ecology provide a natural defence against pests; calls on the Commission to no longer authorise Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) crops that are either herbicide tolerant or which produce their own pesticides, either for import or cultivation in the EU, due to biodiversity damage and health risks;
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 56 #

2020/2260(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 f (new)
3 f. Urges the Commission to set up a European vegetable protein production and supply strategy, with the view to become less dependent on genetically modified (GM) feed imports and to create shorter food chains and regional markets;
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 60 #

2020/2260(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Stresses that the EU-Mercosur Agreement is inconsistent with the Farm to Fork Strategy, in particular its objectives of reduction of dependence on animal feed (including soybeans grown on deforested land), and the shift to a more plant-based diet and shorter supply chains and to become global standard for sustainability; deplores, in particular, that it boosts embodied deforestation; facilitates the importation of genetically modified foods containing residues pesticides, the production and/or use of which is prohibited on European soil and provides for the removal of barriers to trade in chemical pesticides;
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 69 #

2020/2260(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Stresses that EU free trade agreements (FTAs) should not disrupt local agriculture, damage small producers or exacerbate dependency on food imports; calls into question international trade rules which allow dumping through the WTO green box; welcomes the Commission’s commitment to compliance of EU trade agreements with the Paris Agreement,more specifically, calls on the EU to embark on a modification of the current WTO definition of dumping, with the aim to cover cases where subsidies enable export sales to take place at below the costs of production; welcomes the Commission’s commitment to compliance of EU trade agreements with the Paris Agreement by turning it into an “essential clause”; stresses that to be enforceable, environmental objectives set in EU FTAs must be clear, measurable, verifiable and include sanctions for non-compliance; and calls for market access in FTAs to be conditional on compliance with process and production methods criteria, with reference to environmental sustainability and climate change;
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 74 #

2020/2260(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. Highlights that trade agreements can have a negative impact on food security in developing countries; recalls as well that EU consumption represents around 10% of the global share of deforestation, through its high import dependency of agricultural commodities such as palm oil, meat, soy, cocoa, maize, timber, rubber; in addition, notes with concern that biodiversity of cultivated crops and farmed animals has decreased because of international trade, while specialisation in agriculture has a downside negative effect for ecosystem, that are less diverse, and therefore less functional and less resilient;
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 77 #

2020/2260(INI)

5 b. Urges the EU to guarantee the coherence of European agricultural and trade policies in line with the commitments to Policy Coherence for Development (PCD); calls for a fully- fledged sustainability ex ante and ex post impact assessment of EU free trade agreements (FTAs); more broadly, calls for the EU to support developing countries’ demands to protect their food production and to safeguard their population from the potentially destructive effects of cheap imports, notably through the revision of their common external tariffs within the remit of revised economic partnership agreements (EPAs); which shall support effectively the integration of regional market;
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 81 #

2020/2260(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Denounces the EU’s double standards on pesticides, which allow the export from the EU of hazardous substances banned in the EU.Recalls that “Farm to Fork” strategy aims to gradually ban hazardous pesticides from agriculture and promote alternative practises; denounces the EU’s double standards on pesticides, which allow the export from the EU of hazardous substances banned in the EU. recalls EU’s commitments towards the “do-not-harm principle”; demands the modification of the current EU rules to eliminate this legal incoherence, in line with the Rotterdam Convention of 1998 and the Green Deal;
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 88 #

2020/2260(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6 a. Recalls that progress still needs to be made for Sustainable Fisheries Partnership Agreements to become truly sustainable, highlights that these agreements must be in line with best available scientific advice and must neither threaten the small-scale fisheries sector in third countries nor undermine local food security;
2021/02/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 796 #

2020/2260(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3a. Urges the Commission to strengthen Regulation (EC) No 1107/2009 concerning the placing of plant protection products on the market, by means of more comprehensive, rigorous and independent scientific assessments covering all the substances contained in the commercial product for which a marketing authorisation application has been made, and a more transparent procedure not subject to any conflicts of interest;
2021/02/18
Committee: ENVIAGRI
Amendment 1268 #

2020/2260(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8 a (new)
8a. Considers that an ambitious plan for European organic farming is needed to achieve a successful transition, meet growing consumer demand for organic products, take more effective action for the climate and environment, and improve farmers’ incomes and regional economies; suggests that the targets for organically farmed land should be set at 30% by 2030 and 100% by 2050, and that the simple announcement of the Commission’s future action plan, which is expected in the spring, is not sufficient to explain how those targets will be achieved; notes that it would be highly desirable for the targets for organically farmed land to be clearly set out in the CAP National Strategic Plans that are currently being prepared, and that the Commission should ensure that those targets are met and that the European and national budgetary resources needed to develop organic farming as a whole are sufficient and considerably increased so as to support as many conversions as possible and invest in small processing and marketing structures, advice, research, promotion among European consumers, and food education;
2021/02/18
Committee: ENVIAGRI
Amendment 1450 #

2020/2260(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 a (new)
12a. Believes that it is necessary to create a regulatory environment that encourages the development of sectors in which everyone involved in the food chain is jointly committed, in the long term, to achieving the transition and supplying healthy and sustainable food to all consumers, while reinforcing the resilience of our food system, particularly during times of crisis, as well as our food sovereignty and farmers’ incomes;
2021/02/18
Committee: ENVIAGRI
Amendment 1610 #

2020/2260(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Recalls the need to promote effective Agricultural Knowledge and Innovation Systems (AKIS), enabling all food chain actors to become sustainable by speeding up innovation and accelerating knowledge transfer; recalls, in addition, the need for a farm sustainability and farm and food ‘general accountancy’ data network to set benchmarks for farm performance and document the uptake of sustainable farming practices, while allowing for the precise and tailored application of new production approaches at farm level by providing farmers with access to fast broadband connections;
2021/02/18
Committee: ENVIAGRI
Amendment 1694 #

2020/2260(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16 a (new)
16a. Calls for a mandatory EU-wide front-of-pack nutrition labelling system based on independent and sound science; indicates in this regard that the Nutri- Score label, which has been adopted by several EU Member States, industrial players and consumer associations, is to date the easiest label to understand nutritional information, makes consumers to choose healthier foods, incentivises manufacturers to improve the nutritional quality of their products and thus participates in the fight against the increase in cardiovascular disease, cancer, obesity and diabetes;
2021/02/18
Committee: ENVIAGRI
Amendment 1763 #

2020/2260(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18
18. Welcomes the fact that the strategy rightly recognises the role and influence of the food environment in shaping consumption patterns and the need to make it easier for consumers to choose healthy and sustainable diets; reiterates the importance of promoting sustainable diets by raising consumer awareness of the impacts of consumption patterns and providing information on diets that are better for human health and have a lower environmental footprint; calls, for public health reasons, for all raw and processed foods to have labels indicating the presence of pesticide residues; underlines that food prices must send the right signal to consumers; welcomes, therefore, the strategy’s objective that the healthy and sustainable choice should become the most affordable one;
2021/02/18
Committee: ENVIAGRI
Amendment 1792 #

2020/2260(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18 a (new)
18a. Believes that it is essential to respond to the growing demand of consumers, relayed on numerous occasions in European Parliament resolutions, for better information about the origin of all of the food products that they purchase by introducing mandatory labelling, including for seafood and ingredients used in processed products; considers that, with regard to processed products, the number of parties involved in their preparation is also information that should be provided to consumers, given their interest in short supply chains;
2021/02/18
Committee: ENVIAGRI
Amendment 1870 #

2020/2260(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20
20. Highlights the recognition in the strategy that Europeans’ diets are not in line with recommendations for healthy eating, and that a population-wide shift in consumption patterns is needed towards more healthy and plant-based foods and less red and processed meat, sugars, salt, and fats, which will also benefit the environment; calls for food product labelling to list natural ingredients separately from artificial ingredients (produced in laboratories or industrially manipulated); emphasises that EU-wide guidelines for sustainable and healthy diets would bring clarity to consumers on what constitutes a healthy and sustainable diet and inform Member States’ own efforts to integrate sustainability elements in national dietary advice; calls on the Commission to develop such guidelines and specific actions to effectively promote healthy plant-based diets;
2021/02/18
Committee: ENVIAGRI
Amendment 2211 #

2020/2260(INI)

26. Recalls the global responsibility of European food systems and their key role in setting global standards for food safety, environmental protection, social and labour law, fair trade and animal welfare; calls on the Commission and the Member States to ensure that all food and feed products imported to the EU fully meet relevant EU regulations and standards, and to providehibit them from accessing the EU market if they do not; calls, too, for development assistance to support primary producers from developing countries in meeting those standards; welcomes the Commission’s intention to take the environmental impacts of requested import tolerances into account;
2021/02/18
Committee: ENVIAGRI
Amendment 14 #

2020/2222(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital J
J. whereas corruption is a major threat in the private and public sphere and has a disproportionate impact on the poor and most vulnerable, increasing costs and reducing access to services, including health, education and justice, undermining the trust and confidence which are necessary for the maintenance and development of sustainable economic and social relations and it poses a threat to the very foundations of the Union core values;
2021/09/16
Committee: CONT
Amendment 16 #

2020/2222(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital K
K. whereas a rising number of organised crime groups are active in the EU, often with cross-border reach; the phenomenon being increasingly complex with new criminal markets and new modi operandi emerging due to globalisation and new technologies;
2021/09/16
Committee: CONT
Amendment 34 #

2020/2222(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Recalls that governments need efficient and transparent reporting, independent ex post audits and accountability procedures, and open channels of communication with civil society and the private sector to ensure that the funds and measures are helping the people who need it most; points out the importance of providing an up-to-date, transparent and reliable information to the public during the crisis;
2021/09/16
Committee: CONT
Amendment 41 #

2020/2222(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. BEmphasises the critical role of the civil society organisations and believes that it is important to keep citizens engaged in the fight against corruption and fully protected from negative personal consequences; calls on the Commission to provide the right platforms for engagement;
2021/09/16
Committee: CONT
Amendment 80 #

2020/2222(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23 a (new)
23 a. Urges the Commission to propose a review of the Financial Regulation, which includes a solid legal basis for mandatory use of open and standardised public procurement data, as well as to make budgetary control IT-systems mandatory, public and interoperable with national databases;
2021/09/16
Committee: CONT
Amendment 88 #

2020/2222(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 25 a (new)
25 a. Alerts for the fact that organised criminal groups operate without borders and increasingly acquire assets in MS other than those in which they are based and in third countries;
2021/09/16
Committee: CONT
Amendment 100 #

2020/2222(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 29
29. Takes the view that a centralised procurement administration to which contractors and contracting authorities are obliged to systematically report highly detailed project data and progress (in a standardised format) should be created, in order to facilitate data collection and treatment on an EU level, however, an intermediate level on the national level (i.e. decentralised collection point) could be introduced in order to facilitate the data collection exercise, given the language differences and the local characteristics (such as regional responsibilities);
2021/09/16
Committee: CONT
Amendment 101 #

2020/2222(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 29 a (new)
29 a. Suggests the use of financial disclosure/assets declaration systems for the prevention, detection and investigation/prosecution of corruption with a view to promoting accountability and awareness among public officials, avoiding conflict of interest;
2021/09/16
Committee: CONT
Amendment 27 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Calls for the elimination of harmful practices such as female genital mutilation (FGM) and early and forced child marriage; is extremely concerned that more than 200 million girls and women worldwide have been forced to undergo FGM; calls for full access to physical and psychological care by interculturally sensitive and trained personnel; calls on the Commission to examine the synergies between the internal and external EU programmes to ensure a coherent long- term approach to stop FGM both within and outside the EU, given that the issue is inherently linked to other parts of the world;
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 42 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Insists that CSE programmes are important as they provide age-appropriate information about puberty, the menstrual cycle, pregnancy and childbirth in particular contraception, prevention of HIV and STIs; recalls the role of non- governmental organisations as service providers and advocates for SRHR; underlines that CSE programmes help prevent early pregnancy and marriage, which lead to girls dropping out of school; calls on CSE programmes to also focus on interpersonal relationships, sexual orientation, gender equality, consent and the prevention of gender-based violence;
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 63 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Calls for the Gender Action Plan III to give more prominence to its SRHR thematic policy area given the tremendous impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on women and girls in developing countries; underlines the importance of strengthening the promotion of the right of every individual to have full control over, and decide freely and responsibly on matters related to their sexuality and sexual and reproductive health;
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 75 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Calls on the EU to secure adequate and well-targeted funding for SRHR in its development cooperation policy; reiterates its call for at least 85% of ODA funded programmes, in the NDICI, to have gender equality and women’s and girls’ rights and empowerment as a significant objective, as defined by the OECD-DAC;
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 78 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7a. Calls on the EU to facilitate the integration of comprehensive programmes on SRHR into national strategies and policies of partner countries as recommended by the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) Programme of Action and SDG 5;
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 84 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8
8. Emphasises that SRHR services should be gender-responsive, rights-based, youth-friendly and available to all, regardless of age or marital status, including during conflicts and disasters; calls on the Commission and Member States to reinforce its gender equality perspective in its humanitarian actions; recalls with concern that most unmet needs for sexual and reproductive health services are among adolescents, unmarried people, LGBTIQ people, persons with disabilities, minority ethnic groups, and the rural and urban poor;
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 98 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 9 a (new)
9a. Stresses the need to ensure access to adequate WASH infrastructure in schools to ensure sexual and reproductive health, whether in relation to contraception, pregnancy, childbirth, abortion, sexually transmitted diseases or menstrual hygiene.
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 1 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Proposal for a decision 1
Paragraph 1
1. Grants the Commission discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the eighth, ninth, tenth and eleventh European Development Funds for the financial year 2019 / Postpones its decision on granting the Commission discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the eighth, ninth, tenth and eleventh European Development Funds for the financial year 2019;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 3 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Proposal for a decision 2
Paragraph 1
1. Approves the closure of the accounts of the eighth, ninth, tenth and eleventh European Development Funds for the financial year 2019 / Postpones the closure of the accounts of the eighth, ninth, tenth and eleventh European Development Funds for the financial year 2019;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 7 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas it is crucial to ensure that development aid is used in accordance with its original purpose, meaning to reduce and ultimately to eradicate poverty, as stated in Article 208 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, with due consideration for aid and development effectiveness principles;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 13 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E
E. whereas the alignment of Union development cooperation with partner countries’ own development priorities should be always and fully respected and is a key element of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 14 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F
F. whereas policy coherence and complementarity of various external policies should be carefully looked at, especially when several policies are being implemented in a single partner country, with the view to promoting synergies and trade-offs between existing policies and to avoiding possible damaging consequences of one single EU policy on an area otherwise dealt with by another policy and, as much as possible, unnecessary administrative burden;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 17 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I
I. whereas budget support, while playing a key role in driving change and in addressing the main development challenges, carries a considerable governance risk and should be granted only if the beneficiary state is able to demonstrate a sufficient level of transparency, accountability, respect for the Rule of Law and human rights prior to receiving budget support assistance, followed by thorough ex-post checks;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 20 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Is concerned that the estimated level of error surpassed the materiality threshold, with 3,5 % of expenditure affected for the eighth, ninth, tenth and eleventh EDF (compared to 5,2 % for 2018, 4,5 % in 2017, 3,3 % in 2016, 3,8 % in 2014 and 2015, 3,4 % in 2013 and 3 % in 2012); notes that the growing trend of the estimated level of error has temporary stopped; expects, nevertheless, that the Commission reflect on the root causes of the succession of adverse opinions and take all steps necessary to further reduce the estimated level of error;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 30 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. NotesIs worried about the Court’s observation, as in previous years, that the frequency of identified errors, including some contained in final claims which had been subject to ex-ante external audits and expenditure verifications, points to weaknesses in those checks; notes with concern that this is not only problematic in terms of the effectiveness of the checks but also in terms of the efficiency of the management and control system because the checks performed did not prevent or correct the error; reiterates its expectation that the control system should be more rigorous and calls on DG INTPA to continue efforts to improve the assessment of both effectiveness and efficiency of its control system by identifying key performance indicators for both, to set realistic and ambitious targets and to monitor and improve its control system;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 31 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Notes DG INTPA’s eighth RER study, which resulted in an RER of 1,13 % , up from 0,85 % in 2018 and below the 2 % materiality threshold fixed by the Commission; notes the Court’s observation that four major factors distort the RER, contributing to the underestimation of the residual error rate, namely the insufficient coverage of certain aspects of procurement procedures, the very low number of on- the-spot-checks in the country of project implementation, which is deemed insufficient to detect errors that are not apparent in documents, the method for determining the RER, which results in a rate that does not necessarily reflect the actual residual errors, and possible overreliance on previous control work, which is contrary to the purpose of the RER study, namely to identify the errors that have evaded precisely those controls; calls on DG INTPA, as in previous years, to liaise with the Court and to address those issues in an update of the methodology and in a more thorough performance of next year’s RER study;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 32 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Notes with concern the Court’s statement that the absence of reservations in the 2019 annual activity report is unjustified; further notes the Court’s consideration that it results partly from the limitations of the RER study and partly from the introduction of a ‘de minimis rule’, which states that a reservation is not needed if the individual spending area it would cover represents less than 5 % of total payments and has a financial impact of less than EUR 5 million; consequently, reservations are no longer made in some cases where they were made in previous years, even if corresponding risks remains and the errors remain the same; recalls that a reservation is a keystone in the accountability construction and therefore constitutes a preventive and transparency instrument within the assurance building of DG INTPA, reflecting ongoing challenges or remaining and recurring weaknesses faced at headquarters or within Union delegations;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 33 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21
21. Notes with satisfaction the continued commitment of the United Kingdom to pay all its obligations under the current multiannual financial framework and previous financial perspectives as if it were still a Member State, as expressed in the Agreement on the withdrawal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland from the European Union and the European Atomic Energy Community (the ‘Withdrawal Agreement’); notes furthermore that the Withdrawal Agreement states that the United Kingdom is to remain party to the EDF until the closure of the eleventh EDF and all previous unclosed EDFs, and is to, in this respect, assume the same obligations as the Member States under the Internal Agreement by which it was set up, as well as the obligations resulting from previous EDFs until their closure and that the United Kingdom may participate, as an observer, without voting rights, in the EDF Committee;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 36 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24 a (new)
24 a. Recalls on the Commission to: - strictly respect and make applicable in contribution and framework agreements the aforementioned responsibilities of entities implementing Union funds and the obligation to provide the Court and OLAF with any requested document needed for audit completion; - pay regular attention to the pillar assessment requirements and reports of the international organisations and NGOs concerned by this lack of cooperation to review the appropriateness of their accountability tools; to reconsider related provisions or terms of reference when the pillar assessment methodology is to be reviewed to comply with the EDF Financial Regulation; calls for an adaptation, where necessary, of the existing delegation agreements in force with those international entities;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 37 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24 b (new)
24 b. Notes that there is still a need for a more systematic approach to the communication of Union´s grant-funded activities to enhance Union´s visibility, and to strengthen transparency, accountability and human rights due- diligence along the chain of funding; calls on the Commission to introduce in the framework agreements the obligation for the leading Agency to ensure the visibility of the Union in multi-donor projects; calls on the Commission to carry out sample-based on-the-spot controls years after the completion of the co- financed projects to check the continued impact of the EDF interventions and to take the necessary steps to ensure the long-term impacts of its operations;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 39 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 26
26. Notes with appreciation that sub- Saharan Africa is still the largest recipient of budget support with a share of 36 %; observes furthermorewith concern that the share of low income countries decreased to 32 % (compared to 38% in 2018) and that lower middle income countries, with 47 % of the total ongoing commitments, represent the largest beneficiaries of budget support;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 41 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 26 a (new)
26 a. Recalls that budget support aims at strengthening the partnership with the Union partner countries, to promote sustainable development, eradicate poverty, reduce inequalities, and consolidate peace and democracy, ultimately to contribute to the achievement of Sustainable Development Goals; notes that the Union budget support shall be guided by the internationally agreed Busan effectiveness principles such as Ownership by partner countries, Results focus, Inclusiveness and accountability; highlights that, as it fosters transparency and good governance, budget support contributes also to the fight against corruption and fraud;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 43 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 28 a (new)
28 a. Recalls on DG INTPA, however, to strictly assess in its policy dialogue the risks related to corporate tax avoidance, tax evasion and illicit financial flows affecting particularly developing countries; encourages DG INTPA to assess the fiscal impact and to help to the definition of oriented investment objectives;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 46 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 32 a (new)
32 a. Reiterates its call on the Commission to carry out an evaluation on a country-by-country basis of the long- term on-going EDF financed projects in order to demonstrate the true impact of decades-long Union investment on the ground and how it has effectively helped beneficiary countries’ economic, social and sustainable development;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 50 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 5 a (new)
The European Union Trust Fund for Africa
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 51 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 35 a (new)
35 a. Is concerned that as a follow-up to the EDF’s 2018 discharge report the Commission hasn’t properly implemented Parliament’s numerous recommendations related to the EUTF;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 52 #

2020/2190(DEC)

35 b. Recalls Parliament’s regular stance that the Commission should ensure that any trust fund established as a new development tool must always be in line with the Union’s overall strategy and development policy objectives, i.e. the reduction and eradication of poverty, and must, in particular, ensure that the security interests of European countries do not override the needs of the recipient populations; encourages the Commission to consider limiting financial aid to EUTF projects deflecting from this centreline;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 53 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 35 c (new)
35 c. Stresses that in order to meet the policy objectives, the EUTF must address the root causes of destabilisation, forced displacement and irregular migration by promoting resilience, economic opportunities, equal opportunities, security of populations, and human and social development; observes with great concern that to the opposite of helping to address these causes of destabilisation, the EU funds in 2019 were increasingly being spent to help close borders, stiffen migration and push for returns of migrants back to Africa;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 54 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 35 d (new)
35 d. Recalls that EUTF funding lines must not be used for security measures jeopardising migrants’ rights; calls the Commission to put in place tangible guarantees that migration-related EUTF projects are not used by the implementing authorities to violate migrants basic human rights; in that respect is appalled to learn that 91,3million EUR were paid for a border control project in Libya, which is planned to run until end of 2021, and includes training and the equipment for the Libyan Coast Guard which recently was accused1a of sending migrants to detention centres and subject them to torture, abuse and extortion;[1] _________________ 1aComplaint to the ECA concerning the mismanagement of EUTF funds IBM Libya Programme, Global legal action network, Association for juridical studies on immigration, Italian recreational and cultural association.
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 55 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 35 e (new)
35 e. Reiterates its calls on the Commission to follow-up on the 2018 EDF Discharge report regarding the project “Reconnecting Eritrea and Ethiopia through rehabilitation of the main arterial roads in Eritrea”, funded by the EUTF and managed by the United Nations Office for Project Services, which finances Eritrean national construction companies using forced labour via national service; notes with great concern that EUTF paid their first tranche of EUR 20 million in 2019, followed by additional EUR 60 million 2020 despite the clear opposition by the Parliament; also notes the answer by the commissioner responsible for international partnerships from 15 September 2020 where she informed the parliament that the Commission adopted the “no more roads” approach for Eritrea and has reallocated the remaining funds to other programs; demands that the Commission presents the full report on the case to the discharge authority;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 56 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 35 f (new)
35 f. Considers that due care is needed to ensure better communication among the Commission, Parliament and Member States concerning the implementation of the EUTF and sufficient public reporting, oversight and audit of their operations and performance; invites the Court to consider an audit of the impact of the implementation of the EUTF for Africa on Union development policy both from a budgetary and results point of view; calls therefore on the Commission to draw conclusions from the audit and ensure that EUTF projects that have been inefficiently implemented are terminated or greatly limited in funding;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 57 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 35 g (new)
35 g. Risks and challenges related to the EDF aid implementation
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 58 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 35 h (new)
35 h. Recalls that good governance, the rule of law and the respect for human rights are unavoidable preconditions concurring to the effectiveness of aid; calls upon the Commission to set the rule of law and the respect for human rights as the ultimate precondition for approving financial aid; invites the Commission to make more stringent use of the clause included into the financial agreements with partner countries that enables the Commission to suspend or to terminate the agreement in case of breach of an obligation relating to respect for human rights, democratic principles and the rule of law e (art. 26.1 of the General conditions);
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 59 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 35 i (new)
35 i. Is concerned by the Commission rejection of Parliament recommendation to include in the next annual activity report a structured assessment of the impact of the activities of the EDF; invites the Commission to revise its position and respond positively to the Parliament specific request;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 60 #

2020/2190(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 35 j (new)
35 j. Reiterates its concerns about the inconsistency between the budgetary process of the EDF where the EP is not involved in establishing and allocating EDF resources, and the necessary accountability process where the Parliament is the discharge authority, except for the Investment Facility, which is managed by the EIB and therefore outside the scope of the audit;
2021/03/05
Committee: CONT
Amendment 1 #

2020/2170(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Recalls that the European Chemicals Agency ('ECHA') is the driving force among regulatory authorities in implementing the Union's chemicals legislation for the benefit of human health and the environment as well as for innovation and competitiveness; notes that it provides information on chemicals, helps companies comply with legislation and advances the safe use of chemicals; underlines that Regulation (EC) No 1907/20061a (REACH Regulation) specifies that this should be done in a way that ensures that animal testing is only ever a last resort and that the use of non- animal methods is promoted; __________________ 1aRegulation (EC) No 1907/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2006 concerning the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH), establishing a European Chemicals Agency, amending Directive 1999/45/EC and repealing Council Regulation (EEC) No 793/93 and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1488/94 as well as Council Directive 76/769/EEC and Commission Directives 91/155/EEC, 93/67/EEC, 93/105/EC and 2000/21/EC (OJ L 396, 30.12.2006, p. 1).
2020/12/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 3 #

2020/2170(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3a. Calls for ECHA, as one of the Union agencies responsible for assessing regulated products, to receive sufficient funding to carry out its tasks;
2020/12/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 6 #

2020/2170(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6a. Regrets the lack of resources in the ECHA budget dedicated specifically to ensuring knowledge and promotion of non-animal testing methods; reiterates its call to provide resources for staff within ECHA exclusively dedicated to animal protection and the promotion of non- animal methods across all ECHA activities1a; __________________ 1aEuropean Parliament resolution of 10 July 2020 on the Chemicals Strategy for Sustainability, P9 TA(2020)0201
2020/12/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 9 #

2020/2170(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 a (new)
8a. Encourages ECHA to pursue its efforts to perform its REACH dossier evaluation checks and to make the process more effective; recalls that dossiers evaluation checks on over 2 000 dossiers covering 700 substances revealed that 70 % of the dossiers were not compliant with the legal information requirements of REACH or did not contain sufficient information to ensure a safe use for Union citizens and the environment;
2020/12/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 10 #

2020/2170(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 b (new)
8b. Asks ECHA to improve the transparency and the user-friendliness of its database, and the interface between evaluation and follow-up risk management, including, for example, a short note on the ECHA’s registered substances in the database with regard to the compliance and evaluation status of the dossiers adding outcome of substance evaluation (further risk management needed or not), stating explicitly if the dossier was found non-compliant and on what ground and adding the outcome of Board of Appeal decisions as well as the follow up delivered or intended by ECHA;
2020/12/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 11 #

2020/2170(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 c (new)
8c. Asks ECHA to develop guidance on the minimum information requirements needed to justify granting derogations to restrictions and to ensure that no derogation is accepted when registration dossiers are not compliant or updated;
2020/12/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 1 #

2020/2163(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Reiterates its concern that only 89 % of management board members and 81 % of advisory forum members submitted the required annual declarations of interest in 2019; notes that these figures are respectively 7 and 8 percentage points lower than in 2018; recalls that independence and transparency are crucial given the important work of the Centre; calls for a mechanism to ensure that all outstanding and future declarations of interest are submitted without delay, and calls on the Centre to consider not allowing members to take up their roles before this crucial information is provided and checked;
2020/12/17
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 2 #

2020/2157(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 9
9. Takes note that the EMA received 20 reports of improprieties from an external source in 2019 and that 13 of the cases received in 2019 and 11 cases received in previous years were closed; calls on the EMA to analyse the causes of those improprieties;
2020/12/16
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 3 #

2020/2157(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 10
10. NWelcomes the efforts of EMA to strengthen its policies on transparency in relation to drugs and vaccines against COVID-19; notes that the authorisation process for a vaccine against COVID-19 will require a speedy and transparent process within the EMA; notes that specific attention should be paid to the transparency of data from clinical trials as regards such vaccines; welcomes the EMA decision to publish the clinical study reports of drugs and vaccines against COVID-19 within three days after marketing authorisation; encourages the EMA to publish data from clinical trials before marketing authorisation and failing that, in a timely manner; calls on the EMA to request that the sponsors of clinical trials make their clinical trials protocols public before marketing authorisation;
2020/12/16
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 4 #

2020/2157(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 10 a (new)
10a. Welcomes the efforts of EMA to increase transparency around its activities, in particular the efforts made in favour of significantly simplified clinical trials reporting for universities and hospitals and other improvements that have led to more clinical trials resultsbeing reported;
2020/12/16
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 5 #

2020/2157(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 10 b (new)
10b. Calls on the EMA to continue increasing the level of transparency around its activities; in particular calls on the EMA to resume as soon as possible its policy on the publication of clinical data for medicinal products for human use (‘Policy 0070’) which was suspended in December 2018 and has still not been reinstated today;
2020/12/16
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 6 #

2020/2157(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 10 c (new)
10c. Notes with concern that the EMA still does not authorise requests for access to documents via email and regrets that long delays of more than a year are the norm in terms of answering those requests; calls on the EMA to publicly set, and comply with, clear timeframes for responding to such requests from now on;
2020/12/16
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 7 #

2020/2157(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 10 d (new)
10d. Reminds the EMA that it is urgent that Regulation (EU) No 536/2014 1a is applied; recalls that this will only be possible with the launch of the fully functioning clinical trials information system which must not be further delayed; calls on the EMA to include a fully public monitoring dashboard in the clinical trials information system that allows the public to monitor and compare the performance of national competent authorities and clinical trials sponsors, including the timely discharge of their various obligations; __________________ 1aRegulation (EU) No 536/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 April 2014 on clinical trials on medicinal products for human use, and repealing Directive 2001/20/EC (OJ L 158, 27.5.2014, p. 1).
2020/12/16
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 1 #

2020/2154(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1