BETA

1108 Amendments of György HÖLVÉNYI

Amendment 3 #

2023/2183(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Notes that the implementation of the European Development Funds (EDFs) concerns countries that are facing aggravating impacts of climate change and are weakened by the consequence of the COVID pandemic, Russia’s war in Ukraine, as well as rising debt; insists, therefore, that the remaining projects under the EDFs should focus on advancing the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals reiterates that security, mutually beneficial partnerships and international cooperation are fundamental conditions for the world to make progress on the SDGs towards 2030 and beyond ;
2023/12/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 7 #

2023/2183(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Highlights the role of local implementing partners and the need to ensure their support and capacity building; notes that with the phasing out of EDF projects, local know-how on dealing with EU funds should be maintained, with a view to using them for projects under the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) - Global Europe instrument underlines that EU projects should be subject to evaluation, monitoring and reporting in order to determine their effectiveness and avoid unintended negative impacts; ;
2023/12/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 8 #

2023/2183(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Calls for stronger coordination between the Commission and the EEAS and EU delegations to facilitate discussions and cooperation with relevant local actors, including faith-based organisations on the ground in order to identify the projects that best meet development effectiveness objectives;
2023/12/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 9 #

2023/2183(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 b (new)
2 b. Notes that local, non- governmental actors, including faith- based organisations are well placed partners to deliver EU assistance people in need notably in remote areas, highlight that strengthened EU engagement with these organisations could accelerate efficiency of development cooperation;
2023/12/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 11 #

2023/2183(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Stresses the exceptionally dire food security situation in ACP countries, those funds need to be complemented with appropriate measures enhancing local productivity empowering small scale farmers in developing countries and supporting school meals as a vital tool to address food insecurity;
2023/12/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 3 #

2023/2129(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Is alarmed about the rising number of crises worldwide and the highest-ever humanitarian funding gap; is worried that Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) - Global Europe (GE) is stretched to its limits and is not sufficient to address existing needs; further notes with concern that the Russian war of aggression against Ukraine worsened the global food crisis, triggered an energy, cost of living and debt crisis worldwide and created economic uncertainty;
2023/12/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 6 #

2023/2129(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. Notes that the European Union and its 27 EU Member States together remain the world’s biggest provider of external assistance, accounting for approximately 43 % of the total official development assistance (ODA) provided by all OECD ODA donors to developing countries;
2023/12/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 10 #

2023/2129(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 b (new)
1 b. Welcomes the Global Gateway strategy as a concerted EU response to global challenges; is of the opinion that in times of new geostrategic challenges, EU foreign policy and development cooperation actors must coordinate better in order to increase the EU’s presence and visibility worldwide;
2023/12/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 19 #

2023/2129(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Reminds the Commission’s commitment to dedicate at least 10% of the EU’s development portfolio to support access to quality education; welcomes the progress reached so far and calls on the Commission to continue the implementation of this commitment; further calls on the Commission to involve local actors, including faith-based organisations, with relevant experiences in providing quality education into the implementation of the EU financing for education in developing countries;
2023/12/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 25 #

2023/2129(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Appreciates the role of local NGOs and partneorganisations, including faith-based actors in service delivery; underlines the importance of enhancing their capacity to manage and implement actions financed by the EU and invites the Commission to facilitate adequate training towards this aim; is concerned about the continued difficulties faced by small local NGOs as well as faith-based organisations to access Union funding;
2023/12/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 31 #

2023/2129(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. Recalls the Parliament’s power of scrutiny and the need for transparency in the implementation of the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) - Global Europe; underlines that the Commission is responsible for identifying, formulating, implementing, monitoring and evaluating EU assistance; recalls that the European External Action Service (EEAS) is tasked with ensuring the continuity and coherence of EU external policies with the integrated approach that includes the NDICI-Global Europe; stresses that the Parliament is responsible for democratic oversight and scrutiny as a co-legislator under the co- decision procedure; is of the opinion that this approach enables further cooperation between the EU institutions, the Member States and the European Investment Bank (EIB) to continuously increase the EU’s collective effectiveness and visibility;
2023/12/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 7 #

2023/2108(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph -1 (new)
-1. Takes into account the UN Guiding Principles for Business and Human Rights (UNGPs), which aim to enhance standards and practices with regard to business and human rights in order to achieve tangible results for affected individuals and communities, and the EU framework on business and human rights;
2023/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 10 #

2023/2108(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Underlines the urgent need to approve binding and enforceable international norms to regulate the activities of transnational corpoBelieves that advancing the work on the UN binding instrument on business and human rights may offer a positive outlook on the future of business practions (TNCs) and their global value chainces and pave the way for sustainable business practices; sStresses that a large proportion of human, labour and environmental rights viole importance of business enterprises in that they can also boost sustainable development through job creations are committed by TNCs based in the Global North, but operating in developing nd economic development, which should also be duly taken into accountries;
2023/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 14 #

2023/2108(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Recalls that people in developing countries, especially indigenous and traditional communities, smallholders and other small-scale food producers, women, human rights defenders and workers, are disproportionally affected by the human, labour and environmental rights violations committed by TNCs, which often go unpunished;
2023/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 19 #

2023/2108(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. Highlights that in many regions of the world, Micro-Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs) are often the driving force of local economies; underlines MSMEs account for 90% of businesses, 60 to 70% of employment and 50% of GDP worldwide; reiterates the importance of ensuring a adequate level playing field and urges the Commission to provide safeguards and exemptions for MSMEs in the negotiations of the instrument;
2023/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 20 #

2023/2108(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 b (new)
2b. Underlines that the freedom to conduct a business is a right enshrined in the article 16 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights; encourages the EU and the Member States to lead the discussion at UN level and other multilateral fora for the establishment of the recognition of the human right to conduct a business at global level;
2023/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 21 #

2023/2108(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 c (new)
2c. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to reinforce their support for MSMEs and in this context, highlights the importance to join efforts with the UN in the celebration of Micro-, Small and Medium-sized Enterprises Day on 27 June;
2023/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 22 #

2023/2108(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Calls on the Council to adopt an ambitious mandate for the Commission to fully engage in the negotiations on the UN legally binding instrument on TNCs and human rights (LBI), in accordance with the objectives stipulated by UN Human Rights Council Resolution 26/9 of 14 July 2014, which mandates those negotiations; notes that the Member States should otherwise engage in the process individually, but encourages them to do so; calls on the EU to continue actively participating in the process; recalls, in this regard, the importance of close cooperation between the EU and international institutions;
2023/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 32 #

2023/2108(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Underlines that such an LBI, to effectively protect victims and guarantee access to justice, must include, among other things, free, prior and informed consent for activities developed in indigenous territories, the right to say no, the reversal of the burden of proof, mechanisms to assure extraterritorial jurisdiction, international cooperation obligations to enforce foreign judgments, the right to information and the right to full reparation.;
2023/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 14 #

2022/2135(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Further emphasizes that addressing the root causes of the food crisis requires structural changes in the agricultural sector of developing partner countries, particularly through empowering local small-scale farmers enabling to use new agricultural technologies, implementing modern water management methods, and through facilitating their access to the market.
2022/12/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 16 #

2022/2135(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 b (new)
3 b. Highlights that empowering women hasa significant importance in combating food insecurity, notably through addressing short comings of land rights regulations in developing countries.
2022/12/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 1 #

2022/2081(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Questions the large-scale tapping of the cushion within the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument – Global Europe, established by Regulation (EU) 2021/947 of the European Parliament and of the Council1 , for other purposes than the response to new needs it is aimed for; calls on the Member States to cover from their budgets any additional funding for Syrian refugees in Türkiyereminds that the European Parliament resolution of 7 October 2021 on the implementation report on the EU Trust Funds and the Facility for Refugees in Turkey recalled that the funds from the Emerging challenges and priorities cushion under the NDICI-Global Europe are expected to top up funding from the geographic and thematic programmes and rapid response actions; underlines that the Commission has committed to discussing the use of these funds as part of the geopolitical dialogue with Parliament, and to providing detailed information before their mobilisation, while fully taking into consideration Parliament’s remarks on the nature, objectives and financial amounts envisaged; _________________ 1 Regulation (EU) 2021/947 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 9 June 2021 establishing the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument – Global Europe, amending and repealing Decision No 466/2014/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council and repealing Regulation (EU) 2017/1601 of the European Parliament and of the Council and Council Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 480/2009 (OJ L 209, 14.6.2021, p. 1).
2022/12/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 10 #

2022/2081(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Underlines that the Global Gateway strategy could be a game changer for developing partner countries, particularly in Africa, where shortcomings of physical infrastructure and connectivity are barriers for development, further notes that for the success of this initiative, the Commission needs to provide all relevant information to the Parliament as budgetary authority of the European Union;
2022/12/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 11 #

2022/2081(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 b (new)
2 b. Notes that enhanced Private- Public Partnership and domestic resource mobilisation in EU partner countries are essential to fulfil the funding gap to achieve SDGs, further calls on the Commission in this context to support good governance and tax governance in EU partner countries;
2022/12/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 21 #

2022/2081(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Regrets the continued great difficulties faced by small local NGOs, including Faith-Based Organisations, in accessing Union funding because of the highly demanding procedures involved; invites the Commission to fully use existing flexibilities, without taking unreasonable fiduciary risks, and to propose necessary changes to rules.
2022/12/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 24 #

2022/2081(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. Emphasizes the particular importance of involvement of local organizations in the implementation of EU development cooperation with particular regard to support to access to education to all, highlights that in EU partner countries churches, and faith based organizations as major providers of education have a particular importance.
2022/12/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 25 #

2022/2081(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 b (new)
5 b. Urges the Commission to indicate the country level spending targets regarding the announced assignment of at least 10% for education and to inform the Parliament about the involvement of local implementing partners.
2022/12/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 27 #

2022/2081(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 c (new)
5 c. Underlines with deep concern that the growing insecurity in EU partner countries, notably inthe Sahel Region, Nigeria and on the Horn of Africa is a major threat for the stability of our neighbouring continent, emphasizes that without security there is no development and the lack of security is a major threat for the EU’s development efforts, urges the Commission to use all available instruments to combat radicalisation, foster security and reconciliation in EU partner countries.
2022/12/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 28 #

2022/2081(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 d (new)
5 d. Welcomes that the Commission finally, after a two and a half year delay announced the appointment of the EU Special Envoy for the promotion of freedom of religion or belief outside the EU, urges the Commission to secure the necessary financial means to the Special Envoy to execute his duties, particularly in those EU partner countries, where the increasing violence against religious communities undermines the EU’s efforts to foster sustainable development.
2022/12/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 1 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 1 a (new)
– having regard to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability, Article 24, of 12 December 2006, having regard to the Convention relating to the Status of Refugees, having regard to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women,
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 2 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 23 a (new)
– having regard to the Safe Schools Declaration, issued by the Global Coalition to Protect Education from Attack, and to the Comprehensive School Safety Framework 2022-2030 released in June 2022 which takes an “all-hazards, all-risks” approach, including, natural and climate-change induced hazards, technological hazards, biological and health hazards, conflict and violence as well as everyday dangers and threats, having regard to the Guidelines for protecting schools and universities from military use during armed conflicts, issued by the Global Coalition to Protect Education from Attack, and to the strategy of the Global Alliance for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience in the Education Sector (GADRRRES), having regard to the Continental Education Strategy for Africa 2016-2025 (CESA 16-25)1a, and to the Continental Strategy for Technical and Vocational Education and Training to foster Youth Employment, having regard to the position paper by Educo of 2023 entitled ‘Education in Emergencies: an urgent right’, __________________ 1a https://au.int/sites/default/files/documents /29958-doc-cesa_-_english-v9.pdf
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 3 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 29 a (new)
– having regard to the IMF Fiscal Affairs Department report entitled 'How to Control the Fiscal Costs of Public- Private Partnerships'1a and the European Court of Auditors Special Report 09/2018: ‘Public Private Partnerships in the EU: Widespread shortcomings and limited benefits’1b, having regard to the report entitled 'An Evaluation of International Finance Corporation (IFC) Investments in K-12 Private Schools' by the Independent Evaluation Group of the World Bank Group1c and the IFC Management Response, having regard to the European Parliament resolution of 13 November 2018 on EU development assistance in the field of education (2018/2081(INI))1d, having regard to the EU Strategy for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities 2021- 2030, having regard to the EU Strategy on the Rights of the Child, having regard to the Youth Action Plan in European Union external action for 2022- 2027, having regard to the EU Gender Action Plan III, having regard to the Abidjan Principles on the human rights obligations of States to provide public education and to regulate private involvement in education – as agreed and adopted in Côte d’Ivoire in February 2019, having regard to the United Nations Population Fund report entitled 'State of World Population 2022: Seeing the Unseen'1e, having regard to its resolution of 14 March 2023 on Policy Coherence for Development (PCD), having regard to the EU guidelines on children and armed conflict, having regard to the Buenos Aires Commitment adopted at the fifteenth session of the Regional Conference on Women in Latin America and the Caribbean in November 2022 on the fair social organization of care, __________________ 1a https://www.imf.org/en/Publications/Fisca l-Affairs-Department-How-To- Notes/Issues/2018/10/17/How-to-Control- the-Fiscal-Costs-of-Public-Private- Partnerships-46294 1b https://www.eca.europa.eu/en/publication s?did=45153 1c https://ieg.worldbankgroup.org/evaluation s/evaluation-international-finance- corporation-investments-k-12-private- schools-7 1d https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/doc ument/TA-8-2018-0441_EN.html 1e https://www.unfpa.org/sites/default/files/p ub-pdf/EN_SWP22%20report_0.pdf
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 4 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A
A. whereas the EU should support its partner countries in achieving free universal access to education and help shape a learning ecosystem based on acquiring new skills required in the context of the increasing role of digitalisation, building resilience to cope with climate change-induced challenges, and addressing existing shortcomings in educational policies and practices in order to enable their populations to develop their full potential and foster the sustainable development of their home countries and reduce inequalities;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 5 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas the recent unforeseen major challenges, such as the COVID-19 pandemic and its consequences as well as the Russian aggression against Ukraine and the global food crisis, climate change and its consequences, biodiversity crises, increasing number of humanitarian crises, debt-constrained budgets together with the growing number of protracted crises and conflicts, which should not be forgotten, all serve to exacerbate the existing global learning crisis,; whereas according to the UNESCO, natural disasters, pandemics and conflicts, and the resulting internal and cross-border displacement, can affect mental health of entire generations leaving them, uneducated and unprepared to contribute to the social and economic recovery of their country or region; whereas the global food crisis is impacting children’s education worldwide, with girls being the most affected; whereas households in low- and lower- middle-income countries bear 39% of the total cost of education compared to just 16% in high-income countries according to the UNESCO Global Education Monitoring Report 2022;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 6 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C
C. whereas eaccording to UNESCO in 2023 about 244 million children and youth are out of school1a; and Afghanistan is the only country in the world where women and girls are denied access to education beyond primary school; where currently 80% of school-aged girls and young women in Afghanistan have been deprived of their fundamental right to education by the Taliban regime; whereas the number of crisis-impacted school-aged children requiring educational support is 224 million; and about 72 million are out of school completely; whereas out of these 72 million, 53% are girls, 17% have functional difficulties, and 21% (about 15 million) have been forcibly displaced; __________________ 1a Even before the COVID- 19 pandemic, an estimated 2568 million children were out of school globally;, with 132 boys and 127 million girls being out-of-schools
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 7 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C a (new)
C a. whereas global humanitarian support for education covered only 22% of the funds requested in 2021, which is less than for other sectors; whereas in 2021, only 2.9% of global humanitarian support was allocated to education, despite the UN target of 4%;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 8 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D
D. whereas in the sub-Saharan region, no country has achieved gender parity in both primary and secondary education, and girls continue to face the greatest challenges to attending primary schoolmany developing countries, girls continue to face the greatest challenges to attending primary school and accomplishing the full cycle of initial education, including accomplishing full secondary and higher education and participating in training programmes; whereas in low-income countries, less than two thirds of girls complete their primary education, and only 1 in 3 completes lower secondary school; whereas these challenges are particularly worrying in the sub-Saharan region due to different shortcomings and challenges including poverty and gender-specific inequalities; whereas children with disabilities have insufficient access to education; whereas for instance compared to men without disabilities, women with disabilities are three times more likely to be illiterate;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 9 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E
E. whereas girls remain disproportionately more likely than boys to drop out of school earlythe education system early due to the lack of sanitary conditions in schools, the absence of safe facilities and targeted healthcare support, early child marriage and pregnancy in particular in the sub-Saharan region and they are facing significant rates of conflict related physical and sexual violence, financial and socio-economic factors and uneven distribution of domestic and parental tasks between men and women whether they are enrolled in school or not and consequently their job opportunities and social security are diminished; whereas these restrictions on access to education become even more severe when other discrimination factors intersect with gender , disability, migratory background, geographical location and belonging to minorities;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 10 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F
F. whereas access to universal education and training are key to making people employable, thereby allowing them to gain access to decent work and to escape povertyis a human right and is cornerstone for sustainable development, being a key to reduce social inequalities and realising other fundamental rights, making people employable, thereby allowing them to gain access to decent work they choose to do, empowering youth and especially girls and women to gain autonomy and to escape poverty and become actors of change in their communities and countries; whereas, to this end, training curricula and market requirements should be consistent;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 11 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G
G. whereas the quality of education also remains a major challenge many countries and regions of the Global South in particular in the sub- Saharan region, characterised by 9 out 10 children not able to read by the age of 10, even when being in school for most of them, low learning levels, a high pupil to trained teacher ratio of 58 pupils per trained teacher at primary level, and 43 pupils per trained teacher at secondary level whereas according to the UNESCO estimations the sub-Saharan region is not only a region with the highest number of out-of-school population but also the only region where this number is growing, and reaching 98 million in 2021; whereas vocational education offers a chance to gain skills or capacities for practical jobs related to a specific trade or an occupation; whereas according to the World Bank, the region with the biggest increase in learning poverty rates between 2019 and 2022 was Latin America and the Caribbean, reaching the same level as South Asia;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 12 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G a (new)
G a. Whereas By 2030, an additional 68.8 million teachers will need to be recruited for primary and secondary schools to expand access and replace those leaving the workforce (UNESCO); whereas the proportion of qualified teachers in the sub-Saharan region has steadily declined since 2000 at both primary and secondary levels and to reach SDG4 there is a need to recruit 15 million new teachers by 2030;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 13 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital H
H. whereas physical infrastructure for education and learning environments also remain insufficient and underfunded especially for children with disabilities and with learning difficulties, in many regions of the world, notably in the sub- Saharan region, where only 47% of schools have electricity, and more than 50% of the schools do not have drinking water as well as adequate sanitation and menstrual hygiene management facilities for girls and young women;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 14 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I
I. whereas globally, 350 million children are educated by non-state actors, while according to estimates, faith-based organisations provide education to 100 million students globally; whereas in sub- Saharan Africa, the share of education provided by faith-based educational institutions ranges widely across different countries, with an average estimated at 40 %public social services provided by the state, such as education and healthcare are still not universally available in developing countries; whereas schools and other educational institutions operated by non-state actors, including faith-based organisations and civil society organisations, being inclusive and complementary to national education system and providing quality universal education are important to mitigate the gaps where the state falls short to secure access to quality education;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 15 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital J
J. whereas in addition to the lack of adequate education infrastructure, the lack of security and funding, the high rates of violence and conflict, gender inequality and the impact of climate chang,e as well as shortcomings in national regulations, learning materials and planamong which deficiencies in benchmarking literacy skills and curricula planning, as well as the absence of accessible reading materials and other learning resources and the lack of quality teacher training, pose additional challenges to achieving SDG 4 in developing countries;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 16 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital K
K. whereas Africa’s young population has huge potential to boost sustainable development on the continent; whereas it is estimated, however, that 70 000 skilled professionals leave Africa each yearHuman Capital Index of Sub-Saharan African countries remained low, at 0,4 compared to world average of 0,57, suggesting that the sub-Saharan region captures only 55% of its human capital potential; whereas Africa’s young population has huge potential to boost sustainable development on the continent if empowered thanks to adequate opportunities for education, training, work and decision-making; whereas it is estimated, that 70 000 skilled professionals leave Africa each year; whereas the labour market in sub-Saharan Africa is characterised by rising skills mismatch, low productivity, low paid jobs, high youth unemployment and underemployment against a rising youth population set to reach more than one billion by 2050; whereas according to the estimation of the African Development Bank Group only 3 million formal jobs are created annually in the continent while 10-12 million youth are entering the labour market each year; whereas the NEET rates (proportion of youth not in employment, education or training) have increased by 3.8 and 1.5 percent respectively in Latin America and the Caribbean and Asia and the Pacific in just one year, and in both regions the gender gap is extremely significant, according to the International Labour Organization;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 17 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital L
L. whereas the number and length of humanitarian crises have increased in the last decade, to an average humanitarian crisis now lasts more than 9 years and the average duration of contemporary displacement is increasing whereas the share of the EU’s humanitarian budget spent on education in emergencies has increased from 1 % in 2015 to 10 % since 2015,9 and is maintained at this level ever since; whereas the total value of this spending reached EUR 970 million between 2015 and 2022; , whereas this budget is still insufficient and the funding gap for education in emergencies continues to grow;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 18 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital M
M. whereas the Commission has committed to dedicate at least 10 % of investments from the EU’s budget for development cooperation, in particular under the NDICI/Global Europe Instrument, to ensuring quality education, equality and equity in education, and to matching skills and jobs in developing countries;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 19 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Reaffirms that everyone has the right to education and that education, notably basic education, must be free, accessible and compulsoryquality, inclusive accessible without any form of discrimination and compulsory in order to meet sustainable development goals by 2030, while technical and professional education, as well as higher education, must be equally accessible on the basis of merit;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 20 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Recognises that universal education has a unique potential to improve living conditions reduce inequalities, combat poverty, fight child exploitation and trafficking foster democratisation and the foundation of inclusive societies, and facilitate social mobility to ensure that all children and adults, including the most marginalised, are able to realise their full potentialrefugees, displaced people and other vulnerable groups, are able to realise their full potential; underlines that quality education has a positive impact on fostering citizenship, promote shared social values, civic and democratic engagement and establishing a responsible, peaceful society and further notes that quality education is a tool to prevent and combat radicalisation among youth; Condemns any use of schools and educational institutions to spread hate speech, is concerned in particular by the activities of religious extremist groups misusing education taking advantage of shortcomings of state systems and spreading biased word views notably among young people; Stresses the key role of education as a vehicle for sharing values, raising awareness and reducing the risks of conflict; calls on the EU to support cooperation programmes which contribute to educating and raising awareness among young people on the fight against hate speech, xenophobia, violence against women, violence based on sexual orientation or disability and all forms of discrimination in developing countries; encourages the transmission of knowledge on the land-sea link and the crucial need to preserve and protect the ocean, the common good of humanity;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 21 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Acknowledges that access to quality, universal education notably basic education, enables developing partner countries to unlock the human capital potential of their young populations and boost not only the human development but also the economic growth and sustainable social development of their countries as part of an approach that aligns with and supports free and equitable public education systems; encourages cooperation on agricultural education between European colleges and partner countries such as those participating in the Great Green Wall (GGW), an innovative project aimed at enabling local communities to adapt to climate change, which promotes integrated ecosystem management and offers a solution to food insecurity across the Sahel belt by focusing on the fight against land degradation and desertification which among other benefits also helps to tackle the root causes of forced migration;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 22 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Underlines the need to recognise the transformative power of education and training at all levels as well as of culture and heritage for human capital development and job creation; further underlines that more focus is needed on work ethic, the role of women and youth, and that there is a need to recognise the role of different local actors as agents of development to accelerate access to education and training; stresses the importance of promoting education and training for fostering sustainable livelihoods and as a prerequisite for the achievement of Agenda 2030; especially for girls and women recognising their role as actors of change in their communities and countries; Stresses in this regard the great potential of sharing knowledge, skills and know- how in areas such as climate change adaptation, biodiversity conservation and agro-ecological transitions; notes, therefore, the role that European overseas territories can play in building cooperation and mobility and exchange programmes with developing countries in their regional basins, in particular with OACPS countries; supports and calls for further enhancement of the Erasmus+ program to African countries and encourages the development of mobility projects and partnerships aimed at strengthening the attractiveness of both education in the countries of the Union and the training systems of partner countries; Takes note that developing countries are facing different challenges particularly in the field of education also due to the different cultural, social and economic background and that therefore the EU’s efforts needs to be adapted to the local environment and conditions;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 23 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. ENotes that social and economic development in EU partner countries is hindered by the lack of trained professionals locally available; further emphasises that investments in tertiary education, and particularly in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) skills, are critical for designing technologies that generate the conditions that support quality job creationnew youth employment opportunities and for quality job creation or job switching; calls on the EU to guide young people towards the jobs of the future by supporting the development of training and skills linked to the green transitions, the digital transition and technological innovation in developing countries; stresses the importance of promoting the education and training of girls and women in STEM;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 24 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Underlines that access to quality, universal education as a human right for all must be ensured regardless of socio- economic status, cultural background, religion and belief, gender, sexual orientation, disability geographical situation or the rural-urban divide, including in fragile and conflict-affected countries, underlines the need to engage with partner countries in particular with countries in the sub-Saharan region, by understanding the local sensitivities and to strive to find common understanding on these challenges; Calls on the Commission to develop methodologies and guidelines that enhance the ability of its aid projects to reach all learners, in particular those who may be unable to access education; emphasizes in this context the particular challenges for forcibly displaced people and the importance of reducing disruption and ensuring continuity of education; Stresses the need to support the efforts of developing countries to provide equal educational opportunities and good quality education that meets contemporary challenges and modern standards for all;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 25 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. Notes that girls and young women in developing countries are vulnerable to early childbirth and unintended pregnancy, child marriage, prostitution, HIV transmission and gender-based violenceDeplores that girls and women in developing countries are particularly vulnerable to early childbirth and unintended pregnancy, child marriage, trafficking, prostitution, to genital mutilation, to transmission of Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) including HIV and gender-based violence, especially in poor, isolated and remote areas as well as in humanitarian crises situations; recalls in this context the particular importance to have access to sexual and reproductive health and rights in line with SDG 5 as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences; Further calls on the European Union to support programs that facilitate young people's access to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services in education and training establishments, particularly for girls and young women, taking into consideration the EU Gender Action Plans; Highlights, in this regard, the need to work with partner countries to encourage a comprehensive, evidence based, age- appropriate sexuality education that provide age-appropriate information about puberty, the menstrual cycle, pregnancy and childbirth that may equip youth with age-appropriate knowledge with the purpose to raise awareness on gender-based violence and reproductive health, to outline the importance of preventing sexual abuse, as well as to prevent early pregnancy and marriage, to close gender disparities in all aspects and all levels of education, promote women’s leadership, change harmful gender norms, attitudes and practices and promote a more equal sharing of unpaid care between women and men in line with the concept of care society; Underlines the need to ensure that all school environments are safe and promote the health and wellbeing of all young people, as well as the importance of confronting violence against girls both in school and in the community as well as the need to assure girls and boys, women and men, equal rights and opportunities in all aspects and levels of education and empowerment; Underlines the importance of quality infrastructure, equipment and learning materials as boundary conditions for providing quality education; calls for measures ensuring school accessibility and transport, especially for children with disabilities; urges the Commission to set up programmes, which offer the necessary disability-related support to overcome barriers such as inaccessible environment for education and training, and increasingly promote the usage of assistive technologies and digitalization for education purposes that make learning more accessible to persons with disabilities, and enable the teaching on the use of braille script or sign language for visually impaired children and for those with a hearing or speaking impairment;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 26 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Notes with concern the rising number of crisis affected children; calls on the Commission and the Member States, together with the international community in this context , to employ innovative solutions to provide educational opportunities for boys and girls affected by conflicts, humanitarian crises and national policies that prohibit education, in particular for girls and women in totalitarian regimes; further notes that securing access to education for children and young people in humanitarian crises requires adequate financing as well as improved cooperation between humanitarian and development actors as well as better engagement with local stakeholders; further urges the international community to apply humanitarian-development-peace nexus approach to address protracted crises, through coordinated and systematic engagement with local stakeholders, including representatives of civil society, education and governance; further urges the international community to apply humanitarian-development-peace nexus approach to address protracted crises; underlines that the education sector should prioritize specific preparedness actions and policy measures to anticipate risk and respond to the educational needs of children and adults in crisis situations, including displaced populations; to this end, crisis-sensitive planning should focus on the risks to education posed by conflict and natural hazards, including climate risks, to limit the negative impact of crises on the individual learner, teacher and the education administration; Underlines the need for designing climate-resilient and shock-responsive education systems and infrastructures that enable children to continue learning in a fragile environment and amid the impacts of the climate crisis; Notes that humanitarian appeals for education in emergencies severely lack the needed financial resources; welcomes in this context the efforts of the UN fund Education Cannot Wait (ECW) to accelerate progress on this issue;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 27 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Notes that the EU has not fully capitalised on opportunities to engage with local faith-based Highlights the opportunities offered by the Union engaging with civil society, and grassroots nonpartisan, local non-for profit organisations, local faith- based organisations, as well as organisations representing youth, women and girls, and persons with disabilities, which contribute to the national public education system, highlights also the imporgtanisations, which has the potential to facilitate humanitarian access and therefore to increase the efficiency of the EU’s actiont role of international NGOs providing education in emergencies; further notes that these organisations have the potential to facilitate humanitarian access and therefore to increase the efficiency of the EU’s actions and enable EU assistance reaching directly vulnerable groups including young people in emergency settings and communities in remote areas;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 28 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Underlines that brain drain from Africa has a severe impact on economies in dedeveloping countries entails the loss of young workers, talent and vitality and has an impact on economic and sustainable development in those countries, particularly in the health sector; emphasises that it is estimated that African countries have loping countries;st around 2 billion USD through brain drain in the health sector alone between 2002-2015 and that quality education that meets market demands creates jobs which leads to decreased brain drain:
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 29 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Stresses that free school meals are vital tonot only vital to ensure good health, good learning for students and to fight combat hunger and malnutrition and increase school enrolment but also have a positive economic impact; insists that local food production based on agroecology and sustainable fisheries can significantly help fight poverty and hunger while making population less dependent on food supply from external markets; calls on the EU to support cooperation programmes that facilitate young people’s access to free school meals;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 30 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Stresses the particular role of EU delegations in engaging in dialogue with local faith-based stakeholddemocratic local governments, civil society organisations, humans rights organisations women’s organisations, parents’ associations, teachers and education providers, in line with Article 17 TFEUssociations, education and training institutions and providers as well as with local faith-based stakeholders among others, as stipulated in Article 17 TFEU with the aim to accelerate efficiency and to secure that EU support is reaching remote, hard-to-reach and vulnerable communities;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 31 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Welcomes the current political commitment made by the Commission to dedicate at least 10% of the budget of development cooperation under the Multi Annual Financial Framework of 2021- 2027 to support access to quality education in developing countries; Urges the Commission to define a clear targets for EU funding forimplementation strategy in external action for its at least 10% spending target on education without delay and to utilise that funding in a more results-oriented manner, with clear indicatorstransparent indicators based on disaggregated data, accompanied with guidelines aligned with the recommendations of the UN Transforming Education Summit; further notes that the results-based budgeting and management were referenced by numerous countries as means of ensuring greater efficiency on the Transforming Education Summit in 2022 (;urges the Commission, in the mid-term review process of the NDICI-Global Europe instrument, to closely examine the amounts and projects associated with access to education and training in partner countries and to assess the effectiveness of the measures supported, taking into account the political commitment made by the Commission;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 32 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 a (new)
13 a. Stresses the importance of data on the needs regarding education, disaggregated data by gender, age, disability status, etc., establishing a comprehensive framework for systematic collection and analysis of disaggregated data on EU-funded initiatives in inclusive education, to track funding for inclusion and report against equity indicators; Stresses the importance of enhancing cost and impact assessment during the selection and monitoring of educational initiatives; this includes the necessity to ensure that projects are of sufficient duration to effectively address children's educational needs, of avoiding excessive administrative burdens for implementing partners, and of addressing long-term sustainability for education programs;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 33 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14
14. Calls on the Commission to provide technical assistance to EU partner countries, in cooperation with Member States, and relevant actors, such as the UN, and CSOs on improving quality of national regulations quality standards and plans on education as well as data collection and monitoring with a view to facilitating appropriate governance and long-term planning for educationstrengthening education systems, notably public education systems; recalls the need for a multisectoral approach regarding education; Notes the possible development impact of digital education policy that creates possibility for e-learning, through tailored solutions for the application of digital technology for teaching and learning to fit regional and local context, provided there are adequate conditions; Underlines the potential of digital technologies and e-learning to facilitate people's access to education and training, in particular for vulnerable people, people with disabilities or living in remote or isolated areas; calls on the European Union to support the development of connectivity infrastructure and digital capabilities in developing countries in order to bring the furthest away populations closer to education and develop digital skills; Calls on the Commission to support initiatives enabling professionals and educators from EU countries to transfer their knowledge and experience to colleagues in developing countries through cultural and professional exchange programmes similar to the Erasmus+ programme;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 34 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14 a (new)
14 a. Recognises that priorizing pre- primary and primary education in the funding would ensure more equitable learning outcomes, as it reaches out the poorest parts of society; highlights that investments in quality education and training is needed to realise integral human development; further considers that extracurricular activities in schools are highly contributing to the social development of youth;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 35 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Underlines the importance of national budgeting for prioritising education and training in partner countries and of dedicating a fixed share of GDP to prioritising education and the improvement of inclusion in the education system of women and girls as well as to envisage a financing architecture for the implementation of regional and local skills strategies; welcomes in this context the pledge made by signatories Declaration on Education Financing on 6 July 2021 that GPE partner countries that spent more than 20% of their annual public expenditure on education before the COVID-19 pandemic will continue to protect this level of investment by maintaining education budgets above this level as well as that GPE partner countries that previously spent below 20% of their annual total public expenditure on education will endeavour to progressively increase their domestic education expenditure towards the 20% global benchmark until 2025; Highlights the crucial importance of increasing the spending capacity in education of partner countries through assistance in expanding their tax base, combating tax evasion and addressing illicit financial flows; recognises that the domestic financing for education is determined also by wider economic factors recalls the need to work on debt relief measures including through engaging in a strategic dialogue with the IMF that enable debt-distressed partner countries to allocate a larger portion of their budget to education;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 36 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Calls on the Commission to enhance its partnerships with local non- governmental organisations, including faith-based organisations providing education to marginalised groups and to young people in emergency settingand the European External Action Service (EEAS) to enhance their cooperation and partnerships with local organisations, including faith-based organisations and democratic local governments, civil society organisations and organisations representing people with disabilities, youth and women as well as international organisations providing educational opportunities to vulnerable and isolated groups, including when they are facing mental health problems or social difficulties; in line with the Abidjan Principles on the human rights obligations of States to provide public education and to regulate private sector participation in education; notes that EU delegations in partner countries have a particularly important role in involving these actors in the implementation of EU funding for access to quality and inclusive education as the primary contact point for local partners;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 37 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Recognises that public funding is the principal and fundamental tool, however alone is insufficient to cover the education funding gap and that there is a need for; recognises also the role of enhanced public-private partnerships (PPP), particularly in the field of technical and vocational training, in order to systematically adapt to changes in the vocational landscape through up- skilling and reskilling with special focus on creating accessible digital environment that enables the development or improvement of digital competence; further stresses that inclusion of the private sector needs to be done in a carefully monitored way, to avoid, the commoditisation and privatisation of educational services and exacerbation of existing inequalities, also making sure that any investment to education system always respect fundamental human rights, including the right to access to universal education, as well as humanitarian principles in humanitarian actions; insists that PPP must be designed in ways that do not place increased burdens or risks on the public purse and do not promote a market-driven approach that views education as a commodity rather than a fundamental human right; Recalls that the private sector cannot replace, but rather complement public investments in critical services, such as education, that provide crucial long-term prospects for the graduation from poverty;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 38 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18
18. Emphasises that enhanced PPPs are neededcarefully designed and scrutinised PPPs can help to provide access to universal quality education and technical and vocational training for all stresses the importance of building adequately equipped learning environment which addresses acute problems as the teachers deficit, and through adopting the necessary steps towards achieving better teaching methods in order to ensure the success and sustainability of EU investments, notably under the Global Gateway initiative, which should be accompanied by follow-up and monitor mechanisms to measure the impact;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 39 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19
19. Calls on the Commission to consider the need for locally available trained professionals at an early stage ofthroughout the planning and implementation of investments under the Global Gateway initiativeNDICI-Global Europe Instrument, as well as under the Global Gateway initiative, in particular in the field of education and calls on the Commission to support technical and vocational education and other training projects in order to enable EU investments to become more sustainable and be beneficial for partner countries on the long term as well;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 40 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21
21. Calls on the Commission to commit to dedicating a fixed share, at least 10 %, of the current and future EU development budgetpolicy budget, , moving towards 15% as called for by the Transforming Education Summit, to supporting access to quality universal education and supporting access to technical and vocational training in partner countries, thus ensuring the predictability of aid; welcomes the attention given to Heading 6 in the Commission’s proposal for the revision of the MFF for the period 2024-2027, with an increase of at least 10.5 billion to address the various challenges in partner countries; stresses in this regard the importance of increasing funding for geographic and thematic programmes in the area of education and training under the NDICI-Global Europe instrument; Calls on EU Member States and development partners to fulfil their commitment to spend 0,7 % of their gross national income (GNI) on official development assistance (ODA) notes that the Member States which joined the EU after 2002 committed to striving to increase their ODA/GNI to 0,33 %; welcomes the efforts which these and other Member States have made so far to gradually scale up their ODA spending; encourages them to continue on this track; Welcomes the EU’s leadership in funding for education in emergencies reaching 10% of humanitarian budget; urges Member States to strengthen their efforts to scale up their contribution to education in emergencies; join this leadership also by strengthening their legal frameworks to achieve this target by 2030, Recognises the need to finance local organisations providing access to quality education, apply the triple nexus approach, the support for teachers to ensure a quality education and the investment in school material, especially for long-term displaced children; Confirms the particular importance to continue the close monitoring of the implementation of the Commission’s commitments to support access to quality education;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 41 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 a (new)
21 a. Recognises the crucial role of qualified teachers for quality education, especially female teachers, that can serve as role models for girls; calls to accelerate efforts to improve the status of teachers and their working conditions to make the teaching profession more attractive through robust social dialogue and teacher participation in educational decision making and by improving the financing for teachers through integrated national reform strategies, including effective governance and dedicated financial strategies and budgeting; Welcomes the announcement of the launching of Regional Teachers' Initiative in Africa and for Africa as a flagship initiative under the EU–Africa Global Gateway Investment Package;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 42 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 22
22. Notes that the programming of EU financial support for development, in particular in the field of access to quality education and technical and vocational training, should be alignedmust be consistent with the political and budgetary commitments and priorities of developing partner countries; underlines that commitment of partner countries and domestic ownership is an inevitable prerequisite to secure sustainability of projects implemented with funding from the EU;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 43 #

2022/2067(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23
23. Calls on the Commission and the EEAS to use all the tools available to them to ensure that EU investments in education and training serve to support the sustainable development of partner countries and do not further accelerate brain dra, in line with Agenda 2030 and SDGs 4 and 5; calls for the mobilization of the Member States of the European Union to implement partnerships with developing countries in terms of university education and professional training for young people in developing partner countries to study abroad, guaranteeing to the Member States of the EUhe positive impact in their communities of origin; Calls on the Commission and the EEAS to use all the tools available to them to ensure that EU investments in education and training serve to support the sustainable development of partner countries as defined in Agenda 2030 and SDG 4 and 5;
2023/10/23
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 4 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 9 a (new)
— having regard to the UN Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment of 10 December 1984,
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 7 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 12 a (new)
— having regard to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), adopted on 13 December 2006,
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 9 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 12 b (new)
— having regard to the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearances, adopted on 20 December 2006,
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 15 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 18
— having regard to the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence (the Istanbul Convention) of 11 May 2011, which not all Member States have ratified,deleted
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 23 #

2022/2049(INI)

— having regard to the EU Guidelines on the promotion and protection of freedom of religion or belief, adopted on 24 June 2013,
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 42 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas an effective protection and defence of human rights means putting them as well as human dignity at the core of all of the EU’s external policies including development, trade, security and defence, migration, neighbourhood and enlargement;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 44 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C
C. whereas consistency between the EU’s internal and external policies is an indispensable part of an effective EU human rights policy, while respecting the principles of the UN Charter of 26 June 1945;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 49 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D
D. whereas the Union strongly believes in and fully supports multilateralism, a rules-based global orderworld order based on international law and the set of universal values, principles and norms that guide the UN member states;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 51 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E
E. whereas the rise inof authoritarianism, illiberalism and populism around the world threatens the global rules-based ordertotalitarianism and dictatorship around the world threatens the world order based on international law and the values and principles on which the Union is founded;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 63 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F
F. whereas violations of the rights to freedom of thought, conscience and religion, including the right to believe or not to believe, to change religion, and to express publicly one’s own faith, give rise to situations of oppression, conflict and war around the world;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 72 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Reaffirms the universality and indivisibility of human rights and the inherent dignity of every human being; stresses, in this regard, its strong commitment to addressing first and foremost the challenges to human rights worldwide and reiterates the duty of the EU andresponsibility of the EU, with the support of its Member States to act as a global leader in the promotion and protection of human rights and democracy in line with the founding values of the Union, while respecting international law;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 76 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Insists that the protection of the human dignity of every human being as well as human rights and fundamental freedoms must be the cornerstone of the Union’s external policy; strongly encourages the Union, to that end, to strive for a continued ambitious commitment to make the protection of human rights a central part of all EU policies in a streamlined manner and to enhance the consistency between the EU’s internal and external policies in this field, while respecting international law;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 79 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Expresses deep concerns at the grave threats to human rights and democracy worldwide, noting that the number of democracies has continued to decline, while the number of authoritariantotalitarian, authoritarian and dictatorial regimes hasve grown and nearly 75 % of the world’s population have experienced a deterioration in the situation of human rights in their country in the past year; underlines with concern the serious violations of human rights and international humanitarian law in an increasing number of places around the world;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 83 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Deplores the fact that despite the need to concentrate on responses to the threats posed by climate change and the recovery from the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic through global solidarity, some authoritarian leaders have intensified repression, fuelled and expanded existing conflicts, and sparked new ones with devastating effects on human rights;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 84 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Deplores the fact that despite the need to concentrate on responses to the threats posed by climate change and the recovery from the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic through global solidarity, some authoritariantotalitarian, authoritarian and dictatorial leaders have intensified their repression, fuelled and expanded existing conflicts, and sparked new ones with devastating effects on human rights;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 102 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Emphasises the importance that the EU and its Member States consistently act together and in unity to address global challenges to human rights and democracy, while respecting international law;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 105 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. Urges the EU and its Member States to intensify their efforts all over the world to support democracy and human rights; calls on the EU and its Member States, in this regard, both individually and in cooperation with like-minded international partners, to thwart unacceptable attempts to weaken democratic institutions and universal human rights, especially those that present authoritarian regimes as superior to democracies and diminish the space for and role of civil society, and religious and faith-based actors;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 118 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Calls for the EU to reflect on how to promote a human rights-based approach in all EU instruments and strategies in order to strengthen the EU’s human rights foreign policy; underlines that the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI – Global Europe), including its thematic programme on human rights and democracy, is one of the main tools at the EU’s disposal to improve the human rights situation around the world and help foster resilient, inclusive and democratic societies; stresses that the engagement of local civil society, and religious and faith- based actors is vital to protect human rights and democracy in their countries and reiterates its call to fully engage them in all of the EU’s relevant external activities; highlights the importance that NDICI – Global Europe attaches to the promotion of human rights and democracy with strategic international and local partners, particularly through EU Election Observation Missions; underlines Parliament’s role in the instrument’s programming process and calls on the Commission and the European External Action Service (EEAS) to share all the relevant information in a timely manner in order to enable Parliament to play its role accordingly, in particular during high-level geopolitical dialogues with the Commission;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 136 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Notes with deep regret that the post of the EU Special Envoy for the promotion of freedom of religion or belief outside the EU has remained vacant for more than a year; reiterates its urgent call for the Council and the Commission to carry out a transparent and comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness and added value of the position of the Special Envoy as part of renewing and reinforcing its mandate, to provide the Special Envoy with adequate human and financial resources, and to adequately support the Special Envoy’s institutional mandate, capacity and duties; recalls that the Special Envoy’s duties should focus on promoting and protecting freedom of thought, conscience, religion and belief, andincluding the rights to non-belief, apostasy and the espousal of atheistic views not to have a religion and the right to change religion, the fight against forced conversion and misuse of blasphemy legislation, the support to the public and peaceful expression of ones’ own faith;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 152 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 a (new)
11 a. Welcomes the initiative of the EEAS to have a regular dialogue and consultation with Churches and religious and non-religious actors in the preparation of the EU human rights dialogues and calls other EU institutions to follow this example when designing and implementing their external policies, under the framework of Article 17 of the TFEU;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 168 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Welcomes the fact that the EU Global Human Rights Sanctions Regime has been increasingly used as an essential tool that strengthens the EU’s role as a global human rights actor through the use of targeted sanctions by the Council; calls for the restrictive measures that have already been adopted to be implemented effectively and in full, and for the adoption of additional measures if necessary; reiterates its request for a legislative proposal to extend the scope of the GHRSR to include acts of corruption or, alternatively, for a proposal for a new thematic sanctions regime against serious acts of corruption in order to effectively target the economic and financial enablers of human rights abusers; reiterates its call for the introduction of qualified majority voting for the Council’s decisions and implementation of sanctions under the GHRSR; reiterates its call on the Commission and the Council to strive to incorporate Parliament’s recommendations for future targeted sanctions, as stipulated in its resolutions and elsewhere;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 184 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Stresses that corruption seriously hinders the enjoyment of human rights worldwide; calls for the fight against corruption to be a part of all of the EU’s efforts and policies to promote human rights and democracy, by formulating a dedicated global anti-corruption strategy, including programmes under the EU’s external financial instruments and enhancing Parliament’s role of scrutiny; underlines the utmost importance for the EU and its Member States to lead by example by applying the highest transparency standards to their external funding and by stepping up their support for civil society organisations, churches and faith-based organisations and leaders, activists and investigative journalists engaged in the fight against corruption;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 194 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Highlights that 2022 marks the 10th 15. anniversary of Parliament’s decision to exert political leadership in committing to a major advancement in its democracy support activities, which it has implemented through a Comprehensive Democracy Support Approach since 2014; welcomes, in particular, its support for capacity-building for partner parliaments, mediation and fostering a culture of dialogue, including intercultural and interreligious dialogue and compromise, including among young political leaders, as well as for empowering women parliamentarians, human rights defenders and relevant representatives from civil society organisations, churches and faith- based organisations, and the free media; calls on the Commission to continue to pursue and step up its activities in these areas and to bolster funding and assistance for EU bodies and agencies, as well as other grant-based organisations, respecting the principle of non-discrimination; underlines that in the current context of heightened global tensions and repression in an increasing number of countries, direct support for civil society, religious and faith-based organisations’ leaders and people who express critical and dissenting opinions is of the utmost importance; stresses the importance of EU election observation missions and Parliament’s contribution to developing and enhancing their methodology; calls on the Commission, in this regard, to consider updating the election observation methodology to reflect the developments of the last two decades;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 212 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Is deeply concerned by growing attacks against the rules-based global order byworld order based on international law by totalitarian, dictatorial and authoritarian regimes, including undermining the functioning of UN bodies when they exercise their due competences under their mandates; underlines that the diminished effectiveness of these bodies brings with it real costs in terms of conflicts, lives lost and human suffering, and seriously weakens the general ability of countries to deal with global challenges; calls on the EU Member States and like-minded partners to intensify their efforts to reverse this trend; shows concern also about activities of certain UN bodies and representatives that trespass the boundaries of their respective policy mandates through non-consensual and ultra vires interpretations;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 224 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18
18. Notes with concern the increasing disregard for international humanitarian law and international human rights law, particularly in the ongoing conflicts around the world; underlines the utmost importance for humanitarian aid agencies, as well as humanitarian charitable organisations, including religious and faith-based ones, to be able to provide full, timely and unhindered assistance to all vulnerable populations and calls on all parties to armed conflicts to protect civilian populations and humanitarian, health and mediucational workers, as well as religious actors carrying out humanitarian or pastoral activities; calls for the systematic creation of humanitarian corridors in regions at war and in combat situations, whenever necessary, in order to allow civilians at risk to escape the conflict, and strongly condemns any attacks on them;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 228 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18 a (new)
18 a. Calls on the EU and its Member States to admit the important role of churches and the faith based organizations in responding to humanitarian crises; recognizing that religious actors can contribute to promoting peace in different ways, address non-violence in their communities and stress universal respect for justice and human rights; highlights that religious communities have indispensable potential in conflict- management in developing countries towards political transitions as being key mediator in negotiations;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 237 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20
20. Strongly welcomes the continuous contribution of the International Criminal Court (ICC) to the fight against impunity; calls for the EU and its Member States to provide the ICC with sufficient support to enable it to carry out its work; reiterates its condemnation of continuous efforts to undermine the legitimacy and work of the ICC by authortotalitarian and illiberal, dictatorial and authoritarian regimes and calls for the EU and its Member States to continue their efforts to counter them; welcomes the fact that the EU has provided support for the very first time to the ICC’s investigation capacities to help it scale up its investigations into war crimes committed by Russian armed forces in Ukraine, and encourages the EU and its Member States to support the collection of evidence in other third countries where crimes against humanity or genocide occur, based on credible reports;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 251 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21
21. Reiterates its call on the Commission to develop a comprehensive EU action plan on fighting impunity, which should include a chapter on Ukraine; calls for the EU and its international partners to make full use of all relevant instruments to fight impunity, including support for universal jurisdiction at national level, special tribunals at a national and international level including for the crime of aggression, as well as establishing flexible cooperation and funding mechanisms to swiftly collect and analyse evidence of these crimes; calls on the Commission to ensure that these instruments are applied in a coordinated and complementary manner with other relevant EU and Member State instruments; reiterates its commitment to providing all possible assistance to ensure accountability for atrocities committed by Russian armed forces in Ukraine and provide effective remedies for the damages suffered by Ukrainian civilians;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 267 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23
23. Is deeply concerned about the long- term negative consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on both the general state of democracy and human rights worldwide; highlights the disproportionate adverse impact on families and groups in most vulnerable situations, including women, children, persons with disabilities, persons with certain chronic diseases, elderly, LGBTIQ persons, impoverished people, persons belonging to ethnic, belief and religious minorities, refugees and migrants and persons in prison or detention; praises the role that human rights defenders and journalists have played, sometimes even risking their lives, in reporting or attempting to prevent human rights violations during the pandemic;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 271 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24
24. Reiterates that personal liberty and freedom of assembly, as well as freedom of religion and freedom of expression are cornerstones of democracy; is deeply concerned by the growing use of mass surveillance technologies by totalitarian, dictatorial and authoritarian regimes to curtail these freedoms, which increased further under the guise of COVID-19 prevention measures; calls for a strict and effective ban on sales of mass surveillance technologies to totalitarian, dictatorial and authoritarian regimes; calls for a greater response to the mass infiltration of disinformation and conspiracy theories within the digital sphere, perpetuated largely but not exclusively by authoritarian regimetotalitarian, dictatorial and authoritarian regimes, as well as non-state actors;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 279 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 25
25. Calls for the EU and its international partners to strengthen their efforts to ensure full enjoyment of human rights by women and their equal treatment with men; underlines that women continue to be the main victims in violent crises and that sexual and gendersex-based violence has continued in many places around the world, notably being used in armed conflicts as a weapon of war; calls for more concerted efforts to eliminate the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and fight impunity of the perpetrators of such violence; stresses the need to pursue efforts to fully eradicate the practice of female genital mutilation; stresses that women human rights defenders, activists, journalists and lawyers have been particularly targeted, with online harassment and intimidation increasing rapidly; highlights the increase in domestic violence and setbacks to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) in both developing and developedon access to maternal health care in developing countries ; and calls for the EU and its Member States to fully support the right of women to bodily integrity, dignity and autonomous decision-making; calls for a stronger EU commitment and support to the protection of motherhood in third countries, in particular of mothers who suffer hostility, discrimination or stigmatization due to their condition of being mothers, in pregnancy or with born children, or are in a situation of unemployment or poverty;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 315 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 27
27. Stresses that the right to education has suffered particular setbacks, with unparalleled disruptions to education due to COVID-19 but also to religious extremism and gender discrimination against girlspolitical instrumentalisation of religion and discrimination against girls and serious weakening of the fundamental right and freedom of parents to educate their children in accordance with their ethical, pedagogical or religious views, as recognised in international human rights law; calls for the EU to step up its work to provide access to quality education, including innovative ways to circumvent the obstacles imposed by national authorities; calls on the Commission and the EEAS to step up their support for third countries to help them adapt to the challenges they have faced during the COVID-19 pandemic in the field of education; stresses that support could take the form of an increased funding allocation through NDICI – Global Europe, but could also include providing capacity-building and best practices based on the lessons learned through the EU delegations worldwide; highlights that the changed international environment and emerged sudden major crisis situation may require a financial solution enabling multi donor response to cover the growing gap of funding to achieve SDG4;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 331 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30
30. Underlines its opposition to and condemnation of intolerance, xenophobia and discrimination on the basis of race, ethnicity, nationality, social class, disability, caste, religion, belief, age, sexual orientation or gender identity, which in many of the world’s regions leads to killings and persecution; stresses that racism, discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance continue to be a major problem worldwide and have been further exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic; calls for the EU and its Member States to lead the global fight against increasing antisemitism, andti-Christian hatred and religious persecution, welcomes the adoption of the EU strategy to this end;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 348 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30 a (new)
30 a. Deplores that many countries despite their international obligations and commitments to protect minorities are pursuing a policy of forced assimilation of national, ethnic and linguistic minorities by disregarding their fundamental and human rights; calls for the EU and its Member States to provide active support for EU partner countries to respect the fundamental human rights of national, ethnic and linguistic minorities, including their culture, language, religion, traditions and history in order to preserve diversity, linguistic and cultural identity, where these minorities can freely enjoy their individual and community rights, in all areas of education and public life; reiterates the need to fulfil the obligations and commitments based on international treaties and agreements;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 353 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 31
31. Calls for the EU to step up its efforts to ensure the full enjoyment of human rights by lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, non-binary, intersex and queer persons (LGBTIQ); stresses that LGBTIQ persons around the world continue to face human rights violations, including discrimination, persecution, violence and killings; calls for the full implementation of the LGBTIQ equality strategy 2020- 2025 as the EU’s tool for improving the situation of LGBTIQ people around the world, while respecting the competencies of the Member States;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 359 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 32
32. Underlines the utmost importance of freedom of expression and access to reliable information for democracy and flourishing civic space; expresses deep concern about the growing limitations to freedom of expression in many countries around the world by state and non-state actors, particularly for journalists, through censorship or the need for self-censorship and the abuse of counter-terrorism laws or anti-corruption laws to silence journalists and civil society organisations as well as members of religious communities and churches; expresses concern, moreover, about the physical safety of journalists and their being targeted in conflicts; as well as religious leaders who are under threat for their commitment to human dignity and fundamental rights;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 378 #

2022/2049(INI)

35. Notes that 2021 marked the 40th anniversary of the UN Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief; notes with grave concern that the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion, to hold a belief, or not to believereligious or non- religious belief, including the right to change religion or publicly express it, is still violated in many countries around the world; stresses the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, as some governments still use it as a pretext for further discriminatory practices including violence against and scapegoating religious minorities; calls for the EU and its Member States to step up their efforts to protect the right to freedom of thought, conscience, religion or belief, to raise these issues at UN human rights forums and to work with the relevant UN mechanisms and committees;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 421 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 37
37. Reaffirms the inalienable human rights of migrants, refugees and forcibly displaced persons, which must be reflected in the EU’s migration policy and in its cooperation with third countries in this area; stresses that the EU should step up its efforts to acknowledge and develop ways to address the root causes of irregular migration and forced displacement, building the resilience of migrants’ communities of origin and helping them offer their members the possibility toto improve the life opportunities of their members and their families locally and enjoy a decent and safe life in their home country; calls for the EU and its Member States to continue and where possible step up their support for countries hosting most refugees, as well as transit countries; reiterates that close cooperation and engagement with third countries remain key to preventing migrant smuggling and human trafficking; stresses, in this regard, that the dissemination of information and awareness-raising campaigns on the risks of smuggling is crucial; calls for EU- funded humanitarian operations to take into consideration the specific needs and vulnerabilities of children and to ensure their protection while they are displaced; underlines the importance of developing an effective framework of safe and legal pathways to the EUsafe and legal pathways, while respecting the principles of subsidiarity and responsibility of each EU Member State; and welcomes, in this regard, the Commission communication on attracting skills and talent to the EU13 , including the development of Talent Partnerships with partner countries; _________________ 13 Commission communication of 27 April 2022 on attracting skills and talent to the EU (COM(2022)0657).
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 469 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 41
41. Strongly condemns the grave violations of human rights committed by the Russian armed forces; underlines the utmost importance of ensuring accountability for these violations and calls for the EU and its Member States to continue to offer their full support for the actors, measures and mechanisms to this end, including the Ukrainian prosecutors, investigators and judiciary, the ICC, the Commission of Inquiry of the UN Human Rights Council, and national investigations under the principle of universal jurisdiction; stresses the importance of swiftly gathering and preserving evidence of war crimes and crimes against humanity and welcomes the efforts of independent civil society to this end; calls on the Commission to provide all the necessary assistance in this process, including additional funding from the NDICI – Global Europe, and urges the Member States to engage in this process themselves whenever they are in a position to do so; welcomes the amended mandate of the EU Advisory Mission to Ukraine and the Commission’s proposal to extend the mandate of Eurojust to support the fight against impunity; calls for an informed decision to be made about the most appropriate solution to hold to account the individuals and entities responsible for enabling Russia’s war of aggression against Ukraine and the war crimes committed on Ukrainian territory, which could include the creation of a special international court or enabling the ICC to deliberate on these crimes;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 488 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 43
43. Underlines that human rights, a healthy environment and combating climate change are dependent on one another; calls for progress towards the recognition of the right to a clean, healthy and sustainable environment, as laid out in Resolution 48/13 of the UN Human Rights Council, and stresses its appreciation for the peaceful work undertaken by environmental human rights defenders including land and water defenders and their lawyers, as well as indigenous activists, to preserve and safeguard such an environment despite the threat of violence and the risk to their lives; recognises, moreover, the important role of civil society organisations, including environmental faith-based organisations and their leaders, as well as indigenous peoples who claim their rights peacefully for their invaluable work in the preservation of the environment;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 494 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 44
44. Calls for the EU and its Member States to step up their contribution to the fight against climate change and biodiversity loss globally, in particular by ensuring that goods imported by the EU are produced in accordance with human rights protected under international law, including the rights of indigenous people, and do not contribute to serious deforestation or dangerous damage to natural ecosystems with a balance approach that do not impede the development of the communities and their population in third countries;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 503 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 46
46. Calls for the EU to use the full potential of conditionality on human rights to grant preferential access to its market to third countries; calls, in particular, for a closer link between preferential treatment and progress on human rights in the updated Regulation on the Generalised Scheme of Preferences (GSP+) and for greater transparency throughout all steps of the procedure for granting GSP+ status, including following up on any possible violations; calls for a standing invitation for the EU to observe national elections in third countries to be established as a condition for granting those countries GSP+ status; reiterates its calls for the Commission to systematically carry out human rights impact assessments focused on the risks of human rights violations prior to granting any preferential regime to a country and to swiftly respond to any violations, including the consideration of revocation of GSP+ status if warranted;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 512 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 47
47. Welcomes the Commission’s proposal for a directive on corporate sustainability due diligence as a step towards fostering responsible corporate behaviour with regard to human, labour and environmental rights with a balance approach that does not harm the development of the communities and their population in third countries; emphasises that the directive’s requirements as regards reporting on the sustainability and due diligence strategies should apply to all publicly listed undertakings and to small and medium-sized undertakings operating in high-risk economic sectors; calls on the Commission to draw up a strong and coherent strategy on forced labour as an accompaniment to its proposal, notably with a view to implementing a complete ban on EU imports of goods produced through forced labour;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 528 #

2022/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 48
48. Stresses that human rights must fully encompass the digital sphere and individuals must be protected from the improper use or abuse of technology, either by state or non-state actors, including business companies providing or benefitting from these technologies; underlines the risks posed by digital technologies to personal liberty and democracy at large and condemns the role of misuse or abuse digital technologies inthat lead or imply human rights violations, in particular privacy and data protection; calls for more intensive efforts to establish a comprehensive legal framework on digital technologies, which should balance the need to protect human rights with taking advantage of the possible gains such technologies can offer for human well- being;
2022/10/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 38 #

2022/2047(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. Notes that protection of cultural heritage needs to be an integrated part of the EU external actions as a tool to promote peace and stability, inter-cultural and inter-religious dialogue and mutual cultural understanding;
2022/09/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 42 #

2022/2047(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 b (new)
4b. Underlines that lack of proper infrastructure, professional knowledge and trained professionals can be a barrier of proper management of cultural heritage and artefacts;
2022/09/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 44 #

2022/2047(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 c (new)
4c. Calls for adequate funding for the protection, conservation and restauration of cultural heritage under the NDICI- Global Europe, particularly in conflict prone areas;
2022/09/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 52 #

2022/2047(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 d (new)
4d. Calls for the integration of adequate training, knowledge exchange and sharing of best practices into EU initiatives, including initiatives supporting education and exchange programmes;
2022/09/12
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 6 #

2022/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. Notes that consequences of the Russian invasion of Ukraine have exacerbated the already existing vulnerabilities of economies in developing countries, notably in the agro-food sector, further notes that the current food crisis intertwined with the deteriorating security situation, impact of climate change and the economic recession due to the COVID-19 pandemic are exhausting resources of partner countries;
2022/09/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 12 #

2022/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Calls on the Commission to adopt, in early 2023, an ambitious MFF revision proposal that substantialadequately increases the resources for Heading 6 to adapt to the new challenges where a common EU response has an added value; urges the Member States to agree to a significant increase in ceilings;
2022/09/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 15 #

2022/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Reaffirms that the increased financial needs to reach the SDGs cannot be covered only by funding from the MFF and from EU Member States but there is a need for an enhanced Public-Private- Partnership in the field of development cooperation;
2022/09/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 22 #

2022/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Calls for more coherent application of the humanitarian- development-peace nexus approach to be able to address the growing number of protracted crises in a sustainable manner;
2022/09/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 28 #

2022/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Calls for the MFF revision to provide additional funds to humanitarian aid to address emergencies particularly in the context of food insecurity as well as to the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) – Global Europe instrument, particularly to reinforce the budget lines most in demand recently and to meet the additional needs caused by the Russian war against Ukraine, particularly in the context peace, security and conflict prevention, financing of cross-sectoral efforts to increase capacity for diversified local and regional food production, ensure nutritional and food security, without diverting money from other geographic regions;
2022/09/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 32 #

2022/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. Calls for securing adequate financing under the geographic programmes of the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) –Global Europe for supporting sustainable agriculture, forestry and fisheries to increase food security, create economic opportunities and jobs while prioritising financing for training and education for young people inline with the commitments made by the Commission;
2022/09/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 34 #

2022/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 b (new)
5 b. Underlines that, in the framework of development cooperation, there is a need to foster a more resilient economic system in partner countries, particularly in terms of small scale family farming to increase agricultural productivity;
2022/09/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 38 #

2022/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 c (new)
5 c. Calls for securing adequate financing under the thematic programmes of the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) – Global Europe for supporting inclusive and quality education in fragile environments as well as vocational and technical training to accelerate access to decent jobs;
2022/09/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 39 #

2022/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 d (new)
5 d. Highlights that access to quality education and vocational training for young people in developing countries is a necessary precondition for economic diversification and empowerment as well as for resilience building;
2022/09/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 41 #

2022/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Notes that the MFF revision shouldmay have to be accompanied by the necessary legislative changes to the NDICI – Global Europe Regulation to enhance flexibility and efficiency of implementation and to reflect to the changed international environment.
2022/09/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 46 #

2022/2046(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6 a. Takes note that the scarce resources of the MFF need to be utilised in a more efficient way and there is a need for better involvement of local organisations with extensive experience in the field of humanitarian assistance, education and health care - such as churches and faith-based organisations (FBOs) - in the implementation of EU funded programmes;
2022/09/08
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 124 #

2022/0426(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 11 a (new)
(11a) In order to clarify a legal uncertainty in the definition of trafficking in human beings, this Directive adopts a broader concept of what it should be considered than under Directive 2011/36/EU and Framework Decision 2002/629/JHA, and therefore includes additional forms of exploitation. The contract, usually called surrogacy, through which a natural or legal person agrees with a woman that she will carry a child for the purpose of handing it upon birth, regardless of the name and terms and conditions of such contract, is considered human trafficking, both of the woman who carries or is to carry the child and of the child.
2023/07/07
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 127 #

2022/0426(COD)

(16a) In accordance with the European Parliament resolution of the 21st of January 2021 on the EU Strategy for Gender Equality (2019/2169(INI)), in its paragraph 32, which “acknowledges that sexual exploitation for surrogacy and reproductive purposes or purposes such as forced marriages, prostitution and pornography is unacceptable and a violation of human dignity and human rights”. In accordance with the European Parliament resolution of the 10th of February 2021 on the implementation of Directive 2011/36/EU on preventing and combating trafficking in human beings and protecting its victims (2020/2029(INI)), in its paragraph 28, that classifies surrogacy as a Traffic in Human Beings. In accordance with the European Parliament resolution of 5th of May 2022 on the impact of the war against Ukraine on women (2022/2633(RSP)), that “underlines the serious impact of surrogacy on women, their rights and their health, the negative consequences for gender equality and the challenges stemming from the cross- border implications of this practice, as has been the case for the women and children affected by the war against Ukraine; asks the EU and its Member States to investigate the dimensions of this industry, the socio-economic context and the situation of pregnant women, as well as the consequences for their physical and mental health and for the well-being of babies; calls for the introduction of binding measures to address surrogacy, protecting women’s and newborns’ rights”.
2023/07/07
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 131 #

2022/0426(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 1
Directive 2011/36/EU
Article 2 – paragraph 3
(1) in Article 2, paragraph 3, “or forced marriage, or illegal adoption”, "or the exploitation of a woman for reproductive purposes through surrogacy" is added at the end of the paragraph.
2023/07/07
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 62 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 2
(2) This Regulation concerns the recognition in a Member State of the parenthood of a child as established in another Member State. It aims to protect the fundamental rights and other rights of children in matters concerning their parenthood in cross-border situations, including their right to an identity31 , to non-discrimination32 and to a private and family life33 , taking the best interests of the child as a primary consideration34 . This Regulation also aims to provide legal certainty and predictability and to reduce litigation costs and burden for families, national courts and other competent authorities in connection with proceedings for the recognition of parenthood in another Member State. To attain these aims, this Regulation should require Member States to recognise for all purposes the parenthood of a child as established in another Member State. _________________ 31 Article 8 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. 32 Article 2 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Article 21 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. 33 Article 9 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Articles 7 and 24 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. 34 Article 3 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Article 24 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 64 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 5
(5) Under the Treaties, the competence to adopt substantive rules on family law, such as rules on the definition of family and rules on the establishment of the parenthood of a child, lies with the Member States. However, pursuant to Article 81(3) TFEU, the Union can adopt measures concerning family law with cross-border implications, in particular rules on international jurisdiction, on applicable law and on the recognition of parenthood. In accordance with Article 67(1) TFEU the relevant legislation shall respect fundamental rights and the different legal systems of the Member States.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 88 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 18
(18) Article 8 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms of 4 November 1950 (‘European Convention of Human Rights’) lays down the right to respect for private and family life, while Article 1 of Protocol No. 12 to the said Convention provides that the enjoyment of any right set forth by law must be secured without discrimination on any ground, including birth. The Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights has interpreted Article 8 of the Convention as requiring all States within its jurisdiction to recognise the legalrecognised, in the only case on which it had to rule, Paradiso and Campanelli v Italy (ECHR, 24 January 2017, n° 25358/12), the right of a Member State to not recognise a parenthood established abroad to the orderer of a surrogacy contract. Member States are not required to register the details of the birth certificate of a child born via surrogacy abroad in order to establish the parent- child legal relationship established abroad between a child borwith the orderer mother. The jurisprudence of the European Court of surrogacy and the biological intended parent, and to provide for a mechanism for the recognition in law of the parent- child relationship with the non-biological intended parent (for example through the adoption of the child)54 . _________________ 54 For example, Mennesson v. France (Application no 65192/11, Council of Europe: European Court of Human Rights, 26 June 2014) and Advisory Opinion P16-2018-001 (Request no. P16- 2018-001, Council of Europe: European Court of Human Rights, 10 April 2019)Human Rights, without prejudice to the need for States to identify ways to ensure the protection of the child interest in the legal recognition of the link with those who de facto exercise parental responsibility, has recognised to the States a margin of discretion in identifying the ways in which to formalise the relationship with the orderer of a surrogacy contract. This orientation does not prevent the solution of the non-registration of the foreign document that recognises the parenthood to both the members of the couple that resorted to surrogacy abroad. With regard to the solution of adoption, the European Court of Human Rights has underlined that it can be considered sufficient to guarantee the protection of the rights of minors to the extent that it is capable of constituting a link of real "filiation" between adopter and adopted, and on condition that the modalities provided for by domestic law guarantee the effectiveness and speediness of its implementation, in accordance with the best interest of the child.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 98 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 21
(21) In conformity with the provisions of international conventions and Union law, this Regulation should ensure that children enjoy their rights and maintain their legal status in cross-border situations without discrimination. To that effect, and in the light of the case law of the Court of Justice, including on mutual trust between Member States, and of the European Court on Human Rights, this Regulation should cover the recognition in a Member State of the parenthood established in another Member State irrespective of how the child was conceived or born and irrespective of the child’s type of family, and, including domestic adoption. Therefore, subject to the application of the rules on applicable law of this Regulation, this Regulation should cover the recognition in a Member State of the parenthood established in another Member State of a child with same-sex parents. This Regulation should also cover the recognition in a Member State of the parenthood of a child adopted domestically in another Member State under the rules governing domestic adoption in that Member State.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 110 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 24
(24) For the purposes of this Regulation, parenthood, also referred to as filiation, may be biologic, genetic, by adoption or by operation of law. Also for the purposes of this Regulation, parenthood should mean the parent-child relationship established in law, and should cover the legal status of being the child of a particular parent or parents. This Regulation should cover the parenthood established in a Member State of both minors and adults, including a deceased child and a child not yet born, whether to a single parent, a de facto couple, a married couple or a couple in a relationship which, under the law applicable to such relationship, has comparable effects, such as a registered partnership. This Regulation should apply regardless of the nationality of the child whose parenthood is to be established, and regardless of the nationality of the parents of the child. The term ‘parent’ in this Regulation should be understood, as applicable, as referring to the legal parent, the intended parent, the person who claims to be a parent or the person in respect of whom the child claims parenthoodwhich means the person to which a child has a legally established link of filiation, may it be biologic, genetic, by adoption or by operation of law.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 127 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 31
(31) The requirements for the recording of parenthood in a register should be excluded from the scope of this Regulation. It should therefore be the law of the Member State in which the register is kept that should determine under what legal conditions and how the recording must be carried out, and which authorities are in charge of checking that all requirements are met and that the documentation presented or established is sufficient or contains the necessary information. In order to avoid duplication of documents, the national registration authorities should accept the documents drawn up in another Member State by the competent authorities whose circulation is provided for by this Regulation. In particular, the European Certificate of Parenthood issued under this Regulation should constitute a valid document for the recording of parenthood in a register of a Member State. As the procedure for the issuance of the European Certificate of Parenthood and its contents and effects should be uniform in all Member States as set out in this Regulation, and the European Certificate of Parenthood should be issued in conformity with the rules on jurisdiction and applicable law laid down in this Regulation, the authorities involved in the registration should not require that the European Certificate of Parenthood be first transposed into a national document on parenthood. This should not preclude the authorities involved in the registration from confirming the conditions necessary to establish the authenticity of the European Certificate of Parenthood or from asking the person applying for registration to provide such additional information as required under the law of the Member State in which the register is kept, provided that information is not already included in the European Certificate of Parenthood. The competent authority may indicate to the person applying for registration how the missing information can be provided. The effects of recording the parenthood in a register (for example, depending on the national law, whether registration establishes parenthood or only provides evidence of the parenthood already established) should also be excluded from the scope of this Regulation and be determined by the law of the Member State in which the register is kept.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 145 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 38
(38) This Regulation shouldall respect the different systems for dealing with parenthood matters in the Member States. As regards 'authentic instruments', Member States often empower authorities, such as notaries, administrative authorities or registrars to draw up authentic instruments establishing parenthood with binding legal effect in the Member State in which they have been drawn up or registered (‘authentic instruments with binding legal effect’), or to draw up authentic instruments which have no binding legal effect in the Member State in which they have been drawn up or registered but which have evidentiary effects in that Member State (‘authentic instruments with no binding legal effect’). The term 'empowerment' in this Regulation is to be interpreted autonomously in accordance with the definition of 'authentic instrument' used horizontally in Union instruments and in the light of the objectives of this Regulation.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 180 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 56
(56) Considerations of public interest should allow courts and other competent authorities establishing parenthood in the Member States to disregard, in exceptional circumstances, certain provisions of a foreign law where, in a given case, applying such provisions would be manifestly incompatible with the public policy (ordre public) of the Member State concerned. However, the courts or other competent authorities should not be able to apply the public policy exception in order to set aside the law of another State when doing so would be contrary to the Charter and, in particular, Article 21 thereof, which prohibits discrimination, while complying with the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 201 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 67
(67) The recognition in a Member State under this Regulation of a court decision establishing parenthood given in another Member State, or of an authentic instrument establishing parenthood with binding legal effect drawn up or registered in another Member State, shouldall not imply the recognition of the possible marriage or registered partnership of the parents of the child whose parenthood has been or is to be established.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 221 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 75
(75) Considerations of public interest should allow Member State courts or other competent authorities to refuse, in exceptional circumstances, to recognise or, as the case may be, accept a court decision or authentic instrument on the parenthood established in another Member State where, in a given case, such recognition or acceptance would be manifestly incompatible with the public policy (ordre public) of the Member State concerned. However, the courts or other competent authorities should not be able to refuse to recognise or, as the case may be, accept a court decision or an authentic instrument issued in another Member State when doing so would be contrary to the Charter and, in particular, Article 21 thereof, which prohibits discrimination, while complying with the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 259 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 90
(90) This Regulation respects the fundamental rights and observes the principles recognised in the Charter. In particular, this Regulation seeks to promote the application of Article 7 on everyone’s right to respect for their private and family life, Article 9 on the right to marry and right to found a family, Article 21 prohibiting discrimination, and Article 24 on the protection of the rights of the child.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 275 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1
1. This Regulation shall not affect the rights that a child derives from Union law, in particular the rights that a child enjoys under Union law on free movement, including Directive 2004/38/EC. In particular, tThis Regulation shall not affect the limitations relating to the use ofpreclude the Member States from using public policy as a justification to refuse the recognition of parenthood where, under Union law on free movement, Member States are obliged to recognise a document establishing a parent-child relationship issued by the authorities of another Member State for the purposes of rights derived from Union law.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 276 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Nothing in this Regulation can be interpreted as obliging a Member State to accept the practice of surrogacy, or any of its legal consequences.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 285 #

2022/0402(CNS)

2a. (j) the recognition of parenthood of orderers in a surrogacy contract, of children born of surrogacy.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 328 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 1
1. The law applicable to the establishment of parenthood shall be the national law of the Statechild ofr the habitual residence of the person giving birth at the time of birth or, where the habitual residence of the person giving birth at the time of birth cannot be determined, the law oflaw of the State of which one of the parents is a citizen at the Stattime of birth of the child.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 330 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 2
2. Notwithstanding paragraph 1, where the applicable law pursuant to paragraph 1 results in the establishment of parenthood as regards only one parent, the law of the State of nationality of that parent or of the second parent, or the law of the State of birth of the child, may apply to the establishment of parenthood as regards the second parent.deleted
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 383 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 31 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. (f) if the recognition of parenthood induces the tolerance or acceptance of a contract, usually called surrogacy, through which a natural or legal person agrees with a woman that she will carry a child for the purpose of handing it upon birth, or any consequences of such a contract.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 427 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 39 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. (f) if the recognition of parenthood induces the tolerance or acceptance of a contract, usually called surrogacy, through which a natural or legal person agrees with a woman that she will carry a child for the purpose of handing it upon birth, or any consequences of such a contract.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 8 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 16 a (new)
— having regard to the Council conclusions of 10 June 2021 on enhancing the European financial architecture for development,
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 22 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C
C. whereas policy coherence and close cooperation between all official development finance institutions, their government shareholders, EU institutions and all existing partners is urgently needed; whereas the successful mobilisation of further capital, both private and public, in addition to official development assistance (ODA) and other existing forms of development finance, is critical;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 26 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D
D. whereas the establishment of the Team Europe approach as the global EU response to COVID-19 could help to establish a single strategic coordination framework for the EU’s external response to the pandemic, in support of partner countries and other major disasters, such as Russia’s war in Ukraine, in support of partner countries; whereas this approach is a promising process in enabling further cooperation between the EU institutions, the Member States and European bilateral and multilateral development finance institutions, the EIB and the EBRD, continuously increasing the EU’s collective effectiveness and visibility;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 32 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F a (new)
F a. whereas food insecurity is a significant barrier of achieving the SDGs, particularly in Africa where two in every ten people in Africa are undernourished; whereas this challenge will only become more acute due to population growth; whereas EU cooperation with partner countries needs to tackle this challenge effectively, in a sustainable manner;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 34 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F b (new)
F b. whereas Member States called on European development banks and financial institutions to increase their collaboration and coordination, both among themselves and with other multilateral and international financial institutions, building on the strengths and expertise of each institution, thus enhancing the efficiency, visibility and impact of the EFAD, with particular attention to the private sector while complementing and supporting public sector engagement;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 36 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F c (new)
F c. whereas there is a USD 148 billion annual financing gap in low- and lower- middle-income countries to achieve SDG 4 from now until 2030; whereas additional costs due to COVID-19 related school closures risk increasing this financing gap by up to one-third;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 43 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. Advocates that EU policies and initiatives need to support coordination and cooperation between Member States in the field of development policy and the EU actions need to complement and support initiatives of Member States;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 53 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Notes that the EFAD needs to maximize the advantages of different structural backgrounds and working modalities of the existing European development banks and financial institutions in order to increase efficiency of the EU's contribution to sustainable development;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 56 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Underlines the interconnection between development and security; highlights the role that development plays in preventing conflicts, ensuring durable exits from conflicts and bolstering crisis management; insists on the importance of further developing a well-tailored development-security nexus; further notes that a lack of security and armed conflicts exacerbates the already existing vulnerabilities in developing countries, increasing the funding gap for achieving the SDGs;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 60 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Acknowledges that security is an essential precondition for investments and for sustainable development and notes that conflict prevention and resolution needs to be integrated into EU development cooperation; welcomes in this context the activities of churches in conflict resolution and management, contributing to peace and security;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 61 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 b (new)
3 b. Underlines that the USD 2.5 trillion funding gap can be achieved only by promoting Public-Private-Partnerships and private investments, domestic resource mobilisation in partner countries and by more efficient utilisation of EU funding, while strengthening good governance and combating corruption;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 62 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 c (new)
3 c. Notes that education and vocational training as cross-cutting issues make a major contribution to achieving the SDGs; emphasises that EU investments and cooperation need to prioritize this area together with job creation in the context of the EFAD;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 71 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. Underlines that consistency across all EU financing instruments, initiatives and strategies, notably the new NDICI- Global Europe instrument, Team Europe initiative and the new Global Gateway strategy, is crucial in order to maximise the EU’s global response to sustainable growth, development and peace;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 78 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. Believes that the EFAD should improve the EU’s visibility and the impact of its development finance in the world, in order to ensure that the EU’s perceived role in the world matches the magnitude of its support;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 85 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6 a. Emphasises that the EU’s financial contribution to sustainable development in partner countries needs to enable partner countries to contribute to their own economic and social development and to achieve the SDGs; underlines the paramount importance of domestic ownership in this context;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 88 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 2 a (new)
Is concerned that, despite the recent improvements, the current status quo is still lacking proper coordination, characterised by duplication and continued competition between the European Investment Bank (EIB), the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) and European development and finance institutions;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 106 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. BNotes that the Team Europe approach emerged as a response to the COVID-19 pandemic; believes that the Team Europe approach should play a key role in further improving strategic cooperation and global coordination and the coherence and effectiveness of development efforts, especially at partner- country level , and believes that it has the potential to further identify key issues that need to be solved, notably stronger policy direction and focus, and stronger mechanisms for communication and visibility;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 111 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 a (new)
11 a. Insists that the EFAD should enable inclusiveness and the participation of all interested development finance institutions, including smaller and medium-sized partners;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 128 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14 a (new)
14 a. Notes the particular importance of EU investments in the field of agriculture, where private investments are lacking due to the high risk of investments;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 130 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14 b (new)
14 b. Underlines the need for EU investments to contribute to improving local agricultural production capacities and supply chains;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 131 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14 c (new)
14 c. Emphasises that local farmers, small holders and family farms need to have access to financial services, and in particular to micro-financing, in order to have the means to make farming resistant to climate-related challenges, while improving productivity, increase income and be able to innovate;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 132 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14 d (new)
14 d. Notes that the lack of market access due to connectivity issues is one of the main barriers to food security in many regions in Africa; considers that EU investments in this field could have a strong impact;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 133 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 3 a (new)
Notes that there is a need to adapt the working methods and tools of the European Investment Bank (EIB) and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) to the investment needs in Africa, particularly through providing more risk capital and guarantees in order to facilitate large scale investments while maintaining EU support for smaller scale local projects; points out that it is crucial that European investments are accompanied by a visible presence of the EU and continuous political dialogue;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 135 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 3 b (new)
Underlines that SMEs have an important role in achieving the SDGs and therefore need to have easy access to financial services in the EFAD framework; notes that EU policies need to encourage the cooperation of companies and enterprises, particularly SMEs, to play an active role in initiatives contributing to sustainable development in developing countries;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 139 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15 a (new)
15 a. Calls on the European Commission to support further coordination between the European Union, the Member States — including their implementing agencies and public development banks —, as well as the European Investment Bank (EIB) and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) and to encourage them to pool resources, finance, coordination and communication in common projects, particularly under the Team Europe approach;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 150 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18 a (new)
18 a. Welcomes the partnership of the EBRD, as the multi-lateral development Bank; notes that the multi-lateral background of the EBRD, pooling together expertise from EU and non-EU countries alike, is of particular importance, notably to increase EU engagement in Central Asia and in North Africa; calls for considering this aspect when formulating the EFAD;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 159 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20
20. Encourages the EIB, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development and the European development banks and financial institutions to strengthen their cooperation, drawing on their respective financial expertise, added value and resources ;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 185 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 4 a (new)
Emphasises that Policy Coherence for Development needs to be mainstreamed in EU external policies; notes, furthermore, that trade, investment and job creation are a vital part of EU engagement for development and are contributing to sustainable development; notes that possible shortcomings of these policy areas need to assessed and addressed in order to achieve the SDGs;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 187 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 27
27. iInsists that the Member States honour their commitment to spend 0.7 % of their gross national income on ODA; notes that Member States which joined the EU after 2002 committed that they will strive to increase their ODA/GNI to 0.33%; welcomes the efforts these Member States made so far to gradually scale up their ODA spending; encourages them to continue on this track; underlines the important role of ODA as a catalyst for change and a lever for the mobilisation of other resources; stresses the importance of the EU’s commitment to mobilise resources for climate action and the EIB’s and other EFAD members' role in making progress in this area;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 193 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 27 a (new)
27 a. Calls for a stronger coordination between the European Commission and the EEAS and EU delegations, particularly in developing countries with the most fragile economies, to facilitate discussions and cooperation with relevant actors on the ground in order to identify the most effective projects;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 195 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 27 b (new)
27 b. Recognises the role of local micro, small and medium-sized enterprises, cooperatives, inclusive business models and research institutes as engines of growth, employment and local innovation, which will in turn contribute to the achievement of the SDGs;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 196 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 27 b (new)
27 b. Highlights that the EFAD requires a close-to ground approach, and thus calls for the facilitation of policy discussions with partner countries, Member States, private sector and EFAD members to better adapt EU financing to local needs;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 197 #

2021/2252(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 27 c (new)
27 c. Calls on the Commission to establish a link between possible de- risking activities and financial support for access to education and vocational training, particularly for the purpose of establishing proper infrastructure and training for teachers, under the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) – Global Europe, in order to facilitate achieving SDG 4;
2022/05/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 33 #

2021/2213(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Insists on the need to give greater prominence to the human and social development aspects of the agreement, including to improve access to quality education and vocational training, in order to enable ACP countries to unlock the human capital potential of their young people and to boost human development, economic growth and employment in their countries;
2024/02/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 51 #

2021/2213(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Welcomes the fact that gender equality and women’s economic empowerment are recognised as key drivers for sustainable development; supports the commitments to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), in the context of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the outcomes of their review conference, in line with SDG5;
2024/02/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 55 #

2021/2213(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Strongly supports the objective to mobilise investment, support trade and foster private sector development, with a view to achieving sustainable and inclusive growth and creating decent jobs for all; stresses, in this context, that a strong link will have to be established between the agreement and the Global Gateway initiative; welcomes the EU-LAC Global Gateway Agenda and the EU-Africa Global Gateway Investment Package; stresses that massive investments are required in both hard and soft infrastructure in ACP countries, from digital, transport and energy networks, to health, education and food systems; supports the Global Gateway initiative as a response to this, aiming to provide a viable and attractive alternative for partner countries that delivers lasting benefits for local communities;
2024/02/05
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 1 #

2021/2209(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 1 a (new)
— having regard to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Article 26), the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (Article 18) and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (Articles 13 and 14);
2021/12/16
Committee: AFET
Amendment 4 #

2021/2209(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 6 a (new)
— having regard to the UNESCO Convention against Discrimination in Education, adopted on 14 December 1960;
2021/12/16
Committee: AFET
Amendment 16 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. Notes that developing countries, particularly in the Sub Saharan region are combating various and diverse challenges in securing access to quality education; in this context calls on the Commission to develop country specific strategies in implementation of the funding for education, taking into account the regional and national sensitivities;
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 17 #

2021/2209(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas access to education is a fundamental human righteducation is internationally recognised as a fundamental human right, having parents a prior right to choose the kind of education that shall be given to their children (Article 26 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights);
2021/12/16
Committee: AFET
Amendment 18 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 b (new)
2b. Notes that 10 to 12 million youth enter the workforce each year but only 3.1 million jobs are created in Africa, and the economic recession in consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic further aggravated this gap;
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 22 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Emphasises that the COVID-19 pandemic has amplified the existing vulnerabilities in social services in Africa, in particular in the field of education; underlines with deep concerns that school closures impacted around 250 million students in Sub-Saharan Africa, adding to the 100 million out of school children before the pandemic;
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 41 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. UnderlinesAffirms that if given the right opportunities, every person can have an impact on progress, sustainable development, and growth; underlines in this context that access to quality education for all must be ensured regardless of socio-economic status, cultural background, religion and the rural- urban divide; notes the particular importance of supporting girls in accessing quality education and of addressing the issue of girls dropping out of school at an early stage;
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 51 #

2021/2209(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I
I. whereas it is estimated that school closures during crises may lead to increases in teenage pregnancy of as much as 65 %6 ; whereas girls out of school are disproportionally exposed to the risk of child marriage; whereas it is estimated that one million girls in Sub-Saharan Africa may be blocked from returning to schools once they reopen given the existence of certain policies that ban pregnant girls and young mothers from school; _________________ 6World Vision (2020), COVID-19 Aftershocks: Access Denied.
2021/12/16
Committee: AFET
Amendment 58 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. NPoints out the need to scale up domestic and international financial resources to tackle the financing gap to meet SDG 4; notes that the COVID-19 pandemic has aggravated education funding gaps, adding up to one third to the annual funding gap and reaching USD 200 billion1 ; __________________ 1 https://en.unesco.org/news/unesco-warns- funding-gap-reach-sdg4-poorer-countries- risks-increasing-us-200-billion-annually
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 60 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6a. Acknowledges that achieving quality education must be a priority for the official development assistance (ODA) of the Union and the Member States; calls for massive investment in education system particularly in infrastructure and training of teachers and welcomes in this regard the commitment made by the Commission to increase funding for education from 7% to at least 10% of total development funding;
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 61 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 b (new)
6b. Notes that the pupil-trained professional ratio despite various efforts and assistance provided by the EU so far remained high: one trained teacher per 58 students at primary level, and 43 pupils per trained teacher in secondary;
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 69 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7a. Stresses the importance to accompany the investment in training and education with support to job creation to provide better future outlook for the next generation of African youth; notes the particular importance of public-private partnership in achieving SDG 8 (access to decent work);
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 74 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 b (new)
7b. Stresses the importance of secondary education and vocational training, which are essential for youth employability and sustainable development; underlines the challenge of digital exclusion, particularly in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, and calls for increased efforts for education and training in digital skills and for facilitating the use of ICTs;
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 75 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 c (new)
7c. Is concerned about the persistence of child labour, and calls for coherent strategies to prevent this phenomenon and rehabilitate former child workers, underlines that access to affordable quality education and empowering families with decent work are primary tools to prevent child labour;
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 76 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 d (new)
7d. Notes that forced displacement leads to rising number of people living in refugee settings; calls the Commission to support skill transmission in refugee camps and a strong education support for refugees and displaced people in order to support their integration and engagement in income generating activities;
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 81 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 a (new)
8a. Calls on the Commission to establish a link between possible investment de-risking activities and financial support to access to education and vocational training, particularly to establishing proper infrastructure and training of teachers, under the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) - Global Europe;
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 89 #

2021/2209(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Calls on the Commission, the EEAS and the Member States to support the authorities of third countries in implementing ‘safe school’ operations, including providing hygiene supplies and sharing information on handwashing and other hygiene measures; highlights, in this regard, the key role that teachers can play in health promotion as well as civil society actors, including Churches, Faith Based Organizations and NGOs;
2021/12/16
Committee: AFET
Amendment 92 #

2021/2209(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 9 a (new)
9a. Calls on the Commission to define clear and accountable benchmarks and indicators to improve access to quality of education in developing countries;
2022/01/21
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 93 #

2021/2209(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. Calls on the Commission, the EEAS and the Member States to support the authorities of third countries in establishing risk mitigation and management plans through resilience planning; highlights the importance of developing contingency planning and crisis response plans now to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission in schools and to better anticipate the impact of school closures on children and on their families, especially on the poorest and most marginalised children as well as those who suffer severe disabilities; considers crucial to pay attention to the impact in family life, in particular in parents’ responsibilities, of the closing of schools and therefore having their children at home;
2021/12/16
Committee: AFET
Amendment 99 #

2021/2209(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6 a. Highlights the importance of Churches, religious communities and associations, and religious leaders to prevent and combat the COVID-19 pandemic as well as to support children and their families, to overcome the challenges and difficulties provoked by the health crisis, improving their wellbeing and provide training and education programmes;
2021/12/16
Committee: AFET
Amendment 105 #

2021/2209(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Calls on the Commission, the EEAS and the Member States to support the authorities of third countries in ensuring appropriate care for children, including by putting in place a contingency plan for the care of children orphaned or left without appropriate care because of severe cases of COVID-19 that require hospitalisation of adult caregivers; their parents or those who have guardianship over them;
2021/12/16
Committee: AFET
Amendment 111 #

2021/2209(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Calls on the Commission and the EEAS to support the governments of third countries in building stronger gender- responsive education systemeducation systems that recognises the specific needs of boys and girls;
2021/12/16
Committee: AFET
Amendment 118 #

2021/2209(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Calls on the Commission, the EEAS and the Member States, as well as the national governments of third countries, to develop specific programmes to manage and mitigate the mental health and psychosocial impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on children, teachers and their communities, and to design specific preventive campaigns aimed at children, parents and teachers on the risks ofwhen using the internet, such as harassment, trafficking, sexual abuse and cyberbullying as well as promote special plans to assist children who have been victims of these practices, and their parents;
2021/12/16
Committee: AFET
Amendment 121 #

2021/2209(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Calls on the Commission, the EEAS and the Member States to support the authorities of partner countries in addressing the challenges in their education systems with the aim of making them capable of withstanding future crises, and making systems more resilient and inclusive, through planning for resilience, implementing learning recovery programmes and protecting educational budgets, with dedicated investments in high-quality, affordable and inclusive education, while respecting the special education needs of every child and parental rights, including investments in education technology, teacher training and other resources to ensure children and youth do not miss out on opportunities to enter the labour market later in life;
2021/12/16
Committee: AFET
Amendment 132 #

2021/2209(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Considers that national governments – and their competent national authorities – must communicate with children in a child-friendly manner and with their parents to explain the measures taken to limit the spread of COVID-19;
2021/12/16
Committee: AFET
Amendment 2 #

2021/2204(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 17 a (new)
— Having regard to the EU Guidelines on the promotion and protection of freedom of religion or belief of 24 June 2013, in those aspects where the Guidelines address support for and engagement with human rights defenders on behalf of religious groups, philosophical, non-confessional or other civil society organisations,
2022/11/21
Committee: AFET
Amendment 100 #

2021/2204(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18 – indent 9 a (new)
- The promotion of training for HRDs on such matters as reporting on human rights abuses and attacks on HRDs, local and international legal mechanisms of protection against human rights violations, and procedural rights in such cases where HRDs face criminal charges for their legitimate activities;
2022/11/21
Committee: AFET
Amendment 162 #

2021/2204(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 34 a (new)
34 a. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to encourage and facilitate active engagement and consultation with HRDs already relocated to Europe on designing and implementing HRDs relocation programs, aid and regional initiatives according to the specific realities and needs faced by HRDs in third countries;
2022/11/21
Committee: AFET
Amendment 189 #

2021/2204(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 47 a (new)
47 a. Notes with regret that EU Delegations are not present in some countries where HRDs are facing risks and danger in conducting their activities; acknowledges that EU delegations’ presence in such thirds countries is essential for the implementation of these Guidelines and effective engagement on individual urgent and serious HRD cases and other local actions; calls on the EEAS to continue exploring possibilities of establishing the EU presence in the form of a delegation in the countries with serious human rights concerns;
2022/11/21
Committee: AFET
Amendment 2 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 5 a (new)
— having regard to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR),
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 8 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 9 a (new)
— having regard to the report of the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations, entitled “The State of Food and Agriculture, Overcoming water challenges in agriculture, 2020”,
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 16 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 15
— having regard to the Council Conclusions of 17 June 2019 on the EU human rights guidelines on safe drinking water and sanitation, and of 19 November 2021 on water in the EU’s external action,
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 17 #

2021/2187(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Reaffirms that access to water is a vital imperative and a fundamental right, in the context of the 64/292 Resolution of the UN General Assembly;
2021/12/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 22 #

2021/2187(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. whereas Africa’s urban population is 567 million and continues rapidly growing and the continent will have the fastest urban growth in the world; notes that the rapid urbanisation will pose serious challenges to secure access to drinking water and to food security;
2021/12/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 25 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A
A. whereas Resolution 64/292 of the UN General Assembly recognises ‘the right to safe and clean drinking water and sanitation as a human right that is essential for the full enjoyment of life and all human rights’; whereas the absence of water is incompatible with life and both rights are essential for a dignifiedwater is indispensable for life and essential for a dignified life; whereas water has also a strong cultural, spiritual and religious dimension due to its fundamental role in society’s life;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 29 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas the denial of the human rightlack of access to water has repercussions on enjoyment of the right to health; considering that contaminated water, the inadequate management of urban, industrial and agricultural wastewater and poor sanitation are linked to the transmission of serious diseases and even death;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 36 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C
C. whereas the human right to water is linked to the right to education; whereas children, in most cases girls, have to walk miles every day to fetch water, which prevents them from attending school; whereas one out of three children does not have appropriate access to water and sanitation in schools;1a whereas the UN’s 2021 Sustainable Development Goals Report shows that globally, more than a fifth of primary schools lacked access to basic drinking water or single-sex toilets and more than a third lacked basic handwashing facilities;2a whereas girls are also forced to drop out of school when they are unable to access gender-appropriatsuitable toilets and manage their menstruation in a dignified manner; n appropriate manner; whereas children with certain severe disabilities also suffer difficulties to access education due to the lack of adapted toilets and sanitation facilities; _________________ 1ahttps://water.org/our-impact/water- crisis/childrens-and-education-crisis/ 2a https://unstats.un.org/sdgs/report/2021/Th e-Sustainable-Development-Goals- Report-2021.pdf
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 40 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D
D. whereas the disadvantages faced by many women and girls, people with certain disabilities and elderly people with regard to water, sanitation and hygiene manifest themselves in multiple ways that impact on their overall health, well-being and dignity, reproductive health, education, nutrition, security, and economic and political participation;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 42 #

2021/2187(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Notes that the rapidly growing urban population in developing countries requires increased efforts to support sustainable waste water management and to investments in water management systems in urban areas;
2021/12/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 45 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F
F. whereas the sixth United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) is to ensure that the entire world has universal and equitable access to safe drinking water by 2030‘Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all’ by 2030 remains severely off-track and under-financed, according to the latest status report by UN-Water;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 46 #

2021/2187(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 b (new)
2 b. Underlines that the access to water is a cross cutting issue, strongly affecting security, calls for the Commission to support water diplomacy and to foster regional cooperation between partner countries for better management of water resources;
2021/12/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 47 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G
G. Wwhereas, according to the United Nations, 785 million people have no access to basic water services, 2 billion people do not have safe and cle the UN’s 2021 Sustainable Development Goals Report shows that, despite the increased proportion of the global population using safely managed sanitation services and drinking water in their homes when they need it, 4.2 billion people live without, and the improvement in basic hygiene, in 2020 still 2 billion people lack safely managed drinking water, 3.6 billion lack safely managed sanitation, and 672.3 mbillion people still practise open defecation; lack basic hygiene; and that 129 countries are not yet on track to have sustainable managed water resources for 2030;3a _________________ 3a https://unstats.un.org/sdgs/report/2021/Th e-Sustainable-Development-Goals- Report-2021.pdf
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 53 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital H
H. whereas per capita freshwater availability has fallen by 20% over the past two decades; whereas population growth, agricultural intensification, urbanismuch of the net growth in global population up to 2050 will occur in the cities of developing countries, thus increasing urban demands for water and food;4a whereas urban water demand is projected to increase by 50-70% over the three next decades;5a whereas an unbalanced distribution of population growth and depopulation of rural areas, uncontrolled agricultural intensification, the effects of climate change, environmental degradation, as well as certain unlawful and polluting practices in water use, are posing ever-greater water access problems in many regions; _________________ 4a https://www.fao.org/3/i4560e/i4560e.pdf 5a https://documents1.worldbank.org/curate d/en/978191614167678978/pdf/Water- Resource-Management-Working-to- Improve-Water-Security.pdf
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 59 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I
I. whereas the ongoing climate crisis, with increasing droughts, floods and torrential rains, is exacerbating inequalities in distribution of water; whereas floods and other waccording to the World Meteorological Organization “Atlas of Mortality and Economic Losses from Weather, Climate and Water Extremes (1970 – 2019)”6a, out of the top 10 disasters, the hazards that led to the largest human losses during the period have been droughts (650 000 deaths), storms (577 232 deaths) and floods (58 700 deaths); _________________ 6ahttps://public.wmo.int/en/media/press- release/weather-related -disasters account for 70% of all deaths linked to natural disasters; - increase-over-past-50-years-causing- more-damage-fewer
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 65 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital J
J. whereas ‘water stress’ or water supply-linked vulnerability can be a direct and indirectould be in some cause ofs a driver of induced displacement and migration, along with multiple factors; whereas, according to the UN’s water development reports, five of the world’s eleven regions, accounting for two thirds of the global population, are currently experiencing water stress; whereas, according to the UN’s 2020 Sustainable Development Goals Report, water scarcity could displace some 700 million people by 2030;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 68 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital J a (new)
Ja. whereas 80-90% of wastewater in developing countries is discharged directly into rivers, lakes and seas, causing water-borne diseases hindering tourism and economic development while severely damaging the environment;7a _________________ 7a https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/top ics/water/unsgab/wastewater
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 69 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital K
K. whereas uncontrolled deforestation, land- grabbing and certain other industrial and natural resource overexploitation and extraction activities, carried out by certain private or public ventures, contribute towards the drying-upimpact the water level of rivers, lakes, and more generally, other water sources;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 74 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital L
L. whereas the vast majority – around 70% – of the world’s fresh water is used for agriculture, while the remainder is divided between industrial (19%), mainly in the food, textile, energy, industrial, chemical, pharmaceutical, and mining sectors, and domestic use (11%), including human consumption; where there are disparities among regions in the world, and Europe and Central Asia have a more balanced use of water (35.7% for agriculture, 30.7% for industry, and 33.5% for domestic use), while, for example, agriculture accounts for 80% of India’s water demand;8a _________________ 8a https://blogs.worldbank.org/opendata/cha rt-globally-70-freshwater-used- agriculture https://www.iea.org/commentaries/managi ng-the-water-energy-nexus-is-vital-to- india-s-future
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 76 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital M
M. whereas agriculture is the largest consumer of the world’s freshwater resources and 41% irrigation worldwide occurs at the expense of ecosystems; whereas 33% of arable land is used to grow fodder to feed livestock; where rain fall is insufficient, supplemental irrigation provides essential soil moisture and, thus, increases water productivity, with a potential increase of global cereal production by 35%, the largest potential being in Africa and Asia, as suggested by the FAO 2020 report on “The State of Food and Agriculture, Overcoming water challenges in agriculture”;9a whereas the same report suggests that food productivity and rural incomes10a can be significantly enhanced through investments in new irrigation systems or the habilitation and modernization of existing ones, and this should be combined with improved water management practices including improved agricultural practices, such as the use of drought-tolerant varieties; whereas irrigation covers only 20% of the total land use for agriculture, but supports 40% of global food and fodder output, and 55% of output value;11a _________________ 9a https://www.fao.org/3/cb1447en/cb1447en .pdf 10a https://www.fao.org/land- water/water/water-management/en/ 11a https://documents1.worldbank.org/curate d/en/875921614166983369/pdf/Water-in- Agriculture-Towards-Sustainable- Agriculture.pdf
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 79 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital N
N. whereas the energy sector is currently responsible forrepresents 10% of global water extraction and its water consumption is expected to rise by almost 60% by 2040;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 81 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital O
O. whereas the extractive industries have contributed more efficient and sustainable methods and processes should be implemented in the extractive sector theo avoid overexploitation of surface and groundwater resources, as well as high levels of pollution and the destruserious impacti on of glaciers, forests, wetlands, rivers and other vital water sources for human consumption; whereas economic incentives would create opportunities for more efficient use of energy and water resources among these businesses;12a _________________ 12a https://iea.blob.core.windows.net/assets/59 268647-0b70-4e7b-9f78- 269e5ee93f26/Energy_Efficiency_2020.pd f
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 85 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital P
P. whereas the garment and textile industry counties is one of the biggest employers worldwide, with 150 million people’s lives touched by the global apparel industry, that is to say 1 in 6 people on the planet working in the global fashion supply chains, being 75% of them women;13a whereas it is among the sectors that consume the most water in the world, and whereas apparel and textiles are produced in some of the world’s most water-scarce regions; whereas this industry is ranked as the second most polluting in the world and a large part of that pollution ends up in bodies of water; _________________ 13ahttps://ec.europa.eu/international- partnerships/system/files/gvc-garment- final_en.pdf
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 93 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital Q
Q. whereas the growing demand for water is causing water resources to be overexploited and water’s scarcity has made it a disputed resource; whereas 263 transboundary lake and river basins cover almost half of the Earth’s surface, 145 states have territory in these basins, and 30 countries lie entirely within them; whereas there are approximately 300 transboundary aquifers, helping to serve the 2 billion people who depend on groundwater; whereas around two-thirds of the world’s transboundary rivers do not have a cooperative management framework;14a whereas, according to the UN, conflicts over water are expected in some 300 areas across the world; _________________ 14ahttps://www.unwater.org/water- facts/transboundary-waters/
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 94 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital R
R. whereas the preservation of water resources is under attack and has been made a criminal offence in many countries; whereas in recent years water has become a disputed resource in many countries;environmental legislation in some countries criminalises certain actions that substantially damages the quality of water, as for example, the Directive 2008/99/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 19 November 2008 on the protection of the environment through criminal law;15a _________________ 15ahttps://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal- content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32008L00 99
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 96 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital S
S. whereas, according to Global Witness, more than a third of the land and environmental defenders murdered worldwide between 2015 and 2019 belonged to indigenous communities, whose land and water management skills are crucialimportant in combating the climate crisis and biodiversity loss;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 97 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital T
T. whereas denying access to wathe intentional deprivation of water leading to the extermination of civilians is a crime against humanity (Articles 7.1 and 7.2.b of the ICC Statuter) and destroying water infrastructure have been used as an essential tactic by occupying powers to annex occupied territoriemay constitute genocide if the victims form a national, ethnical, racial or religious group (Article 6.c of the ICC Statute); whereas it may also be considered as a war crime under Article 8(2)(b)(xxv) of the 1998 ICC Statute, as any attack or destruction to drinking water installations and supplies and irrigation works is band displace people from their landned by Article 54(2) of the 1977 Additional Protocol I and Article 14 of the 1977 Additional Protocol II to the 1949 Geneva Conventions;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 102 #

2021/2187(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Calls for coordinated and coherent water management in developing countries with regard to its various uses (agriculture, energy production, industry, etc.), and calls on the European Union to provide better support to developing countries for sustainable water management particularly support to agricultural sector for sustainable irrigation systems and investments in wastewater management, reservoirs, wetland restoration and in water storage systems;
2021/12/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 112 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Underlines that enshrining the right to safe drinking water and sanitation as a human right was a crucial milestone on the road to greater social and environmental justice; affirms, however, that progress in access to these rights is hampered by the low political priority given to the sector, poor implementation and monitoring of policies, underfunding, lack of accountability and gaps in public participation, particularly among the most marginalised in society, in particular in developing countries;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 117 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Recalls the responsibility of states to promote and safeguard all human rights; reiterates, therefore, that states must ensure universal access to safe drinking water and water for sanitation and hygienic purposes in sufficient quantity and quality;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 121 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Recalls that states that ratify a human rights treaty undertake to protect, respect and fulfil the commitments adopted in the international, regional and, national and local framework for the protection of these rights; takes the view in this regard that the international community’s recognition of the right to water and sanitation must encompass protection and enforceability arrangements and, therefore, calls on the EU to promote protection mechanisms at international, regional and national level to ensure that upholding the right to water and sanitation is not optional for states but rather an enforceable right;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 140 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. Maintains that the full exercise of the right to water depends on the preservation of biodiversity, and therefore demands that water management should respond primarily to environmental and social interests and notDemands that water management should respond primarily to environmental and social interests, including labour integration and increasing the incomes and safety conditions of people in poverty and not only to those of the various sectors of the economy;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 145 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Stresses that development models that favour vast projects and large-scale business activities undermine the availability and quality of water in all countries and increase competition for water and exacerbate other water-related conflicts;deleted
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 149 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6a. Considers that public investments and policies must encourage and incentivize the private sector to invest in technologies and management practices that enhance the sustainable production of crops, livestock, and fish by both smallholders and larger companies;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 152 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. Underlines that pollution and the excessive extraction of water resources by means of industrial activities or discharge are among the most commonly identified threats tothe inefficient management of water resources and pollution caused by some industrial activities negatively affect the exercise of the human rights to water and sanitation;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 156 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Calls on the Commission to discourage the practices of water- grabbing and hydraulic fracturing and make them subject to environmental and human-rights impact assessments;deleted
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 161 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Recognises the important work undertaken by environmental rights defenders, in particular those safeguarding the right to water, and roundly condemns the killings, abductions, torture, gender- based violence, threats, harassment, intimidation, smear campaigns, criminalisation, judicial harassment, forced evictions and displacements carried out by numerous perpetrators, including governments and multinational corporationstate and non-state actors;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 168 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 a (new)
9a. Highlights the important role of local authorities and governments and locally led approaches by civil society actors, including NGOs, Churches, Faith- Based Organizations in protection of surface water, ground water, drinking water and wetlands, and their responsibility to ensure that sound water management regulatory frameworks are effectively implemented and enforced;16a _________________ 16a https://www.oecd.org/environment/resour ces/Council-Recommendation-on- water.pdf
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 174 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Calls on the Commission to check carefully that the infrastructure and energy projects financed through the various development cooperation and external policy instruments, including the European Investment Bank, uphold and neither jeopardise internationally recognized human rights and the Sustainable Development Goals nor contribute to the expulsion of indigenous peoples from their lands; where they traditionally live;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 180 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Notes with concern that the lack of access to water and adequate sanitation has a devastating effect on women’s rights, the human rights of disabled as well as elderly people, making it difficult for women and girlsthem to lead safe and healthy lives;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 189 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Is gravely concerned thaabout violations of the right to water and sanitation in occupied territories aim tof displaced people from their lands and is worried about the denial of access to and control over water resources and infrastructurewhen they are living in precarious conditions in informal settlements;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 195 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14
14. Stresses that companies worldwide mustshould be incentivised to ensure that their activities do not encroach ondanger the enjoyment of the human right of access to safe drinking water; demands support for the binding treaty being drafted at the United Nations; encourages to build up public-private partnerships that, recognising water as a public good, promotes a better and more affordable access to water, sanitation and hygiene for all, in particular in the creation, the efficient maintenance and management of water infrastructures;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 205 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Deplores that, as several UN experts have stated, the commodification of water andwater is treated as a mere commodity without further social and cultural considerations, subject to speculation in futures markets is, in breach of basic human rights and contributes to increasing environmental degradation and exacerbating the vulnerability of the poorest and most marginalised in societyies, particularly in less developed and developing countries, flying in the face of the Sustainable Development Goals;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 209 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Calls on states to take legal measures as a matter of urgency to preventing water from being subject to financial speculation on futures markets and to promote democratican appropriate framework of governance of water and sanitation and hygiene services under a approach primarily grounded in human rights and common good considerations;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 216 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Recalls that, as the EU Water Framework Directive recognises, water is not a mere commodity but a public good that is vital to human life and dignity; calls on the Commission, given that these are services of general interest that fall, therefore, primarily in the public interest, to permanently exclude water and sanitation and wastewater treatment from the scope of any trade agreements and to check carefullycheck that trade agreements and the activities of European companies do not undermine, whether by action or omission, the right to drinking water and sanitation;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 225 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19
19. Stresses that public provision is the most appropriate model for the exercise of the human rights to water and sanitation; urges states in this regard to engage in a transparent and robust deprivatisation procesUrges states to improve the effective enjoyment of the human rights to water and sanitation; calls on governments to increase public investments in sustainable water-related infrastructure and to safeguard water as an essential public good;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 233 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20
20. Calls on the World Bank and the IMF to prohibit the imposition of conditions requiring governments to privatise water and sanitation services when providing grants, loans and technical assistance; stresses that the widespread privatisation of public goods in many societies is systematically dismantling human rights safeguards and further marginalising those living in the most abject poverty;deleted
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 239 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21
21. Demands thatEncourages the promotion of stakeholder engagement for informed and outcome-oriented contributions to water policy design and implementation,17a including civil society organisations working to address breaches of the rights to water and sanitation have adequate resources andallowing them to have access to relevant information and the ability to participate meaningfully in water-related decision- making processes; _________________ 17a https://www.oecd.org/environment/resour ces/Council-Recommendation-on- water.pdf
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 247 #

2021/2187(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 22
22. Stresses that inequalities inlack or limited access to water and sanitation are often attributable to systemic inequalities orsuffered by people that are poor or socially exclusionded; calls on governments to guarantee the absence of discrimination in access to water and sanitation services, as a public good, ensuring the provision thereof for all, in particular by affording priority to access for marginalised groups with a view to remedying systemic discrimination;
2022/01/19
Committee: AFET
Amendment 5 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 12
— having regard to the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence (hereinafter ‘the Istanbul Convention’) of 11 May 2011, which not all Member States have ratified,deleted
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 10 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 16 a (new)
— having regard to the Council of Europe Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Dignity of the Human Being with regard to the Application of Biology and Medicine, of 4 April 1997, and its Protocols;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 13 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 17
— having regard to the Commission communication of 12 November 2020 entitled ‘Union of Equality: LGBTIQ Equality Strategy 2020-2025’ (COM(2020)0698),deleted
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 15 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 17 a (new)
— having regard to the Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief, proclaimed by General Assembly resolution 36/55 of 25 November 1981;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 17 #

2021/2181(INI)

— having regard to the UN General Assembly resolutions A/RES/73/296, titled “International Day Commemorating the Victims of Acts of Violence Based on Religion or Belief” of 28 May 2019, and A/RES/72/165,establishing the International Day of Remembrance of and Tribute to the Victims of Terrorism of 19 December 2017;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 19 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 17 c (new)
— having regard to the EU Guidelines on the protection and promotion of freedom of religion of belief, adopted on 24 June 2013;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 20 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 17 d (new)
— having regard to the UN Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide of 1948, and the resolution 43/29 adopted by the Human Rights Council on 22 June 2020 on the prevention of genocide;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 21 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 17 e (new)
— having regard to the EU guidelines and the mandate of the EU Special Envoy on the promotion of freedom of religion or belief outside the EU, adopted on 15 January 2019;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 22 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 17 a (new)
— having regard to the UN Declarations on the Rights of Persons Belonging to National or Ethnic, Religious and Linguistic Minorities, adopted on 18 December 1992;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 23 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 17 b (new)
— having regard to the Council of Europe Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities and the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages, adopted on 5 November 1992;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 25 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 18
— having regard to the Commission communication of 23 September 2020 on a New Pact on Migration and Asylum (COM(2020)0609),deleted
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 57 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Underlines the importance of both the new Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) – Global Europe and the EU Action Plan on Human Rights and Democracy 2020–2024 for this goal; recalls that the use of the rule of qualified majority voting within the Council on human rights issues would result in a more effective and proactive EU foreign and security policy, and would strengthen cooperation on matters of key strategic interest for the EU, while reflecting its fundamental values;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 67 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Is deeply concerned by increasing number of illiberal democracies and autocratic regimestotalitarian, autocratic and dictatorial regimes worldwide, which are in the majority for the first time in 20 years; calls for the EU and the Member States to make full use of the tools at their disposal to support good governance, democratic institutions and space for civil society worldwide, including Churches and religious communities and associations;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 92 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 3
EU Special Representative for Human Rights and EU Special Envoy for Freedom of Religion or Belief
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 132 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14 a (new)
14a. Shows its concern about the reported conflicts of interests of a number of UN experts financed directly by private foundations and aligning their positions with the private foundations' agendas; calls on the UN bodies and organs to be carefully scrutinised and to investigate these cases to avoid the reputation and credibility of the UN institutions from being undermined and eroded by lack of action; underlines the importance of a strict application of the mandates of the UN human rights’ rapporteurs, in particular, the respect of the principles of impartiality and independence, in order to maintain untouchable the required high moral standards required for these important positions;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 134 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Reiterates its strong support for the International Criminal Court (ICC) as the only international institution able to prosecute some of the world’s most heinous crimes and to bring justice to their victims, and highlights the importance of impartiality and independence of the Court; calls on the EU Member States to provide adequate financial support to enable the ICC to carry out its tasks; supports the universality of the Rome Statute and calls for the EU to include a specific clause on its ratification and access in agreements to be concluded with third countrie as well as to support alternative efforts to prosecute atrocity crimes in special chamber in national courts or hybrid courts; strongly condemns any attack on the staff or on the independence of the ICC; is of the opinion that attempts to undermine the credibility and essential role of the ICC constitute attacks on multilateralism and should be contested as such by the EU and its Member States; stresses that the ICC needs full access to the countries it investigates to be able to perform its tasks; underlines the potential of other innovative tools to bring perpetrators of international crimes to account, including universal jurisdiction at national-level judiciaries; underlines, in this context, the current discussions in the UN International Law Commission on the immunity of state officials and calls for follow-up to them; calls for the EU to continue to strengthen capacity building at national level in third countries, while supporting international criminal tribunals and mechanisms, as well as platforms and organisations dedicated to the fight against impunity such as the Coalition for the International Criminal Court;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 141 #

2021/2181(INI)

16. Underlines that COVID-19 has significantly strengthened the recent trends of totalitarian, dictatorial or authoritarian regimes to dilute weakening democracy; deplores the abuse of the epidemiological crisis by these regimes to further constrain the freedom of expression, religion and of assembly through restricting the functioning of democratic institutions, the repression of dissent, including limiting media freedom both online and offline and targeting critics with defamation campaigns, banning or heavily restricting worship and religious gatherings, the mass use of surveillance tools, disinformation campaigns, limiting access to information through blanket internet shutdowns, bandwidth throttling and content blocking, emergency measures implemented without clear criteria for their revocation and the restrictions placed on the democratic exercise of elections;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 149 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Highlights the highly negative impact of COVID-19, which has disproportionately affected women, LGBTIQ persons andgroups in vulnerable groupssituation, including women, LGBTIQ persons, the poor, children, persons with disabilities, migrants, refugees, asylum seekers, religious and national minorities, informal workers and persons in prison or detention, among others; stresses that groups in vulnerable groupsituations are also more affected by the negative economic and social consequences of the pandemic, as well as the restrictions in access to healthcare and education; notes with concern the increase in intolerance, discrimination and hate speech against certain vulnerable groups, in particulaand even persecution of religious communities and other minority groups;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 165 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19
19. Is seriously concerned at the precarious situation of human rights defenders and deplores the fact that they are the victims of increasing violence, including targeted killings; underlines the particularly severe situation, further aggravated by COVID-19, of female, children, environmental, labour, environmental and indigenous human rights defenders; deplores the increased use of techniques such as harassment, criminalisation and defamation campaigns, arbitrary arrests and unlimited detention in inhumane conditions used to silence human rights defenders, often on the basis of ill-defined terrorism charges; reiterates its call to EU Delegations and Member States’ embassies in third countries to regularly visit activists in prison, monitor their trials and advocate their access to justice and protection;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 193 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 22
22. Highlights the interdependence between human rights, a healthy environment and combating climate change, and welcomes the UN’s call for global recognition of the right to a safe, clean, healthy and sustainable environment; underlines the vital role played by environmental human rights defenders and local and indigenous populations in preserving such an environment, despite the threats of violence that they often face from those responsible for, and profiting from, environmentally harmful practices; encourages the EU and the Member States to promote the recognition of ecocide as an international crime under the Rome Statute of the ICC, and requests that the Commission study the relevance of ecocide to EU law and EU diplomacy;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 205 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23
23. Underlines the crucial importance of advancing women’s rights and welcomnotes the EU Action Plan on Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment in External Action 2021–2025 (GAP III) as a sign of the EU’s commitment in this field; commends the important role played by female civic activists in political, social and environmental movements, and deplores the fact that women often become targets of violence as a result of both their gendersex and their activities, even paying for them with their lives;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 208 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24
24. Deplores the fact that women continue to make up the majority of victims of gender-based violence, such as domestic violence and sexual violence and abuse, including female genital mutilation, and that they face discrimination in political and professional life, as well as in access to education and healthcare; stresses that the provision of care, protection and access to justice for victims of gender- based violence and trafficking has significantly decreased as a result of the pandemic, and calls for the EU to promote the development of emergency assistance plans and protocols both at UN level and in partner countries, with the aim of adapting assistance programmes to the circumstances of the pandemic, its aftermath and future crises; highlights the need to protect mothers in vulnerable situation, in particular single mothers and those who have a large family, to avoid poverty and social exclusion; and points out the need to create a social and economic environment and conditions that allows mothers to continue their professional development;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 232 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 27
27. Reiterates its call for the EU and its Member States to step up their efforts to eliminate all forms of abuse against children; welcomes the new EU Strategy on the Rights of the Child adopted by the Commission, but stresses that children continue to be victims of violence, early and forced marriage, forced conversion, child pornography and paedophilia, sexual abuse, including genital mutilation, trafficking, child labour and recruitment as child soldiers, and that they suffer from a lack of access to education and healthcare, and from malnutrition and poverty, in particular in humanitarian crises and armed conflicts; stresses that 2021 is the International Year for the Elimination of Child Labour; calls for the streamlining of the rights of the child and the children and armed conflicts (CAAC) agenda in all the EU’s external policies; calls on the Member States to uphold their responsibilities with regard to the protection of foreign fighters’ children who are EU citizens; calls for the full respect of the right of children to be educated and taught in accordance with the religious, philosophical or pedagogical tenets or their parents, as expressed by Article 14.3 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 246 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 28
28. Reiterates its strong condemnation of discrimination, xenophobia, intolerance, persecution and killings linked to race, ethnicity, nationality, social class, disability, caste, religion, belief, age, sexual orientation and gender identity or sex that continue to be a major problem in many countries; welcomes the launch of the EU’s anti-racism action plan 2020– 2025, which recognises not only the individual and social dimensions, but also the structural nature of this phenomenon; stresses that in spite of 20 years of work since the signing of Durban Declaration and Programme of Action in 2001, racism, discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance continue to be a scourge around the world and calls for a zero-tolerance approach to them;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 254 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 29
29. Underlines the difficult situation, discrimination and threats to life faced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, non-binary, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ) people around the world; welcomes the fact that the LGBTIQ Equality Strategy 2020–2025 includes the EU’s commitment to include LGBTIQ issues in all its external policies, including support under the NDICI – Global Europe Instrument and Instrument for Pre-Accession funds;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 263 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30
30. Fully supports the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion, to hold a belief, or not to believe, and the right to manifest and to change or leave one’s religion or belief without fear of violence, persecution, or discrimination; deplores the persecution suffered by minorreligious communities on the grounds of belief or religion in many places in the world; condemns the abuse of blasphemy laws to perpetuate discrimination and deplores the misuse of religion and religious institutions to the detriment of human rights through the persecution, including by legal means, of belief or religious minorities, women and LGBTIQ persons; for political, economic or other spurious goals: invites EU member states which are not yet part of the International Religious Freedom or Belief Alliance, to join it in order to increase the efforts to promote and protect this crucial human right; encourages member states to appoint a special representation or envoy for religious freedom in third countries and create a EU net that could work jointly with the EU Special Envoy on Freedom of Religion of Belief;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 273 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30 a (new)
30a. Laments the precarious position of the EU Special Envoy on Freedom of Religion or Belief, regrets the excessive time that took to designate a new one, and the fact that, once again, the post is vacant; demands a reinforcement of its mandate, and allocation of sufficient financial and human resources, and a quick designation of a high profile responsible person for this important position;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 276 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30 b (new)
30b. Calls on the EU and its member states to encourage and support international efforts to collect evidences of atrocity crimes against religious communities and minorities, bringing the perpetrators to court, making effective the criminal sentence, and compensating the victims;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 279 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30 c (new)
30c. Shows its concern about the increasing number of situations and cases, mostly in Western countries, where the right to conscientious objection, which is rooted in the freedom of conscience, religion or belief, is attacked, undermined or eroded, and their holders are fined, punished, fired from their works for exercising it, or face social intolerance and discrimination; demands EU institutions, including the EEAS, to pay attention to this worrying trend and to protect the victims, and consider their defenders and supporters of the right to conscientious objection as human rights defenders; reminds that the right to conscientious objection is recognised in Article 10.2 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 280 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 14 a (new)
National, ethnic and linguistic minorities
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 282 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30 a (new)
30a. Calls for governments of the EU’s partner countries to respect the fundamental human rights of national, ethnic and linguistic minorities, including their culture, language, religion, traditions and history to preserve cultures and diversity; reiterates the need to fulfil the obligations and commitments they have assumed under international treaties and agreements, so as the Council of Europe’s recommendations;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 284 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30 b (new)
30b. Deplores that many countries despite their international obligations and commitments to protect minorities are pursuing a policy of forced assimilation of national, ethnic and linguistic minorities by disregarding their fundamental and human rights;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 301 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 16
EU Global Human Rights Sanctions Regime ("EU Magnitsky Act")
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 307 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 32
32. Welcomes the adoption of the EU Global Human Rights Sanctions Regime (EU GHRSR-"EU Magnitsky Act") as an essential addition to the EU’s human rights and foreign policy toolbox, which strengthens the EU’s role as a global human rights actor by allowing it to take restrictive measures against legal and natural persons involved in grave human rights violations in the world; condemns any arbitrary and unjustified retaliatory restrictive measures imposed on the EU or other entities as a response to the EU’s decisions under the EU GHRSR-EU Magnitsky Act; regrets the fact that the Council has decided to apply unanimity instead of qualified majority voting when adopting sanctions on human rights issues;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 315 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 33
33. Calls for the extension of the scope of the EU GHRSR-EU Magnitsky Act to include acts of corruption in order to ensure the effective targeting of the economic and financial enablers of human rights abusers; sStresses the need for an effective strategy to implement the EU GHRSR- "EU Magnitsky Act", consistent both with the EU’s other external policies, in particular with its human rights policies, and with the existing international frameworks on sanctions, international criminal law and international humanitarian law; welcomes the Commission’s announcement that in 2021, it will conduct a review of practices undermining sanctions and of the existing reporting obligations for Member States on their implementation and enforcement;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 320 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 17
Migration and Asylum
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 329 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 34
34. Reaffirms the inalienable human rights of migrants and refugees as recognised in international treaties, and calls for the EU and its Member States to fully uphold them in their cooperation with third countries, both in terms of the establishment of high legal standards and, equally importantly, their operationalisation in order to ensure the effective protection of these rights in practice; reiterates its call on the Commission to carry out a review of the human rights impact of migration policy frameworks and of the EU’s cooperation on migration with third countries; underlines the risks related to informal arrangements on return and readmission, which are not subject to judicial scrutiny and therefore do not allow for effective redress for human rights violations suffered by migrants and asylum seekers;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 334 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 35
35. Equally, calls for independent, effective mechanisms to monitor formal readmission agreements, both at the EU’s borders and in partner countries in order to ensure full respect for human rights, including the principle of non-refoulement; recalls that the right to asylum is guaranteed by Article 18 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union; expresses its hope that the New Pact on Migration and Asylum, including the new European Union Agency for Asylum, will help the EU Member States in creating efficient, properly functioning asylum systems, improving protection for asylum seekers and respecting the principles of the fair sharing of responsibility and solidarity among Member States; reiterates the need for a European agreement on a humanitarian visa or on the use of the European Temporary Protection Directive;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 336 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 35 a (new)
35a. Calls on the EU and member states to address the root causes of migration in order to avoid that people, individuals and families feel forced to leave their home country; to support and promote the development in the countries of origin, invest in education and provide direct assistance to improve life opportunities locally, which contributes to a more stable and sustainable society and also eliminates human rights violations;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 337 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 35 b (new)
35b. Requests the EU and member states to make effective the primary right not to migrate and to remain in one’s homeland in safety, security and dignity; to support the right of refugees and asylum seekers to return to their homelands, once the situation of persecution or violence that provoked their displacement has disappear, while respecting the principle of non- refoulement;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 345 #

2021/2181(INI)

36. Underlines that universal respect for international humanitarian law and international human rights law is of the utmost importance, and calls for the parties in the world’s armed conflicts to ensure the full, timely and unhindered access of humanitarian aid agencies to vulnerable populations and areas, and to protect these civilian populations, particularly women and children, as well as humanitarian and medical workers as well as religious personnel; underlines the importance of contributing to the creation of humanitarian corridors for emergency situations, including those involving a risk or imminent risk of escalating into widespread and major human rights abuses;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 346 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 36 a (new)
36a. Calls on the EU institutions to admit the important role of the faith based organizations in responding to humanitarian crises; stresses that religions can contribute to promoting peace in different ways, address non- violence in their communities and stress universal respect for justice and human rights; underlines that religious communities have indispensable potential in conflict-management in developing countries towards political transitions as being key mediator in negotiations;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 353 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 38
38. Stresses the multi-faceted threat to the enjoyment of human rights brought about by modern armed conflicts, which, in addition to states, often involve non-state agents and terrorist organisations; reiterates its call for the EU to strengthen its response to conflicts in collaboration with partner countries and regional organisations, including a strong focus on conflict prevention, mediation and good offices efforts, as well as reconciliation, addressing the root causes of the conflicts, humanitarian aid, providing the necessary support to the international peacebuilding and peacekeeping missions, as well as EU missions in the framework of the common security and defence policy, and post- conflict reconstruction operations supporting and applying strong integration and scrutiny of human rights and a robust gender perspective;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 368 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 40
40. Emphasises that the EU has a unique opportunity to exert leverage on businesses to uphold human rights at global level with the upcoming EU binding legislation on corporate due diligence and corporate accountability, obliging companies to prevent, identify, communicate, account for and remedy potential and/or actual adverse impacts on human rights, the environment and good governance in their value chain; calls for the strategy to apply to all large undertakings governed by the law of a Member State, established in the territory of the Union or operating in the internal market, as well as publicly listed small and medium-sized companies; stresses the need to establish and enforce sanctions to make the legislation effective; calls for companies’ due diligence strategies to be made public; welcomes the full entry into force in 2020 of the EU Conflict Minerals Regulation and the EU Taxonomy Regulation as constructive steps in this field;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 377 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 21
Importance of strong human rights clauserecommendations in international agreements
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 379 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 42
42. Reiterates its call for the systematic inclusion of human rights clauserecommendations in all international agreements between the EU and non-EU countries; calls for these clauses to be enforced through clear benchmarks andrecommendations to be monitored, with the involvement of Parliament, civil society , and the relevant international organisations; underlines that the establishment of specific benchmarks could lead the EU to explore the introduction of proportionality into sanctions for non-compliance; underlines that breaches of agreements should trigger clear consequences, including, as a last resort, suspension or the withdrawal of the EU from the agreements well as Churches and FBOs, and the relevant international organisations; underlines that breaches of agreements should trigger clear consequences; recommends the inclusion of monitoring mechanisms on human rights in trade and foreign investment agreements, as well as complaints mechanisms, in order to ensure effective recourse to remedy for affected citizens and local stakeholders;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 387 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 43
43. Underlines the strong link between trade and human rights and the incentivising role played by access to trade on upholding human rights conditionality for third countries; notes the ongoing review of the GSP+ Regulation, which is an opportunity to further strengthen this link; underlines that access to GSP+ is contingent on progress in the area of human rights and calls for the strict application of corecommendiationalitys to partner countries including, if warranted, the swift revocation of GSP+ status;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 400 #

2021/2181(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 46
46. Stresses the vital role of social platforms in advancing freedom of expression and of organisation, but underlines the need for proper safeguards to prevent, on the one hand, the unjustified censorship of users’ content, including automated censorship, and, on the other, the spread of hate speech, fake news and disinformation; welcomes the adoption of the new EU rules on the control of exports, brokering, technical assistance, transit and transfer of dual-use technologies; calls on member states to adopt a judicial or administrative mechanism that allows any user of social platforms to challenge the legality of any decision adopted by these platforms to censor the content posted by the user;
2021/10/13
Committee: AFET
Amendment 31 #

2021/2066(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A
A. whereas corruption is a human rights violation, directly undermining the enjoyment of human rights and disproportionately affecting the most vulnerable groups in society, barring them from equal access to political participation, basic services, justice, natural resources, jobs, education, health and housing, while exacerbating poverty and inequality;
2021/09/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 79 #

2021/2066(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I
I. whereas corporate due diligence regulations are indispensable means to prevent and tackle human rights and environmental violations; whereas the provisions of the UNCAC should form part of the due diligence obligrecommendations envisaged in the forthcoming Commission proposal on the matter;
2021/09/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 155 #

2021/2066(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 – point h
(h) mainstream a rights-based anti- corruption approach into EU external action in the programming of the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI), the Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA) and the EU trust funds; prioritise binding anti-corruption commitments with targets and timetables; strengthen monitoring and enforcement; ; prioritise domestic revenue raising in developing partner countries by assisting tax evasion and straighten good governance; improve communication between specialised EU agencies and partners on the ground; invest in digital and data- driven methods to fight corruption;
2021/09/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 160 #

2021/2066(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 – point i
(i) design programmes under the IPA, the NDICI, and the EU trust fundin line with the relevant regulations of these instruments to support anti-corruption capacity building; increase the efficiency of EU spending by including clear programme targets and timelines;
2021/09/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 162 #

2021/2066(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 – point j
(j) ensure that the highest ethical and transparency standards are applied in EU funding, that CSOs and independent actors are included and that grievance mechanisms are available and accessible; ensure that all EU bodies and agencies improve access to information and refrain from charging fees for access to information;
2021/09/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 167 #

2021/2066(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 – point l
(l) in all EU-third country trade agreements, include a strong and mandatory human rights conditionality framework with anti- corruption clauses; as a last resort, impose sanctions or suspend agreements in the event of serious acts of corruptionrecommendations;
2021/09/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 186 #

2021/2066(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 – point o
(o) recognise the crucial role of impartial CSOs, human rights defenders (HRDs) and investigative journalists in the fight against corruption, through changing societal norms, fighting impunity, gathering data, and achieving better implementation and enforcement of anti- corruption measures;
2021/09/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 195 #

2021/2066(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 – point q
(q) strengthen protection of whistleblowers and anti-corruption HRDs, including through temporary visa schemes;
2021/09/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 214 #

2021/2066(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 – point u
(u) assume a leadership role in forging a coalition of democracies to counter the global rise of kleptocracy; insist on including anti- corruption on the agenda of upcoming international summits such as the G7 or the Summit for Democracy proposed by United States President Biden; continue to proactively contribute to the work of international and regional forums to fight corruption and promote human rights;
2021/09/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 229 #

2021/2066(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 – point y
(y) initiate the procedure for the EU to become full member of GRECO, in which the EU has held observer status since 2019;deleted
2021/09/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 243 #

2021/2066(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 – point ac
(ac) set up an EU mandatory human rights and environmental due diligence (HRDD) instrument that requires companies to engage actively in the identification, assessment, mitigation, prevention and notification of any adverse impacts of their businesses and supply chains on human rights, and which includes strong anti- corruption provisions and obligatory grievance mechanisms;
2021/09/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 259 #

2021/2066(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 – point af
(af) swiftly come forward with a legislative proposal to amend the current EU Global Human Rights Sanctions Regime by extending its scope to include acts of corruption; note the risk of corrupt actors moving their assets to the EU as more and more countries adopt stricter frameworks;
2021/09/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 15 #

2021/2055(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. Takes note that churches play a critical role to ensure peace as a mediator and are contributing to social cohesion and stability also as providers of basic social services;
2021/09/07
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 17 #

2021/2055(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 b (new)
1 b. Notes that young people in developing countries are particular vulnerable to extremist ideologies and quality education is key to combat radicalisation; notes that extremist movements often exploit the weak presence of the State in rural areas;
2021/09/07
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 18 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 32
— having regard to its resolution of 29 April 2021 on blasphemy laws in Pakistan, in particular the case of Shagufta Kausar and Shafqat Emmanuel9 , its resolution of 14 April 2016 on Pakistan, in particular the attack in Lahore, and its resolution of 13 December 2018 on Iran, notably the case of Nasrin Sotoudeh, __________________ 9 Texts adopted, P9_TA(2021)0157.
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 22 #

2021/2055(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Recognises that FBOs cover approximately 40 % of healthcare and a significant part of education in sub-Saharan Africa alone1 , while their role remains mostly unrecognised, underlines that churches and faith based organisations are contributing to human development; _________________ 1 https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/1 0665/43884/9789241596626_eng.pdf
2021/09/07
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 41 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C
C. whereas discrimination and persecution of religious is carried out by different actors – whether governments or other groups in society – and can take different forms, such as killings, torture, physical attacks, arbitrary arrests, coercion, forced conversion, kidnapping and forced marriage, forced birth control, forced displacement, various forms of human trafficking (slavery, sexual or labour exploitation), threats, exclusion, discriminatory and unfair treatment, harassment, expropriation of private properties, limitation of access to elective offices, employment, education, health and administration services, destruction of places of worship, cemeteries and cultural heritage, and online hate speech;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 43 #

2021/2055(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. Recognises that the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated persecution and violence against religious minorities in some of the developing countries; denounces the use of freedom-restricting measures as part of pandemic-prevention measures to discriminate against religious minorities; calls on partner developing countries to develop inclusive social protection systems that do not discriminate against minorities on religious grounds or on any other grounds in terms of equal access to health care, food, humanitarian assistance or education; calls on the EU to better equip itself with instruments that enable it to better target the most vulnerable populations, including religious minorities;
2021/09/07
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 48 #

2021/2055(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 b (new)
4 b. Acknowledges the special role which religious leaders, faith-based organizations, and faith communities play in COVID-19 education, preparedness, and response; notes that religious leaders are integrated into their communities through service and compassionate networks and are often able to reach the most vulnerable with assistance and health information and identify those most in need; notes that religious leaders are a critical link in the safety net for vulnerable people within their faith community and wider communities;
2021/09/07
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 60 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C a (new)
Ca. whereas in numerous conflicts and crises around the world, attacks on cultural heritage have been an instrument of symbolic violence and the politicization of cultural heritage, often when including its religious aspects directly contributing to humanitarian crises, displacement and migration, the violation of religious and cultural rights as well as human dignity; whereas these can polarize either a society, a country, a region, an ethnical group or a community and increase the risk of violent conflict, thus cultural heritage destruction and looting can be a weapon of war, and a warning sign for future mass atrocities; whereas, furthermore, these represent major obstacles to dialogue, peace and reconciliation;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 61 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C b (new)
Cb. whereas the destruction of cultural heritage renders communities, especially religious communities, vulnerable as they are deprived of an important part of their identity, while extremist groups and other conflict parties can easily spread their influence in areas where identities and social cohesion have been weakened and divisions in communities been reinforced;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 63 #

2021/2055(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. Underlines that delivering humanitarian assistance must be free from any kind of discrimination, and strongly condemns any discrimination based on religious affiliation in distributing humanitarian assistance;
2021/09/07
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 65 #

2021/2055(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 b (new)
5 b. Notes that local churches and FBOs have a strong social embeddedness and a deep knowledge of local sensitivities and needs which is a high added value to EU cooperation in developing countries; therefore calls on the Commission and the EU Delegations to engage with local churches and FBOs in the planning of humanitarian interventions and development actions, and calls on the Commission to involve churches and FBOs in the implementation of EU projects;
2021/09/07
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 76 #

2021/2055(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6 a. Calls on the Commission and the EEAS to mainstream, in the EU’s external actions, the protection of freedom of religion and belief, as well as the right to change or abandon one's religion and belief without coercion, notably in developing countries;
2021/09/07
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 78 #

2021/2055(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 b (new)
6 b. Notes that persecution of religious minorities endangers not only human lives, human rights and human development but also cultural heritage, calls on the Commission to integrate the protection of cultural heritage in all the relevant dimensions of the EU toolbox, notably in development cooperation, and calls for appropriate financial support for the protection of cultural heritage in the programming exercise of the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) –Global Europe;
2021/09/07
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 83 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Takes the view that, regardless of their religion and belief, it is essential to promote and ensure the inclusion of all equal and inclusive citizenship for all in their societizens in their societieses, where the members of religious minorities live, and in political and cultural life;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 107 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. Underlines that although it is usually religious minorities that are the target of persecution or intolerance, there are cases in which persecution is also suffered by religious communities that are not sociologically minorities and have a large presence in a territory or state, but find themselves in a situation of vulnerability that makes them easy targets of intolerance and violence by terrorist groups that seek to subjugate, expel and, in some cases, exterminate them;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 113 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. Stresses that among believers’ groups, Christians are estimated to constitute the majority of people facing persecution for their faith; underlines that globally around 340 million Christians experience high levels of persecution and discrimination, with over 4 500 Christians killed for their faith, 4 500 churches and other Christian buildings attacked, and over 4 200 believers detained without trial, arrested, sentenced or imprisoned in 2020 alone; is alarmed about the increase in the overall level of discrimination,stresses that these are minimum figures since many incidents go unreported; is alarmed about the increase in the overall level of persecution and discrimination, which increased by 19% between 2019 and 2020; and especially about the sharp 60% increase in the number of faith-related killings compared to 2019;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 116 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5a. Recalls that indigenous religious communities, among others Christians in the Middle East countries, contribute profoundly to the social stability, conflict prevention and peace of their countries;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 134 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8 a (new)
8a. Applauds churches’ and faith based organisations’ irreplaceable humanitarian activities in conflict-hit zones, assisting people in dire need regardless of denominational background;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 144 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Notes with particular concern that persecution of Christians is widespread in the Middle East, at times amounting to genocide, and has prompted an exodus of Christians from the region over the past two decades, resulting in approximately 15 million Christians making up 4 % of the population in the Middle East and North Africa, down from 20 % a century ago; is alarmed by the situation in Iraq, where there were 1.5 million Christians before 2003, a number now reduced by 87% within one generation to approximately 175,000;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 145 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Notes with particular concern that persecution of Christians is widespread in the Middle East, at times amounting to genocide, and has prompted an exodus of Christians from the region over the past two decades, resulting in approximately 15 million Christians making up 4 % of the population in the Middle East and North Africa, down from 20 % a century ago; stresses in this respect the inalienable right to stay of discriminated and persecuted religious communities in their homelands;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 157 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Recalls the genocides, crimes against humanity and war crimes were committed in Iraq and Syria by the so- called ‘ISIS/Daesh’ against Christians, Yazidis, Muslims and other religious and ethnic minorities in the territories under its control during the period 2014-2020;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 190 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Notes that persecution of religious minorities in Asia is commonplace in many countries, especially in those with communist regimes, and that blasphemy laws are of particular concern, particularly in Pakistan, that disproportionately target minorities, including Christians and Hindus; notes that in addition to the penalties, these laws create an environment and pretext that lead to riots and mob violence against religious minorities’ communities and neighbourhoods as well as their temples, which create intimidation and social unrest among them;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 219 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19 a (new)
19a. Condemns the violence and attacks by radical Hindus in India against religious minorities, including mobs;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 239 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 a (new)
21a. Recalls that after major defeats of 'ISIS/Daesh' in Syria and the Middle East, the terror organisation is gaining new ground through its affiliates in the Sahel, among others in Mali and Burkina Faso, aiming at imposing its rule and violent ideology in the area;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 248 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 22 a (new)
22a. Emphasises the need to investigate and prosecute the murdering, kidnapping, raping, wounding and other crimes committed against Christian farmers in the Middle Belt of Nigeria, and encourages the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court to enlarge the ongoing investigations for the crimes against humanity and war crimes presumably committed by Boko Haram, adding the mentioned crimes committed by jihadist Fulani militias in the Middle Belt, that have already provoked thousands of killings;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 300 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 28
28. Deplores the fact that more than 70 countries in the world enforce criminal laws or seek to introduce new legislation which provide for punishments for blasphemy, apostasy and conversion, including the death sentence; notes that laws already in place are used disproportionately against people belonging to religious minorities, and are thus seen, with good reason, as an instrument of oppression; calls for the EU to intensify its political dialogue with all countries concerned with a view to repeal those laws; underlines that converts leaving a majority faith often experience the most severe violations including imprisonment, forced divorce, abduction, physical violence and murder;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 308 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 28 a (new)
28a. Stresses the importance of intercultural dialogue, including interfaith dialogue as a catalyst for reconciliation that can contribute to heal the scars of war and rebuild society, to ensure an adequate vision for the future while learning to live together peacefully and constructively in a multicultural context, developing a sense of community, belonging and mutual trust to envisage a peaceful common future, thus the EU shall use the collaboration in the protection of cultural heritage as a confidence building measure between religions, communities, ethnic groups and states including the protection of cultural heritage as part of CSDP missions planning and operational documents and ensure relevant expertise in the field;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 324 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30 a (new)
30a. Encourages the Commission to assist and support members of religious minorities and their families, who look for international protection or are IDPs due to war, violence and persecution, and who are willing to voluntary return to their home places, including the reconstruction of their homes, livelihoods and basic infrastructures, such as schools and hospitals;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 326 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30 a (new)
30a. Underlines the need of enhancing the EU’s role, as a value based actor, in preserving peace, preventing conflict and strengthening international security by adding cultural heritage within the EU’s toolbox as a factor contributing to the development of peace, reconciliation and mutual understanding, intercultural and inter-faith dialogue, international solidarity, identities and social cohesion, capacity building, local, inclusive and sustainable development, cities’ and regions’ regeneration;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 345 #

2021/2055(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 33 a (new)
33a. Welcomes the regular contacts and cooperation of EU institutions with CSOs, including Churches and religious communities, to improve the situation of persecuted religious minorities in third countries, and overcome the difficulties and obstacles they have to face in their everyday life; encourages EU institutions to intensify partnerships with CSOs, including Churches and religious communities, in particular with those in third countries dealing with religious freedom and supporting and assisting religious minorities, and leaders of persecuted religious minorities, in order to advance religious freedom and to improve the wellbeing of religious minorities’ faithful, in particular those who are in most vulnerable situations;
2021/06/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 31 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. Notes that the lack of access to affordable vaccines is still a major challenge in developing countries, considers that, therefore, investments in local manufacturing capacities, training of health professionals and the development of storage and roll-out capacities should be priorities in the EU external response to COVID-19;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 36 #

2021/2007(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Welcomes, as a positive step, the recently announced US support for a proposal to temporarily waive certain provis that least-developed countries already enjoy a waiver, granted until 1January 2033, regarding the implementations of the Agreement on Trade- Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights for the prevention, containment and treatment of COVID-19; urges the Commission, therefore, to follow through on its promise to engage in active and constructive text-based negotiations at World Trade Organization level.provisions on pharmaceuticals, and is convinced that suggestions of removing IP protections for vaccines would not remedy the existing shortage of vaccines; urges therefore the Commission, in cooperation with the WTO , to follow through on its promise to engage in active and constructive text-based negotiations at World Trade Organization to work on incentivising and supporting the scaling up of production capacities for vaccines in developing countries and incentivise voluntary licensing agreements as well as to launch a dialogue about existing obstacles to voluntary licensing and how to overcome them;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 41 #

2021/2007(INI)

5 a. Strongly supports effective measures to address the shortage of vaccines against COVID-19, especially in developing countries, and therefore supports the Commission and the Member States in their efforts to push non-EU countries to lift existing export bans and to step up the donation of vaccines; calls on the Commission and the Member States to further increase their efforts to support technology transfer and voluntary licensing for intellectual property rights to treat endemic or pandemic infectious diseases in the world population;
2021/06/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 16 #

2020/2273(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Recalls that agricultural productivity and resilience depend on biodiversity to guarantee the long-term sustainability of our food systems; underlines, furthermore, that much of the present biodiversity has been preserved by farming and forest management as well and is dependent on the continued active management of farmland and forest;
2021/02/05
Committee: AFET
Amendment 28 #

2020/2273(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Welcomes the intention of the Commission to develop a new European biodiversity governance framework and to follow an inclusive approach involving civil society in a compliance watchdog role to monitor the implementation of EU environmental legislation; also welcomes its aim to put forward a new initiative in 2021 on sustainable corporate governance to address human rights and environmental due diligence across economic value chains; insists in this regard on the need to elaborate EU legislation for mandatory human rights and environmental due diligence for EU companies, EU- domiciled companies and third-country companies operating in the internal market, imposing legal obligations to identify, cease, prevent and mitigate adverse impacts throughout their supply chains and establishing effective monitoring and enforcement mechanisms;
2021/02/05
Committee: AFET
Amendment 37 #

2020/2273(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Stresses that deforestation and land- grabbing by large corporations has an enormous impact on indigenous peoples and local communities; underlines the importance of sustainable forest management for the health, climate resilience and longevity of forest ecosystems and as the most effective framework tool for the preservation of the multifunctional role of forests including maintaining and improving forest biodiversity; calls on businesses to recognise their rights and to ensure their effective participation in decision-making regarding their lands, in accordance with the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Business Conduct;
2021/02/05
Committee: AFET
Amendment 7 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. ReaffirmBelieves that sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) areis grounded in human rights, areis a fundamental elements of human dignity, and remain crucial to achieving gender equality, and remains committed to the promotion, protection and fulfilment of all human rights and to the full and effective implementation Beijing Platform for Action and the Programme of Action of the ICPD and the outcomes of their review conferences in the EU’s external action and development, as such and remains committed to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), in this context;
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 17 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Believes that to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, particularly goals 3 and 5 and their associated targets, it is necessary to be committed to the established framework of the Agenda 2030, notably in the context of sexual and reproductive health care;
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 19 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 b (new)
1b. Notes that women’s economic and social empowerment, including their access to education, health and employment, as crucial for sustainable development and growth;
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 21 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Calls for the immediate elimination of harmful practices such as female genital mutilation (FGM) and early and forced child marriage; is extremely concerned that more than 200 million girls and women worldwide have been forced to undergo FGM; and that due to the COVID-19 pandemic the delay or interruption of community outreach programmes and education on harmful practices globally is estimated to lead 2 million more cases of FGM and 13 million more child marriages over the next decade compared to pre-pandemic estimates; calls for full access to physical and psychological care by interculturally sensitive and trained personnel;
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 28 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. Calls for zero tolerance for sexual and gender-based violence, including trafficking, female genital mutilation and child, early and forced marriage, forced abortion, sex-selective abortion, sexual and reproductive exploitation, as well as sexual enslavement through religious coercion;
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 32 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Condemns any violations of SRHRsexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights, including failures to provide access to comprehensive, age appropriate, evidence based sexuality education (CSE), family planning services and maternal healthcare;
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 41 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Insists that CSE programmes are important as they provide age-appropriate information about puberty, the menstrual cycle, pregnancy and childbirth; recalls the role of non-governmental organisations as service providers and advocates for SRHR; underlines that CSE programmes help prevent early pregnancy and marriage, which lead to girls dropping out of school;
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 53 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Recalls that safe and legal abortionaccessible sexual and reproductive health care is anchored in women’s health and rights; warns about the worrying backlash on women’s rights over their bodies in bothand calls to support women’s rights, through strengthening access to sexual and reproductive health care for women and girls, free from coercion, violence, discrimination and abuse in developing countries and the EU; stresses the need for the full implementation of the Maputo Protocol, especially Article 14 where appropriate;
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 64 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Calls for the Gender Action Plan III to give more prominence to its SRHR thematic policy area given the tremendous impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on women and girls in developing countries in line with the Beijing Platform for Action and the Programme of Action of the ICPD and the outcomes of their review conferences;
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 71 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Calls on the EU to secure adequate and well-targeted funding for SRHRsexual and reproductive health care, in its development cooperation policy stresses the importance of a continuous structural dialogue with developing countries in order to achieve sustainable solutions in the protection and fulfilment of women rights;
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 81 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8
8. Emphasises that SRHRsexual and reproductive health care services should be gender-responsive, rights-based, youth- friendly and available to all, regardless of age or marital status, including during conflicts and disasters;
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 92 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 9
9. Reiterates its call onthat both parties of the new agreement between the EU and the Organisation of African, Caribbean and Pacific States toshall commit to the promotion, protection and fulfilment of SRHR free from discrimination, coercion and violence and to the full implementation of the International Conference on Population and Development’s Programme of Actionfull and effective implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action and the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the outcomes of their review conferences and shall commit to sexual and reproductive health and rights, in this context;
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 99 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 10
10. Recalls that asylum seekers and refugees arewomen and girls, especially in conflict affected areas are extremely exposed too often victims ofsexual exploitation, human traffickingers, and forced prostitution; insists that access to SRHR that they have a very limited access health care, including sexual and reproductive health care, therefore these populations is critical for y need special, targeted support, with otheir survivalvulnerable groups.
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 107 #

2020/2215(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 10 a (new)
10a. Calls for ensuring that women can be empowered to fully avail of their human and legal rights, including access to legal status including through birth registration, inheritance rights for women and girls for property and access to land, capital and micro-finances; stresses that such economic empowerment can impact positively on their capability to fully exercises their rights in all domains.
2020/12/11
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 39 #

2020/2134(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Believes that in the next few years climate change will create more environmental migrants from developing countries, and that in order to better protect their human rights, environmental refugee status needs international recognitionaggravate existing vulnerabilities and will increase the displacement of people, and that in order to better protect their human rights, more targeted and more effective implementation of the relevant EU instruments is crucial; as well as the increase of the actions under the NDICI which contribute to climate change and mitigation as stressed in the European Parliament first reading position on the NDICI, adopted in its legislative resolution of 27 March 2019 on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and the Council establishing the NDICI (P8_TA(2019)0298);
2020/10/16
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 54 #

2020/2134(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Deems that the introduction of binding EU legislation on business due diligence can help improve the defence of human rights and compliance with environmental standards in the fight against climate change in developing countries; calls on the Commission to continue working towards the approval of the UN binding treaty for transnational corporations on human rights;
2020/10/16
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 64 #

2020/2134(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Invites the Commission to do more to protect human rights defenders, environmental activists and notably local organisations engaged in the fight against climate change in developing countries.addressing the vulnerabilities aggravated by the climate change in developing countries , if they face unfounded legal actions or discrimination due to their activities in the field of environment protection;
2020/10/16
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 19 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Notes that the due to the COVID- 19 pandemic the small and medium-sized enterprises face a distressing situation, and their support and the creation of favourable market environment is an outmost interest of the Union;
2020/10/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 32 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Stresses that the rights to an effective remedy and fair trial are basic human rights enshrined in Article 8 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), Article 2(3) of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), as well as in Articles 6 and 13 of the ECHR and Article 47 of the Charter; stresses that the Union, as part of its commitment to promote, protect and fulfil human rights worldwide, must promote the rights of victims of business-related human rights violations and abusesviolations of internationally legally binding human rights rooted in human dignity that amount to criminal offences in third countries, in line with Directives 2011/36/EU1 , and 2012/29/EU2 of the European Parliament and of the Council; _________________ 1 Directive 2011/36/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 April 2011 on preventing and combating trafficking in human beings and protecting its victims, and replacing Council Framework Decision 2002/629/JHA (OJ L 101, 15.4.2011, p. 1). 2 Directive 2012/29/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2012 establishing minimum standards on the rights, support and protection of victims of crime, and replacing Council Framework Decision 2001/220/JHA (OJ L 315, 14.11.2012, p. 57).
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 36 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Stresses that the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs) highlight the duty of states to protect against human rights abuseviolations within their territories, jurisdictions, or both, by third parties, including businesses; further emphasises that, independently of the ability and willingness of states to fulfil their human rights obligations, businesses have the responsibility to respect internationally legally binding human rights wherever they operate and to address adverse human rights impactviolations with which they arhave connecmmitted, including by enabling providing remedies to victims;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 40 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Calls on the Commission to apply a human rights-based approach to the future legislation which shall be designed, implemented, monitored and evaluated with high transparency and respecting the core human rights principles of transparency and access to information, inclusion and non-discrimination with a special focus on the most vulnerable;
2020/10/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 48 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 10
10. Points out that corruption in the context of judicial proceedings can have a devastating effect on the lawful administration of justice and judicial integrity, and intrinsically violate the fundamental right to a fair trial, the right to due process and the victim’s right to effective redress; stresses that corruption generally leads to systematic abuseviolation of human rights in the business context, for example, by preventing individuals from fairly accessing goods and services that states are obliged to proviensure in order to meet their human rights obligations, by encouraging wrongful acquisition or appropriation by businesses of land, or by granting licences or concessions to businesses in the extractive sector;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 49 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Stresses that all human rights should be covered by the future legislation; considers that emphasis should be placed on workers and trade union rights, women, children or, indigenous people and minority rights; stresses that full alignment with existing legal obligations and standards at European and international level should be sought; is of the opinion that the legislation should address all types of human rights abusesbusiness-related violations of internationally legally binding human rights rooted in human dignity;
2020/10/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 55 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 11
11. Regrets that despite attempts by European companies to implement their corporate responsibility policies to respect human rights, and various polices and laws in place to encourage or require due diligence across different Member States, only 37% of businesses are currently undertaking due diligence in their supply chains and only 16% cover the entire value chain; stresses that protection of internationally legally binding human rights and prevention of business-related abuses and violations cannot be achieved with current policies and that binding Union legislation is necessary to bridge this gap;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 58 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 12
12. Notes that corporations and investors are calling for mandatory human rights due diligence at Union level, to harmonise standards, and secure a global level playing field and greater legal and business certainty; stresses that any regulatory requirements need to be sufficiently clear for companies to be able to comply with those requirements and know how to avoid sanctions, and due diligence legislation should ensure competitive advantage for European companies in the short and medium term;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 66 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 13
13. Urges the Commission to propose Union mandatory human rights and environmental due diligence legislation imposing legal obligations on Union companies and companies domiciled or operating in the Union internal market and establishing effective monitoring, enforcement and remedy mechanisms; stresses that the legislation should focus on the first tier of the supply chain (T1) outside the EU;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 72 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Is of the opinion that the new legislation should apply to all sectors, to all types of enterprises, whether public or private, and of all size across the Union; without jeopardising the competitiveness of Union enterprises, with special regard to small and medium-sized enterprises; considers that the focus should be placed on the risks;
2020/10/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 77 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 14
14. Recommends that due diligence as required by Union legislation be extended to all potential or actual adverse impacts which the company has or may have caused, contributed to or with which it may bviolations of internationally legally binding human rights which the company has or may have directly linkcaused; this extends to, but is not limited to, abuseviolations across the entire value chain, including the parent undertaking, all subsidiaries, direct and indirect suppliers and subcontractors or other business partners;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 81 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 15
15. Recommends that Union legislation cover all companies and all sectors, including state-owned enterprises, the bankingand provide spector and financial institutions, including the European Investment Bankial exemptions for SMEs in order to avoid disproportionate administrative and regulatory burdens on these small businesses;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 84 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Is of the opinion that the future legislation should establish mandatory and effective corporate due diligence processes reserving competitive advantage for European companies, covering companies’ activities and their business relationships, including their supply and subcontracting chains;
2020/10/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 89 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 16
16. Stresses that all human rights are universal, indivisible, interdependent and interrelated and should be promoted and implemented in a fair and equitable manner; recommends that due diligence obligations should apply to all business- related violations of internationally legally binding human rights abuses;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 96 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 17
17. Recommends that Union mandatory due diligence legislation be adopted to require companies to identify and address their impacts with reference to all internationally recognised human rights including, as a minimum, those encompassed by the UDHR, all nine core international human rights treaties bearing in mind that not every Member State has ratified all the nine treaties, the ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work and all fundamental ILO conventions, as well as the ECHR and ICESCR, which are binding on Council of Europe member states and also bind Member States as a result of Union law and the common constitutional traditions of the Member States;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 102 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 9
9. Expresses the opinion that the future legislation should establish a comprehensive, transparent, coherent system of liability that includes administrative, civil and criminal liability, and a sanctioning mechanism to enforce compliance with the new legislation and ensure enforcement, including through penalties and sanctions of all nature and stresses that regulatory requirements need to be sufficiently clear for companies to be able to comply with those requirements and know how to avoid sanctions;
2020/10/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 111 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 22
22. Notes that the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and Human Rights Council have stated that climate change has an adverse impact on the full and effective enjoyment of human rights; underlines that the member states of the United Nations have an obligation to respect human rights when addressing adverse impacts of climate change; points out that the Supreme Court of the Netherlands has confirmed that Articles 2 and 8 of the ECHR impose a positive obligation for State Parties to take appropriate measures to prevent dangerous climate change; insists that climate change mitigation and adaptation in line with the Paris Agreement’s temperature goals must form part of businesses’ human rights and environmental due diligence obligations under the legislation;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 113 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 10
10. Stresses that access to effective remedy is crucialdue diligence legislation should ensure competitive advantage for Union companies in the short and medium term; considers that the legislation should oblige companies to have an effective grievance mechanism that should be transparent, accessible, predictable, safe, trustworthy and accountable; considers, in addition, that such mechanism should provide for effective judicial remedies to victims of human rights violations, environmental damage and corruption abuses, individually and through collective actions; believes that special protectionfair legal procedures should be provided to human rights defenders and its lawyers;
2020/10/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 122 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 25
25. Notes that some businesses are accused of profiting from or even complicity in war crimes and crimes against humanity due to their own activity or that of their business partners in conflict-affected areas or to their business relationships with state- or non-state actors involved in conflicts globally; Recommends that, in order to prevent substantial risks of grave violations of internationally legally binding human rights abuses and serious breaches of international law, the scope of due diligence under Union legislation be extended to breaches of international criminal law and international humanitarian law in which businesses may be implicated;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 131 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 26
26. Recommends that, requirements for corporate mandatory human rights and environmental due diligence be grounded in the principle of corporate responsibility to respect universal human rights as articulated by the UNGPs; businesses should avoid infringing human rights and address adverse human rights impacts with which they are directly or indirectly connected, entailthem in case of violations, having in prlactice that they should have in place an embedded human rightse a specific policy, a human rights due diligence process and appropriate and adequate measures to facilitate access to effective remedies for business-related violations of internationally legally binding human rights abuses, including at company level, and other grievance mechanisms;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 147 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 28
28. Stresses that universal human rights impacts can be specific to certain rights holders and vulnerable groups due to intersecting factors such as agender, sex, ethnicity, religion, social and employment status, migrant or refugee status, exposure to conflict or violence or other factors; this must be reflected in the due diligence processes, including the human rights impact assessment phase and remedy procedures;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 154 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 29
29. Notes that the risk of business- related human rights adverse impactviolations does not always depend on the size of the company; insists that the scope of due diligence obligations must be based on the risk of adverse impactviolations and must be specific to the country and sector of activity; recalls that according to the UNGPs, three factors should be taken into account in assessing the severity of business impacts on human rights: the scale of the impact, the scope of the impact and whether the impact is irremediable;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 162 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 30
30. Notes that human right riskviolations are context-specific and that, to accurately assess human rights risks, prevent, mitigate and remedy adverse impactthese violations, businesses should include in their analysis, in addition to information from employees, right-holders, affected communities and workers’ representatives, information from reliable independent expert sources, for which transparency is key; stresses in this regard, the key role of national human rights institutions, NGOs human rights oversight bodies such as the United Nations, ILO and Council of Europe, OSCE supervisory mechanisms, and the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights as relevant sources of information and reporting;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 167 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 31
31. Notes that in order to assess human rights riskviolations, independent and non- ideological monitoring of human rights impacts and working conditions in supply chains is essential, in particular by means of monitoring, which has workers and affected communities at its core and fully involves relevant stakeholders;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 186 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 35
35. Notes that rights holders primarily affected by business-related human rights abuseviolations often lack adequate access to information about their rights and about how they are given effect in domestic legislative systems, and have difficulty accessing state agencies and organisations concerned with protection and enforcement of their rights; recommends that the legislation encourage businesses to engage with all affected and potentially affected stakeholders, with their representatives, or both, including workers’ representatives, at all stages of the due diligence process, from development to monitoring and evaluation, in a timely and meaningful manner;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 192 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Subheading 6
Protection of whistle-blowers, human rights, human dignity and environmental defenders
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 196 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 37
37. Suggests that the companies establish effective alert mechanisms; through recourse to such mechanisms any interested party, including trade unions, consumers, journalists, civil society organisations, including Churches and faith based organisations, lawyers, and human rights and environmental defenders, or members of the public, should be able to warn the company of adverse impacts and human rights violations;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 204 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 42
42. Highlights the fact that, as recalled by the UNGPs, states have the duty to ensure, through judicial, administrative, legislative or other appropriate means, that those affected by business-related internationally legally binding human rights abuseviolations have access to an effective remedy; Rrecommends that the legislation makes specific reference to this obligation in line with the United Nations Basic Principles and Guidelines on the Rights to Remedy and Reparation for Victims of Gross Violations of International Human Rights Law and Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 218 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 44
44. Insists that access to evidence and time limitations can be major practical and procedural barriers faced by victims of human rights abuseviolations in third countries, obstructing their access to effective legal remedies; stresses that that the burden of proof should be shifted from the victims to the company and that the legislation must require companies to disclose all necessary information for interested parties to engage in judicial proceedings and for victims to access remedies;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 224 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 46
46. Recommends that the legislation establishes guidance regarding the elements of an effective, fair and equitable operational grievance mechanism, with a view to defining appropriate measures to prevent harm, including providing adequate access to remedies; stresses that it is necessary to clarify the precise scope of the jurisdiction of the courts of the Member States in remedies;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 231 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 47
47. Calls for measures to ensure that Union due diligence legislation is adequately monitored and enforced by national and Union bodies with appropriate duties and powers in accordance with their respective competences; such bodies should have competence to investigate abuseviolations, initiate enforcement actions and to support victims, for instance through legal advice, technical support and representation;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 240 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 49
49. Stresses that criminal law and criminal justice are indispensables ultima ratio instruments might be necessary means of human rights protection against severe human rights violations;
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 246 #

2020/2129(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 51
51. Recommends that the legislation include criminal liability provisions for companies and directors and management that are held responsible in the event of the most severe violations of universal human rights.
2020/10/12
Committee: AFET
Amendment 124 #

2020/2118(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. Underlines the need to support family farms and local small- and medium-size enterprises notably in the agro-industrial sector, in order to increase food security and resilience;
2021/01/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 204 #

2020/2118(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Stresses the need to catch up on routine immunisation programmes as soon as possible and to provide adequate funding for initiatives such as Gavi, the vaccine Alliance, and CEPI, the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations; calls on the Commission to ensure that the EU global response to the COVID-19 pandemic does not undermine EU funding for other vital health programmes, including the Minimum Initial Services Package for sexual and reproductive health and programmes targeting the health of women and pregnant women; urges all countries and the Commission to continue to provide health care services related to sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) as well as routine immunisation services, while ensuring the safety of communities and health workers;
2021/01/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 328 #

2020/2118(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19 a (new)
19a. Calls for enforced empowerment of local communities and for engagement in humanitarian and development actions with local civil society including, churches, faith-based organisations and other local representatives;
2021/01/20
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 3 #

2020/2116(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Reaffirms that the right to migrate is a human right; calls on the Commission to promote development and humanitarian policies that protect the human and social rights of all migrantspeople, including IDPs and vulnerable groups such as women and girls in conflict affected regions, disabled, elderly people , wherever EU action is deployed and irrespective of their legal status;
2020/11/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 5 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 15
— having regard to the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration and the Global Compact on Refugees, adopted by the UN General Assembly in 2018,deleted
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 7 #

2020/2116(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Recalls that EU development cooperation must have as its main objective the reduction and eradication of poverty and that it must be based on partner countries’ development agendas, following a needs and rights-based approach, , and not on EU domestic interestscalls for strong regional cooperation and involvement of local partners in the joint programming;
2020/11/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 17 #

2020/2116(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Takes note of the EU’s New Pact on Migration and Asylum; expresses its regret that the proposed measures are insufficient to ensure respect for migrants’ human rights and is especially worried about the externalisation of EU border management and migration controlstablish a sustainable asylum system, strongly based on cooperation on return and readmission and to ensure respect for human rights and notes that the return and local resettlement of IDPs must be prioritised and supported to grant their rights to stay in their homeland;
2020/11/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 17 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 31 a (new)
- having regard to European Parliament resolution of 25 November 2020 on improving development effectiveness and the efficiency of aid (2019/2184(INI))
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 23 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A
A. whereas migration is a global phenomenon amplified by globalisation, rising conflicts, inequalities, and climate disruption; whereas gradual, normative development within the modern international human rights framework of the rights of migrants, independently of their legal status, represents a source of progress and collective pride for humanity; whereas migrants and lack of security; whereas women and girls, elderly and disabled people remain, however, among the most vulnerable groups worldwide and continue to face violations of their rights; whereas migration continues to be for many individuals a human journey marred by suffering, discrimination and violence; whereas the European Union, as a historic region of both emigration and immigration and as a community united by founding values of human dignity, freedom and human rights, has a particular duty to respect, protect and promote thehuman rights of migrantsall people, notably in its external dealings;
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 28 #

2020/2116(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Insists on the need for humanitarian corridors and safe and legal migration pathways from neighbouring and developing coCalls on the Commission for more efficient conflict management, in cooperation with local actors, insists on the need for humanitarian corridors to the nearest safe destination, in the case of armed conflicts and natural disasters, and calls for addressing the humanitarian needs at local level and for providing assistance for people voluntaries into the EU; ly returning to their place of origin;
2020/11/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 29 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A a (new)
A a. whereas only by addressing the root causes of migration - such as poverty, food and nutrition security, unemployment, instability and the lack of security in third countries of origin of illegal mass migration - we can solve the challenge of illegal migration;
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 33 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas the Commission communication of 7 June 2016 on establishing a new Partnership Framework with third countries under the European Agenda on Migration, which builds on the GAMM principles, stresses that migration issues are at the top of the EU’s external relations priorities; whereas this framework calls for intensified cooperation with third countries, through ‘partnerships’ aiming at ensuring cooperation on migration management, in effectively preventing irregular migration and readmitting irregular migrants, including with positive and negative incentives stemming from different policy elements within EU competence, including neighbourhood, development aidssistance, trade, mobility, energy, security and digital policies, all leveraged towards the same objective;
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 37 #

2020/2116(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. ReiteraNotes that newither development assistance nor bilateral or multilateral partnerships with developing countries must be conditional on cooperation on migration policiesout strong cooperation on return and readmission policies there is no possibility to establish a sustainably asylum system in Europe, and notes that young people are the most valuable resource of developing countries in Africa, therefore it is the interest of partner countries to ensure that these people can return to their country of origin;
2020/11/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 46 #

2020/2116(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Expresses its deep concern about the possible misuse of development funds for border control purposes, including those of the EU Emergency Trust Fund for Africa (EUTF), and the suspected human rights violations linked to the EUTF in Libya, Ethiopia and NigerAcknowledges that EU Emergency Trust Fund for Africa (EUTF) is a flexible and effective tool of addressing root causes of migration as lack of security, unemployment, lack of education and poverty, expresses its concern about the possible misuse of development funds and calls for investigations any cases where the possibility of misuse of EU funds occurs, including validly proofed human rights violations;
2020/11/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 53 #

2020/2116(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Deplores the lack of transparency of the EUTF and the fact that Parliament is not involv's role is limited in its scrutiny; calls on the Commission to comprehensively review the implementation of the EUTF to ensure that it falls in line with development and humanitarian objectives, by acknowledging that the financial architecture and coordination of the Trust Funds highly contributed to the application of nexus-approach in fragile settings;
2020/11/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 59 #

2020/2116(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8
8. Reiterates that the NDICI budget dedicated to migration should be used to address the root causes of migration and not to control migratory flows or fundto improve human security also with facilitating peacekeeping and conflict management, better border control at the external border management.
2020/11/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 59 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Stresses that these obligations require not only the abstract recognition of the applicability of the relevant standards, but also an appropriate operationalisation through detailed and specific instruments that allow for effective protection in practice as well as through a human rights-based approach to the entire migration policy cycle, from formulation to adoption, implementation and evaluation;
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 104 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. Calls on the Commission to ensure transparent ex ante risk assessments, performed by independent agencies, on the impact of any formal, informal or financial EU cooperation with third countries on the rights of migrants and refugees; calls on the Commission to set implementation guidelines for EU agencies and Member States before entering into cooperation with third countries; calls in this respect for particular vigilance in relation to countries which are experiencing ongoing or frozen conflicts and face increased risks of human rights violations;
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 147 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Calls for the extension of the mandate of the Fundamental Rights Agency to allow it to exercise an advisory role in the external dimension of EU asylum and migration policies and its involvement in monitoring exercises;deleted
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 161 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Notes with concern the increasing recourse since 2016 to enhanced conditionality betweethat European development cooperation and migration management, including return and readmission; stresses, however, that according to Article 208 TFEU the primary objective of Union development cooperation policy shall be the reduction and, in the long term, the eradication of poverty; calls, therefore, on the Commission to ensure that policies on development cooperation do not contravene the principles enshrined in Article 208 TFEU; stresses that the use of development cooperation as an incentive for migration management undermines meaningful action on the needs of people in developing countries, the rights of refugees and migrants, and their potential impact on regional migration patterns and contribution to local economies, and thus also undermines a wide range of rights stemming from the Sustainable Development Goalspublic investments should promote eradicating poverty, climate and environmental action, economic and trade policies and addressing illegal migration, and should also be fully aligned with the principles of universal human rights, democracy and good governance;
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 170 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16 a (new)
16 a. Calls for the EU to address the root causes of migration, such as poverty, food and nutrition security, unemployment, instability and the lack of security in third countries of origin of illegal mass migration; the focus should also be on assisting the development of stable institutions to promote sustainable societal development in these states;
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 171 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16 b (new)
16 b. Considers that the EU needs to help third countries to offer a perspective of future for young generations constituting the active work force of their own countries, so that people do not start the dangerous journey towards Europe, risking their own and their children's lives;
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 178 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16 – subparagraph 1 (new)
Notes that EU development cooperation must be aligned with sustainable development goals, also in the context of gender related actions;
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 183 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Notes that a complete, public overview of EU funding to third countries to facilitate cooperation on migration issues remains unavailable; calls on the Commission to provide improved transparency, including by establishing a clear overview of the fundsall instruments within the EU budget used to finance cooperation with third countries in the field of migration management across all its financial instruments and their implementation, including information on the amount, purpose and source of funding as well as detailed information on any other potential support measures provided by EU agencies such as the European Border and Coast Guard Agency, in order to ensure that Parliament can efficiently perform its institutional role of scrutiny of the implementation of the EU budget;
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 188 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18
18. Stresses the importance of allocating a substantial share of future EU funding in the field of migration to civil society groups in third countries for providing assistance and for the protection and monitoring of the rights of migrants, and of ensur, assist the creation of decent life for people ing that a significant part of EU funding is earmarked for the improvement of human rights, international proteceir home countries for providing health care, education, and the future perspective of refugeessupporting job creation;
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 197 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19
19. Notes that the possibilities of mainstreaming migration policy in EU external policy are significantly broadened by the inclusion of migration in the thematic, geographical and rapid response component of the proposed Neighbourhood, Development, International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI); notes with concern, however, that through the ‘rapid response’ component, cooperation with third countries on migration management can be funded without the need for the Commission to publish any programming documents or consult civil society actors, and without the involvement of Parliament, including in the framework of the ‘Migration Preparedness and Crisis Blueprint’, which lacks mechanisms to assess the possible adverse impact of such interventions; insists in this regard on the need to ensure that the 2021-2027 Multiannual Financial Framework is accompanied by a robust human rights framework for the identification, implementation and monitoring of future migration cooperation programmesthat a non-programmed, flexible facility in the NDICI will be necessary to provide swift, effective and targeted response to emerging challenges as natural disasters, armed conflicts and mass migration;
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 206 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21
21. Believes that Parliament must make full use of its powers of implementation, scrutiny and budgetary control and ensure that EU funding decisions and related allocations comply with the Union’s principles of legality and sound financial management, in line with the EU’s Financial Regulation;
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 208 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 22
22. Recalls the commitment of the EU and its Member States under the Global Compact on Refugees to share responsibility for the protection of refugees and ease the pressure on host countries; stresses in this regard that the EU and its Member States should contribute to a more structural and substantial funding of the regions hosting most refugees, and should not use financial means to shift responsibility for the protection of refugees to third countries; reiterates the importance of fully implementing the 23 objectives of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration; believes that Parliament must ensure the proper scrutiny of the implementation of both Compacts by the EU;deleted
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 216 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23
23. Calls for the EU and its Member States to pursue a migration policy that fully reflects the human rights of migrantrefugees as enshrined in both international and regional law; calls on the EEAS, the Commission and the Member States to engage with third countries on the rightto address the root causes of migrantstion as an integral dimension of the EU’s human rights policy; insists that the human rights and migration nexus be adequately covered within the framework of bilateral EU human rights dialogues with the relevant countriesdevelopment policy; calls on the EU Delegations in those countries to monitor closely the rights of migrantsrefugees and internally displaced people, particularly in countries of transit; insists on the proactive engagement of the EU in countries where human rights defenders and civil society organisations, including those who are protecting the lives of migrants and asylum seekers who are at risk, are under threat or are being criminalised for developing partner countries with civil society organisations, as CSOs, churches, FBOs and other organisations with humanitarian, education and human rights protection activities, including those who are protecting the lives of people in need, notably refugees, women and girls in armed conflicts, elderly and disabled people and otheir legitimate workmarginalised groups;
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 221 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24
24. Calls for the EU to carry out a global campaign to support universal ratification of the Geneva Convention relating to the Status of Refugees; urges Member States to lead by example by adhering to the UN Convention on the Rights of Migrant Workers, as one of the core UN human rights conventions;deleted
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 228 #

2020/2116(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 25
25. Believes that the EU must take a leading role in supporting policy and normative developments in relation to the rights of migransustainable development and policy dialogue on universal human rights in multilateral fora; calls on the Commission and the Member States to provide financial and political support for the relevantincrease the efficiency of implementation of development funding, and urge to provide more visibility and accountability for EU funding for international and regional bodies, including NGOs, the International Committee of the Red Cross, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and UNRWA, as well the OHCHR and the UN Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants;
2020/12/14
Committee: AFET
Amendment 7 #

2020/2098(REG)

Proposal for a decision
Citation -1 (new)
-1 having regard to Parliament's roles, functions and competences laid down in the Treaties,
2020/09/24
Committee: AFCO
Amendment 8 #

2020/2098(REG)

Proposal for a decision
Citation -1 a (new)
-1a having regard to the primary obligation of the institutions of the European Union to safeguard the rule of law also in their own functioning,
2020/09/24
Committee: AFCO
Amendment 9 #

2020/2098(REG)

Proposal for a decision
Citation -1 b (new)
-1b having regard to the rights of persons with disabilities and to the European Parliament resolution of 7 July 2016 on the implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, with special regard to the Concluding Observations of the UN CRPD Committee1a ; _________________ 1a OJ C 101, 16.3.2018, p. 138.
2020/09/24
Committee: AFCO
Amendment 12 #

2020/2098(REG)

Proposal for a decision
Paragraph 3
3. Takes note of the temporary measures adopted by its President and its governing bodies in order to cope with such extraordinary circumstances; underlines that those measures were needed to guarantee the continuity of Parliament’s business, which is required by the Treaties, allowing Parliament to carry out its legislative, budgetary and political control functions during the crisis;
2020/09/24
Committee: AFCO
Amendment 14 #

2020/2098(REG)

Proposal for a decision
Paragraph 4
4. Recognises that those temporary measures were fully justified and ensured the validity of all votes taken during their period of applicatione motive and necessity of those temporary measures were tackling the circumstances caused by the COVID-19 pandemic;
2020/09/24
Committee: AFCO
Amendment 15 #

2020/2098(REG)

Proposal for a decision
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. Expresses its desire to restore Parliament's full operation in compliance with its own rules, as laid down in the Treaties;
2020/09/24
Committee: AFCO
Amendment 22 #

2020/2098(REG)


Title XIII a (new) – rule 237 a (new)
Rule 237a Extraordinary measures 1. This Rule applies to situations in which the European Parliament, due to exceptional and unforeseeable circumstances beyond its control, is hindered from carrying out its duties and exercising its prerogatives under the, and according to the Treaties and a temporary derogation from Parliament’s usual procedures set out elsewhere in these Rules is necessary in order to adopt extraordinary measures to enable it to continue to carry out those duties and to exercise those prerogatives. Such extraordinary circumstances shall be considered to exist where the President comes to the conclusion, on the basis of reliable evidence confirmed, where appropriate, by the services responsible for security and safety, the Legal Service of the European Parliament and after consultation with the President of the European Commission and the President of the Council of the European Union, that for reasons of security or safety or as a result of the non-availability of technical means it is or will be impossible or dangerous for Parliament to convene in accordance with its usual procedures as set out elsewhere in these Rules and its adopted calendar. 2. Where the conditions set out in paragraph 1 are fulfilled, the President may decide, with the agreement of the Conference of Presidents and after consultation with the Quaestors, to apply one or more of the measures referred to in paragraph 3. If it is impossible, due to reasons of imperative urgency, for the Conference of Presidents to convene, the President may decide to apply one or more of the measures set out in paragraph 3, points (a), (b) and (c). Such a decision shall lapse five days after its adoption unless approved by the Conference of Presidents within that deadline. The Conference of Presidents shall consult with the Quaestors before its decision. Following a decision by the President, approved by the Conference of Presidents, a political group or Members whose rights stemming from their parliamentary mandate are affected by the decision may, at any time, request that some or all of the measures addressed by that decision be submitted individually to Parliament for approval without debate. The vote in plenary shall be placed on the agenda of the first sitting following the day on which the request was tabled. If a measure fails to obtain a majority of the votes cast, it shall lapse after the announcement of the result of the vote. A measure approved by the plenary may not be the subject of a further vote during the same part-session. 3. The decisions referred to in paragraph 2 shall include the following, exhaustive list of measures: (a) postponement of a scheduled part- session, sitting or meeting of a committee to a later date and/or cancellation or limitation of meetings of inter- parliamentary delegations and other bodies; (b) displacement of the part-session, sitting or meeting of a committee from Parliament’s seat to one of its working places or to an external place or from one of its working places to Parliament’s seat, to one of Parliament’s other working places or to an external place; (c) holding of the part-session or the sitting on the premises of Parliament but fully or partially in separate meeting rooms allowing for appropriate physical distancing; (d) holding of the part session, sitting or meeting of bodies of Parliament under the remote participation regime laid down in Rule 237c; (e) in the event that the ad hoc replacement mechanism laid down in Rule 209(7) fails to provide sufficient remedies to the extraordinary circumstances under consideration, temporary replacement by political groups of Members in a committee unless the Member concerned opposes; (f) the definition of presence in the Chamber and its legal consequences such as rules related to the establishment of quorum and threshold. 4. A decision referred to in paragraph 2 shall be limited in time and scope, shall state the reasons on which it is based and might be subject to the procedure laid down in Article 263 of the TFEU. It shall enter into force upon its publication on Parliament’s website or, if circumstances prevent such publication, by the best available means. All Members shall also be informed individually of the decision without delay. The decision may be renewed by the President in accordance with the procedure under paragraph 2 once or more for a limited time. A decision to renew shall state the reasons on which it is based and might be subject to the procedure laid down in Article 263 of the TFEU. The President shall revoke a decision adopted under this Rule as soon as the extraordinary circumstances referred to in paragraph 1 that gave rise to its adoption have disappeared. 5. This Rule shall be applied only as a last resort, and only measures that are strictly necessary to address the extraordinary circumstances under consideration shall be selected and applied. When applying this Rule, due account shall be taken, in particular, of the principle of representative democracy and of the rule of law, the principle of equal treatment of Members, the right of Members to exercise their parliamentary mandate without impairment, providing proportional and balanced political representation, their right to speak in one of the official languages of the European Union and to vote freely, individually and in person. Compliance with Protocol No 6 to the Treaties needs to be ensured, and, if derogation is necessary with regards to the extraordinary circumstances referred to in this Rule, the formal agreement of the Member States shall be required, in accordance with the Treaties.
2020/09/24
Committee: AFCO
Amendment 29 #

2020/2098(REG)


Title XIII a (new) – rule 237 b (new)
Rule 237b Disturbance of the political balance in Parliament 1. The President may, with the agreement of the Conference of Presidents, adopt the necessary measures in order to facilitate participation of Members or a political group concerned if, on the basis of reliable evidence, the President comes to the conclusion that the political balance in Parliament resulting from the election is severely impaired because a significant number of Members or a political group cannot take part in Parliament’s proceedings in accordance with its usual procedures as set out elsewhere in these Rules, for reasons of security or safety or as a result of the non- availability of technical means. The sole aim of such measures shall be to allow the remote participation of Members concerned by the application of selected technical means under Rule 237c(1) or by other appropriate means serving the same purpose. 2. Measures under paragraph 1 may be adopted for the benefit of a significant number of Members if exceptional and unforeseeable circumstances beyond their control occurring in a regional context lead to their non-participation. Measures under paragraph 1 may also be adopted for the benefit of members of a political group if that group has requested them where the non-participation of a group results from exceptional and unforeseeable circumstances beyond the control of that group. 3. Rule 237a(2), second and third subparagraphs, and the rules and principles laid down in Rule 237a(4) and (5) shall apply accordingly.
2020/09/24
Committee: AFCO
Amendment 35 #

2020/2098(REG)


Title XIII a (new) – rule 237 c (new)
Rule 237c Remote participation regime 1. Where the President decides under Rule 237a(2), to apply the remote participation regime by adopting a measure under Rule 237a(3), point (d), Parliament may conduct its proceedings remotely inter alia by permitting all Members to exercise certain of their parliamentary rights by electronic means. Where the President decides in accordance with Rule 237b that selected technical means under the remote participation regime are to be used, this Rule shall apply only to the necessary extent and only to the Members concerned. 2. The remote participation regime shall ensure that : – Members are able to exercise their parliamentary mandate, including, in particular, their right to speak in plenary and in the committees, to vote and to table texts, without impairment; – all votes are cast by Members individually and in person; – the remote voting system enables Members to cast ordinary votes, roll call votes and secret ballots; – a uniform voting system is applied for all Members, whether present or not on Parliament’s premises; – translation and interpretation services are provided to the greatest possible extent; – the information technology solutions made available to Members and their staff are ‘technology neutral’; – participation of Members in parliamentary debates and votes takes place using secure electronic means that are managed and supervised by Parliament’s services. At the same time, this amendment derogates from Rule 178 and explicitly allows the remote voting system to be used to check the quorum; 3. When taking the decision referred to in paragraph 1, the President shall determine whether that regime applies to the exercise of Members’ rights in plenary only, or also to the exercise of Members’ rights in Parliament’s committees and/or other bodies. The President shall also determine in his or her decision how rights and practices which cannot be exercised appropriately without the Members’ physical presence are adapted for the duration of the regime. These rights and practices concern, inter alia: – the manner in which attendance at a sitting or meeting is counted; – the conditions under which a request for a check of the quorum is made, – the tabling of texts; – the presentation of, and the objection to, oral amendments; – the order of votes; – the deadlines and time limits for the setting of the agenda and for procedural motions. 4. For the purposes of the application of the provisions of the Rules relating to quorum and voting in the Chamber, Members who are participating remotely shall be deemed to be physically present in the Chamber. By way of derogation from Rule 171(11), Members who have not spoken in a debate may, three times per sitting, hand in a written statement, which shall be appended to the verbatim report of the debate. The President shall, where necessary, determine the manner in which the Chamber may be used by Members during the application of the remote participation regime, and in particular the maximum number of Members who can be physically present. 5. Where the President decides in accordance with paragraph 3, first subparagraph, to apply the remote participation regime to committees or other bodies, paragraph 4, first subparagraph, shall apply, mutatis mutandis. 6. The Bureau shall adopt measures concerning the operation and security of the electronic means used under this Rule, in accordance with the requirements and standards laid down in paragraph 2 and after consultation with the Quaestors. 7. Parliament’s competent bodies shall take all measures, including financial measures, necessary to ensure the availability of state-of-the-art technology and optimal conditions for the effective implementation of Rules 237a to 237d.
2020/09/24
Committee: AFCO
Amendment 38 #

2020/2098(REG)


Title XIII a (new) – rule 237 d (new)
Rule 237d Holding of the plenary session in separate meeting rooms Where the President decides in accordance with Rule 237a(3), point (c), to allow a plenary session of Parliament to be held in whole or in part in more than one meeting room, including, where appropriate, the hemicycle, the following rules shall apply: – the meeting rooms used in this context shall be considered to collectively constitute the Chamber; – the President may, if necessary, determine the manner in which the respective meeting rooms can be used, in order to ensure that physical distancing requirements are respected.
2020/09/24
Committee: AFCO
Amendment 40 #

2020/2098(REG)


Title XIII a (new) – rule 237 e (new)
Rule 237e Parliamentary business during a period of extraordinary circumstances 1. Without delay after the adoption of a decision by the President under Rule 237a(2), the Conference of Presidents shall identify those activities which are essential and urgent for Parliament during the period of extraordinary circumstances referred to in Rule 237a(1), taking into account the opinion of the Conference of Committee Chairs. Those activities shall include measures that need to be taken with regard to the extraordinary circumstances, to budgetary matters, to urgent legislative procedures, or to major political events. 2. During the period of validity of a decision adopted under Rule 237a(2), the parliamentary business conducted in part- sessions and committee meetings shall be limited to the consideration and adoption of measures identified as essential and urgent by the Conference of Presidents taking into account the opinion of the Conference of Committee Chairs in accordance with paragraph 1. 3. Within two months after the adoption or modification of the rules regarding extraordinary circumstances under Title XIIIa, the President of the European Parliament shall initiate the procedure of Article 263 TFEU to review the legality of the modification of the Rules of Procedure and ensure that the modification is in line with the principle of the rule of law and democracy.
2020/09/24
Committee: AFCO
Amendment 42 #

2020/2098(REG)


Title XIII a (new) – rule 237 f (new)
Rule 237f Members with disabilities The European Parliament, to the best of its capabilities, shall ensure reasonable accommodation for Members with disabilities and their staff in the course of operating under extraordinary circumstances described in this Title.
2020/09/24
Committee: AFCO
Amendment 19 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A a (new)
A a. whereas, in the absence of relevant provisions in the Financial Regulation at the moment of the decision to create four EUTFs, the European Parliament was not consulted on the establishment of an extra-budgetary instruments;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 20 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A b (new)
A b. whereas given that the European Development Fund (EDF) contributed to the Africa and Bekou EUTFs, the Parliament was not involved at all in setting-up of these two EUTFs; whereas the European Parliament’s possible involvement was limited to an objection to the draft implementing decisions on constitutive agreements on the Madad and Colombia EUTFs;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 27 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C a (new)
C a. whereas the Constitutive Agreement on EU Trust Funds clearly put border management projects in Libya within the scope of the mandate of the EUTF as well as the regulation of the European Neighbourhood Instrument (ENI). The Constitutive Agreement of the EUTF clearly states that the Trust Fund will finance activities that contribute to improving migration management in all its aspects in line with the Global Approach on Migration and Mobility, including containing and preventing irregular migration and fight against trafficking of human beings;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 30 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C b (new)
C b. whereas, the Member States’ contributions to the FRT are not voluntary but based on the GNI contribution key and included in relevant Commission’s decisions; whereas these contributions are directly included in the Union budget as external assigned revenue pursuant to Art.21(2)(b) of the Financial Regulation; whereas in the case of the EUTFs, Member States’ contributions are not integrated into the Union’s budget pursuant to Art. 187(6) of the Financial Regulation;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 32 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D
D. whereas the establishment of both the EUTFs and the Facility for refugees in Turkey (FRT) have been justified by the need for a flexible and swift reaction not possible under the classical institutional framework; whereas the extra-budgetary instruments such as the EUTFs, as well as extraordinary tools such as the FRT, pose challenges with respect to democratic accountability, including the role of the European Parliament and also the integrity of the EU budget; whereas, when setting- up a Union Trust Fund, the European Commission has to justify its value added, visibility, complementarity with other EU financing instrument and alignment with policy objectives;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 48 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E a (new)
E a. whereas European Court of Auditors recommended to the Commission in its special reports on the EUTFs to improve donor coordination (BEKOU), remove weaknesses in implementation, increase efficiency and focused actions (EUTF for Africa) and deliver better value for money(FRT);
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 57 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Recalls that while for the first tranche of the FRT, IPAII contributions represented 52,4%, Humanitarian Aid 46,6%, Instrument contributing to Security and Peace 0,7% and the Development Cooperation Instrument 0,3%, for the second tranche, IPA II contribution represents 64,5%and Humanitarian Aid 35,5%;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 59 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2 b (new)
2 b. Notes that (by the end of 2020), 36,6% of the FRT first tranche allocation has been implemented through direct management and 63,4% through indirect management (of which over four fifths by international organisations); further notes that for the second tranche, direct management represented 32,1% (100% by the European Commission) and indirect management 67,9% (with three fourths by international organisations);
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 60 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2 c (new)
2 c. Further notes that international organisations have been the biggest implementing actors of the EUTFs (36,8%), ahead of the European Commission (35,7%), Member States Agencies (24,2%) and Public Service bodies (3,4%);
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 72 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. Strongly urges that invitations to board meetings take into account the official calendar of the European Parliament and that all relevant information and documents to be discussed at the board meetings be provided well ahead of the meetings in order to enable the active participation of Members and staff of the Secretariat;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 75 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. Welcomes the Commission’s efforts to closely monitor and evaluate interventions, and to generate knowledge about the activities of the EUTFs and of the FRT, through a dedicated set of reports; hails these efforts to achieve greater transparency by publishing relevant data on the web pages of the EUTFs and the FRT; notes that information on the involvement of civil society organisations (CSOs) were made available in the Annual Report of 2019 and 2020 of the EUTF for Africa; regrets, nevertheless, that information on the involvement of local civil society organisations are limited due to the low transparency of subcontracting levels; where possible, such information should be broken down at project level and shall always take into account the protection of confidential and commercially sensitive information;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 89 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7 a. Further refers to the conclusions of the European Parliament Committee on Development's delegation to the Central African Republic in February 2018, which note that the Bȇkou Trust Fund is visible and seems well perceived in the country, with projects adequately addressing needs transiting between rehabilitation, livelihood provision and longer-term development, at least at local and on smaller scales;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 102 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Considers that the Madad EUTF has proven its added value in response to the crisis and for the EU in terms of higher external visibility and clout, increased control, coordination and leverage of funds from various sources, as compared to national level or other international channels; notes that its spending was aligned with the legal bases or the Union instruments used; Regrets the conflict in Syria continues, and needs of the Syrian refugees, unable to return to Syria to their home country in the foreseeable future, and needs of their host communities’ in terms of longer-term integration and employment, still require EU and international long-term assistance and secure their capacity of longer-term integration and employment in a cohesive way with the host communities, points out that the conflict-prone areas in Syria do not permit long term reconstruction to take place;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 103 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10 a (new)
10 a. Notes that the Mid-Term Strategic Evaluation report from October 2018 concluded that the Madad Trust Fund has been “large and cost-effective, reaching a large number of beneficiaries at acomparatively low cost”, that it has “allowed the EU to operate flexibly;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 137 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Welcomes the generally strong degree of local ownership, the involvement of local authorities and civil society organisations (CSOs) in projects supported by the EUTF for Africa; hails the extensive consultations, with base line studies carried out to identify priority needs;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 138 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15 a (new)
15 a. Notes that one of the key objectives of the EUTF for Africa - as determined in its Constitutive Agreement - is addressing the root causes of migration, in particular by promoting resilience, economic and equal opportunities, security and development and addressing human rights abuses;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 147 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16 a (new)
16 a. Acknowledges that border security is essential for the stability of African partner countries and the EU must support partnercountries to improve border security, to tackle illegal migration flows, smuggling and human trafficking;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 161 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 9 a (new)
Points out that Turkey hosts the largest refugee population in the world, with more than 3 million registered refugees from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 180 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 a (new)
21 a. Stresses the importance of transition from humanitarian relief to development cooperation and calls on the Commission to develop and implement a transition strategy, with the final objective of handing over both humanitarian and non-humanitarian activities to the national authorities;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 231 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24 a (new)
24 a. Highlights Commission’s assurances that the 2020 extensions of the Bekou, Madad, Africa and Colombia Trust Funds sought to ensure a continued legal basis for payments of commitments made under the previous MFF 2014- 2020, and that no new commitments to the EUTFs be made under NDICI or IPA III;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 258 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 27
27. Is confident that the NDICI-Global Europe will allow for increased flexibility and responsiveness, allowing it to continue the activities of the existing Trust Funds and thereby safeguard the unity of the Union budget; believes that the allocation of funding to the tasks taken over by NDICI-Global Europe from the Trust Funds needs to be done efficiently;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 265 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 28
28. In the event of greater needs in the MFF 2021-2027, advocates increasing the NDICI-Global Europe envelope through a revision of the MFF and the NDICI-Global Europe regulations, or a strengthening of the relevant NDICI-Global Europe budget lines with contributions in the form of external assigned revenue; stresses that, should nevertheless a need for a duly justified new Trust Fund nevertheless arise, itarise, following an outbreak of a major crisis, a sudden change in international relations requiring a major EU financial response, or the need to pool resources with third countries which would not be feasible under the co-legislated instruments, insists that Parliament must be fully involved from the very outset;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 288 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 32 a (new)
32 a. Emphasise that local churches and faith-based organisations play an active role in development cooperation and in delivering humanitarian assistance to the people most in need and calls the Commission to engage with them, notably in the case of delivering direct support to hard-to-reach communities in developing countries;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 289 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 32 b (new)
32 b. Calls on the Commission to examine the possibilities to involve third country partners in joint initiatives and financing of addressing of common challenges such as migration, forced displacement, climate change, empowerment of women and protection of vulnerable groups;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 290 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 32 c (new)
32 c. Calls on the Commission to prioritise investments in education and job creation to provide possibilities to people in partnercountries to engage in local income generating activities;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 291 #

2020/2045(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 32 d (new)
32 d. Expects the Commission to address ongoing or future crises and potential reconstruction needs with a more efficient and targeted manner through utilising the existing ways and other means possible under the current Financial Regulation in close and coordinated cooperation with Member States and other EU institutions as ‘Team Europe’, and with like-minded international partners and donors;
2021/05/05
Committee: AFETDEVEBUDG
Amendment 2 #

2020/2042(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 2
— having regard to the European Consensus on Development and the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular Goals 1, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 13,
2020/10/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 51 #

2020/2042(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F
F. whereas poverty and inequality should be understood in a wide sense that includes deprivation of access to vital resources of all kinds, and access to education, as well as discrimination, which reduces possible life choices and adaptation capabilities; whereas women, children, elderly people, persons with disabilities and, indigenous peoples and religious communities are often subject to discrimination;
2020/10/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 70 #

2020/2042(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G
G. whereas women suffer disproportionately from the impacts of climate change, owing not least to the agricultural tasks they carry out but also to the discrimination they suffer in terms of access to land and services, participation in decision-making and respect when embarking on activities traditionally dominated by men; whereas women are also strongly over-representedface specific difficulties among people displaced for reasons related to climate change;
2020/10/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 81 #

2020/2042(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital H
H. whereas the COVID-19 pandemic drastically increases vulnerabilities in developing countries both through its direct impact on public health and through its many deepening economic effectsby aggravating already existing economic vulnerabilities ; whereas both the pandemic and climate change are eroding public finances while at the same time increasing financing needs, including for social protection and services;
2020/10/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 86 #

2020/2042(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I
I. whereas the governments of developing countries must lead efforts to reduce vulnerabilities, increase resilience and strengthen support capacities, but countries being primary responsible for the increase of global greenhouse gas emissions, and the EU, its Member States and other developed and emerging countries must radically scale up their actions in line with their commitments, given that the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere that are causing climate change were emitted almost exclusively by them, their emissions remain totally dominant, they possess badly needed resources for effective climate action, and they have made important commitments in this respect; whereas, for all these reasons, the EU, its Member States and other developed and emerging countries have a moral obligation to do much more;
2020/10/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 93 #

2020/2042(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital J
J. whereas developing countries’ poor budgetary discipline and payments on their debts drainlimit their capacities to deal with the climate and other crises and to support their most vulnerable populations; whereasincrease the resilience of vulnerable populations against climate shocks; whereas consideration of international efforts to prevent debt distress and enable orderly debt workout must therefore be intensified;
2020/10/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 96 #

2020/2042(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital K a (new)
Ka. whereas knowledge and technology transfer should facilitate the transition of developing countries to a green economy, by considering the economic and social impacts of the change, and by preserving competitiveness of developing economies on the global stage;
2020/10/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 103 #

2020/2042(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital L
L. whereas adaptation action should mainly focus on the most vulnerable and should include increasing the resilience of their dwellings, and the infrastructure they depend on, to extreme weather events, improving their food and water security, helping subsistence farmers to adaptsupporting farmers in the adaptation of their agricultural methods to changes in rainfall and temperature patterns, and helping poor people in increasingly uninhabitable areas toproviding assistance for people in need to establish decent life condition and to have decent work to contribute to their local re- settlement;
2020/10/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 104 #

2020/2042(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital L a (new)
La. whereas due to the impact of climate change on agriculture the EU must promote sustainable and productive dryland agro-ecosystems through forming model farms, implementing landscape approaches, supporting both exchanges of farmers’ experiences, and farmers’ field schools, and providing training in the framework of EU development cooperation notably in the Sahel region and in other desertification affected areas;
2020/10/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 146 #

2020/2042(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Notes that populations of Small Island Developing States are particularly exposed to impacts of climate change and that their challenges therefore require a special assessment, and increased building of resilience against climate- related shocks;
2020/10/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 162 #

2020/2042(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2 – indent 2
- the reduction of general vulnerability through poverty and inequality reduction, as well as addressing specific vulnerabilities to impacts of climate change resulting, for example, from the locations of dwellings and the bases of livelihoods,knowledge transfer regarding resilience building, early- warning, disaster prevention and management, rural and urban planning;
2020/10/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 177 #

2020/2042(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2 – indent 4
- affirming and seeking widespread, binding recognition that migrationrecognising that climate change can be one of the root causes of migration and that it is becoming ever more necessary as part of the responsto increase local resilience to the impacts of climate change, and proposing international arrangements for managing climate migration,;
2020/10/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 235 #

2020/2042(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6a. Calls for the addressing of structural economic vulnerabilities of developing countries exacerbating the vulnerabilities to climate change, with inclusion of local small and medium size enterprises;
2020/10/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 241 #

2020/2042(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. Calls for climate-related EU gender funding to be scaled up and for urgent gender-based climate action focused on womenaction focused on vulnerable groups such as children, women, elderly and disabled people to be established in the design and implementation of preparedness, mitigation and adaptation programmes;
2020/10/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 246 #

2020/2042(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Expresses its support to young people and recognises their valuable contribution in raising global awareness of climate change and the need to empower younger generations; underlines the importance of intercultural dialogue with migrants and refugepeople from developing countries in order to raise awareness of climate change and also to combat all racist and discriminatory practices against migrantethnic and religious minorities and against vulnerable groups, including women and girls in conflict zones, elderly and disabled people, and other marginalised groups;
2020/10/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 254 #

2020/2042(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Calls for a common and coordinated international response led by the EU aimed at making progress in the implementation of recognition, protection and support measures for people who are compelled to move within and between countries in the context of disasters and the adverse effects of climate change; encourages the Union to analyse and adopt new approaches, considering examples of regulation at regional level such as the Kampala Convention, and to promote the incorporation of, inter alia, the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement into the domestic laws of EU Member States and of third states through bilateral and regional agreementsaddressing of root causes of forced displacement, including climate change, and securing of right of people to stay in their homeland by assisting them in creating decent living and work conditions as well as providing them with essential social services such as education and healthcare;
2020/10/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 264 #

2020/2042(INI)

9a. Calls on the Commission to establish effective and sustainable return and readmission policies in the EU’s multilateral agreements, notably in the new ACP-EU partnership agreement;
2020/10/15
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 8 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 16 a (new)
- having regard to the study “Effective Development Cooperation - Does the EU deliver?: Detailed Analysis of EU Performance”, requested by the European Commission and published in May 20201a; _________________ 1ahttps://ec.europa.eu/international- partnerships/system/files/eu-development- effectiveness-monitoring-report- 2020_en.pdf
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 26 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A
A. whereas the global environment is becoming more complex and uncertain, with a rise in conflict notably religious intolerance and attacks on minorities and geopolitical rivalry and more frequent and severe natural disasters, notably in developing countries, which affect the most vulnerable; whereas this highlights the need for strengthened multilateralism and continuous efforts to increase the effectiveness and impact of European aid;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 43 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C
C. whereas the EU together with its Member States, as the world’s biggest donor of official development assistance (ODA), amounting to EUR 74.4 billion in 2018 and representing almost 57 % of all ODA worldwide, is committed to promoting effective development cooperation geared towards ending all forms of poverty and inequality, and to supporting its development partners in realising the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 47 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D a (new)
D a. whereas the study “Effective Development Cooperation - Does the EU deliver?: Detailed Analysis of EU Performance” points to a decreased alignment of EU Member States and EU institutions to the effectiveness principles and related indicators, in particular predictability, use of indicators drawn from partner country owned results frameworks, using partner country public financial management systems and commitment to involve partner governments in project evaluations, and transparent reporting;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 57 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E
E. whereas although the EU institutions and Member States, local and regional authorities as well as international organisations and civil society organisations have a large stock of data and expertise in the field of development, it remains insufficiently shared; whereas it should be made more accessible and should be used in policy- making;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 74 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G a (new)
G a. whereas aid policies that foster equality are proven to be more effective in achieving SDG's goal, notably fighting poverty and promoting education;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 99 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Underlines that the principles of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation (GPEDC) are built on important and enduring lessons from past development strategies and practices, including both successes and failures, and that these principles remain important expressions of multilateral cooperation and coordination which the EU is committed to upholding; ; calls on the Commission to use its membership in the GPEDC and the OECD-DAC and its voice in international fora and in the governance structures of the IFIs to further strengthen the effectiveness principles and encourage adherence to them and implementation of them in all forms of development cooperation and by all actors involved in development cooperation;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 101 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Recognises that effective development cooperation cannot be delivered through EU cooperation alone and can only be truly effective if all development actors collaborate; expresses concern that, when other actors do not respect and implement the effectiveness principles in their cooperation programmes, the resulting fragmentation and bypassing of partner country systems reduces the effectiveness and impact of assistance overall as a collateral, including EU assistance;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 103 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Calls on the Commission to publish, at least biannually, a report on the progress of the EU institutions and Member States on improving(including their development agencies and local and regional authorities active in development cooperation) are advancing on aid effectiveness in the planning and implementation of European development cooperation and assistance measured against a seaid in relation to the achievement of commonly agreed targets and policy objectives, notably the SDGs, and including progress towards the alignment of policy objectives and the harmonisation of procedures, in particular with regard to joint programming, joint implementation and joint results frameworks; calls on the Commission to present this progress report to the European Parliament;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 119 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Stresses that in view of the future implementation of the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI), joint programming by the EU, its Members States and EU development financing partners should build upon the aid effectiveness principles; believes that the EU should collectively set strategic priorities and identify investment needs/gaps in the pre-programming phase and subsequently look at ways to optimise the range of modalities in the EU institutions’ toolbox, including grants, budget support grants and EIB loans, as well as financing from the Member States; calls on the EU institutions and Member States, accordingly, to share evidence and experience about the kinds of development interventions that tend to be successful and those that have failed, proved difficult to implement or not produced the intended impactCommission to ensure that the programming and implementation of these modalities is co-ordinated, strategically aligned with partner countries priorities and processes and focussed on delivering outcomes and impacts that are transformational for achieving the SDGs in the specific context of each partner country;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 125 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6 a. Calls on EU institutions and Member States and other public and non- governmental actors active in development cooperation to share evidence and experience about what kind of development interventions tend to be successful and which ones have failed, proved difficult to implement or did not produce the intended impact;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 134 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Believes that the use of results- based approaches is critical for the EU’s partner countries and is a fundamental element of their capacity to deliver the SDGs for their citizens; calls on the EU and its Member States to support and use partner countries’ own national results- measuring frameworks and their monitoring and statistical systems, and to involve all relevant actors: local authorities; national parliaments; civil society, including NGOs, diasporas, churches, religious associations and communities, faith-based organisations, social movements and trade unions, indigenous peoples and foundations, and the representation of vulnerable, disabled, discriminated and marginalised people; and the private sector;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 142 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Calls for the EU and its Member States to enhance their commitment to transparent data flows through continuous investment in data visualisation, statistical reporting and the publication of open data, the application of international standards such as IATI (the International Aid Transparency Initiative Standard), and by regularly updating and developing the EU Aid Explorer;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 145 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 a (new)
9 a. Calls upon the EU and its Member States to enhance alignment of their assistance to the effectiveness principles and related indicators, in particular predictability, use of indicators drawn from partner country owned results frameworks, using partner country public financial management systems and commitment to involve partner governments in project evaluations, and transparent reporting;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 146 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 b (new)
9 b. Calls upon Member states to streamline, to a greater extent, their assistance with common European aid objectives in order to improve the effectiveness of EU development policy as a whole;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 150 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Supports a catalytic approach, building on decentralised and bottom-up needs assessments and programming, in strong collaboration with local communities and organisations, which is informed by a thorough analysis of the situation in each partner country; encourages South-South and triangular cooperation;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 154 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Supports the need for a catalytic approach, building on decentralised and bottom-up needs assessments and programming, which is informed by a thorough analysis of the situation in each partner country; encourages South-South and triangular cooperation; including at sub-national levels;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 167 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 a (new)
11 a. Calls upon the Commission and the Member States for development aid policies to align with objective of gender equality so that women’s empowerment is actually achieved thus improving aid efficiency;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 191 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 a (new)
13 a. Calls on the Commission to establish a network of and engage with reliable non-governmental partners, as local civil organisation, churches, faith- based organisations and specialised Member State agencies for the implementation of smaller scale projects;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 195 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 b (new)
13 b. Calls on the Commission to put more emphasis on local ownership and application of humanitarian-development nexus approach in protracted crises in order to secure effective addressing of needs at local level;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 201 #

2019/2184(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14
14. Reiterates its request that the Council and the Member States set out a clear timeline for reaching the target of raising the ODA budget to 0.7 % of GNI considering the internal and the external economic situation, and that the Commission present a concrete action plan defining how additional resources will be leveraged towards achieving the SDGs;
2020/09/25
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 2 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 3a (new)
– having regard to the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights which forbids making the human body and its parts as such a source of financial gain,
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 16 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 11
– having regard to the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence (hereinafter ‘the Istanbul Convention’) of 11 May 2011, but also bearing in mind that not all Member States ratified the text,
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 18 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 11 a (new)
– having regard to the Council of Europe Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities and the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages,
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 19 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 11 b (new)
– having regard to the Council of Europe Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine, known as the Oviedo Convention and entered into force on 1 December 1999, which prohibits the use of human body for financial gain,
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 23 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 13 a (new)
– having regard to the UN Declaration on the Rights of Persons Belonging to National or Ethnic, Religious and Linguistic Minorities and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples,
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 32 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 14 a (new)
– having regard to the UN General Assembly's decision of 28 May 2019, designating 22 August as UN International Day Commemorating the Victims of Acts of Violence Based on Religion or Belief,
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 36 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 15
– having regard to the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration adopted by the majority of the UN General Assembly on 10 and 11 December 2018, but also bearing in mind that not all Member States accepted the text in the General Assembly,
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 39 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 16
– having regard to the Global Compact on Refugees, affirmed by the majority of the UN General Assembly on 17 December 2018, but also bearing in mind that not all Member States accepted the text in the General Assembly,
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 43 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 22 a (new)
– having regard to the EU Annual Report on Human Rights and Democracy in the World 2015, condemning all forms of gestational surrogacy,
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 102 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Maintains that all states that adhere to internationally recognized fundamental freedoms as cornerstones of democracy must be at the forefront of spreading good governance practices based on human rights and the rule of law around the world, and of strengthening legal international instruments for protecting human rights; underlines the challenges posed by the use of harmful influences that undermine democratic governance and the values intrinsic to human rights, and thus thwart the positive endeavours of democratic states;
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 135 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Stresses the importance of advancing gender equality and women’s rights worldwide; emphasises that, in spite of progress, women and girls continue to suffer discrimination and violence, violence and reproductive exploitation; stresses that many societies still struggle to provide women and girls with equal rights under the law and equal access to education, healthcare, decent work and political and economic representation;
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 157 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Draws attention to instances of persecution and discrimination based on ethnicity, nationality, class, caste, religion, belief, language, sexual orientationgender and age, which remain rife in many countries and societies; is seriously concerned at the increasingly intolerant and hate-filled responses targeting people who are the victims of these human rights violations;
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 171 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Stresses that freedom of speech and expression, as well as media pluralism, are at the heart of resilient democratic societies; recalls that media should reflect the plurality, diversity and non- discrimination; the State regulation of broadcast media should not restrict minority rights of persons belonging to national minorities who should have access to broadcast in their own language; condemns media propaganda and misinformation against ethnic and national minorities; urges that the best possible safeguards against disinformation campaigns and hostile propaganda be put in place by developing a legal framework both at EU and international level for tackling hybrid threats, including cyber and information warfare;
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 219 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Strongly supports the work and efforts of the EU Special Representative for Human Rights (EUSR) in protecting and promoting human rights in the world; underlines the important objective within the mandate of the EUSR to enhance the Union’s effectiveness in this area; calls for the renewal and reinforcement of the mandate and position of the Special Envoy on the promotion of FoRB outside the EU;
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 233 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16 a (new)
16a. Commits itself to promote greater transparency of democratic processes, particularly of the financing of political and issue-based campaigning by different non-state actors2a; __________________ 2aCouncils Conclusions on Democracy adopted by the Council at its 3720th meeting held on 14 October 2019
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 236 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Stresses the link between the increase in human rights violations and widespread impunity and the lack of accountability in regions and countries devastated by conflicts or marked by politically motivated intimidation, discrimination, harassment and assault, abduction, violent policing, arbitrary arrests and cases of torture, in particular, against members of ethnic, racial, religious, political, or cultural minorities;
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 261 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19
19. Welcomes the initialTakes note of the initial exploratory discussions within the Council regarding the establishment of an possible global EU human rights sanctions mechanism, the so-called ‘Magnitsky List’, allowing for targeted sanctions against individuals complicit in serious human rights violations, while noting that no political decision has been made on this issue;
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 304 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21
21. Strongly supports the EU’s strategic engagement for gender equality and its ongoing efforts to improve the human rights situation of women and girls, in line with the 2030 SDGs; calls on the Commission and the EEAS to further contribute to gender equality and girls’ and women’s empowerment by working closely with international organisations and non-EU countries, in order to develop and implement new legal frameworks regarding gender equality, and to eradicate harmful practices targeted at women and girls, such as child marriage and female genital mutilation, as well as forced religious conversion that usually entails abduction, rape and stigmatization;
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 334 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 22
22. Calls for new EU initiatives to prevent and combat child abuse in the world, to rehabilitate conflict-affected children and to provide them with a sheltered environment in which care and education are fundamental; calls for the EU to initiate an international movement to advocate the rights of the child, and reinforcing the family as the natural context of children’s lives, inter alia by organising an international conference on the protection of children in fragile environments;
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 361 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23
23. Welcomes the ratifications of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; reiterates the importance of efficient implementation by both the EU Member States and the EU institutions; stresses, in particular, the importance of non- discrimination and the need to credibly mainstream the principle of universal accessibility and to ensure all the rights of persons with disabilities throughout all relevant EU policies;
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 366 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23 a (new)
Ethnic and linguistic minorities1a Emphasises that national minority communities have specific needs, therefore full and effective equality between persons belonging to a national minority and those belonging to the majority should be promoted in all areas of economic, social, political and cultural life; urges the EU to follow closely the implementation of provisions protecting human rights and of the rights of persons belonging to minorities throughout the enlargement process; stresses the need for more serious attention to the various Council of Europe and UN monitoring mechanisms and for closer cooperation with their different treaty bodies to better channel their findings and use their expertise in the field; recommends to establish the office of an Ombudsman or a Special Rapporteur for Minority Rights whose mandate would include protection of minority rights through country visits and the possibility to interact with minorities’ representatives with a view to raising awareness of challenges and making recommendations for EU Member States as well; stresses that persons belonging to ethnic or national minorities must be not subject to any form of discrimination in the exercise of their rights: culture, traditions, history, mother tongue of the ethnic and linguistic minorities should be respected; people belonging to ethnic and linguistic minorities should be guaranteed the possibility to choose education in their mother tongue or to learn it at different levels of education; in order to encourage and facilitate the effective participation of minorities in public life, the use of their mother tongue in educational system, municipalities, electoral, consultative and other public participation processes should be provided where practicable; condemns all forms of discrimination on whatever grounds, hate crime, incitement to hatred, hate speech and all types of social exclusion against ethnic and national minorities, and calls on the European Union to explicitly condemn and sanction atrocities against people belonging to ethnic and national minorities; __________________ 1aEthnic and linguistic minorities would be a new category between the New technologies and human rights and the Migrants and refugees.
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 379 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24
24. Urges the Commission, the EEAS and the Member States to step up advocacy in relation to FoRB, and to launchto fully implement the EU Guidelines on Freedom of Religion or Belief, and to promote interreligious dialogue with states and representatives of civil society and, churches, religious communities and associations and other faith groups in order to prevent acts of violence, persecution, intolerance and discrimination against persons on the grounds of thought, conscience, religion or belief; calls for the EU to continue to forge alliances and to enhance cooperation with a broad range of countries and regional organisations, in order to deliver positive changenarratives in relation to FoRB; reminds the Council and Commission of the need to adequately support the institutional mandate, capacity and duties of the Special Envoy for the promotion of FoRB outside the EU; calls the Commission, the EEAS and the Member States to promote and protect the fundamental right to conscientious objection, as an expression of Freedom of Religion or Belief;
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 397 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24 a (new)
24a. Notes with concern that Christians represent the largest persecuted religious minority in the world; calls on the Commission to aid persecuted Christian communities in need around the world;
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 418 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 25
25. Reaffirms that the activities of all companies, whether operating domestically or across borders, must be in full compliance with international human rights standards; stresses the need to establish an instrument to regulate, in international human rights law, the activities of transnational corporations and other companies; reminds all countries to implement the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs), and calls on those EU Member States that have not yet adopted National Action Plans on Business Rights to do so as early as possible; calls on the private sector, in particular financial, insurance and transport companies, to provide their services to humanitarian actors carrying out relief activities, including territories under EU sanctions, in full compliance with the humanitarian exemptions and exemptions foreseen in EU legislation;
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 459 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 28
28. Stresses the urgent need to tackle the root causes of migration flows such as wars, conflicts, persecution, networks of illegal migration, trafficking, smuggling and climate change; calls for the external dimension of the refugee crisis to be addressed, including by finding sustainable solutions to conflicts through building cooperation and partnerships with the third countries concerned; insists that the implementation of the Global Compacts on migration and refugees must this context, recognises the refore go hand in hand withlevance of the implementation of the UN’s 2030 Agenda as set out in the Strategic Development Goals, as well asgoing hand in hand with increased investment in developing countries;
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 474 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 29
29. Stresses that the EU should continue to actively support democratic and effective human rights institutions and civil society in their efforts to promote democratisation in a context-sensitive manner, while takes into account the cultural and national background of the third countries concerned in order to strengthen dialogue and partnership; positively notes, in this context, the European Endowment for Democracy’s consistent engagement in the eastern and southern neighbourhoods of the EU to promote democracy and respect for fundamental rights and freedoms; recalls that the experience gained and the lessons learned from transitions to democracy in the framework of the enlargement and neighbourhood policies could make a positive contribution to the identification of best practices that could be used to support and consolidate other democratisation processes worldwide;
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 485 #

2019/2125(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30
30. Reiterates its positive view of the EU’s continued support for electoral processes and its provision of electoral assistance and support to domestic observers; welcomes and fully supports, in this context, the work of the European Parliament’s Democracy Support and Election Coordination Group; recalls the importance of proper follow-up to the reports and recommendations of the election observation missions as a way of enhancing their impact and strengthening the EU’s support for democratic standards in the countries concerned; urges to follow-up the cases of atrocities against ethnic and national minorities representatives during the electoral process, encourage governments to guarantee quota places for minority representation, thereby ensuring democratic elections in the countries;
2019/10/28
Committee: AFET
Amendment 9 #

2019/0226M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 – indent 3
– fostering local economic development and strengthening coastal communities dependent on marine resources and extremely affected by climate change;
2020/02/27
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 12 #

2019/0226M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 – subparagraph 1 (new)
Notes that fishery activities are important job generating activities for coastal communities and contribute to the reduction of the unemployment and facilitate access to decent work.
2020/02/27
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 14 #

2019/0226M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 – subparagraph 1 (new)
Notes that landlocked countries like Mali, importing more than 40% of its fishery import from Senegal, are depending on the fishery export of Senegal and the Senegalese export contributes to the nutrition of the land-locked countries.
2020/02/27
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 17 #

2019/0226M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 – subparagraph 1 (new)
Notes that more than one fifth of the Senegalese export goes to the landlocked countries notably to Mali, Burkina Faso and Niger and it contributes to the economic integration of the African continent.
2020/02/27
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 4 #

2019/0099(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
The Committee on Development calls on the Committee on International Trade, as the committee responsible, to propose rejection of the Council drafrecommend approval of the draft Council decision on the accession of Solomon Islands to the Interim Partnership Agreement between the European Community, of the one part, and the Pacific States, of the other part.
2020/04/01
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 6 #

2019/0090M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3a. Calls for fostering local economic development and strengthening coastal communities dependent on marine resources;
2019/11/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 12 #

2019/0090M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6a. Insist that this agreement should be adapted to Guinea-Bissau's needs and priorities;
2019/11/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 13 #

2019/0090M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Recommends measures to ensure that sectoral support complements and conforms to other programmes financed by different donoother international partners in Guinea- Bissau in order to avoid duplication of funding.
2019/11/18
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 5 #

2019/0078M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 – indent 1
- promoting the transition to a sustainable blue economy in line with SDG 14, by supporting small-scale local fisheries, the modernisation of port infrastructure and the position of women, who play an important part in marketing and processing;
2019/11/19
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 13 #

2019/0078M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 – indent 2 a (new)
- fostering local economic development and strengthening coastal communities dependent on marine resources;
2019/11/19
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 15 #

2019/0078M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 – indent 4
- stepping up monitoring, control and surveillance of fisheries, thus preventing illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing; , notably by improving governance, capacity building and training on this matter;
2019/11/19
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 19 #

2019/0078M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. Insists that this agreement should be adapted to Cape Verde’s needs and priorities, notably those outlined in the Cape Verde’s Blue Economy Plan;
2019/11/19
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 22 #

2019/0078M(NLE)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Recommends that this agreement be brought into line with other programmes, financed by other donors such as the Worldinternational partners such as the FAO, the World Bank or the African Development Bank.
2019/11/19
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 1 #

2018/2656(RSP)


Citation 1 a (new)
– having regard to the Interim Report of the Special Rapporteur on freedom of religion or belief, Heiner Bielefeldt, addressed to the UN General Assembly and focused on means to eliminate religious intolerance and discrimination in the workplace1a, _________________ 1a http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/ Religion/A.69.261.pdf.
2018/06/06
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 42 #

2018/2656(RSP)


Recital A a (new)
Aa. whereas respecting the human right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion implies that the ethos of corporations run by Faith Based Organisations(FBOs) should be respected and protected, not imposing requirements upon them that contradict or undermine their core values and ethical principles; but it also implies the entitlement by FBOs to require their workers and service providers to respect and not undermine their core values and ethical principles and don’t harm them in their labour or professional activities;
2018/06/06
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 111 #

2018/2656(RSP)


Paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Is of the opinion that transnational corporations should refrain from financing or engaging in activities, commercial or non-commercial, that might fuel radicalism or extremism, in particular when it entails the manipulation of a religious creed; and from any direct or indirect support to any group promoting, advocating or justifying violence;
2018/06/06
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 53 #

2018/2084(INI)

4. Is concerned, in the above context, that bilateral and plurilateral trade agreements could lead to the fragmentation of international trade policy and thus undermine the role of the WTO; calls, therefore, for the EU and its Member States to make additional effortscalls, therefore, for the democratic operation of the WTO to be restored and for it to conce again place the WTO at the centre oftinue operating effectively in global trade governance;
2018/09/03
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 55 #

2018/2084(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Expresses its utmost concern that the US is blocking the appointment of several vacant posts on the Appellate Body of the WTO;deleted
2018/09/03
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 4 #

2018/2083(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B a (new)
Ba. whereas an estimated 1.1 billion people worldwide cannot officially prove their identity including birth registration, according to the 2017 update of Identification for Development Global Dataset /ID4D, World Bank/, out of which 78% live in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia, whereas this is a major barrier to achieve target 16,9 of the SDGs but also entails an important barrier for being an actor and benefit in the digital environment;
2018/09/03
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 14 #

2018/2083(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital H
H. whereas digital literacy and skills are key enablers for tackling inequalitiessocial and personal improvement and progress, promoting entrepreneurship and building strong digital economies;
2018/09/03
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 15 #

2018/2083(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I
I. whereas digitalisation should also help improve the delivery of humanitarian relief and resilience, disaster risk prevention and transitional support, linking humanitarian aid and development aid in fragile and conflict-affected contexts;
2018/09/03
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 30 #

2018/2083(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Reiterates the huge potential of digital technology and services in the achievement of the SDGs, and recalls that any digital strategy must be fully in line with and contribute to the realisation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, notably SDG 4 on quality education, SDG 5 on achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls, SDG 8 on decent work and economic growth, and SDG 9 on industry, innovation and infrastructure; recalls that if the SDGs are to be achieved by 2030, a strengthened global, national, regional and local partnership is needed between governmental, scientific, economic, religious and civil society actors;
2018/09/03
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 71 #

2018/2083(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Deplores the persistent digital divides across gender, geography, age, and income within each country; insists, therefore, that international development cooperation should use digital technologies for greater promotion and inclusion of persons disadvantaged groupor vulnerable situations;
2018/09/03
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 75 #

2018/2083(INI)

10. Calls for increased efforts to address the challenges of digital exclusion through education and training on essential digital skills and initiatives to facilitate the use of ICTappropriate use of ICTs in accordance with their age, personal situation and background, including elderly people and persons with disabilities;
2018/09/03
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 85 #

2018/2083(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Highlights the crucial need for deployment of and access to infrastructure, especially in rural and remote areas, that is adequate in coverage, quality, affordability, reliability and security; notes that the main causes hampering connectivity include underdeveloped terrestrial networks, lack of enabling public policies and regulatory frameworks, high taxation of digital products and services, low market competition and absence of an energy grid;
2018/09/03
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 105 #

2018/2083(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Recalls that MSMEs in developing countries make up the majority of businesses and employ the majority of manufacturing and service sector workers; reiterates that facilitating cross-border e- commerce will have a direct impact on improving livelihoods, fostering higher living standards and boosting economic development; reaffirms the contribution that such endeavours could make to gender equality between male and female, since a great number of these companies are owned and run by women; calls for digitalization to be used also to promote education and capability building for entrepreneurship in developing countries as well as creating a favourable environment for start-ups and innovative companies;
2018/09/03
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 113 #

2018/2083(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18
18. Points out that ase transformative potential for agriculture, the largest sector of the African economy, agriculturewhich can benefit hugely from digital technologies; highlights that digital platforms and mobile applications can be used in developing countries to informprovide farmers about market priceswith affordable and safe access to information about price and price volatility and link them with potential buyers, as well as to provide practical information about growing methods and market trends, weather information, and warnings and advice about plant pests and animal diseases, hereby enabling to improve their livelihoods and resilience while improving food and nutrition security; encourages the development and implementation of national e-agriculture strategies for sustainable growth;
2018/09/03
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 122 #

2018/2083(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21
21. Stresses that digital technologies such as SMS and mobile phone apps can provide affordable new tools for circulating important information, particularly for poor and isolated people; notes the potential of mobile phone technology, which has advantages including lower access costs due to increasing network coverage, user- friendliness and falling costs of calls and text messages;
2018/09/03
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 31 #

2018/2081(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Observes that the efforts of developing countries and increases in ODA will not be sufficient to bridge the funding gap; calls therefore for the creation of innovative funding instruments to bolster national education systems; run by the State or by other institutions, including private and religious ones;
2018/09/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 40 #

2018/2081(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Recalls that basic learning is a prerequisite for skills development and induction into working life, girls’ education is a key lever for achieving the SDGs, for health and well-being and for the establishment of peaceful societies, and that the least developed countries are suffering most from a lack of funding despite the fact that they are the countries where investment generates the greatest human, social, economic and health benefits;
2018/09/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 43 #

2018/2081(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Considers therefore that the European Union’s education aid must first cater for two priorities: it must prioritise high-quality, inclusive basic education and provide enhanced support to the Least Developed Countries (LDCs); while respecting parental rights, the access for special education for persons with disabilities, and the cultural background of the society;
2018/09/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 44 #

2018/2081(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Particularly stresses SDG 4.1, whose aim is a full 12-year primary and secondary education cycle, provided free of charge for all; considers that the condition of being ‘free of charge’ should apply not only to schooling itself but also to what would otherwise be ancillary costs; believes that States should consider scholarship schemes to provide schooling for the most disadvantaged children; instructs the European Union and the Member States, in accordance with SDG 4.1 and Article 26 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, not to support private, commercial educational establishments financiallyscholarships and related systems that allow children and their parents to freely choose the type of education which is in accordance with their wishes, needs, background and beliefs, including religious and pedagogical;
2018/09/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 55 #

2018/2081(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14
14. Calls, lastly, for particular attention to be paid to equality between access and quality education for girls and boys in school; recalls the objective that 85% of new European Union programmes should have a gender dimension by 2020;
2018/09/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 77 #

2018/2081(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18
18. Is concerned about the phenomenon of the ‘brain drain’; calls on those Member States that devote too much of their aid to scholarships and the expenses of students from developing countries to reduce it; considers that multiple entry visas would enable these students to update their knowledge and promote circular mobilityo explore and use good practices and experiences such as circular brain mobility, academic and professional exchanges, cooperation with diasporas and others, in order to reduce its potential negative effects in developing countries;
2018/09/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 83 #

2018/2081(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19
19. Notes also the efforts to be made with regard to the recruitment, remuneration, working conditions and initial and in-service training of teachers, as well as the massive investment needed in school infrastructure, in particular to ensure equal access for girlsin rural or underpopulated areas to ensure equal access to education to anyone, without discrimination;
2018/09/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 106 #

2018/2081(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 22
22. Considers that assessments of education systems, including education provided by non-State institutions, are a prerequisite for any improvement in the effectiveness of aid; calls on the Commission and Member States to finance research, aggregation of data and reliable, technical, non-discriminatory and independent assessment tools;
2018/09/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 110 #

2018/2081(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24
24. Underlines the obligation of governments to ensure that their people enjoy the right to education; stresses therefore the need for aat any national education plan should be based on significant consultation of key stakeholders, including civil societyparents and families, civil society, private and religious institutions providing educational services, with specific objectives and monitoring mechanisms, continuousregular assessments and inspections, a clear and transparent demarcation of responsibilities, and allocation of resources subject to independent technical monitoring; encourages the adoption of national regulatory frameworks for the establishment and operation of education services in order to promote the wider range of options for families to choose freely the education for their children which better fits with their wishes, needs, background and beliefs, including pedagogical and religious;
2018/09/04
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 51 #

2018/2037(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B
B. whereas the CAP’s's objectives as set out in Article 39 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) are still valid and relevant, further goals should be to ensure food safety and sovereignty, and the resilience and sustainability of the EU’s agriculture systems and territories;
2018/03/28
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 73 #

2018/2037(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital C
C. whereas the CAP, as a sectorial and common policy, should encourage and strengthen the contribution each farmer makes towards meeting environmental challenges including harnessing the potential of circular economy, and should promote the transition towards an agriculture combining economic with environmental performance standards;
2018/03/28
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 86 #

2018/2037(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital D
D. whereas greening measures are complex and inefficicould be subject to further improvement;
2018/03/28
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 129 #

2018/2037(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Calls for a CAP that has its top priority- further to its original objectives set out in Article 39 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) - has to enhance sustainable agriculture while it promotes the transition of each European farm towards an undertaking combining economic with environmental performance standards as a priority;
2018/03/28
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 175 #

2018/2037(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Calls for a first pillar, defined at EU level, that recogniszes the importance of direct aid and that includes, as a share of up to 30 % of the pillar budget, a contractual incitement scheme for a transitibringing about benefits that are environmentally and economically sustainable on a long towards an agriculture combining economic with environmental performance standardserm, and for the second pillar the predominance of the non-refundable supports should be ensured and maintained in the next CAP;
2018/03/28
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 248 #

2018/2037(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Asks the Commission to ensure that each imported agricultural product meets the same sanitary and social standards that EU products are held to; asks the Commission to conduct a systematic impact assessment of the provisions regarding the agricultural sector in each trade agreement, and to offer specific strategies to ensure that no agricultural sector will suffer as a result of a trade agreement concluded with a third country also taking into account EU geographical indications.
2018/03/27
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 93 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 (new)
-1. Observes that it is not justified either socially or economically to use such quantities of plastic products, of such quality, and that if the costs associated with subsequent waste management or with the negative effects of climate change were reflected in the prices of products, in many cases neither the manufacturer nor the consumer would decide to use plastic;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 104 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Believes that preventing the generation of plastic waste upfront, prioritising reuse of plastic products and boosting our plastics recycling performance are bothall key; calls on all stakeholders to consider the recent Chinese import ban on plastic waste as an opportunity to invest in state-of-the-art recycling capacity in the EU, including from the point of view of environmental and climate change aspects;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 134 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 – subparagraph 1 (new)
5. Observes that, from the point of view of the shift to a circular economy, it is vital to change consumption patterns, to secure widespread recognition of the impact of plastics and other products on the environment, and to develop attitudes and provide education concerning environmental protection;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 141 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Stresses that joint actions by all stakeholders are necessary in order to succeed and achieve an outcome that is advantageous for both the economy and, the environment and the climate; emphasises that converting general concern about plastic waste into public responsibility and behavioural change remains an equally important challenge;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 191 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Calls on the Commission to come forward with an update of the essential requirements in the Packaging and Packaging Waste Directive, addressing in particular prevention, prioritising reuse, design for circularity and over-packaging;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 299 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20
20. Notes that there is no panacea to address the harmful effects of single-use plastics, and believes that a combination of voluntary and regulatory measures is therefore required to resolve this complex issue, including the issue of changes in consumer behaviour;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 313 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21
21. Takes note of actions already taken in some Member States and therefore supports the Commission in coming forward with a specific legislative framework on gradually reducing the use of single-use plastics with the aim of halting the generation of marine litter in the EU and thereby contributing to the goal of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development to prevent and significantly reduce marine pollution of all kinds;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 392 #

2018/2035(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 27 – subparagraph 1 (new)
Observes that biodegradable plastics must be distinguished from non-biodegradable ones in the interests of effective waste management; considers that the Commission should draft legislation to ensure that, once products become waste, it is still possible to establish whether they are biodegradable;
2018/05/25
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 8 #

2018/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B a (new)
Ba. whereas consumers make an associative link between brand, product and quality and expect products of the same brand and/or identical in appearance to be identical also in quality whether they are sold in their own country or in another Member State;
2018/04/18
Committee: IMCO
Amendment 43 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital C a (new)
Ca. whereas consumers make an associative link between brand, product and quality and expect products of the same brand and/or identical in appearance to be identical also in quality whether they are sold in their own country or in another Member State;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 113 #

2018/2008(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6a. Welcomes the European Commission's communication titled 'A New Deal for Consumers' of 11 April 2018, regrets however, that the proposed amendment to Article 6 of the Unfair Commercial Practices Directive (UCPD) may not lead to greater legal certainty; Believes that the preferred option should be adding the practice of dual quality to the blacklist of commercial practices which are in all circumstances considered unfair under Annex I of the UCPD;
2018/04/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 171 #

2018/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 a (new)
21a. Welcomes the European Commission's communication titled 'A New Deal for Consumers' of 11April 2018, regrets however, that the proposed amendment to Article 6 of the Unfair Commercial Practices Directive (UCPD) may not lead to greater legal certainty; believes that the preferred option should be adding the practice of dual quality to the blacklist of commercial practices which are in all circumstances considered unfair under Annex I of the UCPD;
2018/04/18
Committee: IMCO
Amendment 30 #

2018/0248(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 7
(7) The Fund should support the efficient management of migration flows, inter alia by promoting commonhandling of migration flows by Member States, inter alia by providing them sufficient and appropriate means to protect their external borders avoiding irregular migration, but also internal borders in case of temporary reintroduction of border control at internal borders in accordance to the Schengen Borders Code; and to support Member States when they grant international protection to genuine refugees, while protecting public order and national security; the Fund could be also used for promoting jointly agreed measures in the area of asylum, including Member States’ efforts in receiving persons in need of international protection through voluntary resettlement and the non-mandatory transfer of applicants for or beneficiaries of international protection between Member States, supporting integration strategies and a more effective legal migration policy, so as to ensure the Union’s long-term competitiveness and the future of its social modstability and wellbeing of societies and their citizens in Member States, as well and reduce incentives fos long-term competitiveness in the EU, counter irregular migration throughand implement a sustainable return and readmission policy. The Fund should support the strengthening of cooperation with third countries to reinforce management of flows of persons applying for asylum or other forms of international protection, avenues on legal migration, avenues on legal migration in accordance to the needs of each Member State and to counter irregular migration and ensure sustainability of return and effective readmission to third countries. Cooperation with third countries shall be genuinely based on mutual interest.
2018/11/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 40 #

2018/0248(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 11
(11) Partnerships and cooperation of the EU and its Member States with third countries are an essential component of Union migration and asylum policyies to ensure that people are not forced to leave their home countries, as well as the adequate management of migratory flows of persons, including those applying for asylum or other forms of international protection. With the aim of replacing the unsafe and irregular arrivals with legal and safe arrival to the territory of the Member States of third-country nationals or stateless persons in need of international protection, expressing responsible and realistic solidarity with countries in regions to which or within which a large number of persons in need of international protection have been displaced by helping to alleviate the pressure on those countries, helping achieve the Union’s migration and asylum policyies' objectives by increasing the Union’s leverage vis-à-vis third countries, and of effectively contributing to globwhile respecting the public order and national security of Member States, and of effectively contributing, jointly or individually, to other international resettlement initiatives by speaking with one voice in international fora and with third countries, the Fund should provide financial incentives to the implementation of the Union Resettlement [and Humanitarian Admission] Framework and to other analogous humanitarian initiatives adopted by Member States, individually or jointly.
2018/11/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 59 #

2018/0248(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 23
(23) Specific support measures for returnees in the Member States and in the countries of return can improve conditions of return and enhance their reintegration. Return decisions can involve comprehensive and careful assessments of the situation in the country of origin, including an evaluation of the absorption capacity at the local level. Specific measures and actions supporting countries of origin, and in particular vulnerable people, contribute to ensure the sustainability and effectiveness of returns.
2018/11/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 77 #

2018/0248(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 30
(30) Measures in and in relation to third countries supported through the Fund should complement other actions outside the Union supported through the Union’s external financing instruments. In particular, in implementing such actions, full coherence should be sought with the principles and general objectives of the Union’s external action and foreign and development policy in respect of the country or region in question and the Union international commitments. In relation to the external dimension, the Fund should target support to enhance cooperation with third countries and to reinforce key aspects of migration management in areas of interest to the Union's migration policy.
2018/11/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 96 #

2018/0248(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point c
(c) to contribute to countering irregular migration and ensuring effectiveness and sustainability of return and readmission in third countries for both returnees and countries of origin.
2018/11/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 99 #

2018/0248(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 5 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
The Fund shall be open to third countries for activities in the field of return and readmission in accordance with the conditions laid down in a specific agreement covering the participation of the third country to the Asylum and Migration Fund, which shall be made publicly available, provided that the agreement:
2018/11/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 142 #

2018/0248(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 29 – paragraph 1
1. The Commission shall carry out a mid-term and a retrospective evaluation of this Regulation, including the actions implemented under the Fund and the assessment of the impact of returns on Third countries.
2018/11/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 143 #

2018/0248(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 29 – paragraph 2
2. The mid-term and the retrospective evaluation shall be carried out in a timely manner to feed into the decision-making process and the result of the evaluation shall be made public and accessible.
2018/11/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 149 #

2018/0248(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – point 1 – point b – indent 1
340 % for asylum;
2018/11/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 150 #

2018/0248(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – point 1 – point b – indent 2
30 40% for legal migration and integratioreintegration into the countries of origin;
2018/11/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 156 #

2018/0248(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – point 1 – point b – indent 3
420% for countering irregular migration including returns.
2018/11/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 158 #

2018/0248(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – point 4 a (new)
4a. The number of third-country nationals who do not or no longer fulfil the conditions for entry and stay in the territory of the Member State and who are subject to a return decision under national and / or Community law, i.e. an administrative or judicial decision or act, stating or declaring the illegality of stay and imposing an obligation to return, will be taken into account in the area of countering irregular migration including returns.
2018/11/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 189 #

2018/0248(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex III – point 4 – point h
(h) removal operations, including related measures, in full respects of human rights in accordance with the standards laid down in Union law, with the exception of coercive equipment;
2018/11/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 192 #

2018/0248(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex III – point 4 – point i
(i) measures to support with a long term approach the returnee’s durable return and reintegration;
2018/11/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 193 #

2018/0248(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex III – point 4 – point j
(j) facilities and services insupport to third countries in ensuring appropriate temporary accommodation and reception upon arrival, including for unaccompanied minors and other vulnerable groups in line with international standards;
2018/11/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 194 #

2018/0248(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex III – point 4 – point k
(k) cooperation with third countries on countering irregular migration and on effective return and readmission, including in the framework of the implementation of readmission agreements and other arrangements;deleted
2018/11/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 196 #

2018/0248(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex III – point 4 – point m
(m) support for and actions in third countries, including on infrastructure, equipment and other measures, provided these contribute to enhancing effective cooperation between third countries and the Union and its Member States on return and readmission.
2018/11/09
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 63 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Citation 6 a (new)
the programme shall continue to focus on maintaining geographical balance between Member States in respect of the distribution of funds,. The regulation shall refer at least to geographical balance, which may be further defined in the multiannual work programmes.
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 127 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 20
(20) The improvement of governance on environmental, climate change and related clean energy transition matters requires involvement of civil society by raising public awareness, consumer engagement, and broadening of stakeholder involvement, including non-governmental organisations, churches and religious communities in consultation on and implementation of related policies.
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 194 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point b
(b) to support the development, implementation, monitoring and enforcement of the relevant Union legislation and policy, including by improving governance through enhancing capacities of public and private actors and the involvement of civil society and church and religious communities;
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 342 #

2018/0209(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – point 1 – point 1.4
1.4 Number of projects improving governance through enhancing capacities of public and private actors and the involvement of civil society, churches and religious communities;
2018/10/23
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 62 #

2018/0199(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 11
(11) IPA III assistance should mainly focus on assisting the IPA beneficiaries to strengthen democratic institutions and the rule of law, reform the judiciary and public administration, respect fundamental rights and promote gender equality between men and women, tolerance, social inclusion and non-discrimination. IPA assistance should continue to support the efforts of the IPA beneficiaries to advance regional, macro- regional and cross-border cooperation as well as territorial development, including through the implementation of Union macro- regional strategies. In addition, IPA assistance should address security, migration and border management, ensuring access to international protection, sharing relevant information, enhancing border control and pursuing common efforts in the fight against irregular migration and, migrant smuggling and trafficking of human beings.
2018/10/29
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 64 #

2018/0199(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 12
(12) With regard to NDICI assistance, the Union should develop a special relationship with neighbouring countries, aiming to establish an area of prosperity and good neighbourliness, founded on the values of the Union and characterised by close and peaceful relations based on cooperation. This Regulation and the NDICI should therefore support the internal and external aspects of relevant macro-regional strategies with the primary objective of eradicating poverty; they will also be contributing to sustainable development. Those initiatives are strategically important and offer meaningful political frameworks for deepening relations with and among partner countries, based on the principles of mutual accountability, shared ownership and responsibility.
2018/10/29
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 82 #

2018/0199(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 14 – paragraph 3 – point e
(e) promoting social inclusion and tackling poverty, including by enhancing equal opportunities, equality between men and women, and combating discrimination across borders.
2018/10/29
Committee: DEVE
Amendment 85 #

2018/0199(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 14 – paragraph 4 – point c
(c) under external cross-border and component 2 and 3 Interreg programmes supported by the Interreg funds, in addition to points (a) and (b): building up mutual trust, in particular by encouraging people- to-people actions, by enhancing sustainable democracy and by supporting civil society actors and their role in reforming processes and democratic transitions;promoting fundamental rights and freedoms in line with and as recognized by the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union and by supporting civil society organisations and non-state actors, including NGOs, Churches and religious communities and associations, think- tanks and other social groups, and their role in resilience, peacebuilding, reconciliation, reforming processes and democratic transition