BETA

Activities of Dennis RADTKE

Plenary speeches (19)

Employment and social policies of the euro area (debate)
2019/10/10
Dossiers: 2019/2111(INI)
EU disability strategy post 2020 (debate)
2019/12/17
“Housing First” as urgent action to address the situation of homeless people in Europe (debate)
2020/01/13
“Housing First” as urgent action to address the situation of homeless people in Europe (debate)
2020/01/13
Sustainable investment plan, just transition fund and Roadmap on Social Europe (debate)
2020/01/14
A social Europe in a Digital world (topical debate)
2020/02/12
European protection of cross-border and seasonal workers in the context of the COVID-19 crisis (debate)
2020/06/18
Dossiers: 2020/2664(RSP)
Economic policies of the euro area 2020 - Employment and social policies of the euro area 2020 (debate)
2020/10/21
Dossiers: 2020/2079(INI)
A strong social Europe for Just Transitions (short presentation)
2020/12/14
Dossiers: 2020/2084(INI)
FEAD: specific measures to address the COVID-19 crisis (debate)
2021/01/20
Dossiers: 2020/0105(COD)
Decent and affordable housing for all (debate)
2021/01/20
Dossiers: 2019/2187(INI)
The right to disconnect (debate)
2021/01/20
Dossiers: 2019/2181(INL)
European Semester: annual sustainable growth strategy 2021 – European Semester: employment and social aspects in the annual sustainable growth strategy 2021 (debate)
2021/03/10
Dossiers: 2020/2244(INI)
Action Plan for the implementation of the European Pillar of Social Rights, in preparation of the Social Summit in Porto in May (debate)
2021/03/10
European Child Guarantee (debate)
2021/04/28
Dossiers: 2021/2605(RSP)
European Social Fund Plus (ESF+) 2021-2027 (debate)
2021/06/08
Follow-up of the Porto Social Summit of 7 May 2021 (debate)
2021/06/09
Fair working conditions, rights and social protection for platform workers - New forms of employment linked to digital development (debate)
2021/09/13
Dossiers: 2019/2186(INI)
Introduction of a European social security pass for improving the digital enforcement of social security rights and fair mobility (debate)
2021/11/22
Dossiers: 2021/2620(RSP)

Reports (2)

REPORT on a strong social Europe for Just Transitions
2020/11/24
Committee: EMPL
Dossiers: 2020/2084(INI)
Documents: PDF(287 KB) DOC(126 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Agnes JONGERIUS', 'mepid': 125021}, {'name': 'Dennis RADTKE', 'mepid': 188945}]
REPORT on the proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on the adequate minimum wages in the European Union
2021/11/18
Committee: EMPL
Dossiers: 2020/0310(COD)
Documents: PDF(413 KB) DOC(182 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Agnes JONGERIUS', 'mepid': 125021}, {'name': 'Dennis RADTKE', 'mepid': 188945}]

Shadow reports (4)

REPORT on the European Semester for economic policy coordination: Employment and Social Aspects in the Annual Sustainable Growth Strategy 2020
2020/02/28
Committee: EMPL
Dossiers: 2019/2212(INI)
Documents: PDF(266 KB) DOC(100 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Klára DOBREV', 'mepid': 197579}]
REPORT on the employment and social policies of the euro area 2020
2020/10/08
Committee: EMPL
Dossiers: 2020/2079(INI)
Documents: PDF(200 KB) DOC(80 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Klára DOBREV', 'mepid': 197579}]
REPORT on the implementation of Council Directive 2000/78/EC establishing a general framework for equal treatment in employment and occupation in light of the UNCRPD
2021/02/03
Committee: EMPL
Dossiers: 2020/2086(INI)
Documents: PDF(425 KB) DOC(243 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Katrin LANGENSIEPEN', 'mepid': 197461}]
REPORT on fair working conditions, rights and social protection for platform workers – new forms of employment linked to digital development
2021/07/27
Committee: EMPL
Dossiers: 2019/2186(INI)
Documents: PDF(239 KB) DOC(86 KB)
Authors: [{'name': 'Sylvie BRUNET', 'mepid': 197576}]

Oral questions (6)

Effects of the bankruptcy of the Thomas Cook Group
2019/10/14
Documents: PDF(45 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Water crisis in Bulgaria
2020/01/06
Documents: PDF(51 KB) DOC(11 KB)
Holistic EU action in the field of care, including childcare, care for elderly people and persons with disabilities – towards a European Care Strategy
2020/09/15
Documents: PDF(46 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Decent working and employment conditions in the aviation sector
2021/03/18
Documents: PDF(45 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Reversing the negative social consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic
2021/06/15
Dossiers: 2021/2734(RSP)
Documents: PDF(46 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Decent working and employment conditions in the aviation sector
2021/06/18
Dossiers: 2021/2607(RSP)
Documents: PDF(46 KB) DOC(10 KB)

Written explanations (1)

Reinforcing the Youth Guarantee (B9-0310/2020)

. – Ich spreche mich nicht grundsätzlich gegen verbindliche Maßnahmen beim Thema Jugendgarantie aus. Allerdings ist die entsprechende Finanzierung mit dem aktuell in den Verhandlung stehenden MFR-Vorschlag nicht sichergestellt. Daher wären verbindliche Maßnahmen aktuell nicht sinnvoll.
2020/10/08

Written questions (5)

European Professional Card
2020/05/19
Documents: PDF(42 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Azerbaijan’s hostile activities against Armenia
2020/10/07
Documents: PDF(50 KB) DOC(10 KB)
Hazardous substance classification of synthetic amorphous silica (SAS)
2021/03/03
Documents: PDF(39 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Publication backlog concerning the Construction Products Regulation
2021/05/26
Documents: PDF(38 KB) DOC(9 KB)
Revision of the Industrial Emissions Directive (IED)
2021/09/07
Documents: PDF(38 KB) DOC(9 KB)

Amendments (356)

Amendment 3 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 5 a (new)
— having regard to the Commission European Economic Forecast Autumn 2021,
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 19 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A
A. whereas in coordinating economic, budgetary, employment and social policies in the Member States, the European Semester must respectpolicy coordination must respect applicable and relevant Union rules on sound public finances;
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 27 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas the EU is founded on and upholds the fundamental values of the Treaties and the United Nations, and whereas the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on the economy, social affairs and employment, the European Green Deal and poverty must be taken into account in the 2022 annual sustainable growth strategysuch as respect for human dignity, equality and human rights; whereas the deep economic and social impact of COVID-19 pandemic demonstrates the need to address social issues at European level while respecting the diversity of national law and practices;
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 46 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D
D. whereas the COVID-19 pandemic is placing a heavy burden on families and vulnerable groups in terms of their everyday lives, working lives and general livelihoods2 ; __________________ 22021 report of the Bundesinstitut für Bevölkerungsforschung entitled ‘Belastungen von Kindern, Jugendlichen und Eltern in der Corona-Pandemie’.
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 62 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E
E. whereas the EU’s climate neutrality targets represent aboth challenge to the economy and society; whereas they also present opportunities for businesses and opportunitiess and opportunities and an absolute necessity in order to predeploy workers, which will meserve the climate and that socially vulnerable people, families and micro-enterprises will come under pressureo build a better future for the younger and future generations;
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 102 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Notes that the well-being of the EU is at the heart of a modern sustainability and economic strategSocial Market Economy is at the heart of the European project and the EU strategy of competitive sustainability; points out that the dimensions set out in the annual sustainable growth strategy – social and environmental sustainability, productivity, equality and macroeconomic stability – serve as guiding principles for the EU’s recovery and the development of the national recovery and resilience plans and necessary reforms;
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 114 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Stresses that the aim of sustainable economic growth must be to weather future crises in the best possible way, by strengthening the competitiveness of our economies and developing the right skills set for the future to keep up with the demands of a modern labour market;
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 119 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Is concerned that countries were already heavilysome Member States were indebted before the COVID-19 pandemic, that these debts are to be borne by future generations and that some Member States have little room for manoeuvre to support economic recovery through national measures; is convinced that additional instruments are needed that do not place a lasting burden on national budget; welcomes the historic and unprecedented European response in the form of the NextGenerationEU and the Recovery and Resilience Facility as instruments to mitigate the economic and social impact of the pandemic in the Member States;
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 138 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Is convinced that bureaucratic obstacles hinder economic growth; calls on the Commission to recommend reforms to all Member States for immediate implementationUnderlines the need to reduce bureaucratic burdens and red tape in order to support and stimulate economic growth and competitiveness and underlines in this context the Commission Better Regulation Agenda; calls on the Commission in the context of the country- specific recommendations to recommend reforms to cut red tape and simplify access to funding opportunities; for businesses and citizens;
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 160 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. EWelcomes and emphasises the central role inof the new EU strategic framework ofn health and safety at work 2021-2027; notes that prevention so as to ensure safe and healthy working conditions contributes to the health of workers in order to maintainand wellbeing of workers and lead to long-term productivity and competitiveness gains;
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 174 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Considers that increasing purchasing power is a guaranteed means of ensuring furthern important element of economic recovery;
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 194 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Notes that families are the main victims of the COVID-19 pandemic; calls on the Commission to introduce a 25/25 child cost allowance; stresses that the amount will be split between a national allowance under the responsibility of the Member States and a direct EU benefit; stresses that families need this money, and that they would spend it and in turn contribute to the economynd vulnerable groups are among the main victims of the COVID-19 pandemic;
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 202 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Considers that a 25/25 child allowance is an economic stimulus package that is geared towards people, combats poverty, generates purchasing power and provides incentives that favour demographic change;deleted
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 214 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Stresses the need to ensure social equality that everyone in our society has the right skills to find a job and bring their talent to fruition, in particular the young generation; underlines the need to strengthen EU education programs while at the same time aligning training and education with the needs of the economy and the society of the future, supporting employment relationshipsees and teachers to train the right skills as well as investments in digital infrastructure;
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 222 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Calls on the Commission to identify shortages at production sites – e.g. of semiconductors – in order to re- Europeanise them and provide them with financial support;deleted
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 236 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Calls on the Commission to ensure the economy is crisis-resistantand the Member States to ensure a strong and inclusive economic and social recovery, to be better prepared for future crisis, to attract investment and entrepreneurship and to ensure a fair and social EU with well-paid jobs;
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 246 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Stresses the need to address skills shortages; notes that these shortages are holding back productivity and economic growth; expresses concern that digital skills in the EU need to play catch up and that this ibe improved, in line with the needs of future labour markets, which is among other aspects reflected in the shortage of IT professionals; emphasises the importance of focusing and investing in vocational training on thein the context of the twin digital and green transitions; demands that EU training content become more uniform and qualifications more widely recognised;
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 258 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Considers that the transition to a low-carbonclimate neutral economy must be just and based on athe social market economy; stresses the need to enable private sector financing and promote research and innovation in new technologies while safeguarding jobs;
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 265 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Points to the need for the principles of production, service and trade with certification to be improved so as to improve quality; stresses, with reference towelcomes the Commission’s proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on improving working conditions in platform work (COM(2021)0762), that adherence to social standards in the context of platform work is necessary;
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 269 #

2021/2233(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Calls on the Commission to include recommendations for a social register suitable for the certification of companies; calls on the Commission to make certification mandatory for EU- wide public tenders;deleted
2022/01/20
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 8 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 12 a (new)
— having regard to the first Joint Implementation Report of the Framework Agreement on Digitalisation (2021),
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 11 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 13 a (new)
— having regard to the European Economic and Social Committee opinion SOC/698 “Health & Safety at Work - EU Strategic Framework (2021-2027)”,
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 14 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 16 a (new)
— having regard to its resolution of 20 October 2021 with recommendations to the Commission on protecting workers from asbestos(2019/2182(INL)),
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 15 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 17 a (new)
— having regard to its resolution of 16 September 2021 on fair working conditions, rights and social protection for platform workers - new forms of employment linked to digital development (2019/2186(INI)),
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 22 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A
A. whereas in 2015, the European Working Conditions’ Survey (EWCS) found that 21 % of jobs in Europe were “high flying jobs“ and 20 % of jobs in Europe are of poor quality and put workers at increased risk regarding their health; whereas 14 % of workers have been exposed to a high level of psychosocial risks4 ; ;whereas 23 % of European workers believe that their safety or their health is at risk because of their work; whereas the fieldwork of the EWCS 2020 was put on halt due to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic but was relaunched in July 2021 with a view to be published in the end of 2022; __________________ 4 ‘Sixth European Working Conditions Survey – Overview report (2017 update)’, Eurofound, 2017, Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg.
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 25 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A a (new)
Aa. whereas Eurofound concludes that in 2017-2019, many positive economic and social developments took place with consistent economic growth, new employment highs, rising living standards and convergence of Member States towards better living and working conditions1a; whereas the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in nearly one half of all employees in Europe working at least part of their working time from home1b; whereas some studies suggest the perceptions of remote working have substantially improved since the beginning of the pandemic, which in turn is translated into a generalised preference for hybrid work arrangements1c; __________________ 1aEurofound (2021), Living and working in Europe 2020. Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg, p. 66. 1b Eurofound (2020), Living, working and COVID-19. Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg 1c Microsoft Work Trend Index (2021). “The next great disruption is hybrid work - are we ready?”.
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 64 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E
E. whereas the COVID-19 pandemic has caused a rapid increase in teleworking where remote working served as a buffer during the crisis and preserved jobs that might otherwise have been lost9a; whereas remote working is proven to have a strong impact on the organisation of working time by increasing flexibility and workers’ constant availability9 ; whereas it is expected that the uptake of remote working and teleworking will remain higher than before the COVID-19 crisis or that it will even increase further10 ;whereas under normal conditions most employees would prefer a combination of working from home and working from the office with 32 % wanting to work from home several times a week9b; __________________ 9 ‘Working anytime, anywhere: The effects on the world of work’, Eurofound and the International Labour Office, 2017, Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg, and the International Labour Office, Geneva. 9aEurofound and European Commission Joint Research Centre (2021), What just happened? COVID-19 lockdowns and change in the labour market, Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg. 9bEurofound (2021), Living and working in Europe 2020, Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg, p. 43. 10‘Teleworking in the aftermath of the Covid-19 pandemic: enabling conditions for a successful transition’, European Trade Union Institute, 2021, Brussels.
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 73 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F
F. whereas people who regularly work from home are more than twice as likely to work in excess of the requisite maximum 48 hours per week and are at risk of resting for less than the requisite 11 hours between working days; whereas almost 30 % of teleworkers report working in their free time every day or several times a week11 ; whereas telework also provides workers with the freedom to adapt their working hours and schedule to meet their own personal and family needs11a; __________________ 11‘Telework and ICT-based mobile work: Flexible working in the digital age’, New forms of employment series, Eurofound, 2020, Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg. 11a‘Telework and ICT-based mobile work: Flexible working in the digital age’, New forms of employment series, Eurofound, 2020, Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg.
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 110 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Welcomes the Commission’s strategic framework and, in particular, the introduction of the Vision Zero approach to work-related accidents and diseases, including the forthcoming new social scoreboard indicator on fatal accidents at work and the stocktaking OSH Summit in 2023; calls on the Commission to expand the Vision Zero approach to other injuries and accidents, as well as physical and mental attrition; calls on the Commission to significantly increase the focus on prevention strategies; calls for the ambitious implementation of the 7-year plan, also in the light of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the labour market and new ways of work, and believes that strong legislative action is needed on several aspects of EU policy on occupational health and safety in order to complement the variety of soft EU measures envisaged in order to make Vision Zero a reality; calls for a clear focus on social dialogue and workers’ participation in the Vision Zero approach;
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 114 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Calls for Directive 2004/37/EC of 29 April 2004 on the protection of workers from the risks related to exposure to carcinogens or mutagens at work to be updated on a continual basis and in an ambitious timeframe, ensuring that occupational exposure limits containedreiterates its call on the Commission, as a matter of urgency, and following consultation of the ACSH, to present an action plan to achieve occupational exposure limits for at least 25 additional substances in the dDirective exist for a minimum of 50 priority substances by 2024; calls for the inclusion of reprotoxic substances and hazardous medicinal products in the scope of the directive; 2004/37/EC and to consider, based on that action plan, the latest developments in scientific knowledge and after consulting the ACSH, presenting a legislative proposal by 31 December 2024; stresses in that regard the need for the Commission to increase the capacity necessary for reviewing Occupational Exposure Limits (OELs) and adding new ones; reiterates its repeated calls for the inclusion of reprotoxic substances and hazardous medicinal products in the scope of the directive; reiterates its call to revamp the current system to set limit values under the fourth revision of Directive 2004/37/EC and to move towards a new coherent, transparent and risk-based methodology system to be established for setting exposure limits and to better take into account workers' exposure to a combination of substances;
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 121 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. Highlights the need for further action to prevent, detect and better recognise occupational cancers related to night shift work and UV radiation (for outdoor workers); points out that the automation and robotisation of certain activities can significantly reduce the risk of workers being exposed to carcinogens in workplaces; encourages constant analyses and research on new substances under suspicion of being carcinogenic, mutagenic and/or reprotoxic (CMRs), the establishment of OELs for those chemical agents for which they do not yet exist, and periodic revisions whenever it becomes necessary in the light of more recent scientific data and technical developments, in close consultation with social partners; welcomes the workers survey prepared by the EU-OSHA on exposure to cancer risk factors; stresses that more systematic human biomonitoring programmes, in full compliance with data protection measures, both in occupational settings and non-occupational settings can be a one of several relevant sources of information on general chemical exposure effects and health impacts;
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 128 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Welcomes the Commission’s commitment to present in 2022 a legislative proposal to further reduce workers’ exposure to asbestos; recalls that asbestos has been banned in the Union since 2005 and that Member States must ensure that asbestos fibres are completely phased-out as soon as possible; calls on the Commission to be ambitious in its endeavours to achieve the total ban of asbestos and with regard to its zero accidents at work vision, and reiterates its call on the Commission to update the exposure limit for asbestos to 0.001 fibres/cm3 (1 000 fibres/m3); stresses the needreiterates its call for an EU framework directive for national asbestos removal strategies, including public national asbestos registers;
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 144 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Believes that Council Directive 89/391/EEC on the introduction of measures to encourage improvements in the safety and health of workers at work hasmay not proven effective enough for the world of work in the 21st century and the latest developments on labour markets and the assessment and management of psychosocial risks; recalls its request that the Commission include in the Strategic Framework for Occupational Safety and Health the right to disconnect and, explicitly, that it develop new psychosocial measures as part ofnd actions within the framework; call and welcomes oin the Commission, in this regard, to step up the ambition of the Strategic Framework for Occupational Safety and Health; is regard the Commission’s commitment to modernise the OSH legislative framework related to digitalisation by reviewing the Workplaces Directive and the Display Screen Equipment Directive by 2023, as well as in cooperation with Member States and social partners to prepare a non- legislative EU-level initiative related to mental health at work before the end of 2022; commends the Commission’s call on the Member States, in this regard, to update their national legal frameworks, host “peer reviews” addressing occupational psychosocial and ergonomic issues, as well as to strengthen the monitoring and data collection on the situation of mental and psychosocial risks, and underlines the need to step up the ambition in this context; recalls on the Commission to propose a directive on psychosocial's invitation to the social partners to take action and update existing agreements at cross-industry and sectoral level to address new OSH issues related to the digital labour market, in particular psychosocial and ergonomic risks and well-being at work aimed at the efficient prevention in the workplace of, inter alia, anxiety, depression, burnout and stress; call, as well as to find commonly agreed solutions to address the challenges con the Commissionnected to telework, digitalisation and the right to disconnect, building on the European Social Partners Framework Agreement on digitalisation; highlights that occupational disease is a matter closely linked to social security which is a national competence and calls on the Member to aim for the recognition of anxiety, depression and burnout as occupational diseases, to establish mechanisms for their prevention and the reintegration into the workplace of affected employees, and to shift from individual- level actions to a work organisation approach;
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 146 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Believes that Council Directive 89/391/EEC on the introduction of measures to encourage improvements in the safety and health of workers at work hasmay not proven effective enough for the world of work in the 21st century and the latest developments on labour markets and the assessment and management of psychosocial risks; recalls its request that the Commission include in the Strategic Framework for Occupational Safety and Health the right to disconnect and, explicitly, that it develop new psychosocial measures as part of the framework; calls on the Commission, in this regard, to step up the ambition of the Strategic Framework for Occupational Safety and Health; calls on the Commission to propose a directive on psychosocial risks and well-being at work aimed at the efficient prevention in the workplace of, inter alia, anxiety, depression, burnout and stress; calls on the Commission to aim for the recognition of anxiety, depression and burnout as occupational diseases, to establish mechanisms for their prevention and the reintegration into the workplace of affected employees, and to shift from individual- level actions to a work organisation approach;
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 160 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. Welcomes the fact that the Commission is strengthening the gender focus on occupational safety and health; calls on the Commission to propose a legal act based on the framework agreement on harassment and violence at work, and calls on the Commission and the Member States to ensure that the fight against workplace violence, discrimination and harassment applies regardless of the reason for the harassment and that it is not limited to cases based on discriminatory grounds; calls on the Member States’ governments to ratify ILO Convention No 190 to put in place the necessary laws and policy measures to prevent and address violence and harassment in the world of work;
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 173 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Welcomes the Commission’s intention to present by the end of 2021 a legislative initiative to improve the working conditions of platform workers; calls on the Commission to ensure that the proposal guarantees rights for all platform workers forand to address the specificities of platform work to ensure fair and transparent working conditions and a healthy and safe working environment;
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 183 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to guarantee that all workers, including non- standard workers, workers in platform companies and the self-employed are covered by occupational safety and health (OSH) legislation and policies;
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 217 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Recalls the commitment by the Commission to assess the need for further actions to improve the functioning of the existing EU regulatory framework for health and safety and the need to amend the Biological Agents Directive; calls on the Commission to conduct, without delay, a targeted revision of the Biological Agents Directive, drawing on the lessons learned from the unprecedented pandemic health crisis with a view to better preparedness and response planning on health crises in all workplaces;
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 220 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to improve research and data collection on the situation of mental health, psychosocial and ergonomic risks across sectors and additional research on the economic costs of health and workplace exclusion and to conduct a detailed assessment of problems with health and safety associated with remote- work and teleworking;
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 234 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Calls on the Commission, in close consultation with Member States and the social partners, taking into account existing national and sectorial practices, to assess the need for an EU framework with a view to establishing minimum safety and health requirements for remote work across the Union; calls on the Commission to propose a legislative framework with a view to establishing minimum requirements for remote work across the Union; stresses that such a framework should clarify working conditions, including the provision, use and liability of equipment, including as regards existing and new digital tools, and that it should ensure that such work is carried out on a voluntary basis and that the rights, workload and performance standards of teleworkers are equivalent to those of comparable workers;
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 236 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Calls on the Commission, in close consultation with Member States and the social partners, and taking into account existing national and sectorial practices, to propose a legislative framework with a view to establishing minimum requirements for remote work across the Union; stresses that such a framework should clarify working conditions, including the provision, use and liability of equipment, including as regards existing and new digital tools, and that it should ensure that such work is carried out on a voluntary basis and that the rights, workload and performance standards of teleworkers are equivalent to those of comparable workers;
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 247 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Calls on the Commission, on the basis of a thorough assessment, a proper evaluation and a consultation of Member States and the social partners, to propose a directive on minimum standards and conditions to ensure that workers are able to exercise effectively their right to disconnect and to regulate the use of existing and new digital tools for work purposes, whilst taking into consideration the European Social Partners Framework on Digitalisation, which includes arrangements for connecting and disconnecting and provides for the social partners to take implementation measures within the next three years; stresses that a legislative proposal before the end of that implementation period would disregard the role of social partners laid down in the TFEU; insists that any legislative initiative respects the social partners’ autonomy at national level, national collective agreements, and national labour market traditions and models, and does not affect the right to negotiate, conclude and enforce collective agreements in accordance with national law and practice;
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 250 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Welcomes the Commission’s commitment to revisemodernise the OSH legislative framework by reviewing Directive 89/654/EEC and Directive 90/270/EEC laying down minimum safety and health requirements for the work place and work with display screen equipment; calls on the Commission and the Member States to step up the research and data collection, to be more ambitious in this regard and to propose a directive on work- related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and rheumatic /chronic inflammatory diseases; welcomes in this regard the Commission intention to support awareness raising on MSDs and joins the call on the Member States to address occupational risks related to circulatory diseases;
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 260 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14
14. Repeats its call on the Commission to undertake an urgent study of the situation of the employment and health and safety conditions of cross-border and seasonal workers, including the role of temporary work agencies, recruiting agencies, other intermediaries and subcontractors, with a view to identifying protection gaps and the need to revise the existing legislative framework, as well as pandemic-proofinglso considering the lessons learned from the COVID-19 pandemic;
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 278 #

2021/2165(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Stresses the need to recognise and involve social partners in the implementation and enforcement of the OSH legislative framework; calls on the Commission and the Member States to promote social dialogue and to ensure the involvement of social partners in the formulation of all EU and national OSH policies and in measures taken at all levels;
2021/11/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 6 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital A
A. whereas the pandemic has revealed the strengths and limitations of the current set-up for managing value chains and accessibility to medicines and vaccines;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 23 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B
B. whereas universequal access toibility, affordability, and availability of medicines is a fuanda mental right the full realisation of which is incompatible with a pharmaceutical model based primarily on the pursuit of profitdicinal products is essential; whereas the EU can support this by applying a predictable policy framework that fosters public and private investments ensuring affordable patient access to medicines and benefit to society as a whole;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 33 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B a (new)
B a. whereas the disruption of the global supply chain ensuing from the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the EU’s dependency on third countries in the health sector; whereas the EU's open strategic autonomy and security of supply should be ensured by diversification of supply chains for essential medicines and medicinal products, including European manufacturing sites, as well as by applying public procurement rules that should not consider price as the sole criterion;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 47 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B b (new)
B b. whereas Europe’s pharmaceutical sector is a major contributor to the EU economy in terms of creation of highly skilled jobs and investment in innovation; whereas the pharmaceutical sector is a significant driver of trade and economic growth in the EU;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 52 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital B c (new)
B c. whereas data sharing is key to applying artificial intelligence and machine learning tools to research, to enable the digital transformation of healthcare and to tackle disparities in prevention, diagnosis and treatment in Europe; considers that AI-based solutions can help boost the resilience and sustainability of EU’s healthcare systems and offer new solutions to patients via a better diagnosis and the use of real-world data;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 73 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Calls on the Commission to work towards a European public biomedical infrastructure covering the entire medicines value chain and to develop the prospective European Health Emergency Response Authority (HERA) along those lines; considers that HERA should closely collaborate with public and private entities to plan, coordinate and build an ecosystem of private and public capabilities which can provide suitable emergency frameworks for EU access to key raw materials in case of global supply chocks;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 108 #

2021/2013(INI)

2. Calls on the Commission to keep the results of Union-funded R&D in the public domain; points out that the protection of patents must not run counter to the right to healthPoints out that the protection of the social contract between European pharmaceutical companies, patients and society as a whole rests on the EU intellectual property framework; points out that the intellectual property framework acts as a driver of investments in research and development, which is essential to innovation;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 137 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Calls on the Commission to develop a new incentive model, look into decoupling mechanisms as an alternative to exclusive protections, and attach strict conditions to public funds in accordance with the principle of fair return on investmenttargeted incentives to ensure equitable access to medicines also in areas where the development of products would otherwise not be sustainable;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 139 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Welcomes the impact of the Regulation on orphan medicinal products (EC/141/2000) and the Regulation on medicinal products for paediatric use (EC/1901/2006); notes however that scientific progress and investment in research have not been sufficient for the unmet needs of patients with rare diseases, paediatric cancers and neurodegenerative diseases, to deal with antimicrobial resistance (AMR) or to prevent infectious diseases outbreaks; Calls on the Commission to support a regulatory framework which strengthens incentives for orphan medicines research and development in the EU to effectively address these shortcomings;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 151 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 b (new)
3 b. Calls on the Commission to incentivise child specific and first-in-child innovation and to facilitate the repositioning of medicines failing in adults when there is scientific and preclinical rationale;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 156 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Calls onWelcomes the Commission to develop a mandatory European licence in order to be able to respond rapidly to health's proposal to foster production and investment in Europe as well as to simplify and streamline relevant procedures in order to be able to respond rapidly to health crises; points out that a regulatory framework which supports the open strategic autonomy of the EU will benefit patients also outside times of crises;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 177 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Calls for public investment in R&D to be made transparent and for it to be reflected in product availability and pricingaffordability;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 182 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Calls on the Commission to support pricing models based on real production costs, innovation and value to patients; calls also on the Commission to investigate novel pricing and payment models and their possible impact on patient access to innovative medicines;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 203 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7
7. Calls ononsiders that the Commission to promoteand Member States could consider launching joint public procurement and apply most economically advantageous tender (MEAT) criteria more stringently- procedures in times of health crises, as has been done during the COVID-19 crisis, with simplified and transparent procedures in the interest of improved response times; highlights that joint public procurement should not hinder patient access, medical innovation or competition;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 209 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7 a. Urges the Commission, in the context of the EU Public Procurement Directive 2014/24/EU, to develop guidelines to support sustainable public procurement practices in the pharmaceutical field, in particular with regard to the implementation of the criteria of the most economically advantageous tender (MEAT), aimed at ensuring long-term sustainability, competition and security of supply and stimulating investment in manufacturing; calls for remedies against single-winner, price-only tenders that can cause severe price erosion, reducing the number of suppliers on the market and often resulting in short lead times and penalties being applied to companies, which in turn increases the risk of shortages of medical products;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 220 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8
8. Regrets the excessive influence of industry interest groups, which is detrimental to public-health, patient and consumer associations and to trade unions.deleted
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 231 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 a (new)
8 a. Points out that small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) and mid-caps play a crucial role in the pharmaceutical value chain, often as first-movers and drivers of innovation; calls on the Commission to maintain a comprehensive and predictable regulatory framework that fosters the investment and innovation of especially European pharmaceutical SMEs and mid-caps;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 244 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 b (new)
8 b. Calls on the Commission to address unjustified trade restrictions; points out that trade barriers can harm the accessibility and affordability of medicinal products;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 246 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 c (new)
8 c. Calls on the Commission and Member States to fully implement the Clinical Trials Regulation; supports a new framework for the design of innovative trials, the simplification of the requirements for the conduct of clinical trials and additional support for the conduct of so-called pragmatic trials and the pilot project to adopt a framework for the reuse of off-patent medicines; welcomes the launch of a vaccine platform to monitor vaccine efficacy and safety, supported by an EU-wide clinical trials network;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 255 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 d (new)
8 d. Calls for the prudent implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) with regard to data minimisation, purpose limitation, the secondary use of data as well as on data transfer to third countries to avoid unnecessary restriction for health research and cross-border data sharing;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 260 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 e (new)
8 e. Urges the Commission, based on the experience with the authorisation of COVID-19 vaccines, to work with the EMA to consider extending the application of rolling reviews to other emergency medicines; further calls on the Commission to work with the EMA to develop the use of electronic product information for all medicines in the EU;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 265 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 f (new)
8 f. Calls on the Commission to develop new- and extend the scope of existing Mutual Recognition Agreements on Good manufacturing practice (GMP) certificates (most importantly on inspections and batch testing) with more countries who have high manufacturing standards; points out that this could make it easier to include sites in third countries in a production supply chain, without giving up European standards to allow for broadening the production capacity in times of crisis.
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 272 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 g (new)
8 g. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to screen foreign direct investment in pharmaceutical manufacturing plants, which are part of Europe’s critical health infrastructure;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 276 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 h (new)
8 h. Calls on the Commission to increase its involvement in supporting critical health infrastructure protection in Member States and to start applying the European Programme for Critical Infrastructure Protection to the health infrastructure sector;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 280 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 i (new)
8 i. Whereas the Horizon Europe programme provides essential support for research and innovation; whereas the programme is a key driver of job creation, industrial competitiveness, research and innovation also in the health and pharmaceutical sector;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 283 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 j (new)
8 j. Calls on the Commission to propose as soon as possible a legal framework to encourage innovation for new antibiotics with incentives either comparable to the area of orphan drugs or paediatrics or new innovative incentives to stimulate innovation to brings new antibiotics to the market;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 286 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 k (new)
8 k. Stresses that the EU has to build a stronger European Health Union in particular by supporting closer EU cooperation in research and development and by sharing health data;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 287 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 l (new)
8 l. Stresses that R&D is key for the development of innovative medicines, therapies and diagnosis;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 288 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 m (new)
8 m. Highlights that supporting the competitiveness and innovative capacity of the EU’s pharmaceutical industry is crucial;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 289 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 n (new)
8 n. Welcomes the Commission’s Action Plan on Intellectual Property which shall help companies, especially small and medium-sized companies (SMEs), to make the most of their inventions and creations and ensure they can benefit our economy and society and which aims at enabling the European innovative industry to remain a global leader;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 290 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 o (new)
8 o. Fully supports the IP Action Plans proposal to upgrade a series of existing IP tools and make them fit for the digital age, including improving the supplementary protection certificates (SPC) for patented medicinal products among other;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 291 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 p (new)
8 p. Recalls the Council conclusions ‘An EU Industrial Policy Strategy: a Vision for 2030’ of May 2019 recognising that a well-functioning and effective intellectual property rights regime is key to continued development and growth and recalling that it is essential to continue developing, improving and updating the European intellectual property frameworks, so as to ensure that ideas and inventions can be effectively developed and brought to the market, in particular by and for SMEs, to the benefit of the European economy and society at large;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 292 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 q (new)
8 q. Recalls the Commission’s ‘Updating the 2020 New Industrial Strategy: Building a stronger Single Market for Europe’s recovery’ of May 2021 which states that the EU is strategically dependent on third countries regarding pharmaceutical ingredients and other health related products, which could lead to vulnerabilities for the EU and affect the EU’s core interests, and refers to the pharmaceutical strategy to address these issues;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 293 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 r (new)
8 r. Underlines the need to ensure a smart use of IP, and to better fight IP theft, as smart IP policies are essential to help companies to grow, to create jobs and to protect and develop what makes them unique and competitive;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 294 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 s (new)
8 s. Urges to make the IP systemmore effective for SMEs, through actions to simplify IP registration procedures(e.g. reforming EU legislation on industrial designs), to improve access to strategic IP advice (e.g. by making such advice available in all EU-level R&D funding), and to facilitate the use of IP as a lever to gain access to finance;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 295 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 t (new)
8 t. Stresses that investing in research and development is a costly, high-risk endeavour; underlines that patents are intended to offer some guarantee of a return on investment, but the patent system is also designed to balance the interests of inventors with those of the public; repeats therefore that pharmaceutical companies need intellectual property (IP) rights and thus patents to achieve profits and keep innovating also in the interest of the consumers and patients;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 296 #

2021/2013(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 u (new)
8 u. Underlines that the patent systems all over the world are drafted in a way that for a specific period of time, only for the duration of the patent, the inventor is allowed to commercially exploit its patent. Thereafter, the invention can be freely exploited by anyone;
2021/06/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 11 #

2021/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 27 a (new)
— having regard to the University of Leuven research project of May 2016 “European Works Councils on the Move: Management Perspectives on the Development of a Transnational Institution for Social Dialogue”,
2021/07/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 25 #

2021/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas the voice of workerssocial partnership and collective bargaining between representatives of employees and employers on national level and the social dialogue on European level is a key element of the European Social Model, whose shared legacy of social dialogue, workers’ participation, collective bargaining, employee representation on boards, health and safety representation, and tripartism are the building blocks of a diverse and socially sustainable future;
2021/07/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 55 #

2021/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E a (new)
Ea. whereas according to Eurostat, in 2020 EU Member States with well- developed industrial relations systems, working arrangement sand short-working schemes performed better than the EU average and far fewer workers lost their job19a; __________________ 19aEurostat press release, Euro area GDP down by 12.1 % and employment down by 2.8 % (EU 11.8 % and 2.6 %), August 2020.
2021/07/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 97 #

2021/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Is convinced that the workers’ 3. voice must be a key component of EU initiatives to ensure sustainable corporate governance and due diligence on human right, as laid down in TFEU Article 154 on the consultation of management and labour, to ensure sustainable corporate governance and due diligence on human rights; stresses that it is the main responsibility of states and governments to safeguard human rights in their countries and that this responsibility shall not be fully transferred to private actors;
2021/07/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 105 #

2021/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3a. Highlights the importance of continuously improving the EU’s and Member States’ education, training and skills policies including vocational training, in particular in order to ensure lifelong learning and training, as well as the upskilling and reskilling for all workers;
2021/07/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 107 #

2021/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Calls on the Commission to respect the agreements between European social partners at both cross-industry and sectoral level, in accordance with TFEU Article 154 and 155, and to refrain from unilaterally deciding, in spite of the joint request of those social partners, not to transpose such agreements through a generally binding Council decision;
2021/07/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 130 #

2021/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to establish the necessary conditions and requirements to ensure that at least 80 % of corporations in the EU are covered by sustainable corporate governance agreements by 203025 while recognising the particular administrative burden for small and medium-sized enterprises; calls, to this end, for the establishment of strategies agreed with workers to positively influence environmental, social and economic development through governance practices and market presence, to strengthen the role of directors in pursuing the long-term interests of their company, to improve directors’ accountability towards integrating sustainability into corporate decision-making, and to promote corporate governance practices that contribute to company sustainability, including corporate reporting, board remuneration, a maximum CEO-to-worker pay ratio, board composition and stakeholder involvement26 ; __________________ 25Commission staff working document of 4 March 2021 accompanying its European Pillar of Social Rights Action Plan (SWD(2021)0046). 26 Ibid.
2021/07/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 144 #

2021/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Calls on the Commission to deliver on its commitment to put forward without further delay a directive on binding human rights due diligence and responsible business conduct, including workers’ rights such as the right to organise and collectively bargain, health and safety, social protection and working conditions; stresses that this directive should establish mandatory due diligence covering certain companies’ activities and their business relationships, including supply and subcontracting chains, and should ensure the full involvement of trade unions and workers’ representatives throughout the wholein the establishment and implementation of due diligence processtrategies;
2021/07/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 151 #

2021/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Is convinced that introducing and monitoring new digital technologies in the workplace successfully and in a trustworthy manner will have a positive impact on the working environment and will at the same time require timely and meaningful information for and consultation with trade unions and workers’ representatives to ensure full respect for their health, safety, data protection, equal treatment and well-being at work and prevent undue exploitation and surveillance of workers, in particular via management by algorithms; underlines the fact that trade unions and workers’ representatives should have the necessary access and means to assess and evaluate digital technology;
2021/07/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 171 #

2021/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Stresses the importance of ensuring timely and meaningful information and consultation across the EU before any decisions are made abouton policies or measures with cross-border implications; emphasises thate need of workers’ representatives must have access to the requisite expertise to assess the implications of these cross- border policies and processes for the workforce and companies;
2021/07/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 195 #

2021/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Stresses that many shortcomings in EU law would be overcome by introducing thresholds for a minimum EU standard of board-level representation under this new framework directive; considers, to this end, that workers’ representatives should have the following number/proportion of seats on boards: 2 or 3 seats in small companies with 50 to 250 employees, one third of all seats in companies with 250 to 1 000 employees, and half of all seats in big companies with more than 1 000 employees (within the company and its direct or indirect subsidiaries);
2021/07/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 203 #

2021/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19
19. Calls on the Commission to guarantee information and consultation rights to ensure that the European Works Council can deliver its opinion’s opinion is taken into account in company decisions and is delivered before consultation is completed at the respective level; calls on the Commission, moreover, to ensure access to justice for special negotiation bodies and European Works Councils, to introduce effective, dissuasive and proportionate sanctions, to include joint ventures, franchise systems and contract management in the scope of the Directive; to secure that “representative agent” and “central management” location are based upon objective criteria, to put an end to exemptions for old, so-called ‘voluntary’ pre-directive agreements after more than 20 years, to introduce sanctions, to consolidate the concept of the ‘transnational character of a matter’ and incorporate it into the European Works Council Directive, to prevent the abuse of confidentiality rules, to strengthen the subsidiarity requirements and to ensure the efficient coordination of information, consultation and participation at local, national and EU levels;
2021/07/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 193 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 4
Directive 2013/34/EU
Article 19b – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 1
2. The sustainability reporting standards referred to in paragraph 1 shall require that the information to be reported is understandable, accessible in particular for persons with disabilities relevant, representative, verifiable, comparable, and is represented in a faithful manner.
2021/12/10
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 204 #

2021/0104(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 4
Directive 2013/34/EU
Article 19b – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 2 – point b – point i a (new)
(ia) the recognition of trade unions, existence of collective agreements and the coverage of workers therein;
2021/12/10
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 325 #

2021/0050(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 25
(25) Employers with at least 2500 workers or lower, only if already defined at a national level, should regularly report on pay, in a suitable and transparent manner, such as including the information in their management report. Companies subject to the requirements of Directive 2013/34/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council52 may also choose to report on pay alongside other worker- related matters in their management report. _________________ 52 Directive 2013/34/EU, as amended by Directive 2014/95/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 October 2014 as regards disclosure of non- financial and diversity information by certain large undertakings and groups (OJ L 330, 15.11.2014, p. 1).
2021/10/26
Committee: EMPLFEMM
Amendment 470 #

2021/0050(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 1
1. This Directive applies to employers in the public and private sectors. Employers who are bound by collective wage agreements shall be subject to a presumption of appropriateness.
2021/10/26
Committee: EMPLFEMM
Amendment 573 #

2021/0050(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 4 – paragraph 4
4. Whenever differences in pay can be attributed to a single source establishing the pay conditions, the assessment whether workers are carrying out the same work or work of equal value shall not be limited to situations in which female and male workers work for the same employer but may be extended to that single source. The assessment shall also not be limited to workers employed at the same time as the worker concerned. Where no real comparator can be established, a comparison with a hypothetical comparator or the use of other evidence allowing to presume alleged discrimination shall be permitted.deleted
2021/10/26
Committee: EMPLFEMM
Amendment 590 #

2021/0050(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 4 – paragraph 5 a (new)
5a. Remuneration provisions enshrined in collective agreements that are binding upon the employer shall be subject to a presumption of appropriateness. Activities that are assigned to different remuneration brackets, based on these provisions, shall be seen as not being equal work or work of equal value, as long as the provisions are not in breach of paragraph 5 of this Article.
2021/10/26
Committee: EMPLFEMM
Amendment 635 #

2021/0050(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 7 – paragraph 1
1. Workers shall have the right to receive information on their individual pay level and the average pay levels, broken down by sex, for categories of workers doing the same work as them or work of equal value to theirs, in accordance with paragraphs 3 and 4. In the case of employers who are bound by collective wage agreements, a reference to the applicable collective wage agreement shall suffice as information.
2021/10/26
Committee: EMPLFEMM
Amendment 677 #

2021/0050(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
1. Employers with at least 2500 workers or lower if defined at a national level, shall provide the following information concerning their organisation, in accordance with paragraphs 2, 3, and 5: For employers bound by applicable agreements at sectoral level a presumption of appropriateness shall apply with regard to the implementation of reporting requirements in this article
2021/10/26
Committee: EMPLFEMM
Amendment 734 #

2021/0050(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. In the case of employers who are bound by collective wage agreements, a reference to the relevant collective wage agreement shall suffice.
2021/10/26
Committee: EMPLFEMM
Amendment 746 #

2021/0050(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 3
3. The employer shall publish the information referred to in paragraph 1, points (a) to (f) on an annual basis in a user-friendly way on its website or shall otherwise make it publicly available. The information from the previous four years, if available, shall also be accessible upon request. In addition, the employer shall share this information with the monitoring body referred to in paragraph 6. In the case of employers who are bound by collective wage agreements, the obligations in this paragraph shall apply only every five years.
2021/10/26
Committee: EMPLFEMM
Amendment 797 #

2021/0050(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 9 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
1. Member States shall take appropriate measures to ensure that employers with at least 2500 workers or lower if already defined at a national level, conduct, in cooperation with their workers’ following a joint agreement between social partners and in cooperation with workers’ representatives, a joint pay assessment where both of the following conditions are met:
2021/10/26
Committee: EMPLFEMM
Amendment 821 #

2021/0050(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 9 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Employers who are bound by collective wage agreements shall be subject to a presumption of appropriateness. They are excluded from the obligations in this Article.
2021/10/26
Committee: EMPLFEMM
Amendment 99 #

2020/2244(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital O
O. whereas, contrary to the crowding- out hypothesis that has prevailed in economic thinking for the last three decades, public investment and its crowding-in effects should play a central role in this new economic paradigm; whereas investments and reforms should also focus on digital skills and educational and vocational training for all in order to have a positive impact on social cohesion, which is a pre-condition for economic growth, job creation and employment;
2021/01/21
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 103 #

2020/2244(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital O a (new)
O a. whereas cohesion policy, as the EU’s main investment policy for social, economic and territorial development, has demonstrated its effectiveness in reducing inequalities and regional differences, in particular regarding the poorest regions;
2021/01/21
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 105 #

2020/2244(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital O c (new)
O c. whereas the green transition and the digitalisation of the economy will involve substantial economic diversification and transformation of business models and policymaking; whereas that will create new opportunities as well as significant socio-economic challenges in many regions and industrial sectors; whereas the EU needs a common strategy to accompany workers and businesses concerned in order to ensure that no one is left behind;
2021/01/21
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 129 #

2020/2244(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to reform the financial legal framework and the European Semester process in order to strengthen democratic accountability and the involvement of the European Parliament; stresses that the social progress objectives regarding social welfare systems and quality employment must be shielded from the application of macroeconomic conditionality;
2021/01/21
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 166 #

2020/2244(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Stresses that fiscal flexibility to support investment in social rights is vitalimportant, as is the mainstreaming, effectively and at all stages, of all principles enshrined in the EPSR; demands that any proposed fiscal measures be ex-ante assessed and monitored against the provisions of Article 9 of the TFEU to evaluate their social impact, and that they only be considered when they will be beneficial for upward social convergence and increasing wellbeing standards in Member States;
2021/01/21
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 186 #

2020/2244(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to develop a quality employment package, including legislative initiativesinitiatives contributing and supporting Member States actions in the field taking into account diverse forms of national practices and the role of social partners and collective bargaining aimed at improving wages and protecting decent working conditions for all, with a particular focus on telework, the right to disconnect, mental well-being at work, occupational health and safety, the rights of platform workers, ensuring quality jobs for essential workers, and strengthening democracy at work and the role of the social partners and collective bargaining;
2021/01/21
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 190 #

2020/2244(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8 a (new)
8 a. Stresses that Members States should also focus on innovation and investments for improved connectivity and artificial intelligence methods and systematic deployment of 5G and Gigabit infrastructure along urban and rural households and large-scale transport corridors in line with EU’s 2025 5G and Gigabit connectivity objectives;
2021/01/21
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 218 #

2020/2244(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Stresses that implementing the EU skills agenda equitably is critical for promoting health systems and tackling skills shortages for people in new fields of work; warns, however, that a skills agenda is not enough to tackle the increasing precariousness and in-work poverty in the EU labour market; calls on the Commission and the Member States to maximise their efforts to invest in affordable, accessible, inclusive and high- quality vocational education and training, to reinforce upskilling and reskilling measures, including digital and transferable skills, and to promote lifelong learning to prepare workers for the needs of the labour market affected by the green and digital transformations; takes the view that the mutual recognition of qualifications will be beneficial for overcoming skills shortages and skills mismatches;
2021/01/21
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 240 #

2020/2244(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14
14. Calls on the Commission to analyse brain drains in certain regions and sectors, and to support mobile workers by ensuring fair mobility and strengthening the portability of rights and entitlements; underlines that the digitalisation of public services can help to facilitate fair labour mobility, particularly with regard to the coordination of social security systems;
2021/01/21
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 245 #

2020/2244(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14 a (new)
14 a. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to ensure a growth- friendly investment climate and to support SMEs and their employees in the transition to a more digital and greener economy, and to give adequate consideration to the interests of SMEs in the policy making process by analysing the possible effects of policies on SMEs; highlights the importance of improving access for SMEs to public and private funding, including microcredits and crowdfunding, and reducing unnecessary regulatory burdens;
2021/01/21
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 246 #

2020/2244(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Points out that fairness conditions must be establishshould be considered for companies that wish to access public funds and support in order to avoid such support going to companies based in tax havens, to those without significanta jurisdiction referred to in Annex I to Council conclusions on the revised EU list of non-cooperative jurisdictions for tax purposes1a, should not subvert collective bargaining, workers’ participation in company matters or codetermination, or those without a ban on bonuses to limit CEO and top executive remuneration;or codetermination in company decision-making processes in accordance with national law and practice, and should be conditional on maintaining the same level of working and employment conditions and rights, including protection against dismissals and reductions in wages, no bonuses to managers or dividends to shareholders; _________________ 1a OJ C 64, 27.2.1010, p. 8
2021/01/21
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 24 #

2020/2079(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 69 a (new)
- having regard to its resolution of 19 June 2020 on European protection of cross-border and seasonal workers in the context of the COVID-19 crisis2, ______________________________ 2 Text adopted, P9_TA(2020)0176.
2020/07/23
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 158 #

2020/2079(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Highlights that in the current crisis, the Stability and Growth Pact has proven to be inadequate, not allowing Member States the fiscal spac Member States remain fully committed to the Stability and Growth Pact and welcomes their decision to make use of the general escape clause to ensure they need to absorb imbalances and mitigate the social consequences, which maded flexibility to take all necessary measures to support the the activation of the escape clause necessary; demands that social and ecological objectives be given the same legal enforceability as fiscal consolidation and financial stabilityalth of the European citizens and civil protections systems and to stabilise the European social market economy; asks for better integration and strengthening of the role of the social and ecological objectives;
2020/07/23
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 185 #

2020/2079(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. Welcomes Next Generation EU, the EU’s recovery plan; calls on the Member States to make use of the general escape clause and invest in people and social welfare systems, without endeavouring fiscal sustainability and remaining committed to respect the Stability and Growth Pact; calls for specific social progress plans to ensure more effective and stronger welfare states;
2020/07/23
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 214 #

2020/2079(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Calls on the Commission and Member States to ensure that financial assistance is only provided to undertakings not registered in tax havens;he countries listed in the Annex 1 of the Council conclusions on the revised EU list of non-cooperative jurisdictions for tax purposes; 1a __________________ 1aCouncil conclusions (6129/20) on the revised EU list of non-cooperative jurisdictions for tax purposes of 18 February 2020
2020/07/23
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 223 #

2020/2079(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Calls on the Commission to improve the scoreboard by integrating further indicators and clear targets reflecting all 20 principles of the EPSR, and to develop mandatory social targetsbuild upon existing indicators and reinforce the scoreboard by reflecting all 20 principles of the EPSR;
2020/07/23
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 237 #

2020/2079(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Is concerned about the increased rate of unemployment, which will especially affect youth and workers in low- skilled positions and precarious employment; calls on the Commission to elaborate on the possibility of proposeing a permanent EU unemployment reinsurance scheme and a more effective and inclusive Youth Guarantee with high-quality offers of work, training and education; calls on the Member States to adequately invest in effective active labour market policies to prevent long-term unemployment;
2020/07/23
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 254 #

2020/2079(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Stresses that the successful implementation of the EU Recovery Plan requires a proper social dialogue at all levels and effective involvement of the social partners; calls on the Commission and Member States to support capacity building of the social partners in order to strengthen social dialogue and collective bargaining;
2020/07/23
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 284 #

2020/2079(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Asks the Commission to propose legal instruments to ensure decent working conditions for all workers, strengthen collective bargaining coverage, ban zero- hour contracts, end bogus self- employment, set strict limits on subcontracting practices, and improve social protection standards; calls on the Commission to present a European directive on decent working conditions for platform workers and, non-standard workers and workers in precarious forms of employment;
2020/07/23
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 289 #

2020/2079(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 a (new)
13a. Is concerned about the working and living conditions of seasonal workers and other cross-border workers in the low-wage sector; calls for an EU-wide subcontractor liability in certain sectors like agriculture and meat industry, especially in the case of on-site work contracts, and clear rules on subcontracting practices in general;
2020/07/23
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 290 #

2020/2079(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 b (new)
13b. Acknowledges the crucial role of European carers during the pandemic; calls for a European carers’ strategy to ensure fair labour mobility in this sector and improve working conditions for carers;
2020/07/23
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 303 #

2020/2079(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14
14. Calls for an EU teleworking agenda, including a legislative proposalframework to ensure decent working conditions including respect for working hours, leave and the right to disconnect;
2020/07/23
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 306 #

2020/2079(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14 a (new)
14a. Pays attention to the fact that flexible working arrangements and tele- working also play an important role in preserving jobs and production and are one of the key factors in supporting better work-life balance;
2020/07/23
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 313 #

2020/2079(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Asks the Commission to put forward a proposal for a digital EU Social Security Number to facilitate fair labour mobility;
2020/07/23
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 316 #

2020/2079(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Is concerned about limited intergenerational social mobility and increasing income inequality; stresses that national tax and benefit systems must be designed in a way that reduces inequalities, promotes fairness and provides incentives for labour market participation; Therefore, taxation should be shifted away from labour towards other sources where it will have a less harmful effect on inclusive growth and at the same time ensure the full alignment with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and the climate and environmental objectives as defined in the European Green Deal;
2020/07/23
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 331 #

2020/2079(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Calls on the Commission to present an EU child guarantee in 2020, a rights- based,as soon as possible, a comprehensive and integrated anti- poverty strategy, an EU framework on national homelessness strategies, to conduct a comparative study on the different minimum income schemes in the Member States, and to highlight best practice cases with a view to presenting a framework in this regard;
2020/07/23
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 379 #

2020/2079(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 22
22. Calls on the Commission to update the Skills Agenda for Europe in order to meet the skills requirements of the EU labour market and of the ecological and digital transition; underlines that supporting adequate skills with emphasis on digital skills will improve the productivity and resilience of the labour force easing the ecological and digital transition towards a greener and smarter economy;
2020/07/23
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 403 #

2020/2079(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24 a (new)
24a. Calls on the Member States to actively promote the development of the circular and social economy, foster social innovation, social enterprises and strengthen their sustainability, and encourage those forms of work which create quality job opportunities;
2020/07/23
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 22 #

2020/2076(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital C
C. whereas digitalisation and artificial intelligence according to the principles of the Green Deal and the SDG’s are crucial for all industry sectors, increasing competitiveness, creating job opportunities and economic prosperity;
2020/06/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 43 #

2020/2076(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital E a (new)
E a. whereas COVID-19 had an enormous impact on the organisation of work and jobs, and increases the need for a new industrial strategy;
2020/06/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 51 #

2020/2076(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Highlights that EU industrial policy must be in line with the European Pillar of Social Rights and efficiently address the social consequences of structural change and the need to continue implementing its principles, in order to support fair working conditions and equal opportunities, as well as access to well-functioning labour markets and welfare systems; Stresses the urgent need to diversify global supply chains and make them more sustainable and transparent.
2020/06/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 173 #

2020/2076(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7 a. Stress the need for a strong social component in the industrial EU strategy and a fair digitalisation of the industry. The New Industrial Strategy should guarantee adequate support for quality work environment, good working conditions and decent work. This requires measures to adequate support for workers in this transition with a focus on employability and well-being. This requires investments in not only technology driven innovations but also in human centred social dialogue and social innovation.
2020/06/17
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 17 #

2020/2020(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital A b (new)
Ab. Whereas the freedom to provide services is crucial to the Single Market;
2020/06/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 52 #

2020/2020(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital C a (new)
Ca. Taking into account the vulnerable position of workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, free movement of services should not lead to a decline of labour conditions, health and safety of workers.
2020/06/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 56 #

2020/2020(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital C b (new)
Cb. Whereas the free movement of services should follow the principles of the European Pillar of Social Rights and should not affect the further implementation of the Pillar.
2020/06/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 132 #

2020/2020(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Calls on the Commission and Member States to promote the use of digital tools and provide labour inspectorates with sufficient resources. Urges the Commission to make the European Labour Authority fully operational as soon as possible to ensure a better coordination between the national labour inspectorates and to tackle cross- border social dumping.
2020/06/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 15 #

2020/2012(INL)

Draft opinion
Recital B
B. Wwhereas AI offers economic and societal benefits, while at the same time raising a number of challenges; Whereas AI offers economic and societal benefits, while at same time raising a number of challenges and that new AI applications should not have a negative impact on the current labour conditions;
2020/06/24
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 44 #

2020/2012(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Highlights the need to thoroughly assess the effects or implications of AI applications in companies and in public administration in relation to workers, jobs and workflows; considers it indispensable as part of this assessment that workers and their representative social partners are consulted and receive sufficient information before AI applications are put to use; considers it necessary that training be provided to all concerned employees when new AI technologies are introduced at the workplace;
2020/06/24
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 65 #

2020/2012(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Points out that AI solutions have the potential to improve working conditions and the quality of life, yet they can also lead to disproportionate and illegal surveillance of workers, discriminatory treatment due to biased algorithms, including gender biased algorithms3 - and they can undermine the dignity and autonomy of people; AI algorithms at the workplace should be fair, transparent and respecting social implications for the workers concerned. __________________ 3 European Parliament “Education and employment of women in science, technology and the digital economy, including AI and its influence on gender equality”, April 2020
2020/06/24
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 110 #

2020/2012(INL)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Calls for a legislative framework on the ethical aspects of AI applications in the workplace, especially with regard to workers’ rights and working conditions; points out the necessity for this legislative framework to be in line with the rules of protection of personal data and respect privacy of the workers;
2020/06/24
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 35 #

2020/0289(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 5
(5) The limitation of the internal review provided for in Regulation (EC) No 1367/2006 to administrative acts of individual scope is the main obstacle for environmental non-governmental organisations seeking to have recourse to internal review under Article 10 of that Regulation also as regards administrative acts that have a wider scope. It is therefore necessary to broaden the scope of the internal review procedure laid down in that Regulation to include non- legislative acts of a general scope.deleted
2021/03/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 70 #

2020/0289(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 12 a (new)
(12a) National measures, such as those granting state aid, can be challenged before the national courts, as the authority competent to grant the aid is an institution or body of a Member State. Considering the delimitation of competences between the Union and its Member States, Commission decisions concerning state aid are limited to controlling compatibility with the internal market within the meaning of Article 107(3)(c) TFEU and are amenable to judicial review under Article 263 TFEU and under Article 267 TFEU.
2021/03/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 87 #

2020/0289(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 1
Regulation (EC) No 1367/2006
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point g
(g) ‘administrative act’ means any non- legislative act of individual scope adopted by a Union institution or body, which has legally binding and external effects and contains provisions that may, because of their effects, contravene environmental law within the meaning of point (f) of Article 2(1), excepting those provisions of this act for which Union law explicitly requires implementing measures at Union or national level;
2021/03/11
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 15 #

2020/0262(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 1
(1) Directive 2004/37/EC of the European Parliament and the Council45 aims to protect workers against risks to their health and safety from exposure to carcinogens or mutagens at the workplace. A consistenthigh level of protection from the risks related to the occupational exposure to carcinogens and mutagens is provided for in that Directive by a framework of general principles to enable Member States to ensure the consistent application of minimum requirements. The aim of these minimum requirements is to protect workers at Union level. More stringent provisions can be set by Member States. __________________ 45 Directive 2004/37/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 29 April 2004 on the protection of workers from the risks related to exposure to carcinogens or mutagens at work (Sixth individual Directive within the meaning of Article 16(1) of Council Directive 89/391/EEC) (OJ L 158, 30.4.2004, p. 50).
2021/02/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 20 #

2020/0262(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 2
(2) Principle 10 of the European Pillar of Social Rights46 , jointly proclaimed by the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission at the Social Summit for Fair Jobs and Growth on 17 November 2017, provides workers’ right to a high level of protection of their health and safety at work, which includes the protection from the exposure to carcinogens and mutagens at the workplace, irrespective of the arrangements for, and duration of employment and exposure. __________________ 46European Pillar of Social Rights, November 2017, available at : https://ec.europa.eu/commission/sites/beta- political/files/social-summit-european- pillar-social-rights-booklet_en.pdf
2021/02/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 24 #

2020/0262(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 3
(3) Binding occupational exposure limit values are important component of the general arrangements for the protection of workers established by Directive 2004/37/EC and must not be exceeded. Limit values and other directly related provisions should be evidence-based and measurable, being established for all those carcinogens or mutagens for which the available information, including updated scientific and technical data, make this possible.
2021/02/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 36 #

2020/0262(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 5
(5) This Directive strengthens the protection of workers’ health and safety at their workplace. New limit values should be set out in Directive 2004/37/EC in the lightThe Commission should review it on a regular basis and make legislative proposals if appropriate. New binding limit values should be set out in Directive 2004/37/EC. Binding occupational exposure limit values should be evidence-based and measurable, being established on the basis of available information, including newupdated scientific and technical data, economic feasibility of implementation and compliance and should also be based on a thorough assessment of the socioeconomic impact and availability of exposure measurement protocols and techniques at the workplace. That information should, if possible, include data on residual risks to the health of workers, opinions of the Committee for Risk Assessment (RAC) of the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA), as well as opinions of the Advisory Committee on Safety and Health at Work (ACSH) and monographs of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC1a). Information related to residual risk, made publicly available at Union level, is valuable for any future work to limit risks from occupational exposure to carcinogens and mutagens.
2021/02/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 59 #

2020/0262(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 15 a (new)
(15a) In implementing this Directive Member States should take the everyday existence of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) into account. Member States are therefore invited to assess the impact of their transposition act on SMEs in order to make sure that SMEs are not disproportionately affected, with specific attention for micro-enterprises and for administrative burden, and to publish the results of such assessments. While maintaining equal protection levels for all the workers, compliance for SMEs and microenterprises should be facilitated; against this background, specific measures such as incentives and digital tools could help them to better comply with the obligations laid down in the Directive 2004/37/EC. In that regard, the social partners should exchange best practices.
2021/02/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 63 #

2020/0262(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 18 b (new)
(18b) Articles 153, 154 and 155 TFEU establish the scope and authority of the social partners to negotiate and enforce agreements relating to occupational health and safety and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union guarantees, in particular, the fundamental right to life (Article 2) and the right to fair and just working conditions with respect to health, safety and dignity (Article 31(1)).
2021/02/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 90 #

2020/0262(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – point -1z (new)
Directive 2004/37/EC
Article 11 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 – indents 1 and 2
(-1 z) In the second subparagraph of Article 11(1), the indents are replaced by the following: –- Adapted to take account of new or changed risk, – Repeated periodically in healthcare settings for all workers who come in to contact with cytotoxic and mutagens, and – Repeated periodically in other settings if necessary."
2021/02/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 21 #

2020/0101(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 5
(5) An additional exceptional amount of EUR 58 272 800 000 (in current prices) for budgetary commitment from the Structural Funds under the Investment for growth and jobs goal, for the years 2020, 2021 and 2022 should be made available to support Member States and regions most impacted in crisis repair in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic or preparing a green, digital and resilient recovery of the economy and employment, with a view to deploying resources quickly to the real economy through the existing operational programmes. Resources for 2020 stem from an increase in the resources available for economic, social and territorial cohesion in the multiannual financial framework for 2014-2020 whereas resources for 2021 and 2022 stem from the European Union Recovery Instrument. Part of the additional resources should be allocated to technical assistance at the initiative of the Commission. The Commission should set out the breakdown of the remaining additional resources for each Member State on the basis of an allocation method based on the latest available objective statistical data concerning Member States’ relative prosperity and the extent of the effect of the current crisis on their economies and societies. The allocation method should include a dedicated additional amount for the outermost regions given the specific vulnerability of their economies and societies. In order to reflect the evolving nature of the effects of the crisis, the breakdown should be revised in 2021 on the basis of the same allocation method using the latest statistical data available by 19 October 2021 to distribute the 2022 tranche of the additional resources.
2020/07/08
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 26 #

2020/0101(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 7
(7) In order to allow maximum flexibility to Member States for tailoring crisis repair actions in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic or preparing a green, digital and resilient recovery of the economy, allocations should be established by the Commission at Member State level. Furthermore, the possibility for using any additional resources to support aid for the most deprived should also be provided for. In addition, it is necessary to establish ceilings concerning the allocation to technical assistance at the initiative of the Member States while allowing maximum flexibility to the Member States as to its allocation within operational programmes supported by the ERDF or the ESF. It should be clarified that there is no need to respect the ESF minimum share for the additional resources. Taking account of the expected quick spending of the additional resources, the commitments linked to those additional resources should only be decommitted at the closure of the operational programmes.
2020/07/08
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 42 #

2020/0101(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 10
(10) For the ESF, Member States should primarily use the additional resources to support job maintenance, including through short-time work schemes and support to self-employed, job creation, in particular for people in vulnerable situations, support to youth employment measures, education and training, skills development and to enhance access to social services of general interest, including for children and elderly people. It should be clarified that in the present exceptional circumstances support to short-time work schemes for employees and the self- employed in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic can be provided even when that support is not combined with active labour market measures, unless the latter are imposed by national law. Union support to those short-time work schemes should be limited in time.
2020/07/08
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 53 #

2020/0101(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 15
(15) With a view to allow the targeting of these additional resources to the geographic areas where they are most needed, as an exceptional measure and without prejudice to the general rules for allocating Structural Funds resources, the additional resources allocated to the ERDF and the ESF are not to be broken down per category of region. However, Member States are expected to take into account the different regional needs and development levels in order to ensure that focus is maintained on less developed regions, in accordance with the objectives of economic, social and territorial cohesion set out in Article 173 TFEU. Member States should also involve local and regional authorities, as well as relevant bodies representing civil society and social partners, in accordance with the partnership principles.
2020/07/08
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 82 #

2020/0101(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2
Regulation (EU) No 1303/2013
Article 92b – paragraph 8– subparagraph 4
For the ESF, the additional resources shall primarily be used to support job maintenance, including through short-time work schemes and support to self- employed, even when that support is not combined with active labour market measures, unless the latter are imposed by national law. The additional resources shall also support job creation, in particular for people in vulnerable situations, youth employment measures, education and training, skills development, in particular to support the twin green and digital transitions, and to enhance access to social services of general interest, including for children and elderly people.
2020/07/08
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 130 #

2020/0006(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 6
(6) In view of the importance of tackling climate change in line with the Union’s commitments to implement the Paris Agreement, the commitment regarding the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and the increased ambition of the Union as proposed in the European Green Deal, the JTF should provide a key contribution to mainstream climate actions. Resources from the JTF own envelope are additional and come on top of the investments needed to achieve the overall target of 25% of the Union budget expenditure contributing to climate objectives. Resources transferred from the ERDF and ESF+ will contribute fully to the achievement of this target.
2020/05/18
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 203 #

2020/0006(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 13
(13) In order to provide flexibility for the programming of the JTF resources under the Investment for jobs and growth goal, it should be possible to prepare a self- standing JTF programme or to programme JTF resources in one or more dedicated priorities within a programme supported by the European Regional Development Fund (‘ERDF’), the European Social Fund Plus (‘ESF+’) or the Cohesion Fund. In accordance with Article 21a of Regulation (EU) [new CPR], JTF resources should be reinforced with complementary funding from the ERDF and the ESF+. The respective amounts transferred from the ERDF and the ESF+ should be consistent with the type of operations set out in the territorial just transition plans. The transfer of money from the ERDF and the ESF+ to the JTF resources has to be excluded.
2020/05/18
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 373 #

2020/0006(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 – paragraph 2
2. The JTF priority or priorities shall comprise the JTF resources consisting of all or part of the JTF allocation for the Member States and the resources transferred in accordance with Article [21a] of Regulation (EU) [new CPR]. The total of the ERDF and ESF+ resources transferred to the JTF priority shall be at least equal to one and a half times the amount of support from the JTF to that priority but shall not exceed three times that amount. The transfer of money from the ERDF and ESF+ resources to the JTF has to be excluded.
2020/05/18
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 25 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Citation 5
— having regard to the Concluding Observations of the UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD Committee) of 2 October 2015 on the initial report of the European Union, including those on the European Union institutions’ compliance with the Convention as public administration,
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 28 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Citation 5 a (new)
- having regard to the General Comments of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, as the authoritative guidance on the implementation of the UN CRPD,
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 42 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Citation 20 a (new)
- having regard to the exploratory opinion of the European Economic and Social Committee requested by the European Parliament on the situation of disabled women,
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 47 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Citation 21 a (new)
- having regard to the study of the European Parliament Policy Department C of 2016 on European Structural and Investent Funds and people with disabilities in the European Union,
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 48 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Citation 22
— having regard to the Annual Report 2018 of the European Ombudsman, and specifically her strategic inquiries into how the European Commission ensures that disabled people can access its websites (OI/6/2017/EA), how the European Commission treats disabled people under the Joint Sickness Insurance Scheme for EU staff (OI/4/2016/EA), and the Decision in the joint inquiry in cases 1337/2017/EA and 1338/2017/EA on the accessibility for visually impaired candidates of selection procedures to recruit EU civil servants, organised by the European Personnel Selection Office,
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 59 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Citation 28 a (new)
- having regard to the Regulation (EU) No 1303/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 December 2013 laying down common provision on the European Structural and Investments Funds, particularly to articles 4, 6 and 7 12
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 88 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Recital F a (new)
F a. whereas disability is a social construction and according to the social model of disability: - Impairment is a physical, mental or sensory functional limitation within the individual. - Disability is the loss or limitation of opportunities to take part in the "normal life" of the community equally with others due to physical and social barriers. Therefore, the term ‘disabled people’ defines “people with impairments who are disabled by socially constructed barriers”; furthermore, the term ‘people with disabilities’ refers to the disabling that effect rests within the individual person rather than from society. The term ‘disabilities’ when used in this context refers to a person’s medical condition and thus confuses disability with impairment. In addition it denies the political or ‘disability identity’
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 93 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Recital F b (new)
F b. whereas article 19 of the UN CRPD states that "States Parties to the present Convention recognize the equal right of all persons with disabilities to live in the community, with choices equal to others, and shall take effective and appropriate measures to facilitate full enjoyment by persons with disabilities of this right and their full inclusion and participation in the community";
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 109 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Recital G a (new)
G a. whereas a considerable proportion of the four million people experiencing homelessness every year have disability, having been largely overlooked as a target group of the UNCRPD and the EU Disability Strategy;
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 177 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Paragraph 2 – indent 4 a (new)
- reflecting the guidance and interpretation of the UNCRPD given by the General Comments of the UNCRPD Committee, including definitions of the key terms,
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 196 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Paragraph 2 – indent 5 a (new)
- abolishing the institutionalisation in a specific time frame and supporting the practice of personal assistants for disabled people, in all Member States,
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 200 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Paragraph 2 – indent 5 b (new)
- recognising and addressing the multiple and intersectional forms of discrimination they may face, and in particular the challenges faced by women, girls, children, older and LGBTI disabled people, as well as persons from racial and ethnic minorities.
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 202 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Paragraph 2 – indent 5 c (new)
- setting new rules for the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the International Air Transport Association (IATA) in order to protect the rights of the disabled passengers concerning the safety of the integrity of both their body and equipment when transferred, and the recognition of the need for extra seats in cases of a personal assistant or laying,
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 205 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Paragraph 2 – indent 6 a (new)
- by creating mechanisms for the coordination of portability and adaptability of benefits and services for the disabled people between Member States inside the EU;
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 274 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Paragraph 6
6. Stresses the need for continuous monitoring of the implementation of the UNCRPD; calls for the collection of robust, disaggregated, comparable data on the situation of persons with disabilities to facilitate proper monitoring of progress; urges the Commission to provide adequate resources to the EU CRPD Framework to enable it to perform its functions independently and adequately;For that purpose, calls for:
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 282 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Paragraph 6 – indent 1 (new)
- the collection of robust, disaggregated, comparable data on the situation of disabled people to facilitate proper monitoring of progress,
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 285 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Paragraph 6 – indent 3 (new)
- a flexible mechanism that can provide incentives for the optimal implementation of the CRPD. To that extent, commends initiatives like the Access City Awards and calls for relevant initiatives on the national level;
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 318 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Paragraph 8
8. Calls on the Commission to safeguard the UNCRPD-compliant use of EU funds and to ensure that EU funds, in a specific time period of five years, will not contribute to the construction or refurbishment of institutional care settings or any other kind of settings that could easily turn into an institution;
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 327 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Paragraph 8 a (new)
8 a. Calls on the Commission to examine the possibility of legislative and non-legislative proposals regarding the Independent Living strategy that reflects the European Way of Life for the disabled people, by mainstreaming best practices - concerning Independent Living and Personal Assistance, - regarding the assistance for starting a family, - in the field of employment, - in removing all barriers (physical, intellectual, psychological, financial), that prevent disabled people from accessing quality and affordable healthcare services, and provide information in accessible formats, especially for people with lifelong disabilities, - in familiarising disabled and non- disabled people with the social model of disability and combating all stereotypes, like in the area of sexuality, through the development of campaigns and cooperation with the creative industries;
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 364 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Paragraph 9
9. Calls on the Commission to develop a comprehensive campaign in accessible format to raise awareness of the UN CRPD among the persons with disabilitiesdisabled people and the society in general, and promote, coordinate and create educational material that can be used by the national systems;
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 381 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Paragraph 9 c (new)
9 c. Calls on the Commission to create, in cooperation with the private sector, one portal that collects all the instruments provided for the optimal social participation of disabled people,
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 395 #

2019/2975(RSP)


Paragraph 10 a (new)
10 a. Calls on the Commission to ensure that the post-2020 Strategy will specially promote guaranteed access to employment, trainings, inclusive education, to affordable quality healthcare services, to digital services, to sport activities for disabled people;
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 424 #
2020/02/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 19 #

2019/2212(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A a (new)
A a. whereas according to the social scoreboard accompanying the European Pillar of Social Rights, labour market and social trends in the EU continue to be positive for 9 out of 14 headline indicators;
2020/01/29
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 20 #

2019/2212(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A b (new)
A b. whereas employment continues to increase and 241.9 million people were in employment in the EU in the third quarter of 2019, the highest level ever reached;
2020/01/29
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 21 #

2019/2212(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A c (new)
A c. whereas unemployment reached a record low 6.3% in the third quarter of 2019;
2020/01/29
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 23 #

2019/2212(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas the employment rate of older workers (55-64) increased to 58.7 % in 2018; whereas older workers continue to be the main driver of employment growth; whereas the lack of adequate care services is a barrier to keeping older workers, especially women, in the labour market;
2020/01/29
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 61 #

2019/2212(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F
F. whereas income inequalities remain at a high level; whereas wage austerity as well as tax and labour cost competition are harmful for the single marketeconomic crises have led to and increase inequalities and the vulnerability of low wage earnerd number of low wage earners throughout many Member States; whereas intergenerational social mobility is limited in most Member States;
2020/01/29
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 92 #

2019/2212(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I a (new)
I a. whereas homelessness has increased over the last decade in most Member States and poor households are increasingly overburdened by rising housing costs; whereas housing and assistance for the homelessness is one of the priorities within the European Pillar of Social Rights;
2020/01/29
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 143 #

2019/2212(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Is concerned that rates of unemployment and long-term unemployment are still high in some Member States; calls for a new financial instrument to tackle long-term unemployment by providing financial support for measures and projects in regions with above-average long-term unemploymentthe strengthening of existing funds like the European Social Fund Plus to tackle long-term unemployment and for a strong Just Transition Fund for regions that will suffer the consequences of the energy transition and the fight against climate change;
2020/01/29
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 204 #

2019/2212(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Calls on the Commission to present a framework directive on decent minimum income schemes in order to provide a social protection floor;deleted
2020/01/29
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 226 #

2019/2212(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Calls for an strong and integrated response to tackle the lack of affordable housing, poor housing conditions, housing exclusion and homelessness;
2020/01/29
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 244 #

2019/2212(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10 a (new)
10 a. Acknowledges that many traditional jobs are being replaced by new jobs due to digitization; calls on Member States to provide more vocational training in order to keep workers in risk of losing their jobs in the labour market;
2020/01/29
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 268 #

2019/2212(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Calls on the Commission to strengthen the regulation of new forms ofAcknowledges that the number of workers engaged in new forms of employment like platform economies are continuously rising; calls on the Commission to carry out an impact assessment and based on the outcome propose measures that strengthen the rights of platform workers and improve their working conditions of platform workers;
2020/01/29
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 329 #

2019/2212(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Stresses that decisive support is needed for society, workers and businesses to face the challenges of climate change and the transition to carbon neutrality; calls on the Commission and the Member States to ensure adequate social and environmental investment for a true ‘just transition’, the implementation of the EPSR and the achievement of the SDGs, by exempting social spending from the euro area fiscal rules and thereby allowing more investment in human capital, skills and health;
2020/01/29
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 337 #

2019/2212(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16 a (new)
16 a. Welcomes the Commission's announcement to launch a wide public consultation with all the relevant stakeholders to examine the possible directions of development of EU fiscal rules;
2020/01/29
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 44 #

2019/2188(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C
C. whereas women in EU-27 earn 15% less than men on average8; whereas the average gender employment gap stands at 11,5% with women more affected by flexible work forms, atypical and flexible contracts (part-time work, temporary work); __________________ 8 https://www.europarl.europa.eu/news/en/he adlines/society/20200227STO73519/gende r-pay-gap-in-europe-facts-and-figures- infographic
2020/09/02
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 62 #

2019/2188(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C f (new)
Cf. whereas research8a shows that the amount a household receives from a minimum wage tends to be sufficient to protect a single adult against the risk of poverty, but it is often not sufficient to support more than one person; __________________ 8aEurofound (2020), Minimum wages in 2020: Annual review. https://www.eurofound.europa.eu/publicat ions/report/2020/minimum-wages-in- 2020-annual-review
2020/09/02
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 114 #

2019/2188(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital K
K. whereas coverage is declining in OECD countries, and in at least 14 EU Member States one in every two employees works without a wage agreement; whereas only seven Member States have a collective bargaining coverage rate above 80%16 ; whereas the decline was most rapid in those countries where collective bargaining was the target of structural reforms16a; __________________ 16OECD, Visser(2016) ICTWSS Database.https://www.etuc.org/en/docume nt/etuc-reply-first-phase-consultation- social-partners-under-article-154-tfeu- possible-action, p. 6, no 15. 16aEurofound (2020 forthcoming), Industrial Relations Flagship report.
2020/09/02
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 125 #

2019/2188(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital L d (new)
Ld. whereas the contraction of employment during the previous crisis created a dramatic increase in the number of involuntary part-time workers who are most likely to work in basic or lower-level service occupations and sectors and who have amongst the highest in-work poverty risk-levels17a; __________________ 17aEurofound (2017), In-work poverty in the European Union. https://www.eurofound.europa.eu/publicat ions/report/2017/in-work-poverty-in-the- eu
2020/09/02
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 133 #

2019/2188(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital M
M. whereas privatisation and outsourcing areis reducing job security, and this is also an indicator of the increase in precarious employment;
2020/09/02
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 143 #

2019/2188(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital O
O. whereas minimum wage systems vary widely in size, scope and coverage across Member States; whereas the minimum wage is consistently above the defined poverty threshold (60% gross median) in only three Member States and does not consistently provide protection against poverty in other and minimum wages vary widely in terms of their absolute and relative level versus median national wages; whereas minimum wage workers are more likely to have difficulties to make ends meet than other workers; whereas seven out of ten in the EU report at least ‘some’ difficulties (versus five out of ten for other workers) with large difference between EU Member States19a; whereas moreover, in some sectors, groups of workers and selected forms of work are sometimes not included or covered by minimum wage arrangements; __________________ 19aEurofound (2020), Minimum wages in 2020: Annual review. https://www.eurofound.europa.eu/publicat ions/report/2020/minimum-wages-in- 2020-annual-review
2020/09/02
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 174 #

2019/2188(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital Q a (new)
Qa. whereas the COVID-19 pandemic will have significant social and economic consequences, which will have a direct impact in terms of increasing poverty, especially among the most vulnerable groups in society, as its effects will be felt most keenly by workers in precarious positions such as temporary workers, seasonal workers, platform workers, etc. as well as in various economic sectors which will be impacted through job losses, wage and/or working time reduction during and after the pandemic; whereas 16% of workers in the EU consider that they are likely to lose their job in the near future and 40% of workers say their financial situation is now worse than before the pandemic20a; __________________ 20aEurofound (2020), Living, working and COVID-19dataset, Dublin, http://eurofound.link/covid19data
2020/09/02
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 194 #

2019/2188(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Stresses that in-work poverty needs to be addressed at its root causes, such as but not limited to education and training; calls on the Commission to urge Member States to invest in qualitative education and training, to share good practices and to have specific attention for life-long learning;
2020/09/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 204 #

2019/2188(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Is convinced that the axiom that ‘work is the best remedy for poverty’ no longer applies today in the face of low- wage sectors, atypical and precarious working conditions and the dismantling of social security systems and that a poverty- free life can only be secured by effective collective agreements and minimum wage systems are needed to realise a poverty- free society;
2020/09/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 246 #

2019/2188(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. Welcomes the Commission’s plan to promptly propose a legal instrument to ensure that every worker in the Union receives a fair minimum wage21; calls also for this plan to ensure, through legislation or collective agreements, that nobody is at risk of poverty and that everyone can live from their work and participate in society; underlines that the floor should be at least 60 % of the national gross median wage; stresses that if this is too low to live on in relation to standards in a given country, an additional mechanism based on objective criteria should be used to calculate a supplement that ensures a decent life; __________________ 21 https://ec.europa.eu/commission/sites/beta- political/files/political-guidelines-next- commission_en.pdf
2020/09/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 266 #

2019/2188(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Calls on the Commission to ensure mandatory minimum working conditions for all workers, in particular for those employed in atypical and precarious work or the bogus self-employed, either by improving existing directives or through new legal acts, and to ban zero-hour contracts;
2020/09/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 362 #

2019/2188(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Calls on the Commission and Member States to enforce, effectively and through sanctions,effectively to enforce the right of workers to organise and to negotiate and conclude collective agreements, and to ensure that unions can enter plants, speak to workers at work and organise them;
2020/09/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 406 #

2019/2188(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20 a (new)
20a. Calls for measures/actions to be taken to avoid a renewed increase in involuntary part-time employment as a result of Covid-19;
2020/09/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 437 #

2019/2188(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23
23. Proposes to actively counter potential high unemployment through European and national employment programmes and to invest in new sustainable jobs, future-oriented infrastructure, digital change and ‘green transition’.;
2020/09/04
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 82 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E a (new)
Ea. whereas more and more sectors are likely to be impacted by platform work or similar employment patterns, thus further blurring the distinction between self-employment, false self-employment and traditional employment; whereas the trend towards remote working is growing in many sectors, with opportunities and risks for companies and workers; whereas the booming development of digital technologies creates many new and unpredictable opportunities and risks for so-called non-standard forms of work and employment;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 88 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E b (new)
Eb. whereas platform work is a result of technological progress, providing workers, customers and employers with new opportunities and choices when it comes to place, time flexibility and frequency of their relations, including work and provision of services;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 90 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E c (new)
Ec. whereas a high degree of flexibility is appreciated as one of the biggest advantages of platform work;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 103 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F a (new)
Fa. whereas attempts to simply impose the rules, regulating traditional employment, on platform work could be ineffective and harmful for both companies and workers;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 119 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Notes that the current European framework is unsatisfactory, with EU legal instruments which doare not cover allapplied to platform workers in their personal scope and which do not address the new realities of the world of work; regrets that this fragmentation places some platform workers in a legally precarious situation, resulting in some platform workers enjoying fewer or more limited rights than should be guaranteed to all platform workers regardless of their employment status; therefore a presumption of employment relationship and the reversal of the burden of the proof should be the starting point, complemented by the recognition of platform as companies linked to their sector of activity;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 126 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Expresses the concern, that many platform workers have limited or no social security coverage and subsequently - no retirement plan under the existing pension systems, which is endangering both their future prospects, the public pension systems of the Member States, and our Social model in general;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 135 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Stresses that the meaning of the terms ‘worker’ and ‘self-employed’ are not uniformly defined in all Member States; notes that the boundary between these two terms is less clear for new forms of work, and that some workers are at risk of being misclassified; Therefore, workers in platform companies should have the same rights as other workers
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 137 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. Stresses, furthermore, that platform workers, working in different Member-States or combining regular employment with platform work in different Member-States might be subject to entirely different regulations for the same work;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 145 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Believes that this legal uncertainty must be urgently addressed, while acknowledging that it cannot be easily solved by a one-size-fits-all approach; believes that any proposal must recognise the heterogeneity of platforms and of platform workers, and take into account the current digital labour platforms model, where some platform workers are genuinely self- employed and wish to remain so; therefore, a European framework legislation would be necessary that safeguards well-functioning platform work, but at the same time tackles precarious forms of platform work; this framework can be complemented by either national legislation or collective agreements between the platform companies and the trade unions, recognising the platform as companies with all the obligations it entails (including employers responsibility when it apply) and linking these companies to their sector of activity.
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 153 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3a. Stresses that any regulation should not be harmful towards innovation, the creation of new business models, start-ups and SMEs; emphasizes that flexible working arrangements should be protected when they are not detrimental towards social protection and workers’ rights;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 154 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 b (new)
3b. Underlines, that platform work allows workers to provide their professional services throughout the Union for different and short periods in different Member-States; expresses the concern, that such a working model remains largely uncovered by existing rules on social security coordination and the portability of social rights of platform workers is especially unsecure;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 164 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Welcomes the Commission’s proposal for a legislative initiative to improve the working conditions of platform workers; calls on the Commission, if the social partners do not express the wish to initiate the process provided for in Article 155 of the TFEU, to put forward a new directive on platform workers in order to guarantee them a minimum set of rights regardlessbased ofn their employment status, and to address the specificities of platform work while ensuring a level playing field in all EU Member States to avoid unfair und unequal treatment of workers;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 178 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. Stresses the need to better combat bogus self-employment by means of a directive, so as to cover platform workers which are fulfilling the conditions characteristic of an employment relationship based on the actual performance of work, and not on the parties’ description of the relationship; is of the opinion that special attention should be given to digital labour platforms that strongly organise conditions and remuneration of online and on-location platform work,conclude collective agreements which could be used as guidance for determining the degree of responsibility of platforms towards platform workers;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 195 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 – indent 1
ensure that the framework for collective agreements works smoothly and better implement the prohibition of exclusivity clauses, and ensure all platform workers are permitted to work for different platforms (multi-apping) and not be subject to adverse treatment for doing so;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 206 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 – indent 3
– address the current lack of transparency by ensuring the provision of essential information regarding working conditions, the method of calculating the price or fee, the functioning of the algorithm and transparency in the event of a change in the terms, conditions and procedures for temporary or permanent deactivation, if any, which should be preceded by consultation;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 212 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 – subparagraph 1
believes that the aforementioned communication should be made in a clear, comprehensive and easily accessible way; and should be provided both to the person and the representatives;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 217 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6a. clarify that the third status option will not be an option. recalls that the Court of Justice of the European Union has already established criteria for determining the status of a worker.
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 239 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Considers that platform workers should receive compensation in case of work accidents and occupational diseases, and be offered sickness and invalidity insurance coverage and all other employment rights such as paid holidays; welcomes, in this respect, the initiatives of some platforms to provide as a first step insurance as well as occupational health and safety measures;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 245 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Strongly believes that formal and effective coverage, adequacy and transparency of social protection systems should apply to all workers including the self-employed; calls on the Member States to fully and immediately implement the Council Recommendation of 13 March 2018 on access to social protection for workers and self- employed, and to ensure that their national plans set out relevant measures to be taken address the social protection of platform workers; and to strengthen the rights for platform workers to organise in trade unions
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 254 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10 a (new)
10a. Calls on the Commission, when preparing regulation proposals, to consider the general trends on the labour market and especially the trend towards working time flexibility, characteristic for platform work, but not limited to it, and address the social protection issues, arising from these trends, and especially the portability of accumulated social rights and entitlements; Underlines the need to regulate the use of advanced technologies in order to guarantee the cumulating and portability of social rights and entitlements.
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 266 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Recognises that freedom of association and the right to collective bargaining are fundamental rights for all workers, and believes a directive on platform workers should ensure that these rights are effective fully applied and enforced; notes the potential for imbalanced and asymmetrical relationships between digital labour platforms and workers, who may lack the individual bargaining power to negotiate thefair terms and conditions; notes further that there are also practical issues such as a lack of common means of communication and opportunities to meet online or in person, which can prevent collective representation in practice; calls on the Commission to address such impediments in its proposal; stresses the need for platform workers and platforms to be properly represented in order to facilitate social dialogue collective bargaining, and workers’ representation through their trade unions;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 289 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Believes that basic training must be provided to platform workers by the platform at least on the use of their website or the application; believes further that platform workers, in particular less qualified workers, should be offered training enabling skilling and re-skilling to improve their employability and career paths; calls for the facilitation of the recognition, validation and portability of attainments in the field of non-formal and informal learning; believes in this regard that a ‘certificate of experience’ should be issued for platform workers who have participated in such training, which could be uploaded on individual learning accounts; Encourages platform companies to develop training pathways in order to broaden their workers' professional options and seeks to ensure that when an employer is required, pursuant to EU law or national law or collective bargaining, to provide a worker with training to carry out the work for which he has been employed, this training is given free of charge, counted as working hours and, where possible, takes place during working hours;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 307 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14
14. Considers that platform workers should be entitled to transparent, non- discriminatory and ethical algorithms; believes that algorithm transparency should apply to management functions, task distribution, ratings and interactions, while respecting trade secrets, and that an intelligible explanation of the functioning of the algorithm on the way tasks are assigned, ratings are granted, the deactivation procedure and pricing should always be provided, as well as information in a clear and up-to-date manner on any significant changes to the algorithm; is of the opinion that ethical algorithm implies that all and in particular algorithmic decisions are contestable and reversible and human intervention guaranteed when needed, and that incentive practices or exceptional bonuses in particular should not lead to risky behaviours; is convinced that non-discriminatory algorithms are those which prevent gender and other social biases;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 326 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15 a (new)
15a. Calls on the Commission, that platform workers and any similar form of employment, made possible by technological innovation, are included in the proposals for establishment of a European social security number (ESSN) and that fair mobility rules are applied to platform work in a non-discriminatory manner.
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 340 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16 a (new)
16a. Calls on EU Member States to encourage innovative forms of work which guarantee quality working conditions and prohibit working relationships that lead to insecure working conditions, including non- standard contracts such as 'zero hours' contracts;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 342 #

2019/2186(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16 b (new)
16b. Calls on Member States to ensure that platform workers are able to refuse a work assignment if this takes place outside the reference hours and days or if they have not been informed of the work assignment within the agreed minimum period of notice, without suffering any adverse consequences as a result of their refusal;
2021/03/25
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 71 #

2019/2182(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 f (new)
3f. Calls on the Member States to improve the number, frequency, and quality of the inspections; takes the view that the EU and the Member States should go well beyond the International Labour Organisation’s minimum objective of one inspector for every 10,000 workers;
2021/04/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 90 #

2019/2182(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Calls on the Commission to update Directive 2009/148/EC with the purpose of clarifying that all varieties of asbestos are carcinogenic, andview to amend the existing binding occupational exposure limit value (OEL) for asbestos taking into account the latest scientific knowledge and technical developments, including an evaluation of different types of asbestos fibres and their adverse health effects, as well as to start the process for updating the list of fibrous silicates within the scope of the Directive by verifyingand, in this context, consider the inclusion of actinolite, anthophyllite, tremolite, grunerite and riebeckite as well as winchite, richterite, fluoro-edenite, and erionite, as well as an assessment of a differentiated limit value for different types of asbestos fibres;
2021/04/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 95 #

2019/2182(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Recalls the fundamental legal principle of health and safety at work that the state of the art in technology must always be applied to achieve the highest possible level of protection; calls for the strengthening of technical minimum requirements to lower the concentration of asbestos fibres in the air to the lowest level which is technically possible, including through dust suppression and the suction of dust at the source, continuous sedimentation, and means of decontamination; calls for minimum requirements for the pressure difference between asbestos enclosures and surroundings, fresh air supply and HEPA filters, ensuring sufficient and focused support to employers in transposing these protective measures, in particular SMEs and micro-enterprises, in order to avoid non-compliance;
2021/04/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 101 #

2019/2182(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Notes that the current Union minimum standard for the asbestos OELV is 100 000 fibres per m3 (0,1 fibres/cm3); highlights that some Member States apply much lower OELVs to protect the health of workers, for example an OELV of 2 000 fibres/m3 (0,002) in the Netherlands;, whereas most Member States apply the EU minimum OELV of 0,1 fibres/cm3, and some even above the minimum standard1a; __________________ 1aECHA Scientific report for evaluation of limit values for asbestos at the workplace, 1 February 2021, p. 16.
2021/04/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 105 #

2019/2182(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14
14. Underlines that leading medical researchers from the International Commission of Occupational Health (ICOH) conclude that exposure limits do not protect properly against cancer and propose an occupational limit value of 1 000 fibres/m3 (0,001 fibres/cm3); calls for an updated exposure limit to be set at 0,001 fibres/cm3 (1 000 fibres/m3)suggests that no later than 31 December 2022, the Commission presents a legislative proposal, taking into account the existing recommendations from different stakeholders and after consulting the Advisory Committee for Safety and Health at Work;
2021/04/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 109 #

2019/2182(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Emphasises that employers, but also main contractors, contracting authorities, and owners commissioning work should be required to carry out an asbestos diagnosis before the start of any work in buildings, ships, aircraft, on equipment, or products; underlines in this context the need for a coherent methodology for risk assessment to ensure a Union level playing field and avoid the fragmentation of the single market;
2021/04/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 146 #

2019/2182(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – paragraph 1 – point 3
(3) A financial framework, including the possible use of Union fbased on the use of Union Structural and Investment Funds, for the support of building owners and linking the removal of asbestos to other public policies and programmes (such as energy efficiency, improvements of the living environment, social housing) for reasons of efficiency and the use of synergies;
2021/04/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 151 #

2019/2182(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex I – paragraph 1 – point 4 – point a
(a) accessibility for workers and companies working in a building or infrastructure, owners, inhabitants, firefighters and users;
2021/04/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 160 #

2019/2182(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 2 – point b – paragraph 2 – point e
(e) the starting date and, duration of the work and planned working hours;
2021/04/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 170 #

2019/2182(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 9 – paragraph 1
In the case of certain activities such as demolition or asbestos removal work, in respect of which it is foreseeable that the limit value set out in Article 8 will be exceeded despite the use of all possible technical preventive measures for limiting asbestos in air concentrations, the employer shall determine the measures intended to ensure protection of the workers while they are engaged in such activities, in particular the following:
2021/04/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 173 #

2019/2182(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 12 – paragraph 1
1. Undertakings which intend to carry out demolition or asbestos removal work shall be required to obtain before the start of work a renewable permit from the competent authority. Competent authorities may grant such permits if the applicant undertaking offers proof of adequate state of the art technical equipment for emission-free or, where this is not technically possible yet, low- emission work procedures in line with the requirements of Article 6, and training certificates for their individual workers in accordance with Article 14 and Annex 1a.
2021/04/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 175 #

2019/2182(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 13 – paragraph 1 – point ca
(ca) regular compulsory breaks and with sufficient time for regeneration for must be foreseen for workers wearing strenuous respiratory equipment;
2021/04/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 181 #

2019/2182(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 17 b (new)
17b. Article 21b is inserted: ‘Article 21b In case of a fire, all existing information regarding the presence and location of asbestos shall be shared with firefighters.’
2021/04/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 202 #

2019/2182(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Annex V – paragraph 1 – point 3
(3) the result of the screening should be reported to a competent national body (a one-stop shop), which should issue a certificate, keep a national registry of the certificates, and give advice to owners about applicable laws and regulation, the correct and safe removal of asbestos detected, and financial support available from relevant existing EU funds;
2021/04/05
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 130 #

2018/0197(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point b – introductory part
(b) ‘a greener, low-carbon Europe by promoting clean and fair energy transition, green and blue investment, the circular economy, the fight against climate change, climate adaptation and risk prevention and management (‘PO 2’) by:
2018/10/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 136 #

2018/0197(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point b – point iv
(iv) promoting the fight against climate change, climate adaptation, risk prevention and disaster resilience;
2018/10/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 160 #

2018/0197(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point e – point i
(i) fostering the integrated social, economic and environmental development, cultural heritage and security in urban areas, including functional spaces;
2018/10/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 170 #

2018/0197(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1
(1) With regard to programmes implemented under the Investment for jobs and growth goal, the total ERDF resources in each Member State shall be concentrated at natregional level in accordance with paragraphs 3 and 4. The thematic concentration forms the basis for how the regional ERDF programmes are organised.
2018/10/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 178 #

2018/0197(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 4 – point a
(a) Regions in the Member States of group 1 shall allocate at least 85 no more than 75% of their total ERDF resources under priorities other than for technical assistance to PO 1 and PO 2, and therefore at least 60 25% to PO 13, PO 4 and PO 5;
2018/10/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 197 #

2018/0197(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 a (new)
Article 3a Partnership between regional and local levels (1) Each region shall ensure the adequate participation of local-level players when establishing regional ERDF programmes. Special attention should be paid to municipal authorities, economic and social partners and relevant bodies representing civil society. (2) In keeping with the principle of multi- level governance, regions shall also involve these partners in monitoring and assessing regional programmes, for example by having them participate in regional ERDF monitoring committees.
2018/10/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 228 #

2018/0197(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 2
(2) Member States and their regions shall implement integrated territorial development, supported by the ERDF, exclusively through the forms referred to in Article [22] of Regulation (EU) 2018/xxxx [new CPR].
2018/10/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 229 #

2018/0197(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – title
Sustainable urban and regional development
2018/10/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 230 #

2018/0197(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 1
(1) The ERDF shall support integrated territorial development based on territorial strategies in accordance with Article [23] of Regulation (EU) 2018/xxxx [new CPR] focused on urban areafunctional spaces (‘sustainable urban and regional development’) within programmes under both goals referred to in Article 4(2) of that Regulation.
2018/10/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 231 #

2018/0197(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 1
At least 610% of the ERDF resources at national level under the Investment for jobs and growth goal, other than for technical assistance, shall be allocated to sustainable urban and regional development in the form of community-led local development, integrated territorial investments or another territorial tool under PO 5.
2018/10/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 232 #

2018/0197(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 3
(3) The percentage allocated to sustainable urban and regional development under paragraph 2 shall be complied with throughout the entire programming period when ERDF allocations are transferred between priorities of a programme or between programmes, including at the mid- term review in accordance with Article [14] of Regulation (EU) 2018/xxxx [new CPR].
2018/10/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 233 #

2018/0197(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1
The ERDF shall also support the European Urban Initiative, implemented by the Commission in direct and indirect managementshared management. This initiative shall cover all functional spaces and shall support the implementation of the EU’s urban agenda. Local authorities should be actively involved in establishing and implementing the European urban initiative.
2018/10/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 285 #

2018/0197(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – Table 1 – point 2
2. A greener, low-carbon Europe by (i) promoting energy efficiency CCO 06 – Investments in measures to improveCCR 05 – Beneficiaries with improved promoting clean and fair energy measures energy efficiency energy classification transition, green and blue investment, the circular economy, climate adaptation and risk prevention andthe fight (ii) promoting renewable energy CCO 07 – Additional renewable energy CCR 06 – Volume of additional management. against climate change, climate adaptation and risk prevention and production capacity renewable energy produced management. (iii) developing smart energy CCO 08 – Digital management systems CCR 07 – Additional users connected to systems, grids and storage at local developed for smart grids smart grids level; (iv) promoting climate change the fight against CCO 09 – New or upgraded disaster CCR 08 – Additional population adaptation, risk prevention and climate change, climate adaptation, monitoring, warning and response systems benefiting from protection measures disaster resilience; risk prevention and disaster against floods, forest fires, and other resilience; climate related natural disasters
2018/10/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 79 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 2
(2) Principle 75 of the European Pillar of Social Rights, proclaimed at Gothenburg on 17 November 2017, provides that workers have the right to be informed in writing at the start of employment about their rights and obligations resulting from the employment relationship, including any probationary period, and that they have the right to access to effective and impartial dispute resolution and, in case of unjustified dismissal, a right to redress, including adequate compensation. Principle 5 provides that regardless of the type and duration of the employment relationship, workers have the right to fair and equal treatment regarding working conditions, access to social protection and training, that employment relationships that lead to precarious working conditions isare to be prevented, including by prohibiting abuse of atypical contracts, that any probationary period should be of reasonable duration and that the transition towards open-ended forms of employment is to be fostered. It further provides that the necessary flexibility for employers to adapt swiftly to changes in the economic context and to adopt new forms of employment on a collective bargaining basis is to be ensured, in accordance with legislation and collective agreements.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 80 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 2 a (new)
(2a) Principle 7 provides that workers have the right to be informed in writing at the start of employment about their rights and obligations resulting from the employment relationship, including any probationary period, and that they have the right to access to effective and impartial dispute resolution and, in case of unjustified dismissal, a right to redress, including adequate compensation.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 86 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 3
(3) Since the adoption of Council Directive 91/533/EEC33, labour markets have undergone far-reaching changes due to demographic developments and digitalisation leading to the creation of new forms of employment, which have supported innovation, job creation and labour market growth. New forms of employment are often not as regular or stable ascan vary greatly in their predictability from traditional employment relationships and can sometimes lead to reduced predictability for the workers concerned, creating uncertainty as toover applicable rights and social protection. In this evolving world of work, there is therefore an increased need for workers to be fully informed about their essential working conditions, which should occur in a written form and in a timely manntimely manner and in a written form and in a form easily accessible to workers. In order adequately to frame the development of new forms of employment, workers in the Union should also be provided with a number of new minimum rights aimed at promoting security and predictability in employment relationships while achieving upward convergence across Member States and preserving labour market adaptability. __________________ 33 Council Directive 91/533/EC of 14 October 1991 on an employer's obligation to inform employees of the conditions applicable to the contract or employment relationship (OJ L 288, 18.10.1991, p. 32).
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 103 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 6
(6) The Commission has undertaken a two-phase consultation with the social partners on the improvement of the scope and effectiveness of Directive 91/533/EEC and the broadening of its objectives in order to insertestablish new rights for workers, in accordance with Article 154 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU). This did not result in any agreement among social partners to enter into negotiations on those matters. However, as confirmed byon the basis of the outcome of the open public consultations carried out to seek the views of various stakeholders and citizens, it is importantessential to take action at the Union level in this area by modernising and adapting the current legal framework to new developments.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 107 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 7
(7) In order to ensure effectiveness of the rights provided by the Union law, the personal scope of Directive 91/533/EEC should be updated. In its case law, the Court of Justice ofFor the Epuropean Union has established criteria for determining the status of a worker34 which are appropriate for determining the personal scope of application of this Directive. The definition of worker in Article 2(1) is based on these criteria. They ensure a uniform iposes of this Directive, the terms ‘worker’, ‘employer’ and ‘empleoymentation of the personal scope of the Directive while leaving it to national authorities and courts to apply it to specific situations. Provided that they fulfil relationship’ should follow those criteria, domestic workers, on- demand workers, intermittent workers, voucher based-workers, platform workers, trainees and apprentices could come within scope of this Directive. __________________ 34 Judgments of 3 July 1986, Deborah Lawrie-Blum, Case 66/85; 14 October 2010, Union Syndicale Solidaires Isère, Case C-428/09; 9 July 2015, Balkaya, Case C-229/14; 4 December 2014, FNV Kunsten, Case C-413/13; and 17 November 2016, Ruhrlandklinik, Case C- 216/15ase law of the European Court of Justice (ECJ).
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 118 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 7 a (new)
(7a) In its case law, the Court of Justice has set criteria for determining the status of a worker1a so that a uniform implementation of the personal scope of this Directive should be ensured, while leaving it to national authorities and national courts to apply it to specific situations. The Court of Justice has defined a worker as a natural person who, for a certain period of time, performs services for and under the direction of another person in return for remuneration. Domestic workers, on- demand workers, intermittent workers, voucher based-workers, platform workers, trainees and apprentices who meet those criteria fall within the personal scope of this Directive. Moreover, the Court of Justice has held that the performance of services is to be understood as the performance of work, and that an employment relationship is to be understood as one including a degree of dependency or subordination. The Court of Justice's case-law in this regard should be taken into account in the transposition of this Directive. __________________ Judgments of 3 July 1986, Deborah Lawrie-Blum, Case 66/85; 14 October 2010, Union Syndicale Solidaires Isère, Case C-428/09; 9 July 2015, Balkaya, Case C-229/14; 4 December 2014, FNV Kunsten, Case C-413/13; and 17 November 2016, Ruhrlandklinik, Case C- 216/15.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 123 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 7 b (new)
(7b) Self-employed persons should not fall within the scope of this Directive as they do not meet the criteria set by the Court of Justice for determining the status of a worker.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 135 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 8
(8) In view of the increasing number of workers excluded from the scope of Directive 91/533/EEC on the basis of derogations made by Member States under Article 1 of that Directive, it is necessary to replace these derogations with a possibility for Member States not to apply the provisions of the Directive to a work relationship equal to or less than 8 hours in total in a reference period of one month. That derogation doesshould not affect the definition of a worker as provided for in Article 2(1)ccording to the case law of the Court of Justice.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 148 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 10
(10) Several different natural or legal persons may in practice assume the functions and responsibilities of an employer. Member States should remain free to determine more precisely the person(s) who are considered totally or partially responsible for the execution of the obligations that this Directive lays down for employers, as long as all those obligations are fulfilled. Member States should also be able to decide that some or all of these obligations are to be assigned to a natural or legal person who is not party to the employment relationship. Member States should be able to establish specific rules to exclude individuals acting as employers for domestic workers in the household from the obligations to consider and respond to a request for a different type of employment, to provide cost-free mandatory training, and from coverage of the redress mechanism based on favourable presumptions in the case of missing information in the written statement.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 164 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 13
(13) Information on remuneration to be provided should include all elements of the remuneration, including contributions in cash or kind or other benefits, directly or indirectly received by the worker in respect of his or her work. The provision of such information should be without prejudice to the freedom for employers to provide for additional elements of remuneration such as one-off payments. The fact that elements of remuneration due by law or collective agreement have not been included in that information should not constitute a reason for not providing them to the worker.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 166 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 14
(14) If, due to the nature of the employment, it is not possible to indicate a fixed work schedule due to the nature of the employment, workers should knowsetting the times and dates at or on which work begins and ends or if workers have on-demand contracts or are in a similar employment relationship, employers should inform workers how their work schedule will be established, including the time slots in which they may be called to workon-call times and the minimum advance notice they should receive.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 179 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 15
(15) IEmployers should provide information onabout social security systems should includefunds and proof of registration with the social security authorities and, where relevant, information on sickness, maternity and equivalent, parental, paternity, old-age, invalidity, survivors', unemployment, pre- retirement or, family benefits, or benefits in respect of accidents at work and occupational diseases. Information on social security protection provided by the employer should include, where relevant, coverage by supplementary pension schemes within the meaning of Council Directive 98/49/EC36 and Directive 2014/50/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council37. __________________ 36 Council Directive 98/49/EC of 29 June 1998 on safeguarding the supplementary pension rights of employed and self- employed persons moving within the Community (OJ L 209, 25.7.1998, p. 46). 37 Directive 2014/50/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 April 2014 on minimum requirements for enhancing worker mobility between Member States by improving the acquisition and preservation of supplementary pension rights (OJ L 128, 30.4.2014, p. 1).
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 184 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 16
(16) Workers should have the right to be informed about their rights and obligations resulting from the employment relationship in writinga legally binding document, in paper or electronically, at the start of employment. The relevantbasic and essential information should therefore reach them at the latest on the first dayreach them in written form, as stated above, on the first working day. Any further information should be provided no later than 15 days after the start of the employment relationship.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 196 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 16 a (new)
(16a) Basic and essential information should include the rights conferring legal certainty on the parties to an employment relationship as to the nature, location, time and duration, modalities, scope, performance and remuneration of their employment relationship and the conditions and periods of notice relating to the termination of the relationship and probationary periods.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 211 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 19
(19) Probationary periods allow employers to verify that workers are suitable for the position for which they have been engaged while providing them with accompanying support and training. Such periods may be accompanied by reduced protection against dismissal. Any entry into the labour market or transition to a new position should not be subject to prolonged insecurity. As established in the European Pillar of Social Rights, probationary periods should therefore be of reasonable duration. A substantial number of Member States have established a general maximum duration of probation between three and six months, which should be considered reasonable. Probationary periods may, exceptionally, be longer than six months, where this is justified by the nature of the employment such as for managerial positions and whor in the context of specific measures promoting permanent employment. However, they should under no circumstances last longere this is in the interest of the worker, such as in the case of long illness or in the context of specific measures promoting permanent employment notably for young workersan 12 months. It should be possible to interrupt or suspend probationary periods if the employee has been absent due to a long illness or extended leave so as to enable the employee to demonstrate that his or her abilities correspond to the tasks required and to enable the employer to determine the suitability of the worker for such tasks. Under no circumstances should it be possible unilaterally to extend a probationary period.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 222 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 20
(20) Employers should not prohibit workers from taking up employment with other employers, outside the time spent working for them, within the limits set out in Directive 2003/88/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council.39 IMember States or social partners should jointly be able to lay down conditions for incompatibility clauses,restrictions understood as a restriction on working for specific categories of employers, may be necessary for objectiv for legitimate reasons, such as health and safety, the protection of business secrets or the avoidance of conflicts of interests. __________________ 39 Directive 2003/88/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 4 November 2003 concerning certain aspects of the organisation of working time (OJ L 299, 18.11.2003, p. 9).
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 230 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 21
(21) Workers whose work schedule is mostly variable should benefit from a minimum predictability of workith on-demand contracts or similar forms of employment whose work is unpredictable because their work schedule is mostly variable should, where the work schedule is mainly determined by the employer, be it directly – for instance by allocating work assignments – or indirectly – for instance by requiring the worker to respond to clients' requests or third parties, benefit from a minimum level of stability and predictability with regard to their work.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 244 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 24
(24) Workers should have the possibility to refuse a work assignment if it falls outside of the reference hours and days or has notwhere the worker has been notified withinoutside the minimum advance notice period without suffering adverse consequences for this refusal. Workers should also have the possibility to accept the work assignment if they so wish. It should be possible to indicate the reference hours and days, the time slots on specified days when work can take place at the employer's request, and to change the minimum notice period on an ad hoc basis as agreed between the employee and the employer. If the worker, once he or she has accepted the work assignment, is unable to complete the work because the employer delays assigning tasks to the worker, and the worker is not responsible for that delay, the worker should retain his or her right to remuneration for the work assignment.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 252 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 25
(25) Where employers have the possibility to offer full-time or open-ended labour contracts to workers in non-standard forms of employment, a transition to more secure forms of employment should be promoted in accordance with the principles established in the European Pillar of Social Rights. Workers should be able to request another more predictable and secure form of employment, where available, and receive a written response from the employer, which takes into account the needs of the employer and of the worker.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 259 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 26
(26) Where employers are required by legislation or collective agreements to provide training to workers to carry out the work for which they are employed, it is important to ensure that such training is provided equally, including to those in non-standard forms of employment. The costs of such training should not be charged to the worker nor withheld or deducted from the worker's remuneration, unless the worker gives notice of termination shortly before the training takes place. In this case, a proportionate defrayment of costs by the worker should be regulated by law or collective bargaining.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 266 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 27
(27) Social partners may consider that in specific sectors or situations different provisions can be adapted, completed or improved if they are more appropriate, for the pursuit of the purpose of this Directive, than the minimum standards set inin accordance with Chapter Three of this Directive. Member States should therefore be able to allowencourage the social partners to conclude collective agreements modifapplying the provisions contained inof that cChapter, as long asprovided that the overall level of protection of workers is not loweredcontinues to be respected and that the minimum requirements laid down in this Directive are met.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 279 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 28
(28) The consultation on the European Pillar of Social Rights showed the need to strengthen enforcement of Union labour law to ensure its effectiveness. As regards Directive 91/533/EEC, the REFIT evaluation41evaluation (REFIT)41 conducted under the Commission´s Regulatory Fitness and Performance Programme confirmed that strengthened enforcement mechanisms could improve its effectiveness. It showed that redress systems based solely on claims for damages are less effective than systems that also provide for sanctions (such as lump sums or loss of permits) for employers who fail to issue written statements. It also showed that employees rarely seek redress during the employment relationship, which jeopardises the goal of the provision of the written statement to ensure workers are informed about their essential features of their employment relationship. It is therefore necessary to introduce enforcement provisions which ensure the use either of favourable presumptions where information about the employment relationship is not provided, or of an administrative procedure under which the employer may be required to provide the missing information and subject to sanction if it does not. That redress should be subject to a procedure by which the employer is notified that information is missing and has 15 days in which to supply complete and correct information. __________________ 41 SWD(2017)205 final, page 26.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 295 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 34
(34) Member States should provide for effective, proportionate and dissuasive penalties, for example in the form of fines or compensation, for breaches of the obligations under this Directive.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 302 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 36
(36) This Directive lays down minimum requirements, thus leaving untouched Member States' prerogative to introduce and maintain more favourable provisions. Rights acquired under the existing legal framework should continue to apply, unless more favourable provisions are introduced by this Directive. The implementation of this Directive cannot be used to reduce existing rights set out in existing national or Union legislation in this field nor can it constitute valid grounds for reducing the general level of protection afforded to workers in the field covered by this Directive. Member States should ensure that steps are taken to prevent the introduction of zero-hour contracts or similar types of employment contract.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 305 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 37
(37) In implementing this Directive Member States should avoid imposing administrative, financial and legal constraints in a way which would hold back the creation and development of micro-enterprises and small and medium- sized undertakings whose importance is to be gauged from the Commission Recommendation of 6 May 20031a or any later act replacing that Recommendation. Member States are therefore invited to assess the impact of their transposition act on SMEs in order to make sure that SMEs are not disproportionately affected, with specific attention for micro-enterprises and for administrative burden, and to publish the results of such assessments. __________________ 1a OJ L 124, 20.05.2003, p. 36.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 307 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 38
(38) The Member States may entrust social partners withshould ensure that the implementation of this Directive is entrusted to social partners, where social partners jointly so request to do so and as long as the Member Sta. The Member States should take all the necessary steps t- and make all the necessary stepsresources available to the social partners - to ensure that they can at all times guarantee the results sought under this Directive. If the implementation of this Directive cannot be entrusted to the social partners, Member States should ensure that the social partners are involved in the entire process of transposing this Directive.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 312 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 38 a (new)
(38a) Member States should ensure that national inspection bodies enforce this Directive.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 357 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 6
6. Member States may decide not to apply the obligations set out in Articles 10 and 11 and Article 14(a) to natural persons belonging to a household where work is performed for that household.deleted
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 372 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 2
1. the following definitions shall apply: (a) ‘worker’ means a natural person who for a certain period of time performs services for and under the direction of another person in return for remuneration; (b) natural or legal person(s) who is or are directly or indirectly party to an employment relationship with a worker; (c) the work relationship between workers and employers as defined above; (d) schedule determining hours and days on which performance of work starts and ends; (e) time slots in specified days during which work can take place at the request of the employer. 2. the terms 'microenterprise', 'small enterprise' and 'medium-sized enterprise' shall have the meaning set out in the Commission Recommendation of 6 May 2003 concerning the definition of micro, small and medium-sized enterprises43 or in any subsequent act replacing that Recommendation. __________________ 43Article 2 deleted Definitions For the purposes of this Directive, ‘employer' means one or more ‘employment relationship' means ‘work schedule' means the ‘reference hours and days' means For the purposes of this Directive OJ L 124, 20.5.2003, p. 36.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 423 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – introductory part
2. The information referred to in paragraph 1 shall include at least:
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 435 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point g
(g) any training entitlement provided by the employerentitlement to training that the employer is required to provide under Union or national legislation or under relevant collective agreements;
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 445 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point i
(i) the procedure and formal requirements, including the length of the period of notice, to be observed by the employer and the worker should their employment relationship be terminated or, where the length of the period of notice cannot be indicated when the information is given, the method for determining such period of notice and the deadline for bringing an action contesting dismissal;
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 449 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point i
(i) the procedure, including the length of the periods of notice, to be observed by the employer and the worker should their employment relationship be terminated or, where the length of the periods of notice cannot be indicated when the information is given, the method for determining such periods of notice;
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 457 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point j
(j) the initial basic amount, any other component elements, such as payments in kind or other benefits, and the frequency and method of payment of the remuneration to which the worker is entitled;
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 461 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point k
(k) if the work schedule is entirely or mostly not variable or predictable, the length of the worker's standard working day or week and, any arrangements for overtime and its remuneration, and reasonable advance notice of such work;
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 468 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point l – introductory part
(l) if the work schedule is entirely or mostly variable or unpredictable, the principle that the work schedule is variable, the amount of guaranteed paid hours, the remuneration of work performed in addition to the guaranteed hours and, if the work schedule is entirely or mostly determined, by the employer:
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 484 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point m
(m) any collective agreements governing the worker's conditions of work; in the case of collective agreements concluded outside the business by special joint bodies or institutions, the name of the competent body or joint institution within which the agreements were concluded, and information about the works council or any other representatives of workers in that business;
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 492 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point n
(n) the social security institution(s) receiving the social contributions attached to the employment relationship and any protection relating to social security provided by the employer, and proof of registration with the social security institution(s) concerned.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 514 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 4 – paragraph 1
1. The information referred to in Article 3(2) shall be provided individually(a) to (f) and (i) to (k) shall be given to the worker in the form of a document handed over in person at the latest on the first day of the employment relationship. That document may be provided and transmitted electronically as long as it is easily accessible by the worker and can be stored and printed.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 527 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 a (new)
1a. The information referred to in Article 3(2)(g), (h) and (l) to (n) shall be given to the worker in the form of a document handed over in person at the latest 15 days after the start of the employment relationship.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 532 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 4 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. All documents shall be provided personally, on paper or in electronic form, provided that they are easily accessible, receipt is acknowledged, and they can be stored and printed.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 545 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 4 – paragraph 2
2. Member States shall develop, in cooperation with social partners, templates and models for the document referred to in paragraph 1 and put them at the disposal of workers and employers including by making them available on a single official national website and by other suitable means.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 548 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 4 – paragraph 3
3. Member States shall ensure that the information on the laws, regulations and administrative or statutory provisions or collective agreements governing the legal framework applicable which are to be communicated by employers is made generally available free of charge in a clear, transparent, comprehensive and easily accessible way at a distance and by electronic means, including through existing online portals for Union citizens and businesse. Universally applicable collective agreements are of public interest and shall be made generally available free of charge through existing online portals.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 559 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 5 – paragraph 1
Member States shall ensure that any change in the aspects of the employment relationship referred to in Article 3(2) and to the additional information for workers posted or sent abroad in Article 6 shall be providedersonally communicated, in accordance with Article 4(1a), in the form of a document by the employer to the worker at the earliest opportunity and at the latest on the day it takes effect.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 563 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 5 – paragraph 1 a (new)
(1a) Changes that merely reflect a change in the relevant laws, regulations and administrative or statutory provisions or collective or works council agreements may be notified by means of a reference to the updated status of those laws, regulations and administrative or statutory provisions or collective or works council agreements.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 584 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 – paragraph 2 – introductory part
2. Member States shall ensure that, if the worker sent abroad is a posted worker covered by Directive 96/71/EC, he or she shall in addition at least be notified of:
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 623 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 7 – paragraph 2 – point 1 a (new)
(1a) Member States shall entrust the social partners with setting such extensions if they jointly request this.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 638 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Member States shall ensure that workers who are employed in more than one job are subject to the overall minimum safety and health requirements for the organisation of working time as provided for in Directive 2003/88/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council1a. __________________ 1a Directive 2003/88/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 4 November 2003 concerning certain aspects of the organisation of working time (OJ L 299, 18.11.2003, p. 9).
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 642 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 2
2. EmployerMember States may however lay down conditions for the use of incompatibility where such restrictions are justified byrestrictions, namely restrictions on working for specific categories of employers for legitimate reasons, such as health and safety, the protection of business secrets, or the avoidance of conflicts of interests.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 648 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 2 – point 1 a (new)
(1a) Member States shall entrust the social partners with setting such incompatibility restrictions if they jointly request this.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 649 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 2 – point 2 a (new)
(2a) The worker is obliged to inform the employer of the nature and scope of other forms of employment.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 688 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 9 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Where one or both of the requirements laid down in the first subparagraph is not fulfilled, a worker shall have the right to refuse a work assignment without adverse consequences.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 698 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 9 – paragraph 1 b (new)
1b. Zero-hour contracts and similar types of employment contracts are prohibited.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 705 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 10
Transition to another form of employment 1. Member States shall ensure that workers with at least six months' seniority with the same employer may request a form of employment with more predictable and secure working conditions where available. 2. written reply within one month of the request. With respect to natural persons acting as employers and micro,10 Article 10 deleted The employer smhall, or medium enterprises, Member States may provide for that deadline to be extended to no more than three months and allow for an oral reply to a subsequent similar request submitted by the same worker if the justification for the reply as regards the situation of the worker remains unchanged. provide a
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 735 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 11 – paragraph 1
Member States shall ensure that, where an employers are is required by Union or national legislation or relevant collective agreements to provide training to workers to carry out the work for which they are employed, such training shall be provided cost-free to the workeror which the employer’s general training policy requires for the job in question, such training is available to the worker free of charge.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 763 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 12 – paragraph 1
Member States may allowshall leave it to the social partners to conclude collective agreements, in conformity with the national law or practice, which, while respecting the overall protection of workers, and, subject to the minimum requirements laid down in this Directive, establish arrangements concerning the working conditions of workers which differ from those referred to in Articles 7 to 11. adapt, complement and improve provisions laid down in Chapter III.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 781 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 14 – title
14 Legal presumption and early settlement mechanism (mediation)
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 791 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 14 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
Member States shall ensure that, where a worker has not received in due time all or part of the documents referred to in Article 4(1), Article 5, or Article 6, and the employer has failed to rectify that omission within 15 days of its notification, one of the following systems shall apply:
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 798 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 14 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) the worker shall benefit from favourable presumptions defined by the Member State. Where the information provided did not include the information referred to in points (e), (f), (k) or (l) of Article 3(2), the favourable presumptions shall include a presumption that the worker has an open-ended employment relationship, that there is no probationary period or that the worker has a full-time position, respectively. Employers shall have the possibility to rebut the presumptions; orand
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 805 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 14 – paragraph 1 – point b
(b) the worker shall have the possibility to submit a complaint to a competent authority in a timely manner and to receive an adequate response within a reasonable time frame. If the competent authority finds that the complaint is justified, it shall order the relevant employer(s) to provide the missing information. If the employer does not provide the missing information within 15 days following receipt of the order, the authority shall be able to impose an appropriate administrative penalty, even if the employment relationship has ended. Employers shall have the possibility to lodge an administrative appeal against the decision imposing the penalty. Member States may designate existing bodies as competent authorities.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 841 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 17 – paragraph 2
2. Workers who consider that they have been dismissed upon completion of the probationary period, or have been subject to measures with equivalent effect, on the grounds that they have exercised the rights provided for in this Directive may request the employer to provide duly substantiated grounds for the dismissal or its equivalent. The employer shall provide those grounds in writing.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 856 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 18 – paragraph 1
Member States shall lay down the rules on penalties applicable to infringements of the national provisions adopted pursuant to this Directive or the relevant provisions already in force concerning the rights which are within the scope of this Directive. Member States shall take all measures necessary to ensure that those penalties are applied. Penalties shall be effective, proportionate and dissuasive. They may take the form of a fine. They may also comprise payment of compensation, that may take the form of fines or compensation payments, for instance, are applied. Penalties shall be effective, proportionate and dissuasive.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 862 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 19 – title
MNon-regression clause and more favourable provisions
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 863 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 19 – paragraph 1
1. This Directive shall not constitute valid grounds for reducing the general level of protection already afforded to workers within Member States. This Directive shall not be applied and interpreted in such a way as to undermine, restrict or prejudice more favourable working conditions already negotiated in collective agreements and rights and procedural safeguards providing for a higher level of protection.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 872 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 20 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Member States shall ensure that the social partners are involved in the overall implementation of this Directive and provide them with the necessary means for such involvement to be effective.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 878 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 21 – title
Transitional provisions and preservation of existing arrangements
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 883 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 21 – paragraph 1
The rights and obligations set out in this Directive shall apply to existing employment relationships as from [entry into force date + 2 years]. However, employers shall provide or complement the documents referred to in Article 4(1), Article 5 and Article 6 only upon request of a worker or the social partners. The absence of such request shall not have the effect of excluding workers from the minimum rights established under this Directive.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 886 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 21 – paragraph 1 a (new)
Employment contracts concluded before [entry into force date] shall be exempt.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 888 #

2017/0355(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 22 – paragraph 1
By [entry into force date + 2two years], the Commission shall, in consultation with the Member States and social partners at Union level and taking into account the impact on small and medium-sized enterprises, review the application of this Directive with a view to proposing, where appropriate, the necessary amendments and improvements.
2018/06/28
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 139 #

2017/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1
This Regulation establishes a framework for the screening by the Member States and the Commission of foreign direct investments in the Union on the grounds of national security or public order. It furthermore establishes a mechanism under which the European Commission can screen and take a decision on conditioning or restricting foreign direct investment threatening the security or public order of more than one Member State or the European Union as a whole, as well as foreign direct investment threatening the mid- and long term economic security in certain circumstances.
2018/03/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 155 #

2017/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2
2. The Commission may screen foreign direct investments that are likely to: (a) affect projects or programmes of Union interest on the grounds of security or public orderone or more than one Member State’s or the Union’s security or public order; (b) affect the security or public order of more than one Member State or the Union as a whole; (c) threaten the mid-and long-term economic security of the Union, as defined as key know-how and technologies and listed in Annex II.
2018/03/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 168 #

2017/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 3 a (new)
3a. The Commission is empowered to adopt delegated acts in order to amend projects or programmes of Union interest listed in Annex I and key know-how and technologies listed in Annex II.
2018/03/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 170 #

2017/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
In screening a foreign direct investment on the grounds of security or public order of one or more than one Member State or the security and public order of the Union as a whole, Member States and the Commission may consider the potential effects on, inter alia:
2018/03/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 175 #

2017/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – indent 1
– critical infrastructure, includinge.g. energy, water, transport, communications and the media, health services, data storage, space, defence, research or financial infrastructure, as well as sensitive facilities;
2018/03/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 180 #

2017/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – indent 2
– critical technologies, including artificial intelligence, robotics, semiconductors, technologies with potential dual use applications, cybersecurity, space or nuclear technology;deleted
2018/03/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 197 #

2017/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 a (new)
In screening a foreign direct investment on the ground of safeguarding the mid- and long-term economic security of the European Union, the Commission may consider the potential effects on specific key know-how and technologies, e.g. in the field of artificial intelligence, robotics, semiconductors, technologies with potential dual use applications, cybersecurity, space or nuclear technology, as listed in Annex II.
2018/03/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 203 #

2017/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 2
In determining whether a foreign direct investment is likely to affect security or public order of one or more than one Member State or the Union as a whole, or the mid- and long-term economic security of the Union, Member States and the Commission may take into account whether the foreign investor is controlled by the government of a third country, including through significant funding.
2018/03/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 245 #

2017/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Where the Commission considers that a foreign direct investment is likely to affect the national security or public order of the Member State where the investment is planned or has been completed, it shall issue a reasoned opinion addressed to the Member State.
2018/03/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 247 #

2017/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 2
2. Where a Member State considers that a foreign direct investment planned or completed in another Member State is likely to affect its national or the Union’s security or public order, it may provide commentsshall indicate this to the Commission and to the Member State where the foreign direct investment is planned or has been completed. The cCommentsission shall be forwarded to the Commission in paralleltake adequate action as outlined in Article 9.
2018/03/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 252 #

2017/0224(COD)

3. Where the Commission considers that a foreign direct investment is likely to affect security or public order in one or mormore than one Member States, it may issue an opinion addressed or the Union as a whole, it shall indicate this to the Member State in which the foreign direct investment is planned or has been completed. The Commission may issue an opinionshall take adequate action as outlined in Article 9, irrespective of whether other Member States have provided comments.
2018/03/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 260 #

2017/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 4
4. The Commission or a Member State which duly considers that a foreign direct investment is likely to affect its security or public order may request from the Member State where the foreign direct investment is planned or has been completed, any information necessary to provide commenttake an informed decision as referred to in paragraph 23, or to issue the opinion referred to in paragraph 3while paying utmost attention to the potential sensitivity of the information.
2018/03/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 269 #

2017/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 6
6. The Member States where the foreign direct investment is planned or has been completed shall give due consideration to the comments of the other Member States referred to in paragraph 2 and to the opinion of the Commission referred to in paragraph 31(new).
2018/03/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 279 #

2017/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 1
1. Where the Commission or more than one Member State considers that a foreign direct investment is likely to affect projects or programmes of Union interest on grounds of security or public order, the Commission may issue an opinion addressed to the Member State where the foreign direct investment is planned or has been completedo threaten the security or public order of more than one Member State of the European Union or the Union as a whole or the mid-and long-term economic security of the Union, as defined as key know-how and technologies and listed in Annex II, it shall screen the investment.
2018/03/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 288 #

2017/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 2
2. The Commission may request from the Member State where the foreign direct investment is planned or has been completed any information necessary to issue the opinion referred to in paragraph 1, from the foreign investor and from the target company any information necessary to take an informed decision, while paying utmost attention to the potential sensitivity of the information. The Member State, the target company and the investor may submit to the Commission any information they deem necessary to take an informed decision.
2018/03/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 292 #

2017/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 3
3. The Commission shall address its opinion to the Member State concernedtake a decision within a reasonable period of time, and in any case no later than 25 working days following receipt of the information requested by the Commission pursuant to paragraph 2. This decision can be: (a) a general authorisation of the investment; (b) an authorisation under certain conditions necessary to eliminate the threat; (c) no authorisation; (d) an in-depth investigation in case that there are reasons to assume that more time and information is necessary to take an informed decision, which shall not take longer than 50 days. Where a Member State has a screening mechanism in place as referred to in Article 3(1) and the information on foreign direct investment undergoing screening has been received by the Commission pursuant to Article 8(1), the opinion shall be delivered no later than 25 working days following receipt of such information. Where additional information is needed to issue an opinion, the 25-day period shall run from the date of receipt of the additional information. The opinion of the Commission shall be communicated to the other Member States.
2018/03/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 300 #

2017/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 4
4. The opindecision of the Commission shall be communicated to the other Member States.
2018/03/02
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 301 #

2017/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 5
5. The Member States where the foreign direct investment is planned or has been completed shall take utmost account of the Commission's opinion and provide an explanation to the Commission in case its opinion is not followed.deleted
2018/03/02
Committee: ITRE