BETA

1056 Amendments of François-Xavier BELLAMY

Amendment 51 #

2023/2130(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 36 a (new)
36a. Welcomes the resumption of in- presence plenary sessions in Strasbourg; recalls that the EU Treaties stipulate that Parliament shall have its seat in Strasbourg, where the 12 periods of monthly plenary sessions, including the budget session, shall be held; underlines that the suspension of sessions in Strasbourg, the introduction of electronic voting and remote participation are linked to the exceptional circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic; recalls that any change to the Treaties requires the unanimity of the Member States;
2024/01/31
Committee: CONT
Amendment 60 #

2023/2130(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 44
44. Notes with satisfaction that Members were given the opportunity to take part in plenary debates from the EPLOs in their Member States of election, this being as a result of the exceptional measures put in place during the pandemic, this having been facilitated by the actions of DG COMM; welcomes the increased efforts made by DG COMM to make use of new technologies to facilitate the work of Members during the COVID- 19 pandemic; acknowledges that the remote access for national media to the communication activities of Parliament has opened up ways to interact with Union citizens;
2024/01/31
Committee: CONT
Amendment 129 #

2023/2130(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 79
79. Recalls that the official languages to be used by the Union institutions, bodies and agencies are established in Regulation No 13; acknowledges that DG TRAD ensures that Parliament’s procedural content is available in all 24 official and working languages of the Union, thereby enabl; regrets that, in practice, just one of the Union’s working languages is used more widely ing Parliament to fulfil its commitment to the policy of multilingualism’s work, and increasingly so in recent years; calls for multilingualism to be respected by ensuring, where necessary, an adequate number of translation and interpreting staff; _________________ 3 Regulation No 1 determining the languages to be used by the European Economic Community (OJ P 017, 6.10.1957, p. 385)
2024/01/31
Committee: CONT
Amendment 24 #

2023/2123(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F
F. whereas a market for renewable and low-carbon hydrogen remains to be built and will require appropriate customer protection and significant investments in order to achieve climate and carbon neutrality targets to be incentivised in all hard-to-abate sectors;
2023/07/20
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 31 #

2023/2123(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading -1
Clarifying the role of the Hydrogen Bank as an “Umbrella-scheme”
2023/07/20
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 32 #

2023/2123(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Welcomes the Commission communication on the European Hydrogen Bank (EHB); notes that the name ‘European Hydrogen Bank’ can be misleading, as this is not a bank but an initiative aiming to coordinate activities and financing to support renewable and low-carbon hydrogen projects; considers that the EHB should bear clear responsibility for the implementation of the recommendations included in this resolution under an efficient and streamlined “umbrella-scheme”;
2023/07/20
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 35 #

2023/2123(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Encourages the Commission to provide more funding support and visibility to that initiative, as it will represent an important milestone for kick- starting the European hydrogen market;
2023/07/20
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 37 #

2023/2123(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Stresses that the European Hydrogen Bank can act complementarily to the Net-Zero Industry Act, serving the increased demand for EU-produced hydrogen and the installed production of electrolysers;
2023/07/20
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 68 #

2023/2123(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 1
Financial support for the domestic production of renewable and low-carbon hydrogen
2023/07/20
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 90 #

2023/2123(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Stresses that the design of future auctions should prioritise, but not restrict, the sale of renewable and low-carbon hydrogen to hard-to-abate industries and heavy transport, considering in particular sectors subject to a renewable hydrogen mandate under the Renewable Energy Directive alongside heavy transport and the maritime sector;
2023/07/20
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 97 #

2023/2123(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 b (new)
9b. Asks the Commission to facilitate the access of SMEs in the bidding process, e.g. via a lower capacity minimum, the possibility of pooling and the submission of bids ahead of permits to ensure financial security;
2023/07/20
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 116 #

2023/2123(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Welcomes the Commission’s idea of launching the concept of ‘auctions as a service’; considers that this could lower the administrative costs for the Member States; stresses that the administrative burdens in the application process should be reduced, as far as possible, so that the award processes can also be handled by SMEs;
2023/07/20
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 137 #

2023/2123(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Recalls that the CBAM will apply to hydrogen; calls on the Commission to deliver a robust certification scheme in line with the revised Renewable Energy Directive for imports of renewable hydrogen, equivalent to the rules applying to domestic production, safeguarding a level playing field for reliable international partners; calls on the Commission to ensure that the CBAM adequately ensures a level playing field for hydrogen produced in Europe, including with regard to the indirect carbon costs that are passed on to consumers in European electricity prices but are not faced by consumers in other regions of the world;
2023/07/20
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 189 #

2023/2123(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23
23. Stresses the need for an annual report by the Commission assessing progress in the development of the renewable and low-carbon hydrogen market and evaluating the activities of the EHB; asks that this report also evaluate the geographical breakdown of funding, the number of jobs created, changes in supply and demand, the cost of renewable hydrogen compared to other forms of hydrogen, and the development of dedicated hydrogen infrastructures;
2023/07/20
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 79 #

2023/2122(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 a (new)
9a. Recalls that NGOs operating on European territory are required to comply with the national law applicable in each Member State concerned by their activity, with Union law and with international law;
2023/11/15
Committee: CONT
Amendment 179 #

2023/2122(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23
23. Criticises those situations in which substantial co-funding is awarded from the EU budget toIs concerned about the considerable influence that can be exerted by NGOs that are clearly and predominantly financed by non-EU states, networks, companies or foundations and that deliver research thatwhose activities regularly negatively impacts European industry and transport providers, agriculture, fisheries and transport providers; criticises situations where significant co-financing is provided to them from the EU budget; urges the Commission to trace the flow of funds from the first donor in order to prevent damage to the EU economy;
2023/11/15
Committee: CONT
Amendment 291 #

2023/2122(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 42
42. Reiterates its call in the 2021 Commission discharge resolution24 for the creation of a public blacklist of NGOs that have engaged in activities such as hate speech, incitement to terrorism, religious extremism, Islamic fundamentalism, antisemitism, supporting or glorifying violence or spreading unfounded scientific statements or that have misused or misappropriated EU funds and are listed in the EDES database in order to ensure that they are blocked from access to EU institutions and EU funding programmes; expects a proposal on this to be put forward by the Commission no later than 1 July 2024; _________________ 24 Texts adopted, P9_TA(2023)0137, paragraph 19.
2023/11/15
Committee: CONT
Amendment 39 #

2023/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B a (new)
B a. whereas the outermost regions (ORs) and island territories with the status of overseas countries and territories (OCTs) face a significant number of structural constraints and are less developed than the continental regions of their Member States; whereas a stable and predictable regulatory environment is particularly important for the efficient management of the cohesion funds in these regions;
2023/12/13
Committee: REGI
Amendment 40 #

2023/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B a (new)
B a. Whereas the efficient management of the cohesion funds is crucial to achieving regional development objectives and meeting local needs, and that delays, particularly in some outermost regions, have been observed in the implementation of the 2014-2020 funds, requiring further attention on the efficiency of their management; whereas some regions have not spent nearly 50% of their budget ;
2023/12/13
Committee: REGI
Amendment 153 #

2023/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Calls for disaster prevention and preparedness investments to be guaranteed either through a dedicated policy objective, thematic concentration or a specific enabling condition to ensure investments in local infrastructure and risk management in less developed urban and rural areas, including border regions, outermost regions and island territories; believes that targeted financing should focus on climate change adaptation and mitigation by tackling the side effects of climate change locally (slow onset events as well as extreme weather events), including wildfires, floods, landslides, heatwaves, coastal erosion and other events;
2023/12/13
Committee: REGI
Amendment 161 #

2023/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. Calls for the creation of a technical assistance programme specifically designed for smaller municipalities and cross-border and rural areas, as well as outermost regions, overseas territories and island regions that face new challenges such as the green transition and climate change; recalls that the outermost regions and island territories are at high risk of major natural disasters, and are often impacted by high seismic or volcanic intensity, cyclones, forest fires, storms, floods, droughts, among others; believes that the support should be in the form 100 % EU financing for administrative capacity-building, project design and strategic planning capabilities (including planning instruments), while the allocation criteria should include the number of inhabitants and the needs and challenges of these areas;
2023/12/13
Committee: REGI
Amendment 191 #

2023/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Calls for initial allocations and co- financing rates to be assessed on the basis of NUTS 3 (nomenclature of territorial units for statistics) in order for funding to be directed to where it is most needed and to avoid pockets of underdevelopment from arising ; underlines that such a shift should take into account possible negative effects on EU financing for larger urban areas; stresses that this is necessary in order not to stall the development trajectory of metropolitan areas that were previously supported more intensively by cohesion policy; calls on the Commission to guarantee high co-financing rates for the outermost regions, namely at least 85%, and, in specific cases, 100% financing; recalls that, as recognised by the Treaties, these territories face particular constraints and an economic and social situation aggravated by their remoteness, insularity, small size, difficult topography and climate, or their economic dependence on a few products;
2023/12/13
Committee: REGI
Amendment 211 #

2023/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Calls for the creation of local cohesion boards in the managing authorities and monitoring committees, which should have decision-making powers, including on co-programming and co-reprogramming with local authorities, but also be able to assess, objectively and on an ongoing basis, the effectiveness of fund management by the managing authorities, and thus contribute to the efficient implementation of cohesion policy at local level; reiterates that these boards should include representatives of urban and rural administrations, including mayors;
2023/12/13
Committee: REGI
Amendment 215 #

2023/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 a (new)
11 a. Calls on the Commission to take the necessary measures to address the shortcomings identified in the management of the cohesion funds by the managing authorities, while, at the same time, simplifying the use of technical assistance funds, in order to improve the administrative and management capacities of the competent entities;
2023/12/13
Committee: REGI
Amendment 257 #

2023/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 a (new)
17 a. Calls on the European Commission to provide island regions and overseas countries and territories all the necessary aid, including by way of using cohesion policy, in order to enhance their self-sufficiency and economic development, while taking into account their specific environmental and geographical characteristics, as well as social and economic situation;
2023/12/13
Committee: REGI
Amendment 392 #

2023/2119(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 22 a (new)
22a. Strongly condemns the recent escalation of the conflict over Nagorno- Karabach by Azerbaijan; deplores the fact that the attacks by Azerbaijan and the subsequent ceasefire have led to many Armenians fleeing the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, which amounts to ethnic cleansing; calls in the light of the ongoing tensions for greater international monitoring efforts in the area and for the EU monitoring mission to Armenia (EUMA) to be expanded;
2023/10/02
Committee: AFET
Amendment 397 #

2023/2119(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 22 b (new)
22b. Calls on the EU and the member states to take measures to deter Azerbaijan from any further escalation and human rights violations of the inhabitants of Nagorno-Karabakh and Armenia, including by cooperating in an international monitoring mission, the imposition of targeted sanctions and the suspension of the Memorandum of Understanding on Energy between the EU and Azerbaijan;
2023/10/02
Committee: AFET
Amendment 27 #

2023/2112(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A
A. whereas Europe’s complex, conflict-ridden and contested pastmillennia-old history and rich heritage poses both a challenge and an opportunity for European integration;
2023/10/10
Committee: CULT
Amendment 29 #

2023/2112(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A a (new)
Aa. whereas Europe's heritage, a faithful representation of its past, helps to consolidate a common historical consciousness;
2023/10/10
Committee: CULT
Amendment 31 #

2023/2112(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A b (new)
Ab. whereas the Greco-Latin heritage and the influence of Judeo-Christian culture in Europe have helped to form a shared sense and a shared consciousness of Europe's history;
2023/10/10
Committee: CULT
Amendment 37 #

2023/2112(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas gender-, belief- and ethnicity-based injustices have been inherent in European history over many centurimanifest themselves, including in the form of antisemitism and antigypsyism in particular;
2023/10/10
Committee: CULT
Amendment 47 #

2023/2112(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F
F. whereas historical memory incorporates a distinct degree of subjectivity, given that the choice of what to remember and how the past is interpreted necessarily involves value judgements;
2023/10/10
Committee: CULT
Amendment 59 #

2023/2112(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital H
H. whereas fostering a critical historical consciousness across borders by educational and other means is central for Europeans to be able to come to terms withlearn about their past, confidently deal with the present and work towards a common future;
2023/10/10
Committee: CULT
Amendment 72 #

2023/2112(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I
I. whereas European historical consciousness is understood as an individual as well as collective ability and skill to understand, (self-)critically assess and learn from history, which facilitates the recognition of the inextricable connection and interdependency between past, present and future;
2023/10/10
Committee: CULT
Amendment 81 #

2023/2112(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 1
Dealing with Europe’s (dark) past as a risk andpast as an opportunity
2023/10/10
Committee: CULT
Amendment 86 #

2023/2112(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Acknowledges that thee rich, diverse and oftensometimes conflicting histories of European nations and states make any effort to deal with history at a supranational political level a difficult and potentially dangerous endeavour, and that attempts to regulate how to commemorate and interpret the past always prove to be challenging;
2023/10/10
Committee: CULT
Amendment 91 #

2023/2112(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Recalls that all EU citizens have the right to learn about their history, including the history of their countries and of the European community to which they belong;
2023/10/10
Committee: CULT
Amendment 126 #

2023/2112(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. Recognises that the Union’s concern mainly with narrating a story about itself ex negativo, with the horrors of the past and especially National Socialism and Stalicommunism serving as a ‘negative foundation myth’, provides a strong sense of purpose for the European project, yet bears the risk of nurturing a teleological and simplistic black-and-white scheme of history which potentially hampers a fully informed understanding of Europe’s intricate past and reduces incentives to challenge stereotypes and sacred cows of national histories;
2023/10/10
Committee: CULT
Amendment 135 #

2023/2112(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Recognises the need for a broader and more holistic understanding of European history for a (self-)criticaln informed European historical consciousness to emerge, in particular by widening the focus of current European remembrance initiatives;
2023/10/10
Committee: CULT
Amendment 150 #

2023/2112(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Acknowledges the crucial importance of approaching Europe’s past on the foundation of European core values such as humanism, tolerancerespect for human dignity, freedom, democracy and the rule of law, and of creating an open sphere of discussion that also makes it possible to address difficult elements of national histories and that provides for mutual understanding and reconciliation both within and between European nations;
2023/10/10
Committee: CULT
Amendment 157 #

2023/2112(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Calls on the Member States to revise current curricula and teaching methodologies with a view to shifting focus from national towards European and global history and in order to allow for more emphasis on a supranational historical remembrance, in particular by allowing for multiple interpretations of the same historical period and event and by fostering corresponding teaching styles that favour reflection and discussion over knowledge transfer and that are guided by the overall objective of making students learn ‘how to think’ rather than ‘what to think’strengthen current history curricula, and to foster teaching styles that favour knowledge transfer, reflection and discussion;
2023/10/10
Committee: CULT
Amendment 178 #

2023/2112(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to strengthen the tools currently available at European level in order to foster a (self-)criticaln informed European historical consciousness, in particular the Erasmus+ programme, which supports mobility and intercultural learning as key tools to increase understanding of other cultures and nations, and the CERV programme, which provides support for transnational historical remembrance projects and promotes civic engagement;
2023/10/10
Committee: CULT
Amendment 182 #

2023/2112(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 a (new)
13a. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to put in place an ambitious policy to preserve Europe's heritage, a faithful representation of its past, in order to foster the emergence of a shared consciousness of Europe's history;
2023/10/10
Committee: CULT
Amendment 201 #

2023/2112(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. EnvisionsConsiders that national collective memories eventually contributing to and merging incontribute to a European public sphere, wit in which national remembrance cultures complementing each other rather than being in competition, and dealings with history becoming an issue of civic rather than political action;
2023/10/10
Committee: CULT
Amendment 45 #

2023/2109(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D
D. whereas SMRs offer a lower initial capital investment, greater scalability and siting flexibility for locations unable to accommodate more traditional larger reactors such as Overseas Countries and Territories of the European Union, allowing them to achieve their energetic autonomy, and now have the potential for enhanced safety and security compared to earlier designs;
2023/09/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 72 #

2023/2109(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Underlines the potential of nuclear power and SMRs, through SMRs and high-power generators, in contributing to the EU’s clean energy goals;
2023/09/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 143 #

2023/2109(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 a (new)
12a. Regrets the European Commission's long-standing hostile policy towards nuclear power; points out that, while SMRs offer valuable benefits, they will not be sufficient to achieve our ambition of carbon neutrality, and the deployment of nuclear power will require investment in high-power generators;
2023/09/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 224 #

2023/2109(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23
23. Expresses the need to place SMRs among the technologies recognised as strategic by the Net Zero Industry Act;
2023/09/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 246 #

2023/2109(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 26
26. Emphasises that a robust, capable and reliable supply chain, as much as possible in the European Union, is critical for the success of mass-produced SMRs;
2023/09/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 10 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E
E. whereas the entire book sector value chain relies on the balance between the various actors, such as authors, publishers, translatordistributors, translators, printing companies, booksellers and libraries;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 15 #
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 17 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E c (new)
Ec. whereas bookshops and libraries are the focal point for readership development and reading promotion, whilst contributing to social and digital inclusiveness;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 23 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G a (new)
Ga. whereas the governments of some Member States have exerted influence and regulatory pressure on the book sector, which negatively impacts on freedom of expression and conflicts with EU values;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 27 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital H a (new)
Ha. whereas the COVID-19 pandemic has led to an increase in the market share of electronic formats, particularly audiobooks, yet many readers returned to paper formats after the lockdowns ended;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 28 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital H a (new)
Ha. whereas readers, including young ones have shown a continued preference to read printed books;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 37 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital K a (new)
Ka. whereas the availability of digital books offers an opportunity to improve accessibility for people with disabilities, however this requires adequate investments in the production of different formats and the development of relevant skills;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 38 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital K a (new)
Ka. given the difficulties posed by shortages of the paper and ink required for producing works;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 42 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital K b (new)
Kb. whereas the lack of interoperability between e-book formats reinforces the position of dominant market players, whilst restricting consumer choice and protection;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 43 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital K b (new)
Kb. whereas almost all books for children and young people are printed in Asia;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 44 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital K c (new)
Kc. whereas price cap measures, such as the single book price in some Member States, have helped maintain considerable diversity in the value chain, plentiful supply, editorial pluralism and a local network of independent booksellers;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 45 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital K d (new)
Kd. whereas the Deforestation Regulation will apply to the books value chain, given the essential role played by paper mills and printing houses in collecting data on sources of wood, and given that the paper required to produce a single book contains numerous different sources of wood, it will be impossible to retrace the sources of wood after it has been made into paper;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 54 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. Underlines the need to ensure a balance in the book ecosystem by fulfilling the specific roles of the various actors of the value chain, such as authors, publishers, printers, distributors, translators, booksellers and libraries;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 58 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3a. Recalls that the European Accessibility Act recognises that some ebooks might not be made accessible by publishers, where the process is disproportionately burdensome, the result would fundamentally alter the work, or when the publishing houses are micro- enterprises;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 60 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 b (new)
3b. Underlines that the efforts from publishers to make their e-books accessible must be reflected by the avoidance of duplication and unfair competition from authorised entities working under the Marrakesh EU legislation i.e. Directive (EU) 2017/1564 and Regulation (EU) 2017/1563;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 62 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 c (new)
3c. Underlines that while accessibility obligations apply to the entire book value chain, the final retailer should not be liable for the accessibility of the books they sell, as this could prevent books that benefit from derogations, from being sold;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 67 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. Invites the Commission in its mid- term review of the Creative Europe programme 2021-2027 to introduce measurable goals on how funding is used to improve the accessibility of books for persons with disabilities;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 79 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Urges the Member States to foster cultural diversity by increasing the acquisition budget of libraries, so that they can further expand the range of books that they offer, andto supporting local bookshops, to safeguard the appropriate remuneration of authors and the investment capacity of publishers;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 88 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. Stresses the need to support the creation and translation of European books, in particular by enhancing public funding at both national and European levels so as to improve the circulation, visibility and diversity of translated books;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 91 #

2023/2053(INI)

8a. Underlines the importance of the mobility and exchanges between authors in order to facilitate their creative work and improve their opportunities to gain new professional experiences abroad;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 92 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8 b (new)
8b. Welcomes the new mobility action Culture Moves Europe in the frame of the Creative Europe Programme offering mobility grants to artists and cultural professionals, in particular for literary translators;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 93 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8 c (new)
8c. Calls on in this regard the Commission to explore a possibility to further expand this action to other representatives of the book sector;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 94 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8 d (new)
8d. Recalls that the ability of the book sector to maintain a diverse network of booksellers and innovation-driven market relies on proper education and training that allows people to pursue a career in the book industry;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 98 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 a (new)
9a. Supports further promotion of the EULP in the Member States, including via the creation of an EU category for European children’s books;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 100 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 b (new)
9b. Underlines the positive role taken by influencers to promote books on social media in an innovative way, thus fostering reading and European culture among younger generations;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 111 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 a (new)
13a. Underlines the social role of libraries as places where citizens meet with authors and exchange views, in particular in small towns and less developed regions;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 125 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16 a (new)
16a. Calls on the Commission to ensure that sufficient funding continues to support the Ukrainian book sector, including artists and authors for the duration of the war and the reconstruction of the country;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 127 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16 b (new)
16b. Underlines the role taken by the Creative Europe Programme to fund some of these projects, such as the Tales of EUkraine initiative;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 129 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 a (new)
17a. Calls on the Member States to put tight restrictions on the right to pulp books, which should be limited to cases where stocks are very large and the cost of storage is considerable or where the physical state of the books makes them unsuitable for sale; stresses that for environmental and economic reasons, and at a time of paper shortages, pulping books in order to give collections a ‘makeover’ should no longer be permitted;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 130 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 b (new)
17b. Calls on the Commission to create a ‘Printed in Europe’ label;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 134 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18 a (new)
18a. Calls on the Commission to support print-on-demand programmes that make it possible to legally republish books that are out of print and not scheduled to be reprinted;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 135 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18 b (new)
18b. Calls on the Member States to exercise greater vigilance over paper and ink production capacities, and to explore providing support to this link in the book chain;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 137 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18 c (new)
18c. Calls on the Commission to establish clear guidelines on applying the Deforestation Regulation, taking into account the specific characteristics of the book sector and the enormous complexity of its value chain so as to ensure that the due diligence obligations of the various publishing actors are clear while also remaining proportionate and feasible;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 138 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18 d (new)
18d. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to support the development of industrial capacities in Europe (paper and ink production and printing houses) so that books for young people and children can be printed here and thus reduce their carbon footprint;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 140 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19
19. Acknowledges the potential benefidevelopments for the sector ofrom the use of artificial intelligence (AI), such as automated text analysis, metadata tagging, online discoverability and professional translation automation tools; underlines certain challenges for the sector in this regard, such as the lack of transparency in relation to AI training;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 141 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19 a (new)
19a. Underlines the risks presented by Generative Artificial Intelligence for the book market, including that number of training datasets have been shown to include illegally copied books and that AI- generated books may flood the market and lead to unfair competition with authors whose styles are copied;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 144 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19 b (new)
19b. Stresses the importance of transparency regarding the training data, including regarding the works that have been collected and from which sources, and use of Generative Artificial Intelligence;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 146 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20 a (new)
20a. Calls on the Commission to create a database of published books that is easily accessible to all and that contains bibliographic data (title and elements of the title, authors, role of the author, biography, language of the text, languages in translation, reading age, type of book, etc.), ISBN, availability, price and marketing data (excerpt, front cover, back cover, blurb, table of contents, etc.);
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 147 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20 a (new)
20a. Underlines the importance of collecting data from publishers in order to display the origins of all parts of the book through the entire production chain, including information on paper certification and place of production;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 151 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 22 a (new)
22a. Recalls the decisive role played by the charges consumers pay for the delivery of books they buy online and the importance of fair competition in the market, particularly between independent bookshops and online sales platforms; highlights the anticompetitive practices of some actors by making physical delivery almost free in order to attract consumers; welcomes the initiatives taken by some Member States to regulate delivery charges and calls on the Commission to support them;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 152 #

2023/2053(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 22 a (new)
22a. Calls on the Commission to support national initiatives that help protect SMEs, micro-enterprises and independent structures in the book sector from unfair competition from the large platforms;
2023/06/06
Committee: CULT
Amendment 98 #

2023/2051(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F a (new)
Fa. whereas abusive and coercive contractual practices by video-on-demand platforms threaten the remuneration and working conditions of European creators working with the audiovisual sector;
2023/07/05
Committee: EMPLCULT
Amendment 98 #

2023/2051(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F a (new)
Fa. whereas abusive and coercive contractual practices by video-on-demand platforms threaten the remuneration and working conditions of European creators working with the audiovisual sector;
2023/07/05
Committee: EMPLCULT
Amendment 269 #

2023/2051(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Is concerned by abusive and coercive practices that may result in unfair contractual relationships for CCS professionals; draws attention to issues relating more specifically to 'buy-out' contracts that video-on-demand platforms are trying to impose by applying the law of third countries in order to circumvent the European copyright regulatory framework; requests the Commission to assess and closely monitor the situation in that regard;
2023/07/05
Committee: EMPLCULT
Amendment 278 #

2023/2051(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 a (new)
11a. Calls on the Commission to draw up proposals to put an end to practices circumventing the EU copyright regulatory framework;
2023/07/05
Committee: EMPLCULT
Amendment 1 #

2023/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 1 a (new)
– having regard to the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, and in particular Article 349 thereof,
2023/09/05
Committee: PECH
Amendment 5 #

2023/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 5 a (new)
– having regard to the European Commission's renewed strategy for the EU's outermost regions, putting citizens first and unlocking their potential,
2023/09/05
Committee: PECH
Amendment 15 #

2023/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B a (new)
Ba. whereas the conditions of activity in the outermost regions require unique and appropriate solutions to meet the challenges of endogenous development and food self-sufficiency;
2023/09/05
Committee: PECH
Amendment 16 #

2023/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Highlights the fact that the 2013 revision of the CMO Regulation resulted in a shift from certain types of interventions to an approach more oriented towards the long-term market, with a focus on development and innovation in the sector and without taking sufficient account of the exceptional situation of the regions referred to in Article 349 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union;
2023/09/05
Committee: PECH
Amendment 20 #

2023/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Considers producer organisations (POs) and inter-branch organisations to be the backbone of the fishery and aquaculture sector, supporting the day-to- day management of the CFP and enabling its collective implementation at producer level;
2023/09/05
Committee: PECH
Amendment 21 #

2023/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Is of the opinion that POs and inter-branch organisations have a key role in helping to achieve the objectives of the CFP, which is why they need to be further supported; notes that more must be done to promote the set-up, consolidation and financing of POs and inter-branch organisations across the EU, particularly in Member States where primary production has largely remained fragmented (aquaculture, small- scale fisheries); considers that strong PO presence and that of inter-branch organisations is crucial for enhancing the prosperity of coastal communities and strengthening the position of fishers in the supply chain, especially in the outermost regions;
2023/09/05
Committee: PECH
Amendment 33 #

2023/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. Concludes that properly functioning POs and inter-branch organisations generally have successful measures and actions, but observes that there is still a lack of POs and inter-branch organisations organising small-scale fishers and aquaculture farmers in particular, especially in the outermost regions; notes that the aquaculture POs currently in operation have been particularly successful in their promotion and communication activities;
2023/09/05
Committee: PECH
Amendment 41 #

2023/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Considers that there are currently organisations in the Member States that perform tasks and functions falling within the remit of POs and inter-branch organisations, but that these organisations cannot qualify as POs under the CMO Regulation;
2023/09/05
Committee: PECH
Amendment 46 #

2023/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. Notes that the COVID-19 crisis resulted in the sudden closure of most outlets for fresh aquatic food products, including in the outermost regions, making it opportune to restore the option of using storage aid mechanisms and to extend these to cover aquaculture POs;
2023/09/05
Committee: PECH
Amendment 53 #

2023/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Highlights the fact that the Commission evaluation identified shortcomings in the existing framework in terms of its ability to achieve the objectives of the CMO Regulation, in particular, in taking account of the specific characteristics of the markets in the regions referred to in Article 349 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union;
2023/09/05
Committee: PECH
Amendment 83 #

2023/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14
14. Recalls that POs and inter-branch organisations may be exempted from the application of competition rules in order to achieve their objectives, subject to certain conditions, including that their activities do not lead to the partitioning of markets, do not exclude competition and do not eliminate competition;
2023/09/05
Committee: PECH
Amendment 84 #

2023/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Notes that this exemption is essential for allowing some practices used by POs and inter-branch organisations, especially in the outermost regions, such as controlling the quantities put on the market by POtheir members in order to stabilise markets and prices, comply with conservation requirements and avoid food waste; concludes that non-recognised collective bodies of producers (e.g. cooperatives, cofradías) may not benefit from the exemption under the current criteria for POs;
2023/09/05
Committee: PECH
Amendment 102 #

2023/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19
19. Believes that the Commission and the Member States need to make more effort to achieve more uniform implementation of the CMO Regulation across sectors, by taking sufficient account of the specific conditions under which markets operate in the outermost regions; is of the opinion that more uniform implementation could help to ensure consumer trust in the aquatic food products placed on the single market, and serve the objectives of endogenous development and food self-sufficiency in the outermost regions;
2023/09/05
Committee: PECH
Amendment 106 #

2023/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21
21. Welcomes the outcome of the negotiations on the revision of the Fisheries Control Regulation, in particular the rules aiming to strengthen traceability provisions for all fishery and aquaculture products; is of the opinion that this traceability information will be very important for European consumers, both on the continent and overseas; calls on the Commission to propose further action to ensure that this information reaches final consumers in a simple, accessible format;
2023/09/05
Committee: PECH
Amendment 116 #

2023/2049(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24
24. Reiterates its call for the criteria for recognising POs and inter-branch organisations to be adapted to better accommodate all the different organisations in the Member States that perform tasks that largely fall within the remit of a PO; highlights, in this regard, organisations such as cofradías and prud’homies de pêche, as well as those operating in the outermost regions;
2023/09/05
Committee: PECH
Amendment 2 #

2023/2019(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Recalls the crucial importance of the film and audiovisual sector and of all copyright-protected online content services for the EU, at both economic and cultural level, and considers that this sector vital forand all copyright-protected online content services contribute to safeguarding the EU’s cultural and linguistic diversity and media pluralism;
2023/05/30
Committee: CULT
Amendment 43 #

2023/2019(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7a. Calls on the Commission to support access to film heritage, including for educational purposes, through the MEDIA strand of the Creative Europe programme;
2023/05/30
Committee: CULT
Amendment 47 #

2023/2019(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 b (new)
7b. Calls on the Commission to initiate work on the discoverability of European works online and to examine the role, impact and transparency of recommender algorithms in the cultural sector;
2023/05/30
Committee: CULT
Amendment 14 #

2023/0264(BUD)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8
8. Encourages Member States to monitor the implementation of the Brexit Adjustment Reserve (BAR) and calls on the Commission to extend the deadline if necessary, thereby allowing fishers to fully benefit from its resources; insists that the BAR should also be used to help the wholesale and processing sectors, which have been badly affected by this crisis; stresses that the Brexit Adjustment Reserve should not only finance fleet cessation plans, but must contribute to investments in order to ensure the continuity of the fishing activities most affected by Brexit;
2023/07/10
Committee: PECH
Amendment 21 #

2023/0264(BUD)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 15
15. Reiterates the need to provide substantial support for disadvantaged coastal areas and European outermost regions;. Calls for the European Commission to allow financial support for fleet renewal in the European outermost regions by ending the ban on State aid for vessel replacements. Recalls that, contrary to the provisions of the EMFAF, this objective has not received any European funding in any region.
2023/07/10
Committee: PECH
Amendment 165 #

2023/0081(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 10
(10) To achieve the 2030 objectives a particular focus is needed on some of the net-zero technologies, also in view their significant contribution towards the path to net zero by 2050. These technologies include solar photovoltaic and solar thermal technologies, onshore and offshore renewable technologies, battery/storage technologies, heat pumps and geothermal energy technologies, electrolysers and fuel cells, technologies to produce energies from nuclear processes and their related fuel cycle, sustainable alternative fuels technologies for all aviation sectors, low- carbon technologies, sustainable biogas/biomethane, carbon capture and storage technologies and grid technologies. These technologies play a key role in the Union’s open strategic autonomy, ensuring that citizens have access to clean, affordable, secure energy. Given their role, these technologies should benefit from even faster permitting procedures, obtain the status of the highest national significance possible under national law and benefit from additional support to crowd-in investments.
2023/06/23
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 174 #

2023/0081(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 10 a (new)
(10a) sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) could contribute around 65% of the reduction in emissions needed by all aviation sectors to reach net-zero in 2050. This will require a massive increase in production in order to meet demand and become competitive with fossil kerosene.
2023/06/23
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 453 #

2023/0081(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. The Commission is empowered to adopt delegated acts in accordance with Article 33 to establish net-zero technology-specific benchmarks with a view to approaching or reaching overall benchmarks set out in paragraph 2.
2023/06/23
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 482 #

2023/0081(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) ‘net-zero technologies’ means renewable energy technologies66 ; electricity and heat storage technologies; heat pumps; grid technologies; renewable fuels of non-biological origin technologies; sustainable alternative fuels technologies67 ; electrolysers and fuel cells; advanced technologies to produce energy from nuclear processes with minimal waste from the fuel cycle, small modular reactors, and related best-in- class fuels; carbon capture, utilisation, and storage technologies; and energy- system related energy efficiency technologies. They refer to the final products, specific components and specific machinery primarily used for the production of those products. They shall have reached a technology readiness level of at least 8. _________________ 66 ‘renewable energy' means ‘renewable energy’ as defined in Directive (EU) 2018/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2018 on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources 67 ‘sustainable alternative fuels’ means fuels covered by the Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on ensuring a level playing field for sustainable air transport, COM/2021/561 final and by the Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and Council on the use of renewable and low-carbon fuels in maritime transport COM/2021/562 finaany technology, including its supply chain, the application of which contributes to climate change mitigation either through compliance with the emission threshold of 100g CO2/kWh or within the meaning of Article 10(1) of Regulation (EU) 2020/852 of the European Parliament and of the Council.
2023/06/23
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 505 #

2023/0081(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) ‘net-zero technologies’ means renewable energy technologies66 ; electricity and heat storage technologies; heat pumps; grid technologies; renewable fuels of non-biological origin technologies; sustainable alternative fuels technologies67 ; electrolysers and fuel cells; advanced technologies to produce energyies from nuclear processes with minimal waste from the fuel cycle, small modular reactors, and related best-in-class fueland their related fuel cycle; low-carbon technologies; carbon capture, utilisation, and storage technologies; and energy- system related energy efficiency technologies. They refer to the final products, specific components and specific machinery primarily used for the production of those products. They shall have reached a technology readiness level of at least 8. _________________ 66 ‘renewable energy' means ‘renewable energy’ as defined in Directive (EU) 2018/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2018 on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources 67 ‘sustainable alternative fuels’ means fuels covered by the Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on ensuring a level playing field for sustainable air transport, COM/2021/561 final and by the Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and Council on the use of renewable and low-carbon fuels in maritime transport COM/2021/562 final.
2023/06/23
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 516 #

2023/0081(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point a a (new)
(aa) The Commission is empowered to adopt delegated acts in accordance with Article 33 to amend the definition of “net zero technologies” set out in paragraph 1 to take into account technological innovations in these sectors as well as any update of the Union’s industry priorities.
2023/06/23
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 683 #

2023/0081(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) 120 months for the construction of net-zero technology manufacturing projects with a yearly manufacturing capacity of less than 1 GW;
2023/06/23
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 694 #

2023/0081(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 – paragraph 1 – point b
(b) 185 months for the construction of net-zero technology manufacturing projects, with a yearly manufacturing capacity of more than 1 GW.
2023/06/23
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 859 #

2023/0081(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. The Commission is empowered to adopt delegated acts in accordance with Article 33 to modify technologies listed in the Annex to take into account technological innovations in these sectors as well as any update of the Union’s industry priorities.
2023/06/23
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1537 #

2023/0081(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – table 1
1. Solar photovoltaic and solar thermal technologies 2. Onshore wind and offshore renewable technologies 3. Battery/storage technologies 4. Heat pumps and geothermal energy technologies 5. Electrolysers and fuel cells 6. Sustainable biogas/biomethane technologies 7. Carbon Capture and storage (CCS) technologies 8. Grid technologies 8a. Low-carbon technologies
2023/06/23
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1538 #

2023/0081(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – table 1
1. Solar photovoltaic and solar thermal technologies 2. Onshore wind and offshore renewable technologies 3. Battery/storage technologies 4. Heat pumps and geothermal energy technologies 5. Electrolysers and fuel cells 6. Sustainable biogas/biomethane technologies 7. Carbon Capture and storage (CCS) technologies 8. Grid technologies 8a. Technologies to produce energies from nuclear processes and their related fuel cycle
2023/06/23
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1539 #

2023/0081(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – table 1
1. Solar photovoltaic and solar thermal technologies 2. Onshore wind and offshore renewable technologies 3. Battery/storage technologies 4. Heat pumps and geothermal energy technologies 5. Electrolysers and fuel cells 6. Sustainable biogas/biomethane technologies 7. Carbon Capture and storage (CCS) technologies 8. Grid technologies 8a. Other sustainable alternative fuels technologies
2023/06/23
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 190 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 11 a (new)
(11a) All imports into the Union, and domestic productions of the Union including Overseas Countries and Territories, of critical raw material should comply with the highest environemental and social standards, such as the 2006 Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance (IRMA) or the 2001 International Council on Mining and Metals (ICMM).
2023/05/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 313 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 2 – point a – point i
(i) Union extraction capacity is able to extract the ores, minerals or concentrates needed to produce at least 10% of the Union's annual consumption of strategic raw materials, to the extent that the Union’s reserves allow for this; purchases are prioritized, with a focus on sourcing from European production and European Overseas Countries and Territories.
2023/05/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 329 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 2 – point a – point iii a (new)
(iiia) The capacities of the Union, including those of the Overseas Countries and Territories, shall be prioritized, and whenever feasible, it shall represent a minimum of 50% of the European consumption.
2023/05/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 333 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 2 – point b
(b) diversify the Union's imports of strategic raw materials with a view to ensure that, by 2030, the Union's annual consumption of each strategic raw material at any relevant stage of processing can rely on imports from several third countries, whose production meets the requirements of the certification schemes set out in Article 29, and none of which provide more than 65% of the Union's annual consumption;
2023/05/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 426 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. For strategic raw materials that are a byproducts of other extraction or recycling processes, those main commodity operations shall also automatically qualify as strategic.
2023/05/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 864 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 29 – paragraph 8 a (new)
8a. The recognition provided to schemes under this Regulation shall also be applicable for requirements under other related EU legislation, such as the Conflict Minerals Regulation and Batteries Regulation.
2023/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1026 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – Section 1 – paragraph 1 – point k
(k) Nickel - battery grade
2023/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1049 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – Section 1 – paragraph 1 – point p a (new)
(pa) Zinc
2023/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1053 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – Section 1 – paragraph 1 – point p b (new)
(pb) Indium
2023/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1096 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – Section 1 – paragraph 1 – point w
(w) Nickel – battery grade
2023/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1144 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex IV – paragraph 1 – point b – point i
(i) requirements ensuring environmentally sustainable practices, including requirements ensuring environmental management and impact mitigation; including but not limited to the following environmental risk categories:
2023/05/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1146 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex IV – paragraph 1 – point b – point i – point a (new)
a) damage to habitats, wildlife, flora and ecosystems;
2023/05/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1147 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex IV – paragraph 1 – point b – point i – point b (new)
b) air, including but not limited to air pollution, and greenhouse gas emissions and measurement;
2023/05/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1148 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex IV – paragraph 1 – point b – point i – point c (new)
c) water, including seaded and marine environment and including but not limited to water pollution, water use, water quantities and access to water;
2023/05/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1149 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex IV – paragraph 1 – point b – point i – point d (new)
d) soil, including but not limited to soil pollution, soil erosion, land use and land degradation;
2023/05/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1150 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex IV – paragraph 1 – point b – point i – point e (new)
e) biodiversity, including but not limited to damage to habitats, wildlife, flora and ecosystems, including ecosystems services;
2023/05/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1153 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex IV – paragraph 1 – point b – point i a (new)
(ia) exclusion of deep-sea mining;
2023/05/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1154 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex IV – paragraph 1 – point b – point i b (new)
(ib) exclusion of deep-sea tailing placement;
2023/05/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1155 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex IV – paragraph 1 – point b – point i c (new)
(ic) obligation of reforestation and soil rehabilitation after closure of mining operations;
2023/05/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1158 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex IV – paragraph 1 – point b – point ii
(ii) requirements for ensuring socially responsible practices, including respect for human rights and labour rights;, in particular with regard to:
2023/05/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1159 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex IV – paragraph 1 – point b – point ii – point a (new)
a) child labour;
2023/05/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1160 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex IV – paragraph 1 – point b – point ii – point b (new)
b) forced labour;
2023/05/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1161 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex IV – paragraph 1 – point b – point ii – point c (new)
c) occupational health and safety
2023/05/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1165 #

2023/0079(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex IV – paragraph 1 – point b a (new)
(ba) full compliance with the 2006 Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance (IRMA) certification standard, or the 2001 International Council on Mining and Metals (ICMM);
2023/05/26
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 236 #

2023/0077(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 19
(19) Consumers and suppliers need effective and efficient forward markets to cover their long-term price exposure and decrease the dependence on short-term prices. To ensure that energy customers all over the EU can fully benefit from the advantages of integrated electricity markets and competition across the Union, the functioning of the Union’s electricity forward market should be improved via the establishment of regional virtual hubs with a view to overcome the existing market fragmentation and the low liquidity experienced in many bidding zones. Regional virtual hubs should cover multiple bidding zones while ensuring an adequate price correlation. Some bidding zones may not be covered by a virtual hub in terms of contributing to the hub reference price. However, market participants from these bidding zones should still be able to hedge through a hub.deleted
2023/05/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 244 #

2023/0077(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 20
(20) Virtual hubs should reflect the aggregated price of multiple bidding zones and provide a reference price, which should be used by market operators to offer forward hedging products. To that extent, virtual hubs should not be understood as entities arranging or executing transactions. The regional virtual hubs, by providing a reference price index, should enable the pooling of liquidity and provide better hedging opportunities to market participants.deleted
2023/05/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 246 #

2023/0077(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 21
(21) To enhance the possibilities of market participants for hedging, the role of the single allocation platform established in accordance with Commission Regulation (EU) 2016/1719 should be expanded. The single allocation platform should offer trading of financial long-term transmission rights between the different bidding zones and the regional virtual hubs. The orders submitted by market participants for financial transmission rights shall be matched by a simultaneous allocation of long term cross zonal capacity. Such matching and allocation should be performed on a regular basis, to ensure enough liquidity and, hence, efficient hedging possibilities to market participants. The long-term transmission rights should be issued with frequent maturities (ranging from month ahead to at least three years ahead), in order to be aligned with the typical hedging time horizon of market participants. The single allocation platform should be subject to monitoring and enforcement to ensure that it performs its tasks properly.deleted
2023/05/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 373 #

2023/0077(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 1 – point b
Regulation (EU) 2019/943
Article 1 – point e
(e) support long-term investments in renewablelow-carbon energy generation and enable consumers’ to make their energy bills less dependent from fluctuations of short-term electricity market prices, in particular fossil fuel prices in the medium to long-term.
2023/05/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 395 #

2023/0077(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2
Regulation (EU) 2019/943
Article 2 – point 75
(75) ‘virtual hub’ means a non- physical region covering more than one bidding zone for which an index price is set in application of a methodology;deleted
2023/05/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 527 #

2023/0077(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 5 – point a
Regulation (EU) 2019/943
Article 8
NEMOs shall allow market participants to trade energy as close to real time as possible and at least up to the intraday cross-zonal gate closure time. By 1 January 2028, the intraday cross-zonal gate closure time shall be at the earliest 30 minutes ahead of real time.
2023/05/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 541 #

2023/0077(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 6
Regulation 2019/943
Article 9
1. By 1 December 2024 the ENTSO for Electricity shall submit to ACER, after having consulted ESMA, a proposal for the establishment of regional virtual hubs for the forward market. The proposal shall: (a) define the geographical scope of the virtual hubs for the forward market, including the bidding zones constituting these hubs, aiming to maximise the price correlation between the reference prices and the prices of the bidding zones constituting virtual hubs; (b) include a methodology for the calculation of the reference prices for the virtual hubs for the forward market, aiming to maximise the correlations between the reference price and the prices of the bidding zones constituting a virtual hub; such methodology shall be applicable to all virtual hubs and based on predefined objective criteria; (c) include a definition of financial long- term transmission rights from bidding zones to the virtual hubs for the forward market; (d) maximise the trading opportunities for hedging products referencing the virtual hubs for the forward market as well as for long term transmission rights from bidding zones to virtual hubs.deleted
2023/05/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 563 #

2023/0077(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 6
Regulation 2019/943
Article 9
2. Within six months of receipt of the proposal on the establishment of the regional virtual hubs for the forward market, ACER shall evaluate it and either approve or amend it. In the latter case, ACER shall consult the ENTSO for Electricity before adopting the amendments. The adopted proposal shall be published on ACER's website.deleted
2023/05/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 568 #

2023/0077(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 6
Regulation 2019/943
Article 9
3. The single allocation platform established in accordance with Regulation (EU) 2016/1719 shall have a legal form as referred to in Annex II to Directive (EU) 2017/1132 of the European Parliament and of the Council.deleted
2023/05/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 572 #

2023/0077(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 6
Regulation 2019/943
Article 9
4. The single allocation platform shall: (a) offer trading of long-term transmission rights between each bidding zone and virtual hub; where a bidding zone is not part of a virtual hub it may issue financial long-term transmission rights to a virtual hub or to other bidding zones that are part of the same capacity calculation region; (b) allocate long-term cross-zonal capacity on a regular basis and in a transparent, market-based and non- discriminatory manner; the frequency of allocation of the long-term cross-zonal capacity shall support the efficient functioning of the forward market; (c) offer trading of financial transmission rights that shall allow holders of these financial transmission rights to remove exposure to positive and negative price spreads, and with frequent maturities of up to at least three years ahead.deleted
2023/05/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 579 #

2023/0077(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 6
Regulation 2019/943
Article 9
5. Where a regulatory authority considers that there are insufficient hedging opportunities available for market participants, and after consultation of relevant financial market competent authorities in case the forward markets concern financial instruments as defined under Article 4(1)(15), it may require power exchanges or transmission system operators to implement additional measures, such as market-making activities, to improve the liquidity of the forward market. Subject to compliance with Union competition law and with Directive (EU) 2014/65 and Regulations (EU) 648/2012 and 600/2014, market operators shall be free to develop forward hedging products, including long-term forward hedging products, to provide market participants, including owners of power-generating facilities using renewable energy sources, with appropriate possibilities for hedging financial risks against price fluctuations. Member States shall not require that such hedging activity may be limited to trades within a Member State or bidding zone.deleted
2023/05/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 633 #

2023/0077(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 9
Regulation 2019/943
Article 19a
1a. Member States shall encourage that PPAs contracts reflect the conditions under which the producer generates electricity including its cost of production, while not preventing competition between producers. National regulatory authorities shall provide guidelines on the condition of conclusion of such contracts and may collect relevant information from the producer or the buyer to that extent.
2023/05/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 993 #

2023/0077(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 9
Regulation (EU) 2019/943
Article 19 f
(i) be open to cross-border participation.’;deleted
2023/05/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 266 #

2023/0076(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 14
Regulation (EU) 1227/2011
Article 13
[...] d e [...] l e t e d
2023/05/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 450 #

2023/0053(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 10 – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 1 – point a
(a) 15 years for categories AM, A1, A2, A, B, B1 and BE;deleted
2023/09/26
Committee: TRAN
Amendment 462 #

2023/0053(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 10 – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 6
Member States shall reducemay not impose restrictions on the periods of administrative validity set out in the first subparagraph to five years or less for driving licences of holders residing on their territory having reached the age of 70, in order to apply an increased frequency of medical checks or other specific measures, including refresher courses. This reduced period of administrative validity shall only be applied upon renewal of the driving licenceof driving licences based on the age of holders.
2023/09/26
Committee: TRAN
Amendment 564 #

2023/0053(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 15 – paragraph 3
3. Member States may establish additional rules applicable on their territory to novice drivers during the probationary period to improve road safety. These rules may not limit night-time driving. They shall inform the Commission thereof.
2023/09/25
Committee: TRAN
Amendment 70 #

2023/0046(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 3
(3) To achieve those targets, there is a need for policies to speed up and lower the costs of the deployment of very high- capacity fixed and wireless networks across the Union, including proper planning, coordination and the reduction of administrative burdens, and a need to establish a policy framework where large traffic generators contribute fairly to the adequate funding of telecom networks without prejudice to net neutrality.
2023/07/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 80 #

2023/0046(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 5
(5) The roll-out of very high capacity networks (as defined in Directive (EU) 2018/1972) across the Union requires substantial investment, a significant proportion of which is the cost of civil engineering works. Sharing physical infrastructure would limit the need for costly civil engineering works and make advanced broadband roll-out more effective. Applicable competition legislation should not prevent the sharing of network infrastructure, especially in low traffic areas.
2023/07/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 215 #

2023/0046(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1
1. Upon written request of an operator or a network operator duly mandated by an operator, public sector bodies owning or controlling physical infrastructure or network operators shall meet all reasonable requests for access to that physical infrastructure under fair and reasonable terms and conditions, including price, with a view to deploying elements of very high capacity networks or associated facilities. Public sector bodies owning or controlling physical infrastructure shall meet all reasonable requests for access also under non-discriminatory terms and conditions. Such written requests shall specify the elements of the physical infrastructure for which the access is requested, including a specific time frame.
2023/07/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 323 #

2023/0046(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 3
3. Any operator or network operator duly mandated by an operator shall have the right to submit, via a single information point in electronic format, applications for permits or rights of way and to retrieve information about the status of its application.
2023/07/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 36 #

2023/0033(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 1 a (new)
(1a) Article 153 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union states that the Union will support and complement the activities of the Member States in the improvement in particular of the working environment to protect workers’ health and safety. In this regard, the European Parliament resolution of 14 December 20221a recalls that the required level of protection for human health and the environment does not conflict with the preservation of European heritage. __________________ 1a European Parliament resolution of 14 December 2022 on the implementation of the New European Agenda for Culture and the EU Strategy for International Cultural Relations (2022/2047(INI) - P9_TA(2022)0444).
2023/06/08
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 42 #

2023/0033(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 3
(3) New and revised limit values should be set out in light of available information, including up-to-date scientific evidence and technical data, based on a thorough assessment of the socioeconomic and cultural impact and availability of exposure measurement protocols and techniques at the place of work.
2023/06/08
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 52 #

2023/0033(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 7
(7) Oral and inhalation exposure are both relevant routes for the uptake of lead and its inorganic compounds into the human body. Taking into account the most recent scientific data and new findings with regard to lead and its inorganic compounds, it is necessary to improve the protection of workers exposed to a potential health risk, by reducing both the occupational exposure and biological limit values for lead. Therefore, a revised biological limit value equal to 15 µg/100ml blood, accompanied by a revised occupational exposure limit value equal to 0.03 mg/m3 as an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) should be established. A limit value of 35 µg Pb/100 ml blood should apply to crafts because of the sector’s special features, as well as feasibility, time and adaptation costs.
2023/06/08
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 90 #

2023/0033(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 13 a (new)
(13a) Craftspeople using lead for restoration or building work (organ builders and other instrument makers, stained glass artists, roof restorers, etc.) should be subject to different rules under this Directive in light of the feasibility of the applicable levels and the sustainability of the sectors concerned. The revision of the limit values and the required level of protection for workers’ health and safety must not lead to the disappearance of these activities, which are crucial for preserving heritage, and for preserving skills and the jobs intrinsically linked to them. A fair balance must be achieved in order to ensure the safety of workers through the use of personal protective equipment and regular blood lead level checks, while ensuring the preservation of these crafts.
2023/06/08
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 119 #

2023/0033(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 17 a (new)
(17a) Companies and artisans, particularly those working in crafts, must be given sufficient time to adapt to the new thresholds laid down in this Directive.
2023/06/08
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 163 #

2023/0033(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 3 – paragraph 2 a (new)
When transposing the Directive, Member States shall give proper consideration to the special features of crafts that use lead. These sectors shall be subject to different rules under this Directive: the limit values for these professions are a BOEL of 0.1 milligrams per cubic metre (0.1 mg/m³) and a BLV of 35 µg Pb/100 ml blood. It is compulsory for employees to use personal protective equipment and undergo regular blood lead level checks.
2023/06/08
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 187 #

2023/0033(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 2
Directive 98/24/EC
Annex II
The binding biological limit value for crafts shall be: 35 μg Pb/100 ml blood.
2023/06/08
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 191 #

2023/0033(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 2
Directive 98/24/EC
Annex II
(1) It is recommended that the blood lead level in women of childbearing age does not exceed the reference values of the general population not occupationally exposed to lead in the respective EU Member State. When national reference levels are not available, it is recommended that blood lead levels in women of childbearing age do not exceed the Biological Guidance Value of 4.5 µg/100ml or the national reference level of the general population not occupationally exposed to lead, if it exists.
2023/06/08
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 193 #

2023/0033(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 2
Directive 98/24/EC
Annex II
(1a) Until 31 December 2028, workers whose blood lead level exceeds the biological limit value of 35 µg Pb/100 ml blood due to exposure that occurred before [the date of transposition of this Directive], but is below 70 µg Pb/100 ml blood, shall undergo regular medical checks. If they demonstrate a declining trend towards the limit value of 35 µg Pb/100 ml blood, employers may allow those workers to continue to carry out work involving lead exposure. After 1 January 2029, workers whose blood lead level exceeds the biological limit value of 15 µg Pb/100 ml blood due to exposure that occurred before [the date of transposition of this Directive], but is below 35 µg Pb/100 ml blood, shall undergo regular medical checks. If they demonstrate a declining trend towards the limit value of 15 µg Pb/100 ml blood, employers may allow those workers to continue to carry out work involving lead exposure.
2023/06/08
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 3 #

2022/2188(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital C
C. whereas the Brexit Adjustment Reserve3(BAR) was established to provide support in countering the adverse consequences that Member States, regions and sectors experience as a result of the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the Union and thus to mitigate the related negative impacts on economic, social and territorial cohesion and support the renewal of the EU fishing fleet; whereas the shift in quota shares from the EU to the United Kingdom over the transition period agreed in the TCA will have major negative economic consequences for EU fishers; _________________ 3 Regulation (EU) 2021/1755 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 6 October 2021 establishing the Brexit Adjustment Reserve. OJ L 357, 8.10.2021, p. 1.
2023/05/12
Committee: PECH
Amendment 6 #

2022/2188(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Welcomes the Memorandum of Understanding on offshore energy cooperation and calls for the further development of renewablfossil free energy in line with climate change objectives, and for the establishment of an effective framework for trading arrangements for electricity flows;
2023/05/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 24 #

2022/2188(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Calls on the Commission to assist Member States in making full use of the funds under the BAR to promote and support the fisheries sector and the coastal communities affected, in particular through funding for fishing fleet renewal, and to compensate for the losses suffered, including those suffered by small-scale fisheries;
2023/05/12
Committee: PECH
Amendment 30 #

2022/2188(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Opposes all decisions taken unilaterally that establish fishing opportunities which contravene international law or go against the best scientific advice available and thus call into question the credibility of international agreements and undermine the sustainability of the exploitation of shared resources; urges the Commission to take any necessary and proportionate measures to resolve the dispute or to force the United Kingdom, as well as third countries or regional authorities such as Norway and the Faroe Islands, into full compliance;
2023/05/12
Committee: PECH
Amendment 40 #

2022/2188(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7a. Reminds the Commission that it is essential to ensure that, as of 2026, the TCA is applied in a stable and sustainable manner following the transition period;
2023/05/12
Committee: PECH
Amendment 49 #

2022/2148(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital L a (new)
La. whereas maritime strategy is an essential part of China's plan to expand its power, and the politicisation and militarisation of its civil maritime sector can be observed, including with respect to fishing; whereas the EU should consider the strategic sovereignty challenges related to fishing, particularly in the ORs.
2023/05/23
Committee: PECH
Amendment 117 #

2022/2148(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14 a (new)
14a. Highlights the need for the European Union to extensively cooperate with third countries on fisheries, particularly with regard to fisheries control;
2023/05/23
Committee: PECH
Amendment 181 #

2022/2147(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16 b (new)
16b. Calls on the Commission to consider the possibility of launching a specific Frontex mission to the ORs in order to assist local authorities, particularly in places with the largest irregular migration flows;
2022/12/13
Committee: REGI
Amendment 185 #

2022/2147(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Recalls that the ORs’ fishing fleet is old and obsolete; regrets the fact that the European Maritime, Fisheries and Aquaculture Fund (EMFAF) still does not support the renovation of fleets by covering the purchase of new vessels; calls for a swift solution to this problem, taking into account the specific characteristics of the fleet, in order to improve on-board safety and ensure food sufficiency in these regions;
2022/12/13
Committee: REGI
Amendment 27 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas the 2018 European Year of Cultural Heritage promoted culture and cultural heritage; whereas the preservation, protection and promotion of cultural heritage in all forms is an important driver for strengthening intercultural relations, peace, democracy, sustainable development, reconciliation and cultural coexistence;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 118 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. Welcomes the Pilot Project - Establishing a European Heritage Hub to support a holistic and cost-effective follow-up of the European Year of Cultural Heritage;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 119 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 b (new)
4b. Encourages the Commission to bring forward the legacy of the European Year of Cultural Heritage 2018 to support the creation of more partnerships with the private, public and non-profit sectors for the preservation of cultural heritage;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 135 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5a. Calls on the Member States to fully recognise the right to cultural, artistic and scientific life and related cultural rights as universal human rights, allowing all individuals to participate in the cultural life of the community, to enjoy the arts and to share their benefits; calls on the Member States to promote the development of culture and technical research and to protect the landscape and the historical and artistic heritage, including in the interest of future generations, and to make full use of the potential offered by the EU’s funding, programmes and policies dedicated to culture and their synergies with other programmes; calls on the Member States to dedicate 2% of their budgets to culture, as the European Parliament has requested on many occasions; calls on the Member States to use funding from the Recovery and Resilience Facility to achieve their objectives in terms of cultural investment;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 155 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7a. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to eliminate administrative, financial and linguistic obstacles that hinder physical and mental participation in cultural activities and initiatives, particularly, but not exclusively, for persons with disabilities;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 161 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8 a (new)
8a. Encourages the Member States to recognise the importance of cultural and artistic activities for the mental health and well-being of young people, at both national and international levels, particularly for disadvantaged young people;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 163 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8 b (new)
8b. Stresses the importance of cultural initiatives focused on entertainment and care for persons with disabilities; deplores the fact that the suspension of such activities during the COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant adverse impact on the individuals who had been benefiting from them; asks the Commission to pay more attention to this issue in the coming years;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 172 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 a (new)
9a. Recalls the importance of a full and well-structured school curriculum, which includes the arts and artistic disciplines, with a view to an appropriate and rounded education and the formation of individuals who are more thoughtful, and are more responsible citizens; stresses that the habit of accessing and enjoying culture and artistic and cultural initiatives developed during a person’s formative years results in the development of a cultural attitude and a habit of partaking in culture;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 198 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 a (new)
12a. Notes that the recovery efforts should set out to create a more stable and reliable structure for the CCSI, tackling the problems deriving from the sector’s make-up, composed mainly of individuals and of micro and small organisations and companies, often depending on irregular income and lacking long-term financial predictability;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 205 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 a (new)
13a. Invites the Commission to incorporate cultural heritage as a strategic and crosscutting priority in the Work Plan for Culture 2023-2026;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 227 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 a (new)
17a. Regrets the difficulty generally encountered by individuals and SMEs in the CCSI in obtaining access to banking credit;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 231 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19
19. Highlights the success of the European Capitals of Culture initiative with respect to the development of cities and regions across the EU and associated countries; reiterates the importance of the European Heritage Label as a project enhancing awareness of the cultural and historical roots of the EU in an innovative way;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 234 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20 a (new)
20a. Stresses the need to find a balance between the growth and development of the tourism sector in cities known for their art and in tourist destinations and their permanent residents’ quality of life;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 236 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21
21. Acknowledges the important contribution of the New European Bauhaus initiative for cultural heritage; underlines the significant role it can play in preserving cultural heritage across and beyond the EU, notably by combining sustainable and energy efficient building practices and ensuring the protection of cultural heritage in case of natural and man-made disasters by adding a safety element;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 251 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 22 a (new)
22a. Believes that cultural heritage can help the EU to attain its ambitious objectives of becoming climate-neutral by 2050; recalls that the renovation of heritage and other ancient buildings should always be carried out in compliance with the national rules on conservation, the 1964 Venice Charter for the Conservation and Restoration of Monuments and Sites, and the original architecture; stresses that preserving the environment implies, more broadly, to respect the built heritage, be it or not strictly protected according to the national legislations;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 254 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 22 b (new)
22b. Recalls the article 3 of the Treaty on European Union which stipulates that the EU must ensure that Europe’s cultural heritage is safeguarded and enhanced; calls therefore on the European Commission to take into account this paramount consideration in its decision as regards the inclusion of lead metal to the list of substances subject to authorisation in Annex XIV to the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) Regulation; reiterates that such a measure could result in the closure or delocalisation of many craft enterprises in such areas as the stained glass industry and ultimately impact the restoration of the vast heritage of the Union, as well as the disappearance of many traditional agricultural productions; insists on the need to reconcile the required level of protection for human health and the environment with the preservation of European heritage and asks for a permanent exemption of the cultural sector from the above-mentioned regulation;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 258 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23 a (new)
23a. Asks the Commission to make sure that the principles of environmental sustainability and policies to combat the climate crisis do not in any way affect the physical integrity, architectural coherence, historical character or the value of historic or artistic buildings or of historic centres, even where they are not specifically protected as such;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 261 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23 b (new)
23b. Asks the Commission to make sure that activities to make historic or artistic buildings and culturally or artistically important assets safe and to restore them are conducted in a sensitive manner, using materials that are appropriate for the nature of the asset to be restored and taking the greatest account of the authenticity and quality of the final result of the activity although this may undermine, where necessary, any principles of environmental sustainability and climate crisis combating efforts that may be involved;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 266 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24
24. Acknowledges digitalisation as a means of maximising the benefits of cultural heritage, noting the need for reskilling of CCSI employees;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 268 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24 b (new)
24b. Insists that copyright in works of art and material in the CCSI must remain European, including in relation to the digitalisation of works of art and material in the CCSI, including, but not restricted to, digitalisation carried out by industries outside the EU; discourages economic speculation in this field;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 273 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 25 a (new)
25a. Regrets the gradual disappearance of cultural material in paper form and the repercussions of this trend on the publishing sector, particularly on small and medium-sized publishing houses and bookshops;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 282 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 26 b (new)
26b. Asks the Commission to strongly condemn the destruction of historical, artistic and cultural heritage in recent conflicts that may in some cases constitute violations of human rights and the systematic destruction of the historical, artistic and cultural heritage by totalitarian regimes and terrorist groups as a tool for affirming their supremacy over peoples or minorities;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 312 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 34
34. Insists on the need to step up the fight against illicit trafficking in cultural goods; calls for better cooperation between the EU and third countries in the preservation and protection of cultural heritage and the fight against illicit trafficking of cultural goods;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 323 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 36 a (new)
36a. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to assist Ukraine in its reconstruction and restoration efforts of damages in the culture and heritage sector caused by Russia’s war against Ukraine;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 325 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 37
37. Recalls that promoting and safeguarding culture is both an end in itself and a key contributor to the implementation of the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development; calls on the Commission and EEAS to organise more briefings and exchanges of views and practices in order to ensure the proper implementation of these common priorities;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 331 #

2022/2047(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 38
38. Highlights the potential of culture and cultural heritage as a vector of peace, reconciliation and conflict prevention; calls on the Commission and EEAS to emphasise the role that culture can play in this regard and to provide assistance and education to partners in Member States and third countries in addressing security challenges related especially to the preservation and protection of cultural heritage in conflict areas and the fight against illicit trafficking of cultural goods;
2022/10/12
Committee: CULT
Amendment 42 #

2022/2038(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. Recalls that the derogation from the country of origin principle, established during the revision of the AVMSD in 2018, should be retained, in particular as regards the participation of all audiovisual media service providers in the funding of the audiovisual and cinematographic creation of a Member State whose national market is targeted; stresses that the aim of this is to strike a better balance between the rules that apply to different actors providing the same service, and also to ensure fair competition between all actors targeting a national market; stresses the need to assess the transposition of this mechanism, ensuring that any obligation to participate in funding ultimately contributes to the preservation of the cultural offer and to the outreach of European creation;
2023/01/13
Committee: CULT
Amendment 50 #

2022/2038(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5a. Notes that the digital space is being exploited abusively to disseminate content harmful to minors, particularly on websites and online platforms; considers, therefore, that measures for the protection of minors provided for in the revised AVMS Directive must be strengthened – in conjunction with any other legal instruments – by introducing financial penalties for websites and online content-sharing platforms which fail to comply with the applicable obligations by strengthening the capacity of national media regulators and the competent authorities to prosecute meaningfully any infringements identified, thus ensuring swift and effective action, but also encouraging coordination between public and private stakeholders in taking preventive action; takes the view that the self-regulation arrangements applicable to online content-sharing platforms are insufficient; stresses that stakeholders in the audiovisual sector must comply with the same obligation to protect minors from damaging content;
2023/01/13
Committee: CULT
Amendment 58 #

2022/2038(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6a. Calls on the Commission to ensure greater legal certainty by clarifying the relationship between the various pieces of EU legislation that may impinge on the regulation of the audiovisual sector;
2023/01/13
Committee: CULT
Amendment 69 #

2022/2038(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Encourages Member States to better use and exploit the opportunities that can arise from the appropriate promotion of audiovisual media services of general interest; takes the view that the measures laid down in Article 7(a) could be further strengthened; suggests, furthermore, that ERGA develop guidelines in this regard;
2023/01/13
Committee: CULT
Amendment 76 #

2022/2038(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Considers that the objectives of the Directive are served by Member States taking measures to ensure findability of content and services of general interest vis- à-vis relevant user interfaces and platform services that offer their services to users in the territory of that Member State but are not themselves established there; recalls that it is important for these measures to be based on transparent and objective criteria;
2023/01/13
Committee: CULT
Amendment 85 #

2022/2038(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Considers it appropriate to maintain the European quota targets as minimum targets at their current level; points out that this is a mechanism the aim of which is to promote cultural diversity and stimulate European creation; stresses, however, that because of the late transposition of the revised AMS Directive by the Member States it is still too early to draw conclusions regarding implementation of Article 13, and in particular the provisions thereof on a minimum share of European works that providers of on- demand audiovisual media services should include in their catalogues, or provisions on financial contributions; calls on the Commission to carry out as soon as possible an assessment of the real impact of those provisions on cultural diversity and the promotion of European and independent creation; calls on the Commission to analyse the need for any future changes to the minimum thresholds for European works in the catalogues of providers of on-demand audiovisual media services in conjunction with the necessary assessment of the relevance of the criteria defining a European work; takes the view that, in order to define a European work, criteria such as ownership of intellectual property rights and authorisations for usage by European creators and producers could be taken into account, thus allowing them to retain artistic control over their works; considers that that can help to ensure greater fairness in terms of contractual links between European creators and large platforms;
2023/01/13
Committee: CULT
Amendment 94 #

2022/2038(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 a (new)
12a. Stresses that practices such as the acquisition by platforms, in perpetuity, of all intellectual property rights of European creators and producers can have a negative impact on cultural diversity; calls on the Commission to consider, in connection with any potential revision of the AMS Directive by 2026, measures to enhance enforcement of intellectual property rights;
2023/01/13
Committee: CULT
Amendment 128 #

2022/2038(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 a (new)
13a. Points out that, for the European audiovisual media market to function properly, effective measures to combat piracy of copyright-protected content are required too;
2023/01/13
Committee: CULT
Amendment 131 #

2022/2038(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 b (new)
13b. Stresses that the principle of licence fee territoriality, which is inherent to the audiovisual sector's funding model, plays a crucial role with regard to cultural diversity in that it prevents concentration of dominant players on the market, which would be detrimental to independent, alternative offerings; therefore restates the need to safeguard that principle and to keep audiovisual media services outside the scope of Regulation 2018/302, ensuring the sustainability of a diversified audiovisual offering and thus complementing the objectives of the AMS Directive;
2023/01/13
Committee: CULT
Amendment 133 #

2022/2038(INI)

13c. Points out that data collection by platforms on the use of audiovisual works offers them considerable competitive advantages; calls on the Commission to seek appropriate solutions to this market imbalance and ensure that audiovisual services are able to access data relating to use of their own content;
2023/01/13
Committee: CULT
Amendment 10 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A
A. whereas it is crucial to enable industry to implement the energy and digital transitions while preserving jobs, competitiveness and its ability to develop and produce clean and low-carbon products;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 24 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas in a changing geopolitical world, reducing EU dependencies on critical materials, products, energy and technologies is vital;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 27 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B a (new)
Ba. whereas the Russian war of aggression against Ukraine has shown once again that the EU is highly dependent on energy supply from third countries;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 29 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B b (new)
Bb. whereas a high level of energy supply dependency, such as on Russia, and high energy prices can be detrimental to the production capacities of European companies;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 42 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C a (new)
Ca. whereas the industrial strategy should enable the EU to increase its own production within all sectors of the economy;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 93 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Underlines that the EU cannot be dependent on non-EU countries for products, energy and technologies that are essential to our economy and for our society of the future; stresses that the EU needs to regain a strong position in crucial global value chains and secure the supply of critical materials in times of crisis;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 116 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3a. Calls on the Commission to consider the impact of the Russian war of aggression against Ukraine on the European industry and its capacities in current and future initiatives and objectives;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 117 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 b (new)
3b. Calls on the Commission and Members States to ensure technology neutrality across the whole transition in order to secure competitiveness; stresses that the exclusion of certain technologies will only weaken the industries ability to pivot in times of crisis or when technologies prove themselves financially, economically or environmentally unsustainable; insists therefore that the most sustainable way of achieving the climate goals is a technological open and cost-efficient way, including all technologies that contribute to reach climate neutrality;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 155 #

2022/2008(INI)

6a. Calls on the Commission and Member States to adopt a holistic approach when it creates incentives to support strategic industrial sectors and their supply chains, such as food, pharmaceutics and others, which are facing a sharp increase of energy, transport and raw materials' costs due to the current conflict in Ukraine; stresses that ensuring sufficient access to affordable, secure and diversified clean energy throughout the single market is going to be key to continue with its integration and to pursue the European industry’s transformation plans, boost its green transition and its global competitiveness; underlines how the development of efficient and integrated logistics networks and infrastructures can ensure a smoother access to transport, energy and digital services increase competitiveness of businesses, reduce barriers in the single market and widen markets for products and jobs; reminds the importance of diversification of supplies and material circularity in particular to reduce reliance on third country imports and increase Union's energy and resources independence;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 175 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7a. Underlines the importance of a fully integrated circular economy to create an efficient and decarbonised industry; calls on the Commission to undertake analyses on how products can be recycled and reintroduced into the product cycle; calls on the Commission to give particular consideration when it comes to funding and tender opportunities of the European Union to projects of companies that are innovative frontrunners as regards building and advancing the circular economy;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 220 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10 a (new)
10a. Is concerned about the increasing level of administrative burden for companies; stresses that Europe is experiencing a turning point due to the Russian war of aggression against Ukraine and the consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic; calls on the Commission to introduce a moratorium on bureaucracy, as companies are already severely challenged by high industrial energy prices, in some cases insufficient energy infrastructure, complications in logistics and shortage of skilled workers;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 247 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 a (new)
12a. Underlines that the Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism (CBAM) intends to prevent the risk of carbon leakage on the EU market; states that it is essential to avoid the risk that products exported from the EU are replaced by more carbon intensive goods on the global market; calls on the Commission to present a legislative proposal to develop WTO- compatible solutions, such as an export adjustment mechanism, to be implemented to avoid carbon leakage on European exports, while preserving emission reduction targets; reiterates that in order for CBAM to be efficient in lowering carbon leakage, all possible circumvention practices should be addressed;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 254 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 c (new)
12c. Calls on Member States to diversify their energy mix in order to increase the EUs energy security; the energy mix needs to continue to include sources such as LNG and nuclear in order to avoid energy crisis, market distortion, inflation and energy poverty; emphasizes the need for biomass as a renewable source, as well as support for sustainable forest and land management, needed for long-term storage, adaption and removal of carbon;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 262 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to bring down the time needed to issue permits substantially and create fast-track permitting procedures for infrastructure that supports industry in the energy transition; calls on Member States and the Commission to establish permitting procedures with a clear governance structure that establishes legal certainty in order to attract the necessary investors and lower the investment risk;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 297 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Welcomes the Commission analysis on strategic dependencies and capacities; calls on the Commission to finalise the analyses and technology roadmaps as soon as possible and propose actions to reduce dependence on the identified critical products and energy supplies; highlights the necessity of a strategy based on further in- depth analysis of mutual dependencies to strengthen the EU’s capacity in critical value chains; recommends that these in- depth examinations be extended to all sectors considered as strategic; asks the European Commission to take into account the impact of extraterritorial measures taken by third countries on EU industries, particularly in terms of export controls (e.g.: export licensing requirements);
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 307 #

2022/2008(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15 a (new)
15a. Recommends to explicitly include the options of locating or reshoring strategic manufacturing units in Europe as responses to dependencies, in addition to diversifying sources of supply and building strategic stocks;
2022/04/25
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 31 #

2022/2004(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D
D. whereas it has been observed that 64 % of young people in the 18-34 age group were at risk of depression in spring 202126 and that suicide is the second leading cause of death among young people27 as a result of loneliness, isolation and the lack of educational, employment and, financial, social and life prospects; whereas children and young people with fewer opportunities or from marginalised groups and socially disadvantaged backgrounds have been hit harder by the COVID-19 pandemic, mostly owing to structural inequalities; whereas confinement measures had a particularly negative impact on persons with disabilities; whereas measures taken by governments during exceptional circumstances should always respect the fundamental rights of persons with disabilities and ensure their equal and non-discriminatory access to health care, social services, education ,culture and sports activities; _________________ 26 https://www.statista.com/statistics/1287356 /risk-of-depression-in-europe-2021-by-age 27 UNICEF article ‘The Mental Health Burden Affecting Europe’s Children’ (4 October 2021).
2022/06/01
Committee: CULT
Amendment 81 #

2022/2004(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Draws attention to the role played by schools and early childhood education and care institutions in providing the necessary material and psychological support for children and their families, and calls on the Member States to provide sufficient financial support to mainstream education institutions in order to ensure that both the pedagogical and the psychological development of learners is increasingly promoted; underlines especially the role played by teachers and educators in achieving the psychological support and development of children and young people;
2022/06/01
Committee: CULT
Amendment 201 #

2022/2004(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Highlights the need to monitor developments in, and the consequences of, technological and digital advances through cooperation and dialogue with experts, educators and representatives of civil society; points out the necessity to critically review possible dangers of the digital advances and its unpredictable consequences;
2022/06/01
Committee: CULT
Amendment 11 #

2022/2003(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D
D. whereas there are numerous cases of successful implementation of fisheries co-management within Member States, including in Spain (Galicia, Catalonia and Andalusia), Portugal (Algarve and Peniche-Nazé), France, Sweden (Kosterhavets)2,2 the Netherlands3, Italy (Torre Guaceto) and Croatia (Telašćica and Lastovo)4; _________________ 2 https://oceans-and- fisheries.ec.europa.eu/news/co- management-northern-bohuslan-fishers- and-conservationists-join-forces- sustainable-future-2022-03-01_en 3 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/2 57943913_Co- management_An_alternative_to_enforcem ent 4 https://www.wwfmmi.org/?1715691/First- co-managed-fishery-area-adopted-by-law- in-Croatia
2022/11/14
Committee: PECH
Amendment 14 #

2022/2003(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E a (new)
Ea. whereas a general principle of fisheries co-management needs to be established at both European and national level;
2022/11/14
Committee: PECH
Amendment 22 #

2022/2003(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G
G. whereas traditional management has not had the desired effects on improving stocks and maintaining employmenthe impact of co- management systems on achieving the objectives of the Common Fisheries Policy ought to be assessed;
2022/11/14
Committee: PECH
Amendment 66 #

2022/2003(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7a. Draws attention to the fact that there is no unified assessment of the instances where co-management has been implemented in the EU and elsewhere in the world that identifies the system's main drivers; calls on the Commission to assess the examples of fisheries co-management in the above countries and to give backing to phasing it in within other fisheries and in the regional fisheries bodies in which it participates;
2022/11/14
Committee: PECH
Amendment 75 #

2022/2003(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Asks the Commission for a regulatory framework onnon- binding fisheries co- management, which is directly applicable in the measures, taking into account the specific characteristics of the fisheries sector in each Member States;
2022/11/14
Committee: PECH
Amendment 83 #

2022/2003(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Stresses that there is, moreover, a need in thsome current co-management systems for concrete legislative measures to pave the way for the setting up of co- management committees and to speed up the process of implementing measures, as the legislative framework is currently unclear in most regions, which means that the requisite timeframe for their creation and implementation is in the long term, whereas solutions are needed in the short to medium term;
2022/11/14
Committee: PECH
Amendment 90 #

2022/2003(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Draws attention to the fact that there is no unified assessment of the cases where co-management has been implemented in the EU and in the world, which identifies the main drivers of this system; calls on the Commission to assess the examples of fisheries co-management in the above countries and to support their progressive implementation in other fisheries and in the regional fisheries bodies in which it participates;deleted
2022/11/14
Committee: PECH
Amendment 95 #

2022/2003(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14
14. Calls on the Commission to promote, within the European Maritime, Fisheries and Aquaculture Fund (EMFF), a commitment to co-management models for fisheries with adequate funding so that their operating expenditure can be covered;
2022/11/14
Committee: PECH
Amendment 118 #

2022/2003(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18
18. Reiterates that fisheries co- management already exists and has been successful in many of the known cases, and that there are legislative initiatives in this regard, both at local level, such as in Galicia, Catalonia and Andalusia in Spain, and at state level, such as in France, Portugal, Italy, Sweden, Croatia and the Netherlands; stresses that the lack of standardisation of regulations at European level prevents this system from being applied in other regions and countries;
2022/11/14
Committee: PECH
Amendment 132 #

2022/2003(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 a (new)
21a. Points out that, at European level, co-management should start by improving dialogue between the Commission and the fisheries sector, for example by investing more in the Advisory Councils in order to make the scope for co-management that they provide at European level more effective;
2022/11/14
Committee: PECH
Amendment 124 #

2022/0426(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 11 a (new)
(11a) In order to clarify a legal uncertainty in the definition of trafficking in human beings, this Directive adopts a broader concept of what it should be considered than under Directive 2011/36/EU and Framework Decision 2002/629/JHA, and therefore includes additional forms of exploitation. The contract, usually called surrogacy, through which a natural or legal person agrees with a woman that she will carry a child for the purpose of handing it upon birth, regardless of the name and terms and conditions of such contract, is considered human trafficking, both of the woman who carries or is to carry the child and of the child.
2023/07/07
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 127 #

2022/0426(COD)

(16a) In accordance with the European Parliament resolution of the 21st of January 2021 on the EU Strategy for Gender Equality (2019/2169(INI)), in its paragraph 32, which “acknowledges that sexual exploitation for surrogacy and reproductive purposes or purposes such as forced marriages, prostitution and pornography is unacceptable and a violation of human dignity and human rights”. In accordance with the European Parliament resolution of the 10th of February 2021 on the implementation of Directive 2011/36/EU on preventing and combating trafficking in human beings and protecting its victims (2020/2029(INI)), in its paragraph 28, that classifies surrogacy as a Traffic in Human Beings. In accordance with the European Parliament resolution of 5th of May 2022 on the impact of the war against Ukraine on women (2022/2633(RSP)), that “underlines the serious impact of surrogacy on women, their rights and their health, the negative consequences for gender equality and the challenges stemming from the cross- border implications of this practice, as has been the case for the women and children affected by the war against Ukraine; asks the EU and its Member States to investigate the dimensions of this industry, the socio-economic context and the situation of pregnant women, as well as the consequences for their physical and mental health and for the well-being of babies; calls for the introduction of binding measures to address surrogacy, protecting women’s and newborns’ rights”.
2023/07/07
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 131 #

2022/0426(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 1
Directive 2011/36/EU
Article 2 – paragraph 3
(1) in Article 2, paragraph 3, “or forced marriage, or illegal adoption”, "or the exploitation of a woman for reproductive purposes through surrogacy" is added at the end of the paragraph.
2023/07/07
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 62 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 2
(2) This Regulation concerns the recognition in a Member State of the parenthood of a child as established in another Member State. It aims to protect the fundamental rights and other rights of children in matters concerning their parenthood in cross-border situations, including their right to an identity31 , to non-discrimination32 and to a private and family life33 , taking the best interests of the child as a primary consideration34 . This Regulation also aims to provide legal certainty and predictability and to reduce litigation costs and burden for families, national courts and other competent authorities in connection with proceedings for the recognition of parenthood in another Member State. To attain these aims, this Regulation should require Member States to recognise for all purposes the parenthood of a child as established in another Member State. _________________ 31 Article 8 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. 32 Article 2 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Article 21 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. 33 Article 9 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Articles 7 and 24 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union. 34 Article 3 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, Article 24 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 64 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 5
(5) Under the Treaties, the competence to adopt substantive rules on family law, such as rules on the definition of family and rules on the establishment of the parenthood of a child, lies with the Member States. However, pursuant to Article 81(3) TFEU, the Union can adopt measures concerning family law with cross-border implications, in particular rules on international jurisdiction, on applicable law and on the recognition of parenthood. In accordance with Article 67(1) TFEU the relevant legislation shall respect fundamental rights and the different legal systems of the Member States.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 88 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 18
(18) Article 8 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms of 4 November 1950 (‘European Convention of Human Rights’) lays down the right to respect for private and family life, while Article 1 of Protocol No. 12 to the said Convention provides that the enjoyment of any right set forth by law must be secured without discrimination on any ground, including birth. The Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights has interpreted Article 8 of the Convention as requiring all States within its jurisdiction to recognise the legalrecognised, in the only case on which it had to rule, Paradiso and Campanelli v Italy (ECHR, 24 January 2017, n° 25358/12), the right of a Member State to not recognise a parenthood established abroad to the orderer of a surrogacy contract. Member States are not required to register the details of the birth certificate of a child born via surrogacy abroad in order to establish the parent- child legal relationship established abroad between a child borwith the orderer mother. The jurisprudence of the European Court of surrogacy and the biological intended parent, and to provide for a mechanism for the recognition in law of the parent- child relationship with the non-biological intended parent (for example through the adoption of the child)54 . _________________ 54 For example, Mennesson v. France (Application no 65192/11, Council of Europe: European Court of Human Rights, 26 June 2014) and Advisory Opinion P16-2018-001 (Request no. P16- 2018-001, Council of Europe: European Court of Human Rights, 10 April 2019)Human Rights, without prejudice to the need for States to identify ways to ensure the protection of the child interest in the legal recognition of the link with those who de facto exercise parental responsibility, has recognised to the States a margin of discretion in identifying the ways in which to formalise the relationship with the orderer of a surrogacy contract. This orientation does not prevent the solution of the non-registration of the foreign document that recognises the parenthood to both the members of the couple that resorted to surrogacy abroad. With regard to the solution of adoption, the European Court of Human Rights has underlined that it can be considered sufficient to guarantee the protection of the rights of minors to the extent that it is capable of constituting a link of real "filiation" between adopter and adopted, and on condition that the modalities provided for by domestic law guarantee the effectiveness and speediness of its implementation, in accordance with the best interest of the child.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 98 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 21
(21) In conformity with the provisions of international conventions and Union law, this Regulation should ensure that children enjoy their rights and maintain their legal status in cross-border situations without discrimination. To that effect, and in the light of the case law of the Court of Justice, including on mutual trust between Member States, and of the European Court on Human Rights, this Regulation should cover the recognition in a Member State of the parenthood established in another Member State irrespective of how the child was conceived or born and irrespective of the child’s type of family, and, including domestic adoption. Therefore, subject to the application of the rules on applicable law of this Regulation, this Regulation should cover the recognition in a Member State of the parenthood established in another Member State of a child with same-sex parents. This Regulation should also cover the recognition in a Member State of the parenthood of a child adopted domestically in another Member State under the rules governing domestic adoption in that Member State.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 110 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 24
(24) For the purposes of this Regulation, parenthood, also referred to as filiation, may be biologic, genetic, by adoption or by operation of law. Also for the purposes of this Regulation, parenthood should mean the parent-child relationship established in law, and should cover the legal status of being the child of a particular parent or parents. This Regulation should cover the parenthood established in a Member State of both minors and adults, including a deceased child and a child not yet born, whether to a single parent, a de facto couple, a married couple or a couple in a relationship which, under the law applicable to such relationship, has comparable effects, such as a registered partnership. This Regulation should apply regardless of the nationality of the child whose parenthood is to be established, and regardless of the nationality of the parents of the child. The term ‘parent’ in this Regulation should be understood, as applicable, as referring to the legal parent, the intended parent, the person who claims to be a parent or the person in respect of whom the child claims parenthoodwhich means the person to which a child has a legally established link of filiation, may it be biologic, genetic, by adoption or by operation of law.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 127 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 31
(31) The requirements for the recording of parenthood in a register should be excluded from the scope of this Regulation. It should therefore be the law of the Member State in which the register is kept that should determine under what legal conditions and how the recording must be carried out, and which authorities are in charge of checking that all requirements are met and that the documentation presented or established is sufficient or contains the necessary information. In order to avoid duplication of documents, the national registration authorities should accept the documents drawn up in another Member State by the competent authorities whose circulation is provided for by this Regulation. In particular, the European Certificate of Parenthood issued under this Regulation should constitute a valid document for the recording of parenthood in a register of a Member State. As the procedure for the issuance of the European Certificate of Parenthood and its contents and effects should be uniform in all Member States as set out in this Regulation, and the European Certificate of Parenthood should be issued in conformity with the rules on jurisdiction and applicable law laid down in this Regulation, the authorities involved in the registration should not require that the European Certificate of Parenthood be first transposed into a national document on parenthood. This should not preclude the authorities involved in the registration from confirming the conditions necessary to establish the authenticity of the European Certificate of Parenthood or from asking the person applying for registration to provide such additional information as required under the law of the Member State in which the register is kept, provided that information is not already included in the European Certificate of Parenthood. The competent authority may indicate to the person applying for registration how the missing information can be provided. The effects of recording the parenthood in a register (for example, depending on the national law, whether registration establishes parenthood or only provides evidence of the parenthood already established) should also be excluded from the scope of this Regulation and be determined by the law of the Member State in which the register is kept.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 145 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 38
(38) This Regulation shouldall respect the different systems for dealing with parenthood matters in the Member States. As regards 'authentic instruments', Member States often empower authorities, such as notaries, administrative authorities or registrars to draw up authentic instruments establishing parenthood with binding legal effect in the Member State in which they have been drawn up or registered (‘authentic instruments with binding legal effect’), or to draw up authentic instruments which have no binding legal effect in the Member State in which they have been drawn up or registered but which have evidentiary effects in that Member State (‘authentic instruments with no binding legal effect’). The term 'empowerment' in this Regulation is to be interpreted autonomously in accordance with the definition of 'authentic instrument' used horizontally in Union instruments and in the light of the objectives of this Regulation.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 180 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 56
(56) Considerations of public interest should allow courts and other competent authorities establishing parenthood in the Member States to disregard, in exceptional circumstances, certain provisions of a foreign law where, in a given case, applying such provisions would be manifestly incompatible with the public policy (ordre public) of the Member State concerned. However, the courts or other competent authorities should not be able to apply the public policy exception in order to set aside the law of another State when doing so would be contrary to the Charter and, in particular, Article 21 thereof, which prohibits discrimination, while complying with the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 201 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 67
(67) The recognition in a Member State under this Regulation of a court decision establishing parenthood given in another Member State, or of an authentic instrument establishing parenthood with binding legal effect drawn up or registered in another Member State, shouldall not imply the recognition of the possible marriage or registered partnership of the parents of the child whose parenthood has been or is to be established.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 221 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 75
(75) Considerations of public interest should allow Member State courts or other competent authorities to refuse, in exceptional circumstances, to recognise or, as the case may be, accept a court decision or authentic instrument on the parenthood established in another Member State where, in a given case, such recognition or acceptance would be manifestly incompatible with the public policy (ordre public) of the Member State concerned. However, the courts or other competent authorities should not be able to refuse to recognise or, as the case may be, accept a court decision or an authentic instrument issued in another Member State when doing so would be contrary to the Charter and, in particular, Article 21 thereof, which prohibits discrimination, while complying with the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 259 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 90
(90) This Regulation respects the fundamental rights and observes the principles recognised in the Charter. In particular, this Regulation seeks to promote the application of Article 7 on everyone’s right to respect for their private and family life, Article 9 on the right to marry and right to found a family, Article 21 prohibiting discrimination, and Article 24 on the protection of the rights of the child.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 275 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1
1. This Regulation shall not affect the rights that a child derives from Union law, in particular the rights that a child enjoys under Union law on free movement, including Directive 2004/38/EC. In particular, tThis Regulation shall not affect the limitations relating to the use ofpreclude the Member States from using public policy as a justification to refuse the recognition of parenthood where, under Union law on free movement, Member States are obliged to recognise a document establishing a parent-child relationship issued by the authorities of another Member State for the purposes of rights derived from Union law.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 276 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Nothing in this Regulation can be interpreted as obliging a Member State to accept the practice of surrogacy, or any of its legal consequences.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 285 #

2022/0402(CNS)

2a. (j) the recognition of parenthood of orderers in a surrogacy contract, of children born of surrogacy.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 328 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 1
1. The law applicable to the establishment of parenthood shall be the national law of the Statechild ofr the habitual residence of the person giving birth at the time of birth or, where the habitual residence of the person giving birth at the time of birth cannot be determined, the law oflaw of the State of which one of the parents is a citizen at the Stattime of birth of the child.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 330 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 2
2. Notwithstanding paragraph 1, where the applicable law pursuant to paragraph 1 results in the establishment of parenthood as regards only one parent, the law of the State of nationality of that parent or of the second parent, or the law of the State of birth of the child, may apply to the establishment of parenthood as regards the second parent.deleted
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 383 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 31 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. (f) if the recognition of parenthood induces the tolerance or acceptance of a contract, usually called surrogacy, through which a natural or legal person agrees with a woman that she will carry a child for the purpose of handing it upon birth, or any consequences of such a contract.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 427 #

2022/0402(CNS)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 39 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. (f) if the recognition of parenthood induces the tolerance or acceptance of a contract, usually called surrogacy, through which a natural or legal person agrees with a woman that she will carry a child for the purpose of handing it upon birth, or any consequences of such a contract.
2023/07/20
Committee: JURI
Amendment 128 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 3
(3) In the digital media space, citizens and businesses access and consume media content, immediately available on their personal devices, increasingly in a cross- border setting. Global oOnline platforms and search engines act as gateways to media content, with business models that tend to disintermediate access to media services and amplify polarising content and disinformation. These platforms are also essential providers of online advertising, which has diverted financial resources from the media sector, affecting its financial sustainability, and consequently the diversity of content on offer. As media services are knowledge- and capital- intensive, they require scale to remain competitive and to thrive in the internal market. To that effect, the possibility to offer services across borders and obtain investment including from or in other Member States is particularly important.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 160 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 11
(11) In order to ensure that society reaps the benefits of the internal media market, it is essential not only to guarantee the fundamental freedoms under the Treaty, but also the legal certainty which the recipients of media services need for the enjoyment of the corresponding benefits. Such recipients should have access to quality media services, which have been produced by journalists and editorial managers in an independent manner and in line with journalistic standards and hence provide trustworthy information, including news and current affairs content. Such right does not entail any correspondent obligation on any given media service provider to adhere to standards not set out explicitly by law. Such quality media services are also an antidote against disinformation, including foreign information manipulation and interference.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 163 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 14
(14) The protection of editorial independence is a precondition for exercising the activity of media service providers and their professional integrity. Editorial independence is especially important for media service providers providing news and current affairs content given its societal role as a public good. MWithout affecting the rules of Directive 2010/13/EU and their implementation by the Member States, media service providers should be able to exercise their economic activities freely in the internal market and compete on equal footing in an increasingly online environment where information flows across borders.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 172 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 16
(16) Journalists and editorial managers are the main actors in the production and provision of trustworthy media content, in particular by reporting on news or current affairs. It is essential therefore to protect journalists’ capability to collect, fact-check and analyse information, including information imparted confidentially. In particular, media service providers and journalists (including those operating in non-standard forms of employment, such as freelancers) should be able to rely on a robust protection of journalistic sources and communications, including against deployment of surveillance technologies, since without such protection sources may be deterred from assisting the media in informing the public on matters of public interest. As a result, journalists’ freedom to exercise their economic activity and fulfil their vital ‘public watchdog’ role may be undermined, thus affecting negatively access to quality media services. The protection of journalistic sources contributes to the protection of the fundamental right enshrined in Article 11 of the Charter.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 203 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 20
(20) Media integrity also requires a proactive approach to promote editorial independence by news media companies, in particular through internal safeguards. Media service providers should adopt proportionate measures to guarantee, once the overall editorial line has been agreed between their owners and editors, the the editorial freedom of the meditors to take individual decisions in the course of their professional activityas. The objective to shield editorial managers from undue interference in their decisions taken on specific pieces of content as part of their everyday work contributes to ensuring a level playing field in the internal market for media services and the quality of such services. That objective is also in conformity with the fundamental right to receive and impart information under Article 11 of the Charter. In view of these considerations, media service providers should also ensure transparency of actual or potential conflicts of interest to their service recipients.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 226 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 23
(23) The Board should bring together senior representatives of the national regulatory authorities or bodies referred to in Article 30 of Directive 2010/13/EU, appointed by such authorities or bodies. In cases where Member States have several relevant regulatory authorities or bodies, including at regional level, a joint representative should be chosen through appropriate procedures and the voting right should remain limited to one representative per Member State. This should not affect the possibility for the other national regulatory authorities or bodies to participate, as appropriate, in the meetings of the Board. The Board should also have the possibility to invite to attend its meetings, in agreement with the Commission, experts and observers, including in particular regulatory authorities or bodies from candidate countries, potential candidate countries, EEA countries, or ad hoc delegates from other competent national authorities. Due to the sensitivity of the media sector and following the practice of ERGA decisions in accordance with its rules of procedure, the Board should adopt its decisions on the basis of a two-thirds majority of the votes.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 237 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 24
(24) Without prejudice to the powers granted to the Commission by the Treaties, it is essential that the Commission and the Board work and cooperate closely. In particular, the Board should actively support the Commission in its tasks of ensuring the consistent application of this Regulation and of the national rules implementing Directive 2010/13/EU. For that purpose, the Board should in particular advise and assist the Commission on regulatory, technical or practical aspects pertinent to the application of Union law, promote cooperation and the effective exchange of information, experience and best practices and draw up opinions in agreement withit's own initiative or upon the Commission or upon it's request in the cases envisaged by this Regulation. In order to effectively fulfil its tasks, the Board should be able to rely on the expertise and human resources of a secretariat provided by the Commission. The Commissionn independent secretariat. The secretariat should provide administrative and organisational support to the Board, and help the Board in carrying out its tasks.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 252 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 28
(28) Ensuring a consistent regulatory practice regarding this Regulation and Directive 2010/13/EU is essential. For this purpose, and to contribute to ensuring a convergent implementation of EU media law, the Commission may issue guidelines on matters covered by both this Regulation and Directive 2010/13/EU when needed. When deciding to issue guidelines, the Commission should consider in particular regulatory issues affecting a significant number of Member States or those with a cross-border element. This is the case in particular for national measures taken under Article 7a of Directive 2010/13/EU on the appropriate prominence of audiovisual media services of general interest. In view of the abundance of information and the increasing use of digital means to access the media, it is important to ensure prominence for content of general interest, in order to help achieving a level playing field in the internal market and compliance with the fundamental right to receive information under Article 11 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the Union. Given the possible impact of the national measures taken under Article 7a on the functioning of the internal media market, guidelines by the Commission would be important to achieve legal certainty in this fieldSuch guidelines should respect the Member States' competence in cultural matters with a view to promoting media pluralism and be without effect to existing national prominence measures. It would also be useful to provide guidance on national measures taken under Article 5(2) of Directive 2010/13/EU with a view to ensuring the public availability of accessible, accurate and up-to-date information related to media ownership. In the process of preparing its guidelines, the Commission should be assisted by the Board. The Board should in particular share with the Commission its regulatory, technical and practical expertise regarding the areas and topics covered by the respective guidelines.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 281 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 31
(31) Very large online platforms and very large search engines act for many users as a gateway for access to media services. Media service providers who exercise editorial responsibility over their content play an important role in the distribution of information and in the exercise of freedom of information online. When exercising such editorial responsibility, they are expected to act diligently and provide information that is trustworthy and respectful of fundamental rights, in line with the regulatory or self- regulatory requirements they are subject to in the Member States. Therefore, also in view of users’ freedom of information, where providers of very large online platforms and very large search engines consider that content provided by such media service providers is incompatible with their terms and conditions, while it is not contributing to a systemic risk referred to in Article 26 of Regulation (EU) 2022/XXX [the Digital Services Act]2065, they should duly consider freedom and pluralism of media, in accordance with Regulation (EU) 2022/XXX [the Digital Services Act]2065 and provide, as early as possible, the necessary explanations to media service providers as their business users in the statement of reasons under Regulation (EU) 2019/1150 of the European Parliament and of the Council54. To minimise the impact of any restriction to that content on users’ freedom of information, very large online platforms and very large search enginesshould endeavour to submit , within 48 hours,the statement of reasons prior to the restriction taking effect without prejudice to their obligations under Regulation (EU) 2022/XXX [the Digital Services Act] 2065. In particular, this Regulation should not prevent a provider of a very large online platform and very large search enginesto take expeditious measures either against illegal content disseminated through its service, or in order to mitigate systemic risks posed by dissemination of certain content through its service, in compliance with Union law, in particular pursuant to Regulation (EU) 2022/XXX [the Digital Services Act] 2065. _________________ 54 Regulation (EU) 2019/1150 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 June 2019 on promoting fairness and transparency for business users of online intermediation services (OJ L 186, 11.7.2019, p. 57-79).
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 287 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 32
(32) It is furthermore justified, in view of an expected positive impact on freedom to provide services and freedom of expression, that where media service providers adhere to certain regulatory or self-regulatory standards, their complaints against decisions of providers of very large online platforms or very large online search engines are treated with priority and without undue delay.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 293 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 33
(33) To this end, providers of very large online platforms or very large online search engines should provide a functionality on their online interface to enable media service providers to declare that they meet certain requirements, while at the same time retaining the possibility not to accept such self-declaration where they consider that these conditions are not met. Providers of very large online platforms may rely on information regarding adherence to these requirements, such as the machine-readable standard of the Journalism Trust Initiative or other relevant codes of conduct. Guidelines by the Commission may be useful to facilitate an effective implementation of such functionality, including on modalities of involvement of relevant civil society organisations in the review of the declarations, on consultation of the regulator of the country of establishment, where relevant, and address any potential abuse of the functionality.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 296 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 34
(34) This Regulation recognises the importance of self-regulatory mechanisms in the context of the provision of media services on very large online platforms and very large search engines. They represent a type of voluntary initiatives, for instance in a form of codes of conduct, which enable media service providers or their representatives to adopt common guidelines, including on ethical standards, correction of errors or complaint handling, amongst themselves and for themselves. Robust, inclusive and widely- recognised media self-regulation represents an effective guarantee of quality and professionalism of media services and is key for safeguarding editorial integrity.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 297 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 35
(35) Providers of very large online platforms and very large search engines should engage with media service providers that respect standards of credibility and transparency and that consider that restrictions on their content are frequently imposed by providers of very large online platforms or very large search engines without sufficient grounds, in order to find an amicable solution for terminating any unjustified restrictions and avoiding them in the future. Providers of very large online platforms and very large search engines should engage in such exchanges in good faith, paying particular attention to safeguarding media freedom and freedom of information.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 302 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 36
(36) Building on the useful role played by ERGA in monitoring compliance by the signatories of EU Code of Practice on Disinformation, the Board should, at least on a yearly basis, organise a structured dialogue between providers of very large online platforms and very large search engines, representatives of media service providers and representatives of civil society to foster access to diverse offers of independent media on very large online platforms and very large search engines, discuss experience and best practices related to the application of the relevant provisions of this Regulation and to monitor adherence to self-regulatory initiatives aimed at protecting society from harmful content, including those aimed at countering disinformation. The Commission may, where relevant, examine the reports on the results of such structured dialogues when assessing systemic and emerging issues across the Union under Regulation (EU) 2022/XXX [Digital Services Act]2065 and may ask the Board to support it to this effect.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 313 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 37 a (new)
(37a) Recipients of media services increasingly face difficulties in identifying who bears the editorial responsibility for the content or services they consume, in particular when they access media services through connected devices or online platforms. Failure to clearly indicate editorial responsibility for media content or services (e.g., through incorrect attribution of logos, trademarks, or other characteristic traits) deprives recipients of media services of the possibility to understand and assess the information they receive, which is a prerequisite for forming well-informed choices and opinions and consequently to actively participate in democracy. Recipients of media services should therefore be enabled to easily identify the media service provider bearing the editorial responsibility over any given media service on all devices and user interfaces controlling or managing access to and use of media services.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 319 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 37 b (new)
(37b) Audiovisual media services are subject to various obligations to meet important public policy goals such as supporting cultural diversity and a pluralistic media environment. It is therefore important that devices be designed in a way that ensures fair access to audiovisual media services, from the perspective of both viewers and media service providers. Logical channel numbers allow viewers to directly access the audiovisual media service via numeric pads. However, certain device manufacturers remove numeric pads to divert viewers towards manufacturer- controlled user interfaces. Keeping numeric pads to access logical channel numbers directly on remote controls will ensure that device manufacturers allow fair and direct access to audiovisual media services.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 323 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 38
(38) Different legislative, regulatory or administrative measures can negatively affect theransborder operations of news and current affairs programs of media service providers in the internal market. They include, for example, rules to limit the ownership of media companies by other companies active in the media sector or non-media related sectors; they also include decisions related to licensing, authorisation or prior notification for media service providers. In order to mitigate their potential negative impact on the functioning of the internal market for media services and enhance legal certainty, it is important that such measures comply with the principles of objective justification, transparency, non- discrimination and proportionality.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 370 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 45
(45) Audience measurement has a direct impact on the allocation and the prices of advertising, which represents a key revenue source for the media sector. It is a crucial tool to evaluate the performance of media content and understand the preferences of audiences in order to plan the future production of content. Accordingly, media market players, in particular media service providers and, advertisers and right holders, should be able to rely on objective audience data stemming from transparent, unbiased and verifiable audience measurement solutions. However, certain new players that have emerged in the media ecosystem provide their own measurement services without making available information on their methodologies. This could result in information asymmetries among media market players and in potential market distortions, to the detriment of equality of opportunities for media service providers in the market.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 404 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 2 – point d
(d) Regulation (EU) 2022/XXX [the Digital Services Act]2065;
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 405 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 2 – point e
(e) Regulation (EU) 2022/XXX [the Digital Markets Act]1925;
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 411 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. Directive 2001/29/EC;
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 412 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 2 b (new)
2b. Directive 2010/13/EU and Directive (EU) 2018/1808, with the exception of Article 27 of this Regulation;
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 413 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 2 c (new)
2c. Directive 2019/789/EU;
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 426 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 6 a (new)
(6a) 'publising director', means the legal representative of the media service provider who assumes legal and other responsibility for the provision of a media service;
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 428 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 7
(7) ‘editorial manager’ means a natural person or a number of natural persons possibly grouped in a body, regardless of its legal form, status and composition, that takes or supervises editorial decisions within a media service provider;
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 462 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 14
(14) ‘audience measurement’ means the activity of collecting, interpreting or otherwise processing data about the number and characteristics of users of media services for the purposes of decisions regarding advertising allocation or prices or the related planning, production or distribution of content;
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 478 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 17
(17) ‘serious crime’ means any of the following criminal offences listed in Article 2(2) of the Council Framework Decision 2002/584/JHA58: (a) terrorism, (b) trafficking in human beings, (c) sexual exploitation of children and child pornography, (d) illicit trafficking in weapons, munitions and explosives, (e) murder, grievous bodily injury, (f) illicit trade in human organs and tissues, (g) kidnapping, illegal restraint and hostage-taking, (h) organised or armed robbery, (i) rape, (j) crimes within the jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court. _________________ 58 Council Framework Decision 2002/584/JHA of 13 June 2002 on the European arrest warrant and the surrender procedures between Member States (OJ L 190, 18.7.2002, p. 1-20).deleted
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 613 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 – paragraph 2 – point a
(a) guarantee that editorial managers are free to take individual editorial decisions in the exercise of their professional activity, notably through the exercise of the responsibility entrusted to the publishing director; and
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 645 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 a (new)
Article6a Prominence for audiovisual and audio media services of general interest Member States shall take measures to ensure the appropriate prominence of audiovisual and audio media services of general interest. This Regulation, Directives 2010/13/EU and 2000/31/EC and Regulation (EU) 2022/2065 shall not affect the competence of Member States and shall be without effect to existing promience measures.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 679 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 1
The Board shall act in full independence when performing its tasks or exercising its powers. In particular, the Board shall, in the performance of its tasks or the exercise of its powers, neither seek nor take instructions from any government, national or European institution, person or body. This shall not affect the competences of the Commission or the national regulatory authorities or bodies in conformity with this Regulation.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 700 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 5
5. The Commission shall designate a representative to the Board. The representative of the Commission shallmay participate in all activities and meetings of the Board, without voting rights. The Chair of the Board shall keep the Commission informed about the ongoing and planned activities of the Board. The Board shall consult the Commission, in preparationcular ofn its work programme and main deliverables.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 704 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 6
6. The Board, in agreement with the Commission, may invite experts and observers to attend its meetings. When the Board has to deal with a matter relating to the written press, it shall consult one or more experts in the subject from the relevant national regulatory authorities or bodies.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 724 #

2022/0277(COD)

8. The Board shall give the Commission the opportunity to provide comments before adopting its rules of procedure by a two-thirds majority of its members with voting rights, in agreement with the Commission.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 743 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 1
1. The Board shall have a secretariat, which shall be provided by the Commissionbe supported by an independent bureau.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 970 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – title
Content of media service providers on very large online platforms or very large search engines
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 975 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
1. Providers of very large online platforms or very large search engines shall provide a functionality allowing recipients of their services to declare that:
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 979 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) it is a media service provider within the meaning of Article 2(2) providing news and current affairs content;
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 1011 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 2
2. Where a provider of very large online platform decconsiders to suspend the provision of its online intermediation services in relation to content provided by a media service provider that submitted a declaration pursuant to paragraph 1 of this Article or to restrict the visibility of such content, on the grounds that such content is incompatible with its terms and conditions, without that content contributing to a systemic risk referred to in Article 26 of the Regulation (EU) 2022/XXX [Digital Services Act]2065, it shall take all possible measures, to the extent consistent with their obligations under Union law, including Regulation (EU) 2022/XXX [Digital Services Act]2065, to communicate to the media service provider concerned the statement of reasons accompanying that decision, as required by Article 4(1) of Regulation (EU) 2019/1150, prior to the and to provide the media service provider with an opportunity to reply to the statement of reasons, within 48 hours, prior to restriction or the suspension taking effect.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 1024 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 3
3. Providers of very large online platforms or very large search engines shall take all the necessary technical and organisational measures to ensure that complaints under Article 11 of Regulation (EU) 2019/1150 by media service providers that submitted a declaration pursuant to paragraph 1 of this Article are processed and decided upon with priority and without undue delay.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 1031 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 4
4. Where a media service provider that submitted a declaration pursuant to paragraph 1 considers that a provider of very large online platform or very large search engine frequently restricts or suspends the provision of its services in relation to content provided by the media service provider without sufficient grounds, the provider of very large online platform or very large search engine shall engage in a meaningful and effective dialogue with the media service provider, upon its request, in good faith with a view to finding an amicable solution for terminating unjustified restrictions or suspensions and avoiding them in the future. The media service provider may notify the outcome of such exchanges to the Board.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 1041 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 5 – introductory part
5. Providers of very large online platforms or very large search engines shall make publicly available on an annual basis information on:
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 1051 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 5 – point b
(b) the grounds for imposing such restrictions or suspensions.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 1074 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 18 – paragraph 1
1. The Board shall regularly organise a structured dialogue between providers of very large online platforms and very large search engines , representatives of media service providers and representatives of civil society to discuss experience and best practices in the application of Article 17 of this Regulation, to foster access to diverse offers of independent media on very large online platforms, and very large search engines, and to monitor adherence to self- regulatory initiatives aimed at protecting society from harmful content, including disinformation and foreign information manipulation and interference.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 1088 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 19 – paragraph 1
1. Users shall have a right to easily change the default settings of any device or user interface controlling or managing access to and use of audiovisual media services in order to customise the audiovisual media offer according to their interests or preferences in compliance with the law. This provision shall not affect national measures implementing, inter alia, Article 7a of Directive 2010/13/EU.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 1089 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 19 – paragraph 2
2. When placing the devices and user interfaces referred to in paragraph 1 on the market, manufacturers and developers shall ensure cultural diversity and a pluralistic media environment. Therefore, they shall not favor any video on demand services but give appropriate prominence to audiovisual and audio media services of general interest, by placing them prominently at the first selection level on these devices or user interfaces and ensuring acccess through a single action by the user. Manufacturers and developers shall also ensure that they include a functionality enabling users to freely and easily change the default settings controlling or managing access to and use of the audiovisual media services offered.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 1112 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 20 – paragraph 1
1. Any legislative, regulatory or administrative measure taken by a Member State that is liable to affect the operationransborder operations of news and current affairs programs of media service providers in the internal market shall be duly justified and proportionate. Such measures shall be reasoned, transparent, objective and non- discriminatory.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 1129 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 20 – paragraph 4
4. The Board, upon request of the Commission, shall may draw up an opinion where a national legislative, regulatory or administrative measure is likely to affect the functioning of the internal market for media services. Following the opinion of the Board, and without prejudice to its powers under the Treaties, the Commission may issue its own opinion on the matter. Opinions by the Board and, where applicable, by the Commission shall be made publicly available.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 1141 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 20 – paragraph 5
5. Where a national authority or body adopts a measure that affects individually and directly operations of news and current affairs programs of a media service provider and is likely to affect the functioning of the internal market for media services, it shall communicate, at the request of the Board, and where applicable, of the Commission, without undue delay and by electronic means, any relevant information, including the summary of the facts, its measure, the grounds on which the national authority or body has based its measure, and, where applicable, the views of other authorities concerned.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 1145 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 21 – title
Assessment of media market concentrations that could have a significant impact on media pluralism
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 1197 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 21 – paragraph 6
6. The national regulatory authority or body referred to in paragraph 4 shall take utmost account of the opinion referred to in paragraph 5. Where that authority does not follow the opinion, fully or partially, it shall provide the Board and the Commission with a reasoned justification explaining its position within 30 calendar days from the receipt of that opinion. Without prejudice to its powers under the Treaties, the Commission may issue its own opinion on the matter.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 1209 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 22 – paragraph 1
1. In the absence of an assessment or a consultation pursuant to Article 21, the Board, upon request of the Commission, shall may draw up an opinion on the impact of a media market concentration on media pluralism and editorial independence, where a media market concentration is likely to affect the functioning of the internal market for media services. The Board shall base its opinion on the elements set out in Article 21(2). The Board may bring media market concentrations likely to affect the functioning of the internal market for media services to the attention of the Commission.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 1237 #

2022/0277(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 23 – paragraph 2
2. Without prejudice to the protection of undertakings’ business secrets, providers of proprietary audience measurement systems shall provide, without undue delay and free of costs, to media service providers and, advertisers and right holders, as well as to third parties authorised by media service providers and advertisers, accurate, detailed, comprehensive, intelligible and up-to-date information on the data collected and on the methodology used by their audience measurement systems. Right holders should also have access to consumption data collected regarding their own programs. This provision shall not affect the Union’s data protection and privacy rules.
2023/05/05
Committee: CULT
Amendment 43 #

2022/0219(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 1
(1) The EU Heads of State or Government, meeting in Versailles on 11 March, committed to “bolster European defence capabilities” in light of the Russian military aggression against Ukraine. They agreed to increase defence expenditures, step up cooperation through joint projects, and common procurement of defence capabilities, close shortfalls, boost innovation and strengthen and develop the EU defence industry, including small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).
2023/02/13
Committee: AFETITRE
Amendment 63 #

2022/0219(COD)

(5) Such a new instrument will contribute to reinforce common defence procurement and, through the associated Union financing, to strengthen EU defence industrial capabilities. It is critical for the security of Europe to rely on a strong and autonomous European defence industry pillar.
2023/02/13
Committee: AFETITRE
Amendment 69 #

2022/0219(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 6
(6) Reinforcing the European Defence Technological and Industrial Base shouldmust therefore be at the core of those efforts. Indeed difficulties and gaps still exist and the European defence industrial base remains highly fragmented, lacking sufficient collaborative action and inter- operability of products. However, the equipment needs of the European armed forces in the short term can be efficiently met by the know-how and skills of the EDTIB. The Short Term Instrument allows the ramp-up of the quantities produced, and mobilises the strong potential of European companies through the support of joint procurements.
2023/02/13
Committee: AFETITRE
Amendment 76 #

2022/0219(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 6 a (new)
(6a) In addition, given that the EDTIB requires favourable long-term conditions, it is of utmost importance that access to finance for defence companies is assured, as laid out in the Strategic Compass. Lacking an explicit classification of being sustainable within the EU's taxonomy, EU defence companies are faced with substantial difficulties to secure financing and thus to increase their production capacity rendering relocation of production outside of the EU's common market more attractive to defence companies. By not defining all defence companies as sustainable, EU is actively undermining an industry that is vital to protect our societies and in the long run, this approach could pose a threat to sustainable development. Furthermore, the EU Member States should take a first step in that regard and send a positive signal to European defence companies and the financial sector by adapting the statute of the European Investment Bank in order to allow for financing of defence investments.
2023/02/13
Committee: AFETITRE
Amendment 96 #

2022/0219(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 13
(13) The Short Term Instrument should offset the complexity and risks associated with such joint actions while allowing economies of scale in the actions undertaken by Member States to reinforce and modernise the European Technological and Industrial Base, increasing thereby the Union’s capacity resilience and security of supply. In that context, the content of the defence product originating from the EU, for all its components, shall represent at least 80% of the value of the defence product commonly procured. Incentivizing common procurement would also result into diminished costs in terms of exploitation, maintenance and withdrawal of the systems.
2023/02/13
Committee: AFETITRE
Amendment 132 #

2022/0219(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 18
(18) Furthermore, the common procurement procedures and contracts shall also include a requirement for the defence product to not be subject to control or restriction by a non-associated third country or a non-associated third country entity with unrestricted ability for Member States to use, maintain, modernize and transfer it.
2023/02/13
Committee: AFETITRE
Amendment 145 #

2022/0219(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 21
(21) To generate the incentive effect, the level of Union contribution may be differentiated based on factors such as (a) the complexity of the common procurement, for which a proportion of the anticipated size of the procurement contract, based on experience gained in similar actions, may serve as an initial proxy, (b) the characteristics of the cooperation, such as joint usage, stockpiling, ownership or maintenance, as well as replacement of stockpiles of Soviet-era legacy defence systems with European solutions, developed under an EU design authority and with unrestricted ability for Member States to use, maintain and modernize them, which are likely to induce stronger interoperability outcomes and long-term investment signals to industry, and (c) the number of participating Member States or associated countries or the inclusion of additional Member States or associated countries to existing cooperations.
2023/02/13
Committee: AFETITRE
Amendment 155 #

2022/0219(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 26
(26) In accordance with the Financial Regulation, Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 883/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council3 , Council Regulation (Euratom, EC) No 2988/954 , Council Regulation (Euratom, EC) No 2185/965 and Council Regulation (EU) 2017/19396 , the financial interests of the Union are to be protected through proportionate measures, including the prevention, detection, correction and investigation of irregularities and fraud, the recovery of funds lost, wrongly paid or incorrectly used and, where appropriate, the imposition of administrative sanctions. In particular, in accordance with Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 883/2013 and Regulation (Euratom, EC) No 2185/96 the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF) may carry out investigations, including on-the-spot checks and inspections, with a view to establishing whether there has been fraud, corruption or any other illegal activity affecting the financial interests of the Union. It is of the essence to counteract corruption and uphold the rule of law. In accordance with Regulation (EU) 2017/1939, the European Public Prosecutor's Office (EPPO) may investigate and prosecute fraud and other illegal activities affecting the financial interests of the Union as provided for in Directive (EU) 2017/1371 of the European Parliament and of the Council7 . In accordance with the Financial Regulation, any person or entity receiving Union funds is to fully cooperate in the protection of the Union’s financial interests, to grant the necessary rights and access to the Commission, OLAF, the EPPO and the European Court of Auditors (ECA) and to ensure that any third parties involved in the implementation of Union funds grant equivalent rights. _________________ 3 Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 883/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 September 2013 concerning investigations conducted by the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF) and repealing Regulation (EC) No 1073/1999 of the European Parliament and of the Council and Council Regulation (Euratom) No 1074/1999,(OJ L248, 18.9.2013, p. 1. 4 Council Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 2988/95 of 18 December 1995 on the protection of the European Communities financial interests (OJ L 312, 23.12.95, p.1). 5 Council Regulation (Euratom, EC) No 2185/96 of 11 November 1996 concerning on-the-spot checks and inspections carried out by the Commission in order to protect the European Communities' financial interests against fraud and other irregularities (OJ L292,15.11.96 , , p.2). 6 Council Regulation (EU) 2017/1939 of 12 October 2017 implementing enhanced cooperation on the establishment of the European Public Prosecutor’s Office (‘the EPPO’) (OJ L283, 31.10.2017, p.1). 7 Directive (EU) 2017/1371 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 July 2017 on the fight against fraud to the Union's financial interests by means of criminal law (OJ L 198, 28.7.2017, p. 29).
2023/02/13
Committee: AFETITRE
Amendment 196 #

2022/0219(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2
2. The objectives shall be pursued with an emphasis on strengthening and developing the Union defence industrial base to allow it to address in particular the most urgent and critical defence products needs, especially those revealed or exacerbated by the response to the Russian aggression against Ukraine, taking into account the work of the Defence Joint Procurement Task Force. This can be achieved with unrestricted ability for Member States to use, maintain, modernise and transfer the defence products. The content of the defence products originating from the European Union, for all its components, shall represent at least 80% of the value of the defence products commonly procured. No components shall be sourced from non- associated third countries that contravene the security and defence interests of the Union and its Member States, including respect for the principle of good neighbourly relations.
2023/02/13
Committee: AFETITRE
Amendment 311 #

2022/0219(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. In order to increase the strategic autonomy of the European Union, Member States will identify and provide the Commission with the list of non- European origin components for which no alternative exists in the European Union, and take appropriate measures to ensure their development in the Union, including through research and development, and in particular, through the European Defence Fund.
2023/02/13
Committee: AFETITRE
Amendment 312 #

2022/0219(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 4 a (new)
4a. In line with Article 8 (9), the Commission, assisted by the European Defence Agency, shall endeavour to identify components of non-EU origin for which no alternative exists in the Union and take appropriate measures to foster their development in the Union, including through research and development, and in particular, through the European Defence Fund.
2023/02/13
Committee: AFETITRE
Amendment 325 #

2022/0219(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 12 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. In addition and in line with Article 8 (9), the report shall identify, based on considerations of the Union's essential defence capability needs, the most critical components of non-EU origin, including an assessment of the possibilities for the development of alternative components within the Union.
2023/02/13
Committee: AFETITRE
Amendment 100 #

2022/0212(BUD)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24 a (new)
24 a. Is deeply concerned by the multiple reports highlighting the financing of associations with links to radical religious and political organizations, such as the Muslim Brotherhood; calls on the Commission to guarantee that European funds finance only organizations that strictly respect all European values, including freedom of thought, freedom of speech and equality between men and women, notably through the programme Citizens, Equality, Rights and Values;
2022/09/29
Committee: BUDG
Amendment 151 #

2022/0195(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 45
(45) The EU Biodiversity Strategy for 2030 requires greater efforts to restore freshwater ecosystems and the natural functions of rivers. The restoration of freshwater ecosystems should include efforts to restore the natural longitudinal and lateral connectivity of rivers as well as their riparian areas and floodplains, including through the removal of barriers that have been specifically demonstrated by a local impact study to be harmful for ecosystems, bringing together the local administrative authorities and the stakeholders active in managing ecosystems, with a view to supporting the achievement of favourable conservation status for rivers, lakes and alluvial habitats and species living in those habitats protected by Directives 92/43/EEC and 2009/147/EC, and the achievement of one of the key objectives of the EU Biodiversity Strategy for 2030, namely, the restoration of at least 25 000 km of free-flowing rivers where relevant. When removing barriers, Member States should primarily address obsolete barriers, which are those that are no longer needed for renewable energy generation, inland navigation, water supply or other uses.
2023/01/09
Committee: PECH
Amendment 153 #

2022/0195(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 45 a (new)
(45a) When considering the destruction of barriers, Member States must also take into account the experiences and measures implemented in that connection previously. They must ensure that destruction of such a kind will not jeopardise the good condition of freshwater ecosystems, wetlands or rivers, by causing, for example, the seasonal drying up of rivers. They must take into account the possible beneficial effects of man-made structures that have been in place for centuries and that contribute to the development of current ecosystems.
2023/01/09
Committee: PECH
Amendment 174 #

2022/0195(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article premier – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) the continuous, long-term and sustained recovery of biodiverse and resilient nature across the Union’s land and sea areas through the restoration of ecosystems to good condition as specified by Directives 92/43/EC and 2009/147/EC;
2023/01/09
Committee: PECH
Amendment 177 #

2022/0195(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article premier – paragraph 1 – point c a (new)
(ca) identifying gaps and prioritising the requirements for research and new data to assess the conservation status of species and habitats of Community interest in order to achieve the current targets of Directive 92/43/EEC and 2009/147/EC.
2023/01/09
Committee: PECH
Amendment 212 #

2022/0195(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point 5
(5) ‘favourable reference area’ means the total area of a habitat type listed in Annex II in a given biogeographical region or marine region at national level that is considered the minimum necessary to ensure the long- term viability of the habitat type and its species, and all its significant ecological variations in its natural range, and which is composed of the area of the habitat type and, if that area is not sufficient, the area necessary for the re- establishment of the habitat type, taking into account, in addition, the inevitable deterioration of the areas covered as a result of force majeure events;
2023/01/09
Committee: PECH
Amendment 260 #

2022/0195(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 5 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Member States may put in place restoration measures for the habitats of certain marine species that are not covered by the scope of Annex II, because of their significant role in the ecosystem. Member States shall use the opportunities provided by the common fisheries policy as described in Article 12(3) of this Regulation.
2023/01/09
Committee: PECH
Amendment 273 #

2022/0195(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 5 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. Member States shall put in place knowledge acquisition programmes to assess the conservation status of each group of habitats listed in Annex II whose status is still unknown and shall list the relevant data to be collected in order to ensure the monitoring and implementation of the national action plan, as laid down in Articles 11 and 12.
2023/01/09
Committee: PECH
Amendment 280 #

2022/0195(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 5 – paragraph 4
4. The determination of the most suitable areas for restoration measures in accordance with paragraphs 1, 2 and 3 shall be based on the best available knowledge and the latest scientific evidence of the condition of the habitat types listed in Annex II, measured by the structure and functions which are necessary for their long-term maintenance, including their typical species, referred to in Article 1(e) of Directive 92/43/EEC, and of the quality and quantity of the habitats of the species referred to in paragraph 3. Areas where the habitat types listed in Annex II are in unknown condition shall be considered as not being in good condition.
2023/01/09
Committee: PECH
Amendment 338 #

2022/0195(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 1
1. Member States shall make an inventory of barriers to longitudinal and lateral connectivity of surface waters andwhere such barriers have been specifically demonstrated by a local impact study to be harmful to ecosystems, such a study involving local administrative authorities and the stakeholders active in managing such ecosystems; they shall identify the barriers that need to be removed to contribute to the achievement of the restoration targets set out in Article 4 and following of this Regulation and of the objective of restoring at least 25 000 km of rivers into free- flowing rivers in the Union by 2030 where relevant, without prejudice to Directive 2000/60/EC, in particular Articles 4(3), 4(5) and 4(7) thereof, and Regulation 1315/2013, in particular Article 15 thereof.
2023/01/09
Committee: PECH
Amendment 350 #

2022/0195(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 2 – point a – point ii
(ii) the habitat area evaluated as not in good condition;
2023/01/09
Committee: PECH
Amendment 354 #

2022/0195(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 2 – point a – point iii a (new)
(iiia) the area of habitats currently not evaluated and that remain classified as having an unknown conservation status;
2023/01/09
Committee: PECH
Amendment 357 #

2022/0195(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 2 – point a a (new)
(aa) an inventory of the gaps in the data required to assess the conservation status of the habitat types and the habitats of the species mentioned that remain unknown, and the measures planned to remedy such gaps. Member States shall estimate the funding requirements for data collection and the evaluation of conservation status through a national or transnational scientific programme.
2023/01/09
Committee: PECH
Amendment 360 #

2022/0195(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. Member States shall list the missing data required to evaluate the conservation status of the habitat types that are not in good condition referred to in Articles 4(1), 4(2), 5(1) and 5(2) and the quality and quantity of the habitats of the species referred to in Article 4(3) and Article 5(3) that are present on their territory. Member States shall include in the list their national restoration plans referred to in Article 12.
2023/01/09
Committee: PECH
Amendment 476 #

2022/0195(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex III – title
MARINE SPECIES REFERRED TO IN ARTICLE 5(3)The list below includes the marine species listed in Annexes II, IV and V to Directives 2/43/EEC and 2009/147/EC.
2023/01/09
Committee: PECH
Amendment 522 #

2022/0195(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex VII – point 24
(24) MinimisReduce the negative impacts of fishing activities on the marine ecosystem, for example by using gear with less impact on seabedas laid down by Regulation (EU) No 1380/2013.
2023/01/09
Committee: PECH
Amendment 38 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 3 a (new)
(3 a) The phasing out of the dependency on Russian fossil fuel imports should lead to a reduction of the overall energy dependency of the European Union ; in line with the Recovery and Resilience Facility, the REPowerEU chapters of the RRF should contribute to increase and strengthen the strategic autonomy of the Union, by enabling the Union to increase its own energy production.
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 39 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 3 b (new)
(3 b) Reducing the Union’s dependency on fossil fuels imports should never lead to an increase of its dependency on raw materials imports from third countries.
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 40 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 4 a (new)
(4 a) REPowerEU should reduce our dependency on primary critical raw materials, strengthen domestic sourcing of raw materials in the EU and diversify sourcing from third countries.
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 46 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 6
(6) The REPowerEU chapter should include new reforms and investments contributing to the REPowerEU aims. Furthermore, that chapter should contain an outline of other measures, financed from sources other than the Recovery and Resilience Facility, contributing to the energy-related objectives outlined in recital (3). The outline should cover measures whose implementation should take place between 1 February 2022 to 31 December 2026, the period during which the objectives set by this Regulation are to be achieved. As regards natural gas infrastructure, the investments and reforms of the REPowerEU chapters to diversify supply away from Russia should build on the needs currently identified through the assessment conducted and agreed by the European Network of Transmission System Operators for Gas (ENTSOG), established in the spirit of solidarity as regards security of supply and take into account the reinforced preparedness measures, including gas storage, taken to adapt to new geopolitical threats. Finally, the REPowerEU chapters should provide an explanation and a quantification of the effects of the combination of the reforms and investments financed by the Recovery and Resilience Facility and the other measures financed by other sources than the Recovery and Resilience Facility.
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 48 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 7
(7) An appropriate and technologically neutral assessment criterion should be added to serve as a basis for the Commission to assess reforms and investments included in the REPowerEU chapter sand to ensure that reforms and investments are fit for achieving the specific REPowerEU-related objectives, with a special focus on electricity production and gas storage capacities. An A rating should be required under this new assessment criterion for the relevant recovery and resilience plan to be positively assessed by the Commission.
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 49 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 8
(8) Investments in infrastructure and technologies alone are not sufficient to ensure a reduction of dependency from fossil fuels. Resources should be dedicated to the reskilling and upskilling of people, to further equip the workforce with green skillsThe current crisis reveals the critical needs of qualified professionals in energy sectors. Resources should be dedicated to the reskilling and upskilling of people. Jobs and training related to electricity production, transport and distribution should benefit from increased support. This is in line with the objective of the European Social Fund Plus, which aims at supporting Member States in achieving a skilled and resilient workforce ready for the future world of work. In light of this, resources transferred from the European Social Fund Plus should help support measures for the reskilling and upskilling of the workforce. The Commission will assess whether the measures included in the REPowerEU chapters significantly contribute to supporting a requalification of the workforce towards green skills.
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 49 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 5
(5) To maximise the scope of the Union’s response, all Member States submitting a recovery and resilience plan after the entry into force of this Regulation should be required to include a REPowerEU chapter in their plan. Such amended plans, should be submitted at the latest by [two months after the entry into force of this amended Regulation]. This requirement should apply, in particular, to revised plans submitted by Member States from 30 June 2022 to take into account the updated maximum financial contribution. The Commission should evaluate the amended plans in maximum one month from their official submission.
2022/09/29
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 50 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 10
(10) The recovery and resilience plan, including the REPowerEU chapter, should contribute to effectively addressing all or a significant subset of the challenges identified in the relevant country-specific recommendations, taking into account the specificities of the energy mix of each Member State, including the country- specific recommendations to be adopted under the 2022 Semester cycle which refer inter alia to the energy challenges that Member States are facing.
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 56 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 13
(13) The application of the ‘do no significant harm’ principle is essential to ensure that the investments and reforms undertaken as part of the recovery from the pandemic are implemented in a sustainable manner. It should continue to apply to the reforms and investments supported by the Facility, with one targeted exemption to safeguard the EU’ immediate energy security concerns. Considering the objective of diversifying energy supplies away from Russian suppliers and reducing the overall energy dependency of the European Union, the reforms and investments set out in those REPowerEU chapters which aim to improve energy infrastructure and facilities to meet immediate security of supply needs for oil and gas should temporarily not be required to comply with the principle of ‘do no significant harm’ and should therefore be exempted from such assessment.
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 67 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 1
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Article 4 – paragraph 1
1. In line with the six pillars referred in Article 3 of this Regulation, the coherence and synergies they generate, and in the context of the COVID-19 crisis, the general objective of the Facility shall be to promote the Union’s economic, social and territorial cohesion by improving the resilience, crisis preparedness, adjustment capacity and growth potential of the Member States, by mitigating the social and economic impact of that crisis, in particular on women, by contributing to the implementation of the European Pillar of Social Rights, by supporting the green transition, by contributing to the achievement of the Union’s 2030 climate targets set out in point (11) of Article 2 of Regulation (EU) 2018/1999,and by complying with the objective of EU climate neutrality by 2050 and of the digital transition, by increasing the resilience of the Union energy system through a decrease of dependence on fossil fuels and, diversification of energy supplies, increase of electricity production and energy storage capacities at Union level (‘REPowerEU objectives’) thereby contributing to the upward economic and social convergence, restoring and promoting sustainable growth and the integration of the economies of the Union, fostering high quality employment creation, and contributing to the strategic autonomy of the Union alongside an open economy and generating European added value.
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 71 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 4
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Article 19 – paragraph 3 – point da
(da) whether the reforms and investments referred to in Article 21c(1) effectively contribute towards energy security, security of supply, the diversification of the Union’s energy supply or, reduction of dependence on fossil fuels, increase of electricity production and energy storage capacities before 2030. ;
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 72 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 4
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Article 19 – paragraph 3 – point da
(da) whether the reforms and investments referred to in Article 21c(1) effectively contribute towards the diversification of the Union’s energy supply or reduction of dependence on fossil fuels before 2030. and towards the EU's climate neutrality objective;
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 74 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 6
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Article 21a – paragraph 1
(1) EUR 20 000 000 000 in current prices shall be available, in line with Article 10e(4) of Directive 2003/87/EC, for implementation under this Regulation to increase the resilience of the Union energy system through a decrease of dependence on fossil fuels and, diversification of energy supplies, increase of electricity production and energy storage capacities at Union level. That amount shall be made available in the form of external assigned revenue within the meaning of Article 21(5) of the Financial Regulation.
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 82 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 6
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Article 21c – paragraph 1 – point a a (new)
(a a) reducing global dependency to fossil fuels and to overall energy imports at Union level,
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 83 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 6
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Article 21c – paragraph 1 – point a b (new)
(a b) boosting low-carbon energy sources production within the Union,
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 84 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 6
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Article 21c – paragraph 1 – point a c (new)
(a c) increasing energy storage capacities in the Union,
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 85 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 6
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Article 21c – paragraph 1 – point a d (new)
(a d) reducing dependency on primary critical raw materials, strengthening domestic sourcing of raw materials in the Union and diversifying sourcing from third countries,
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 89 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 6
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Article 21c – paragraph 1 – point b
(b) boosting energy efficiency in buildings, decarbonising industry, increasing production and uptake of sustainable biomethane and renewable or fossil-free and low-carbon hydrogen and increasing the share of renewable and low- carbon energy,
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 90 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 6
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Article 21c – paragraph 1 – point b a (new)
(b a) supporting the secure life extension of operating fossil-free electricity production facilities, such as nuclear plants, in all the Union, at least as long as the Union’s energy security is not recovered,
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 91 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 14
(14) Further incentives should be provided for Member States to request loans, through the clarification of the loan allocation procedure. In accordance with Regulation (EU) 2021/241, Member States may request loans until 31 August 2023. An intention to submit a loan request should be communicated to the Commission 30 days after the entry into force of this Regulation so that the redistribution of the remaining funds can be conducted in an orderly manner and for the Member State to be able to request such support at a later stage.
2022/09/29
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 94 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 6
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Article 21c – paragraph 1 – point c
(c) addressing internal and cross- border energy transmission bottlenecks and supporting zero and low emission transport and its infrastructure, including railways,
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 95 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 6
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Article 21c – paragraph 1 – point d
(d) supporting the objectives in points (a), (b) and (c) through an accelerated requalification of the workforce towards green skillsenergy sector, with a special focus on low carbon or carbon-free electricity production, as well as support of the value chains in key materials and technologies linked to the green transidecarbonisation of energy production.
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 99 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 6
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Article 21c – paragraph 2 – point c
(c) an explanation on how the combination of the measures referred to in paragraph 1 and points (a) and (b) of this paragraph is coherent, effective and expected to contribute to the REPowerEU objectives, including a quantification of the energy savingsproduction and savings, and contribution to energy storage.
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 112 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – paragraph 1 – point a
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Annex V – section 2 – point 2.12 – subparagraph 2 – indent 1
— the implementation of the envisaged measures is expected to significantly contribute to the improvement of energy infrastructure and facilities to meet immediate security of supply needs for oil and gas, notably to enable diversification of supply, reduction of dependency to fossil fuels and to all overall energy imports, in the interest of the Union as a whole,
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 114 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – paragraph 1 – point a
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Annex V – section 2 – point 2.12 – subparagraph 2 – indent 2
— the implementation of the envisaged measures is expected to significantly contribute to boosting energy efficiency in buildings, decarbonising industry, increasing production and uptake of low-carbon or carbon-free electricity, sustainable biomethane and renewable or fossil free and low-carbon hydrogen and increasing the share of renewable and low- carbon energy,
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 116 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – paragraph 1 – point a
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Annex V – section 2 – point 2.12 – subparagraph 2 – indent 3
— the implementation of the envisaged measures is expected to address energy infrastructure bottlenecks, in particular by constructing cross-border links with other Member States, or supports zero- and low emission transport and its infrastructure, including railways,
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 118 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – paragraph 1 – point a
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Annex V – section 2 – point 2.12 – subparagraph 2 – indent 4
— the implementation of the envisaged measures is expected to significantly contribute to supporting a requalification of the workforce towards green skillenergy sectors, as well as supporting value chains in key materials and technologies linked to the green transidecarbonisation of energy production,
2022/09/08
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 140 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2 a (new)
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Article 18 – paragraph 4 – point f
(2 a) Article 18 (4) point f is the replaced by the following "(f)an explanation of how the measures in the recovery and resilience plan are expected to contribute to the digital transition or to the challenges resulting therefrom, and whether they account for an amount which represents at least 20 % of the recovery and resilience plan’s total allocation, based on the methodology for digital tagging set out in Annex VII; that methodology shall be used accordingly for measures that cannot be directly assigned to an intervention field listed in Annex VII, with the exception of new measures included in the REPowerEU chapters, for which the Commission may use new intervention fields and coefficients; the coefficients for support for the digital objectives may be increased for individual investments to take account of accompanying reform measures that increase their impact on the digital objectives; (https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX%3A32021R0241) " Or. en
2022/09/29
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 151 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 3
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Article 18 – paragraph 4 – point q
(q) for the preparation and, where available, for the implementation of the recovery and resilience plan, a summary of the consultation process, which shall be mandatory and conducted in accordance with the national legal framework, of national parliaments, local and regional authorities, social partners, civil society organisations, youth organisations and other relevant stakeholders, and how the input of the stakeholders is reflected in the recovery and resilience plan; in particular, the summary of the consultation process shall explain the outcome of the consultations with local and regional authorities and other relevant stakeholders on reforms and investments included in the REPowerEU chapter and outline how the input received was reflected in the REPowerEU chapter;
2022/09/29
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 158 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 4
(f) whether the recovery and resilience plan contains measures that effectively contribute to the digital transition or to addressing the challenges resulting therefrom, and whether they account for an amount which represents at least 20 % of the recovery and resilience plan’s total allocation, based on the methodology for digital tagging set out in Annex VII with the exception of new measures included in the REPowerEU chapters, for which the Commission may use new intervention fields and coefficients; that methodology shall be used accordingly for measures that cannot be directly assigned to an intervention field listed in Annex VII; the coefficients for support for the digital objectives may be increased for individual investments to take account of accompanying reform measures that increase their impact on the digital objectives; (https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX%3A32021R0241)Or. en
2022/09/29
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 164 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 4 a (new)
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Article 20 – paragraph 6
(4 a) In Article 20 (6) the following sentence is inserted: "6. The arrangements and timetable for monitoring and implementation as referred to in point (e) of paragraph 5, the relevant indicators relating to the fulfilment of the envisaged milestones and targets referred to in point (f) of paragraph 5, the arrangements for providing full access by the Commission to the underlying data referred to in point (g) of paragraph 5, and, where appropriate, the additional milestones and targets related to the payment of the loan referred to in point (h) of paragraph 5 shall be further specified in operational arrangements to be agreed by the Member State concerned and the Commission after the adoption of the decision referred to in paragraph 1. (https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX%3A32021R0241)The operational arrangements shall be concluded at the latest one month after the decision referred to in paragraph 1. " Or. en
2022/09/29
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 167 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 4 c (new)
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Article 21 – paragraph 2
(4 c) Article 21 (2) is replaced by the following: "2. Where the Commission considers that the reasons put forward by the Member State concerned justify an amendment of the relevant recovery and resilience plan, the Commission shall assess the amended or new recovery and resilience plan in accordance with Article 19 and shall make a proposal for a new Council implementing decision in accordance with Article 20(1) within twoone months of the official submission of the request. The Member State concerned and the Commission may agree to extend that deadline by a reasonable period if necessary. The Council shall adopt the new implementing decision, as a rule, within four weeks of the adoption of the Commission proposal. (https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX%3A32021R0241)" Or. en
2022/09/29
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 216 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 6
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Article 21c – paragraph 1
(1) The recovery and resilience plan submitted to the Commission after [the entry into force of this amending Regulation] shall contain a REPowerEU chapter. Member States may propose the inclusion of a REPowerEU chapter in their recovery and resilience plans at the latest by [2 months after the entry into force of this amending Regulation]. The REPowerEU chapter shall outline reforms and investments, with their corresponding milestones and targets, other than measures referred in paragraph 2 (a), aiming to contribute to the REPowerEU objectives, by:
2022/09/29
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 311 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – paragraph 1 – point a
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Annex V – section 2 – point 2.12 b (new)
2.12 b. The consultations conducted in accordance with the national framework for the preparation of the recovery and resilience plan were conducted in a way which ensure that all relevant stakeholders are given effective opportunities to participate in the preparation and the implementation of the recovery and resilience plans. The Commission shall take into account the following elements for the assessment under this criterion Scope: - the Member State provided a comprehensive summary about the consultation process conducted in accordance with the national legislative framework and - the Member State consulted all relevant stakeholders, including national parliaments, local and regional authorities, social partners, civil society organisations, youth organisations and other relevant stakeholders and - the Member State has taken into account to a sufficient degree the input provided by the relevant stakeholders in the recovery and resilience plan and - the Member State has provided sufficient arrangements to ensure the participation of the relevant stakeholders in the implementation of the recovery and resilience plans Rating A – to a large extent B – to a medium extent C – to a small extent
2022/09/29
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 313 #

2022/0164(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – paragraph 1 – point a a (new)
Regulation (EU) 2021/241
Annex V – section 2 – point 2.6
(a a) Annex V - Section 2 - Point 2.6 is replaced by the following: "2.6. The recovery and resilience plan contains measures that effectively contribute to the digital transition or to addressing the challenges resulting therefrom, and that account for an amount which represents at least 20 % of the recovery and resilience plan’s total allocation, based on the methodology for digital tagging set out in Annex VII, with the exception of the REPowerEU chapter for which the Commission may use additional intervention fields and coefficients; that methodology shall be used accordingly for measures that cannot be directly assigned to an intervention field listed in Annex VII; the coefficients for support for the digital objectives may be increased for individual investments to take account of accompanying reform measures that increase their impact on the digital objectives. The Commission shall take into account the following elements for the assessment under this criterion: Scope —the implementation of the envisaged measures is expected to significantly contribute to the digital transformation of economic or social sectors; or —the implementation of the envisaged measures is expected to significantly contribute to address the challenges resulting from digital transition; and —Member States apply a methodology consisting of assigning a specific weighting to the support provided, which reflects the extent to which such support makes a contribution to digital objectives. The weightings shall be based on the dimensions and codes for the types of intervention established in Annex VII, with the exception of the REPowerEU chapter for which the Commission may use additional intervention fields and coefficients, and may be increased for individual investments to take account of accompanying reform measures that increase their impact on the digital objectives. The same weighting system shall apply for measures that cannot be directly assigned to an intervention field listed in Annex VII; and —the implementation of the envisaged measures is expected to have a lasting impact. Rating A –to a large extent B –to a moderate extent C –to a small extent " Or. en (https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX%3A32021R0241)
2022/09/29
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 589 #

2022/0155(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point p
(p) ‘online child sexual abuse’ means the online dissemination of child sexual abuse material and the solicitation of children, including the exposure of children to pornographic content online;
2023/07/28
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 592 #

2022/0155(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point q
(q) ‘child sexual abuse offences’ means offences as defined in Articles 3 to 7 of Directive 2011/93/EU, and, for the scope of this regulation, extends the offense referred to in Article 3, paragraph 2 of the same directive, to the witnessing of sexual activities online, even without having to participate;
2023/07/28
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 602 #

2022/0155(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point w a (new)
(wa) ‘hotline’ means an organisation providing a mechanism, other than the reporting channels provided by law enforcement agencies, for receiving anonymous complaints from the public about alleged child sexual abuse material and online child sexual exploitation, which meets the following criteria: (a) is officially recognised by its home Member State as expressed in the Directive 2011/93/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council; (b) has the mission of combatting child sexual abuse material in its articles of association; and (c) is part of a recognised and well-established international network;
2023/07/28
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 640 #

2022/0155(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point b – indent 3
– functionalities enabling age verification and subsequent blocking of age-restricted websites and content;
2023/07/28
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 691 #

2022/0155(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point e – point iii a (new)
(iiia) the extent to which children have access to age-restricted content.
2023/07/28
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 806 #

2022/0155(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 3
3. Providers of interpersonal communications services that have identified, pursuant to the risk assessment conducted or updated in accordance with Article 3, a risk of use of their services for the purpose of the solicitation of children, shall take the necessary age verification and age assessment measures to reliably identify child users on their services, enabling them to take the mitigation measures and to put in place effective measures to block the access of children to websites that fall under an age- restriction applicable under national law.
2023/07/28
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 1156 #

2022/0155(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 3 – point d a (new)
(da) effective in setting up a reliable age-based filter that verifies the age of users and effectively prevents the access of child users to websites subject to online child sexual abuse, and child sexual abuse offenses.
2023/07/28
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 1326 #

2022/0155(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 19 – title
Liability of providers and hotlines
2023/07/28
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 1328 #

2022/0155(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 19 – paragraph 1
Providers of relevant information society services and hotlines shall not be liable for child sexual abuse offences solely because they carry out, in good faith, the necessary activities to comply with the requirements of this Regulation, in particular activities aimed at detecting, identifying, removing, disabling of access to, blocking or reporting online child sexual abuse in accordance with those requirements.
2023/07/28
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 1393 #

2022/0155(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 24 a (new)
Article24a Anonymous public reporting of online child sexual abuse 1. Member States shall ensure that the public has the possibility to anonymously report child sexual abuse material and child sexual exploitation activities to recognised non-governmental organisations specialised in combatting online child sexual abuse material. 2. Member States shall ensure that hotlines operating in their territory are authorised to view, assess and process anonymous reports of child sexual abuse material. 3. Member States shall grant hotlines the authority to issue content removal notices for confirmed instances of child sexual abuse material. 4. Member States shall authorise hotlines to voluntarily conduct pro-active searching for child sexual abuse material online.
2023/07/28
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 1422 #

2022/0155(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 26 – paragraph 2 – point c
(c) are free from any undue external influence, whether direct or indirect, it being understood that (a) the receipt of any type of financial aid by the Coordinating Authority and (b) the membership of the Coordinating Authority in a recognised international network shall not prejudice its independent character;
2023/07/28
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 1425 #

2022/0155(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 26 – paragraph 2 – point e
(e) are not charged with tasks relating tohave demonstrated competence, skills and experience in the pareventiona orf combatting ofnline child sexual abuse, other than their tasks under this Regulation.
2023/07/28
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 1469 #

2022/0155(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 34 – paragraph 3 a (new)
3a. Users shall have the possibility to lodge a complaint alleging an infringement of this Regulation against providers of information society services with recognised non-governmental organisations specialised in combatting online child sexual abuse material, including the hotlines.
2023/07/28
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 1521 #

2022/0155(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 39 – paragraph 2
2. The EU Centre shall establish and maintain one or more reliable and secure information sharing systems supporting communications between Coordinating Authorities, the Commission, the EU Centre, hotlines, other relevant Union agencies and providers of relevant information society services.
2023/07/28
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 1523 #

2022/0155(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 39 – paragraph 3
3. The Coordinating Authorities, the Commission, the EU Centre, hotlines, other relevant Union agencies and providers of relevant information society services shall use the information-sharing systems referred to in paragraph 2 for all relevant communications pursuant to this Regulation.
2023/07/28
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 1681 #

2022/0155(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 48 – paragraph 8 a (new)
8a. Where the EU Centre receives a report from a hotline, or where a provider that submitted the report to the EU Centre has indicated that the report is based on the information received from a hotline, the EU Centre shall: (a) refrain from forwarding the report to the competent law enforcement authority or authorities to avoid duplicated reporting on the same material that has already been reported to the national law enforcement by the hotlines; (b) monitor the removal of the child sexual abuse material or cooperate with the relevant hotline to track the status.
2023/07/28
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 1756 #

2022/0155(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 54 – paragraph 1
1. Where necessary for the performance of its tasks under this Regulation, the EU Centre mayshall cooperate with organisations and networks with information and expertise on matters related to the prevention and combating of online child sexual abuse, including civil society organisations and semi-public organisations and the INHOPE network.
2023/07/28
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 1760 #

2022/0155(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 54 – paragraph 2
2. The EU Centre mayshall conclude memoranda of understandingstrategic and/or operational cooperation agreements with organisations referred to in paragraph 1, laying down the terms of cooperation.
2023/07/28
Committee: LIBE
Amendment 124 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 14
(14) Physical products that obtain, generate or collect, by means of their components, data concerning their performance, use or environment and that are able to communicate that data via a publicly available electronic communications service (often referred to as tThe data represent the digitalisation of user actions and events and should accordingly be accessible to the user, while information derived or inferred from this data, where lawfully held, should not be considered within scope of this Regulation. In scope are data in raw form (also known as source or primary data, which refers to data points that are automatically generated without any form of processing) as well as prepared data (data cleaned and transformed for the purpose of making it useable prior to further processing and analysis). The Internet of Things) should be covered by this Regulation. Electronic communications services include land- based telephone networks, television cable networks, satellite-based networks and near-field communication networks. Such products may include vehicles, home equipment and consumer goods, medicalm ‘prepared data’ should be interpreted broadly, without however reaching the stage of deriving or inferring insights. Prepared data may include data enriched with metadata, combined with other data (e.g. sorted and classified with other data points relating to it) or re-formatted into a commonly-used format. Such data are potentially valuable to the user and support innovation and thealth devices or agricultural and industrial machinery. The data represent the digitalisation of user actions and events and should accordingly be accessible to the user, while development of digital and other services protecting the environment, health and the circular economy, in particular though facilitating the maintenance and repair of the products in question. By contrast, information derived or inferred from this data, where lawfully held, should not be considered within scope of this Regulation. Such data are potentially valuable to the user and support innovis not generated by the use of the product, but is the outcome of a characterisation, and the development of digital and other services protecting the environment, health and the circular economy, in particular though facilitating the maintenance and repair of the products in question. ssessment, recommendation, categorisation or similar systematic processes that assign values or insights to a user or product. Data that is constitutive of a trade secret should only be made available to a data user or third party if all the necessary measures to protect the confidentiality of the trade secrets have been taken by the third party.
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 138 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 15
(15) In contrast, certain products that are primarily designed to display or play content, or to record and transmit content, amongst others for the use by an online service should not be covered by this Regulation. Such products include, for example, personal computers, servers, tablets and smart phones, cameras, webcams, sound recording systems and text scanners. They require human input to produce various forms of content, such as text documents, sound files, video files, games, digital maps. Likewise defence related products as defined in Article 3(1) of Directive 2009/43 should not be covered by this Regulation.
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 179 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 23
(23) Before concluding a contract for the purchase, rent, or lease of a product or the provision of a related service, clear and sufficient information should be provided to the user on how the data generated may be accessed. This obligation provides transparency over the data generated and enhances the easy access for the user. This obligation to provide information does not affect the obligation for the controller to provide information to the data subject pursuant to Article 12, 13 and 14 of Regulation 2016/679. The data holder cannot be expected to store the data indefinitely in view of the needs of the user of the product, but should however implement a reasonable data retention policy that allows for the effective application of the data access rights under this Regulation
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 201 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 28
(28) The user should be free to use the data for any lawful purpose. This includes providing the data the user has received exercising the right under this Regulation to a third party offering an aftermarket service that may be in competition with a service provided by the data holder, or to instruct the data holder to do so. The data holder should ensure that the data made available to the third party is as accurate, complete, reliable, relevant and up-to-date as the data the data holder itself may be able or entitled to access from the use of the product or related service. Any trade secrets or intellectual property rights should be respected in handling the data. Their confidentiality should be preserved through contractual solutions, such as confidentiality agreements and licensing schemes. It is important to preserve incentives to invest in products with functionalities based on the use of data from sensors built into that product. The aim of this Regulation should accordingly be understood as to foster the development of new, innovative products or related services, stimulate innovation on aftermarkets, but also stimulate the development of entirely novel services making use of the data, including based on data from a variety of products or related services. At the same time, it aims to avoid undermining the investment incentives for the type of product from which the data are obtained, for instance, by the use of data to develop a competing product. Consequently, when providing access to data to users or third-parties, data holders should be able to use technical or organizational measures such as strict access protocols, non-disclosure agreements or any other similar measure meant to ensure the preservation of the secrecy of data considered as trade secrets.
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 281 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 56
(56) In situations of exceptional need, it may be necessary for public sector bodies or Union institutions, agencies or bodies to use data held by an enterprise to respond to public emergencies or in other exceptional cases. Exceptional needs are circumstances which are unforeseeable and limited in time. Research-performing organisations and research-funding organisations could also be organised as public sector bodies or bodies governed by public law. To limit the burden on businesses, micro and small enterprises should be exempted from the obligation to provide public sector bodies and Union institutions, agencies or bodies data in situations of exceptional need.
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 315 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 64
(64) Where it is strictly necessary to include personal data in the data made available to a public sector body or to a Union institution, agency or body the applicable rules on personal data protection should be complied with and the making available of the data and their subsequent use should and be accompanied by safeguards for the rights and interests of individuals concerned by those data. The body requesting the data should demonstrate the strict necessity and the specific and limited purposes for processing. The data holder should take reasonable efforts to anonymise the data or, where such anonymisation proves impossible, the data holder should apply technological means such as pseudonymisation and aggregation, prior to making the data available.deleted
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 447 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 7 a (new)
(7 a) ‘readily available data’ means data generated by the use of a product that the data holder obtains or can obtain without disproportionate effort, going beyond a simple operation;
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 453 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 10
(10) ‘public emergency’ means an exceptional situation negativeto which normal measures for the maintenance of public safety, health and order, are plainly inadequate. such as public health emergencies, emergencies resulting from natural disasters, as well as human- induced major disasters, such as major cybersecurity incidents, negatively and suddenly affecting the population of the Union, a Member State or part of it, with a risk of serious and lasting repercussions on living conditions or economic stability, or the substantial and immediate degradation of economic assets in the Union or the relevant Member State(s) and which is determined and officially declared according to the respective procedures under Union or national law;
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 574 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 3
3. Trade secrets shall only be disclosed provided that all specific necessary measures are taken to preserve the confidentiality of trade secrets in particular with respect to third parties. The data holder and the user canshall agree measurestechnical or organizational measures, such as strict access protocols, to preserve the confidentiality of the shared data, in particular in relation to third parties including liability over possible damages. Contractual instruments such as confidentiality agreements and licensing schemes could be used for this purpose.
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 604 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 5 – paragraph 1
1. Upon request by a user, or by a party acting on behalf of a user, the data holder shall make available the data generated by the use of a product or related service to a third party, without undue delayhat are readily available to the data holder to a third party, without undue delay, easily, securely in machine- readable format, free of charge to the user, of the same quality as is available to the data holder and, where applicable, continuously and in real-time. subject to compliance with applicable laws to the outsourcing of data driven services. Data shall be provided in the form in which they have been generated by the product, with only the minimal adaptations necessary to make them useable by a third party, including related metadata necessary to interpret and use the data.
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 624 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 5 – paragraph 3
3. The user or third party shall not be required to provide any information beyond what is necessary to verify the quality as user or as third party pursuant to paragraph 1. The data holder shall not keep any information on the third party’s access to the data requested beyond what is necessary for the sound execution of the third party’s access request and for the security and the maintenance of the data infrastructure. When giving access to trade secrets, the identity of the data recipient and the scope of data must be disclosed to the data holder for an evaluation of trade secret related risk.
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 641 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 5 – paragraph 8
8. Trade secrets shall only be disclosed to third parties to the extent that they are strictly necessary to fulfil the purpose agreed between the user and the third party and all specific necessary measures agreed between the data holder and the third party are taken by the third party to preserve the confidentiality of the trade secret. In such a case, the nature of the data as trade secrets and the measures for preserving the confidentiality shall be specified in the agreement between the data holder and the third party. The data holder shall therefore be entitled to implement technical or organizational measures, such as strict access protocols, to preserve the confidentiality of the shared data. The trade secret holder should have the possibility to refuse this sharing, when these guarantees are not ensured or respected ex-ante.
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 670 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 – paragraph 2 – point f b (new)
(f b) use the data it receives in a manner that adversely impacts the security of the product or related service(s)
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 674 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. The third party shall bear the responsibility to ensure the security and protection of the data it receives from the data holder.
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 841 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 2 – point c
(c) respect the legitimate aims of the data holder, taking into account the protection of trade secrets and the, privacy, commercial sensitive information, intellectual property and the duration, cost and effort required to make the data available;
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 847 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 2 – point d
(d) concern, insofar as possible, non- personal data;
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 878 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 18 – paragraph 2 – point a
(a) the data is unavailable; or the data holder does not have control over the data
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 879 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 18 – paragraph 2 – point a a (new)
(a a) provided security measures concerning transfer, storing and maintaining data confidentiality are insufficient.
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 894 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 19 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) not use the data in a manner incompatible with the purpose for which they were requested, nor use the date to develop products or related services that compete against the data holder;
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 896 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 19 – paragraph 1 – point b
(b) implement, insofar as the processing of personal data is necessary, technical and organisational measures that safeguard the rights and freedoms of data subjects;deleted
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 901 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 19 – paragraph 1 – point b a (new)
(b a) have in place the appropriate and proportionate technical and organisational measures to manage cyber risk to that data;
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 909 #

2022/0047(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 19 – paragraph 2
2. Disclosure of data constitutive of trade secrets or alleged trade secrets to a public sector body or to a Union institution, agency or body shall only be required to the extent that it is strictly necessary to achieve the purpose of the request. In such a case, provided that all specific necessary measures required by the trade secret holder are taken to preserve the confidentiality of trade secrets, in particular with respect to the third parties. The trade secret holder, the data holder and the public sector body, or the Union institution, agency or body shall take appropriatecan contractually agree on measures to preserve the confidentiality of those trade secretse shared data, in particular in relation to third parties. The trade secret holder should have the possibility to refuse this sharing, when these guarantees are not ensured or respected ex-ante.
2022/11/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 3 #

2021/2251(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Recalls the strong need for culture and education, as the backbone of our democracy, society and economy, to receive support from the Recovery and Resilience Facility (RRF), also with regard to the green and digital transitioniterates the crucial importance that education, culture and sports receive support from the Recovery and Resilience Facility since they play a key role in our daily lives by shaping our identity, creating bonds between generations and deepening our social and democratic participation; recognises how paramount these sectors are for our economies;
2022/02/11
Committee: CULT
Amendment 14 #

2021/2251(INI)

1 b. Recalls the strong need for the whole cultural, creative, education and sports sectors to be better addresed in NRRPs and receive greater support from the Recovery and Resilience Facility in the following period, in line with their digital and green transition;
2022/02/11
Committee: CULT
Amendment 31 #

2021/2251(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Highlights the destabilising impact the pandemic has had on education and sports, causing enormous disruption and societal divides in the entire European Union; expresses concern that the education and sports sectors will not be able to recover without focused earmarking and increased support, namely through national recovery and resilience specific planning and through other EU, transnational and national programmes;
2022/02/11
Committee: CULT
Amendment 39 #

2021/2251(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Deplores the fact that only 14 Member States have included culture inRecalls that the European Parliament called on Member States to allocate at least 2 % of their NRRF plans; fears that this heterogeneity of public investments leads to recovery at different speeds, causing increased disparities within the EU’s culturPs funds to culture and at least 10 % to education in its Resolution on Cultural Recovery for Europe; regrets the fact that not all Member States included these elements in their national recovery and resilience plans; calls on these Member States to amend their national recosystem and threatening Europe’s cultural diversity; very and resilience plans and dedicate enough funds through short-term and long-term investments;
2022/02/11
Committee: CULT
Amendment 87 #

2021/2251(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Strongly believes that for the correct implementation of the RRF a special focus should also be given to micro and small organisations, including in rural areasindependent micro, small and medium sized enterprises or organisations, including in rural and remote areas in all Member States; notes that these actors can contribute significantly to our economy if given proper support;
2022/02/11
Committee: CULT
Amendment 121 #

2021/2251(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7 a. Insists that the Commission calls on Member States to work more closely with key stakeholders, national authorities and agencies and civil societies and to improve their national recovery and resilience plans accordingly to address vital needs of the cultural, creative, education and sports sectors on local, regional and national level;
2022/02/11
Committee: CULT
Amendment 123 #

2021/2251(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 a (new)
9 a. Encourages those Member States that did not request loans to the full extent available, to do so and prioritise measures aiming at increasing their energy security and mitigating the economic effects of the crisis generated by the Russian invasion of Ukraine in the European Union.
2022/03/21
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 155 #

2021/2251(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 a (new)
11 a. Believes that in order to demonstrate its added value, the RRF should focus on investments which could not be adequately financed through other funding instruments of the Union or would have difficulty in obtaining the adequate financing;
2022/03/21
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 156 #

2021/2251(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 9
9. Urges the Commission and thto advise Member States to extend the continuous involvement of stakeholders to the implementation and monitoring of the RRF plansin monitoring the implementation of their national recovery and resilience plans and propose other actions and short-term and long-term measures that will address current and future challenges; notes that this kind of cooperation with Member States will create tangible, sustainable, social and economic benefits both at national and European level.
2022/02/11
Committee: CULT
Amendment 171 #

2021/2251(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14 b (new)
14 b. Reminds that the Facility is subject to the sound economic governance and calls on the Commission to apply the existing rules scrupulously;
2022/03/21
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 176 #

2021/2251(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Welcomes the fact that 22 NRRPs have been approved and observes that as of early February 2022, one Member State had not yet put forward its NRRP; further notes that four NRRPs are pending assessment by the Commission; is concerned that some of the plans have been under assessment for a considerable time;
2022/03/21
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 254 #

2021/2251(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 26
26. EStrongly emphasises that the RRF should not be used to substitute recurring national budgetary expenditure, unless duly justified; notes that the Commission has only approved NRRPs to cover the initial costs of setting up and launching reforms, which might become recurring costs, if the sustainable financing of the future costs shall be ensured from the national budget or other instruments and it fully respects the concept of sustainable fiscal policy; is deeply preoccupied by measures included in some NRRPs which foresee important amounts for salaries; believes that such expenditure has the clear potential to become recurring budgetary expenditure after the RRF implementation period; strongly questions the criteria on which the Commission has approved such measures; believes that RRF expenditure should not lead to an increase of public spending;
2022/03/21
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 296 #

2021/2251(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30 c (new)
30 c. Calls on the Members States to look for ways on how to involve refugees fleeing Ukraine to the European Union, following the military invasion of the Russian Federation, in the practical implementation of the NRRPs, therefore, helping to alleviate their socio-economic situation;
2022/03/21
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 297 #

2021/2251(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30 d (new)
30 d. Reiterates, in the context of the Russian invasion of Ukraine and its possible consequences, particularly as regards the dependence on Russian gas, the importance of EU's energy security; welcomes in this regard the NRRPs containing measures to enhance energy security by decreasing dependence on Russian gas; furthermore, underlines the importance of measures relating to the climate component in order to mitigate the impact of the energy prices crisis upon the EU;
2022/03/21
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 307 #

2021/2251(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 32
32. Observes, that by the nature of the instruments, the control focuses on the achievement of results instead of verifications of costs; notes that this approach can simplify the implementation and contribute to the achievement of the desired outcome; nevertheless, is deeply preoccupied that it also makes the detection of abuse of EU funds more difficult; Urges the Commission to take the appropriate measures to ensure early detection of abuse of EU funds; calls on it to monitor rigorously any possible occurrence of double funding and, if such occurrences are confirmed, to proceed with the recovery of funds without delay;
2022/03/21
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 350 #

2021/2251(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 34 b (new)
34 b. Deplores that national parliaments, regions and municipalities have had a limited or even no involvement in designing national plans; recalls that regions and municipalities are at the forefront of RRP implementation and demands the Commission and the Member States to ensure proper and deep involvement of regions and municipalities, social partners, civil society, youth organisations and other relevant stakeholders;
2022/03/21
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 356 #

2021/2251(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 34 d (new)
34 d. Calls on Member States to ensure that management systems of RRF funds takes into consideration the specific needs of the regional and local level and to put in place management systems that allow for RRF expenditure related to local and regional objectives to be de-centralised;
2022/03/21
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 357 #

2021/2251(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 34 e (new)
34 e. Reiterates the importance of allowing access to private sector to RRF expenditure, where applicable; recalls the importance of SMEs in the implementation of the RRF and warns against measures which would prevent SMEs from accessing RRF funding; invites the Commission to provide detailed analyses on the access of the private sector to RRF funding;
2022/03/21
Committee: BUDGECON
Amendment 20 #

2021/2231(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 12
— having regard to the United Nations Security Council resolutions Nos. 822 of 30 April 1993, 853 of 29 July 1993, 874 of 14 October 1993, and 884 of 12 November 1993,deleted
2022/11/17
Committee: AFET
Amendment 23 #

2021/2231(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 14 a (new)
— having regard to the International Court of Justice Order on the Application of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (Armenia v. Azerbaijan), of 7 December 2021,
2022/11/17
Committee: AFET
Amendment 25 #

2021/2231(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 14 b (new)
— having regard to the Interim Resolution of the Council of Europe on the Execution of judgments of the European Court of Human Rights, Mammadli Group against Azerbaijan, of 22 September 2022,
2022/11/17
Committee: AFET
Amendment 31 #

2021/2231(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 18 a (new)
— having regard to its resolution of 17 January 2019 on Azerbaijan, notably the case of Mehman Huseynov[1], and to other resolutions on Azerbaijan, in particular those concerning the human rights situation and the rule of law,
2022/11/17
Committee: AFET
Amendment 121 #

2021/2231(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Strongly condemns the clashes that eruptedAzerbajian’s aggression towards Armenian sovereign territory of on 12 September 2022 and theirits consequences for the peace process; reiterates that the territorial integrity of Armenia and Azerbaijan must be respected and underlines the EU’s readiness to be more actively involved in settling the region’s protracted conflicts; whereas Russian peacekeepers have not been able to maintain stability in the region and Russian military presence has been decreasing since Russia’s unprovoked and unjustified attack on Ukraine;
2022/11/17
Committee: AFET
Amendment 174 #

2021/2231(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. Continues to be concerned about the fate of Armenian prisoners, both military and civilian, detained during and after the conflict and still held by Azerbaijan and welcomes the release of some of them; is abhorred by reports and footage of extrajudicial killings of Armenian prisoners of war by Azeri soldiers, urges Azerbaijani authorities to thoroughly investigate such incidents, which are clearly in violation of the obligation to humane treatment of prisoners of war, and bring the perpetrators to justice; calls for the immediate and unconditional release of all the remaining detainees, including those captured during the recent military confrontations, and for them to be treated in accordance with international humanitarian law;
2022/11/17
Committee: AFET
Amendment 186 #

2021/2231(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Strongly insists that Azerbaijan and Armenia refrain from destroying cultural, religious or historical heritage and to guarantee that citizens are not prevented from exercising their right to freedom of religion or belief in this regard; calls for the restoration of damaged sites in accordance with UNESCO standards and indications; calls on Armenia and Azerbaijan to quickly allow a UNESCO mission to visit both countries without preconditions;
2022/11/17
Committee: AFET
Amendment 214 #

2021/2231(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Recognises the strategic role played by Azerbaijan as a provider of fossil fuels to the EU and welcomestakes note of its willingness to contribute even more to the EU’s objectives in terms of security and diversification of energy supply and climate neutrality; asks the European Commission to guarantee that no gas imports from third countries could be whitewashing Russian gas under European sanctions;
2022/11/17
Committee: AFET
Amendment 225 #

2021/2231(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. WelcomesTakes note of the new memorandum of understanding between the EU and Azerbaijan signed by President Aliyev and Commission President von der Leyen in Baku on 18 July 2022; strongly regrets the statement by the Commission President that Azerbaijan is a reliable partner, since Azerbaijan continues its attacks on both Nagorno Karabakh and Armenia; recalls that even should Azerbaijan double its gas exports to the EU, it can only provide for a relatively small portion of the bloc’s gas demand, so the rather limited benefits of the gas deal do not outweigh the consequences of creating new dependencies on a regime that does not share and operates against the EU’s core values;
2022/11/17
Committee: AFET
Amendment 285 #

2021/2231(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18
18. Strongly insists that Azerbaijan cease all repression of political opposition activists; regrets that the Azerbaijani government still has not fully executed the judgments of the European Court of Human Rights in the cases of the Mammadli group; reiterates the concerns raised by the Council of Europe in its resolution of September 22, 2022 on the execution of these judgments;
2022/11/17
Committee: AFET
Amendment 292 #

2021/2231(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18 a (new)
18a. Strongly condemns the intimidation, death threats and assassination attempts against opponents of the Azerbaijani government, including in European countries and on Azerbaijani citizens who have been granted political asylum by Member States, such as Mahammad Mirzali in France; stresses that for Member States, preventing any act of retaliation on their territory is a matter of democracy, human rights, as well as security and sovereignty; insists that Europol should keep a close watch on this matter;
2022/11/17
Committee: AFET
Amendment 12 #

2021/2230(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 15 a (new)
— having regard to its resolution of 15 April 2015 on the centenary of the Armenian Genocide,
2022/11/24
Committee: AFET
Amendment 21 #

2021/2230(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas periodical deadly military confrontations between Azerbaijan and Armenia continue; whereas the 9 November 2020 ceasefire agreement, introduced after the 44-day war triggerstarted by Azerbaijan in 2020, has been violated several times resulting in more casualties; whereas in his several statements, including in the most recent speech delivered at «an event organized on the occasion of Victory Day» on November 8 2022, President Aliyev admitted that Azerbaijan had started the war in 2020, stated that ''on the whole, the international attitude towards the 44-day war was positive” and once again threatened to use force against Armenia;
2022/11/24
Committee: AFET
Amendment 26 #

2021/2230(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B a (new)
Ba. whereas the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict has not been yet resolved and requires a comprehensive solution; whereas two years after the signing of the ceasefire statement in November 2020, which ended the 44-day war, humanitarian issues are still pending; whereas Armenia has handed all the minefield maps at its disposal; whereas Azerbaijan has been using the demand for the maps to artificially delay the return of Armenian POWs; whereas there are still 33Armenian POWs illegally kept in Baku and sentenced to imprisonments of 4 to 20 years;
2022/11/24
Committee: AFET
Amendment 30 #

2021/2230(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B b (new)
Bb. whereas during the military aggression by Azerbaijan in September 2022 civilian objects and infrastructure in the three provinces of the Republic of Armenia, namely Gegharkunik, Syunik, and Vayots Dzor, came under shelling of Azerbaijani forces, which left 7600 persons displaced, including1437 children;
2022/11/24
Committee: AFET
Amendment 180 #

2021/2230(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Supports the normalisation of relations between Armenia and Turkey and welcomes the progress achieved so far; calls for the speedy implementation of agreements reached by the special representatives; calls on both sides to engage in the process in good faith and without preconditions; recalls that the previous attempt of normalisation of relations between Armenia and Turkey through the signing of 2009 protocols failed because of Turkey's unilateral support for Azerbaijan and conditioning the opening of border and establishment of diplomatic relations with Armenia on the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict; deplores the signals coming from the Turkish authorities that the current process is closely coordinated with Azerbaijan and emphasizes its calls on Turkey not to repeat the mistake of the past and to take concrete steps in the ongoing process with Armenia;
2022/11/24
Committee: AFET
Amendment 258 #

2021/2230(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 a (new)
21a. Welcomes the visit of the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to Armenia in October 2022 and the IAEA support for ensuring that Armenia’s nuclear program is safe and secure; welcomes also Armenia's commitment to "Rays of Hope" initiative and its positive example in achieving "CancerCare4All”, as stated during the above-mentioned visit;
2022/11/24
Committee: AFET
Amendment 50 #

2021/2229(INL)


Annex to the motion for a legislative resolution
resolution 1. The number of representatives in the European Parliament elected in each Member State for the 2024-2029 parliamentary term is set as follows: Belgium 213 Bulgaria 17 Czech Republic 21 Denmark 15 Germany 96 Estonia 78 Ireland 145 Greece 21 Spain 61 France 7981 Croatia 12 Italy 76 Cyprus 6 Latvia 9 Lithuania 11 Luxembourg 6 Hungary 21 Malta 6 Netherlands 31 Austria 20 Poland 523 Portugal 21 Romania 33 Slovenia 9 Slovakia 15 Finland 15 Sweden 21
2023/03/24
Committee: AFCO
Amendment 83 #

2021/2189(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Welcomes the Commission communication on the strategic guidelines for a more sustainable and competitive EU aquaculture for the period 2021 to 2030; considers these guidelines comprehensive, sound and fit for the purpose of promoting sustainable and competitive EU aquaculture with a long-term focus on the sustainability of the aquaculture sector and on its contribution to the European Green Deal; regrets, however, that they are too much focused on environmental aspects and that they need more ambition to boost sustainable production and the development of a genuinely thriving and competitive EU aquaculture sector; considers that it is important to establish quantitative objectives for the growth of this sector in the framework of the guidelines, just as the Biodiversity strategy, the Farm to fork strategy and other Green Deal strategies set environmental targets;
2022/02/14
Committee: PECH
Amendment 146 #

2021/2189(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Considers that the aquaculture sector should commitntinue to actively applying evidence-based interventions to improve fish welfare, including maintaining water quality within welfare-relevant limits, as a way of reducing the prevalence and spread of diseases, which diminishes the need for antibiotics and lowers pollution levelcontributes to achieving a good environmental status; highlights that the aquaculture sector should continue to improve farming methods in line with the most up-to-date scientific knowledge available in order to achieve better environmental results, resilience against climate change and the optimisation of resource use;
2022/02/14
Committee: PECH
Amendment 177 #

2021/2189(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18
18. Stresses the importance of sustainable feed ingredients for aquaculture in the Union; considers that aquaculture can only fill the fish gap if all species farmed provide a net gain in fish protein, meaning that aquaculturethat does not remove more wild fish from the oceans for feed requirements than it produces should be promoted; stresses the need to uspromote ecologically sustainable marine proteins and oils, by-products and trimmings, other proteins and innovative solutions, such as insect meal and microalgae, and the partial replacement of marine proteins and oils with non-marine alternatives; calls on the Commission and the Member States to promote responsible and sustainable practices and increase the percentage of independently certified fishmeal and fish oil within feeds, with certification done by a credible and independent environmental and social certification scheme, such as the one by the Marine Stewardship Council, that uses low trophic index assessment criteria and the FAO code of conduct;
2022/02/14
Committee: PECH
Amendment 204 #

2021/2189(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 22
22. Calls on the Commission to work further on levelling the playing field through, notably, the restriction or even the prohibition of imports of products which don't have the same environmental and social sustainability and fish welfare standards than the ones produced in the EU, the revision of international trade agreements, including updating rules for the better implementation of aquatic food labelling; considers that, in specific cases such as caviar labelling, the legal framework on information for consumers should be revised; calls on the Commission to analyse the inclusion of sustainable aquaculture sectors in the EU Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism in order to create incentives for European industries and EU trade partners to decarbonise their industries and therefore support both EU and global climate policies towards greenhouse-gas neutrality, and at the same time, without being discriminatory or constituting a disguised restriction on international trade;
2022/02/14
Committee: PECH
Amendment 240 #

2021/2189(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 35
35. Highlights the need to level the playing field for EU organic farmers across the Union, as well as with imported organic products, by providing the same rules, support and harmonising treatments for diseases used in organic aquaculture and organic livestock farming;
2022/02/14
Committee: PECH
Amendment 242 #

2021/2189(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 35 a (new)
35 a. Recalls that the EP report "Towards a sustainable and competitive European aquaculture sector: current status and future challenges" proposes 92 actions to unlock the potential of EU aquaculture through: simplifying administrative procedures; ensuring equity in interaction with other sectors; enhancing the competitiveness of EU aquaculture within and outside our borders; improving consumer information; ensuring animal welfare, but also availability of veterinary products; pursuing better promotional campaigns and communication; supporting research and innovation; encouraging training and employment; increasing the sustainability of the EU's aquaculture sector; ensuring adequate financing through the EMFF and other structural funds; achieving a harmonious symbiosis with fisheries; urges the Commission to closely work with Member States to implement those actions.
2022/02/14
Committee: PECH
Amendment 3 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 2
— having regard to Article 3(3) of the Treaty on European Union and to Articles 113, 11, 38, 120 and 191 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 10 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 12
— having regard to the New Economics Foundation (NEF) report of September 2021 entitled ‘Who gets to fish in the EU? A 2021 update of how EU Member States allocate fishing opportunities’,deleted
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 13 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 13
— having regard to the 2018 World Wildlife Fund report entitled ‘Evaluating Europe’s course to sustainable fisheries by 2020’,deleted
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 15 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 14
— having regard to the report by Low Impact Fishers of Europe and Our Fish of 27 October 2021 entitled ‘How the EU can Transition to Low Environmental Impact, Low Carbon, Socially Just Fishing’,deleted
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 20 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A
A. whereas the CFP includes the objectives of minimising the ‘negative impacts of fishing activities on the marine ecosystem’, of ‘achieving economic, social and employment benefits’, of contributing ‘to a fair standard of living for those who depend on fishing activities, bearing in mind coastal fisheries and socio-economic aspects’ and ‘to the availability of food supplies’ and of promoting ‘coastal fishing activities, taking into account socio- economic aspects’;
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 25 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B a (new)
Ba. whereas, in that connection, the principle of relative stability, which has proved reliable in the long term and provides the visibility and continuity that fishers badly need, is important.
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 33 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E
E. whereas Article 17 states that ‘Member States shall endeavour to provide incentives to fishing vessels deploying selective fishing gear or using fishing techniques with reduced environmental impact, such as reduced energy consumption or habitat damage’ which implies an obligation of means;
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 41 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital H
H. whereas, according the NEF report, only two countries, Denmark and Estonia, have public quota registers;deleted
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 45 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital I
I. whereas the EU has failednot met the deadline to achieve good environmental status of EU marine waters by 2020, as set out in Article 1(1) of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive, and to meet its legal deadline to end overfishing by 2020maximum sustainable yield (MSY) exploitation rate by 2020 for all fishing stocks; whereas, however, considerable progress has been made towards achieving both objectives: particularly for the MSY target, in the north-east Atlantic almost 100 % of the landings from EU-regulated stocks come from stocks fished at MSY levels and, in general, overfishing in the EU is constantly decreasing;
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 59 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital M
M. whereas the World Wildlife Fund has evaluated the systems used for distributing fishing opportunities and considers that 69 % of coastal EU Member States (16 out of 23) have not yet implemented the criteria for ensuring a ‘just and sustainable allocation of fishing opportunities’;deleted
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 60 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital N
N. whereas the NEF notes that of the 22 coastal Member States, 17 use historical landing criteria, 13 use vessel size criteria (e.g. length, power and weight), 12 use social criteria (e.g. fisher age and type of employment contract), 12 use economic criteria (e.g. quota uptake, profitability and economic value), and 11 use environmental criteria (e.g. gear type and pingers); whereas in most cases, the social and environmental criteria do not have much weight in the final quota distribution;deleted
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 64 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital P
P. whereas sommost of the stocks are mainly targeted by different fleet types, but many osome of thersm are targeted by both small- scale and large-scale fleets;
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 70 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital Q
Q. whereas the Low Impact Fishers of Europe and Our Fish report found that by implementing Article 17 of the CFP and allocating fishing quotas based on transparent and objective criteria of an environmental, social or economic nature, the EU can achieve a just transition to a low-carbon, low-impact fishing fleet; whereas, however, this objective must go hand in hand with the objective of “achieving economic, social and employment benefits, and of contributing to the availability of food supplies”;
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 79 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Recalls that fish stocks are natural common goods that should not be considered commodities and should be managed in a way that guarantees the highest long-term benefits for society and minimises the impact on ecosystems;
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 88 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Deplores the fact that thsome Member States are not transparent and are not making public what criteria they apply when distributing fishing opportunities;
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 96 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Emphasises that transparent allocation criteria is one of the parameters allowing to provides stability and legal certainty for operators;
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 118 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. Notes that the Member States have only marginally modified their fishing opportunity allocation methods since the reform of the CFP in 2013;deleted
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 136 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Considers that the current allocation methods allow for a certain level of economic stability in the fishing sector, but may contribute to reinforcing trends such as economic concentration in the fishing sector and the difficulty of attracting new young fishers; considers, furthermore, that these methods do not provide incentives to fishers who implement fishing practices with a reduced environmental impact, do not provide fair opportunities to small- scale fishers and threaten their existence;
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 138 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11 a (new)
11a. Stresses that artisanal and traditional fisheries and their associations, such as "cofradias", are a fundamental feature of the local society, economy, culture and tradition in many coastal areas and islands across the EU and, therefore, they should receive special attention and treatment;
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 159 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Calls on the Member States to incentivise fishers to use the most environmentally friendly fishing practices and to include climate and ecosystem considerations in their allocation processes (e.g. the impact on the seabed and the carbon footprint of each fisher or producer organisation), on the basis of a set of transparent criteria;
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 164 #

2021/2168(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Emphasises that the allocation of fishing opportunities to operators with a lower environmental impact and a better history of compliance willcan contribute to restoring fish populations to a sustainable level and improve biodiversity protection;
2022/02/02
Committee: PECH
Amendment 4 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 21 a (new)
— having regard to the European Sports Charter and Code of Sports Ethics of the Council of Europe, as revised on 16 May 2001;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 12 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F a (new)
Fa. whereas grassroots sport contributes to the development of skills among young people and promotes civic participation through volunteering;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 13 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G a (new)
Ga. whereas illegal streaming of live sport events threatens the financial stability of both professional and grassroots sports which depend on the revenues from sport broadcasting rights;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 29 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5a. Invites sport stakeholders to actively participate in the Conference on the Future of Europe which also covers sport related issues;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 31 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 b (new)
5b. Acknowledges the recent adoption of the revised European Sports Charter within the Council of Europe which highlights the common features of a framework for European sport and its organisation and invites EU institutions to strive for consistency, cooperation and solidarity at continental level, while taking initiative in the field of sport policy;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 44 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 a (new)
9a. Acknowledges sport clubs as the foundation of a European sports model offering everyone the possibility to engage in sport locally, especially young people, regardless of their cultural or socio- economic background;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 48 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Highlights the need for more targeted and increased solidarity and financial redistribution, especially between professional and grassroots sport;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 55 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 a (new)
12a. Calls on sport organisations to respect the established frequency of international sports tournaments, especially the European and World Championships while taking into account domestic competitions and the health of athletes and players;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 61 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 a (new)
13a. Acknowledges the efforts made by sport organisations and federations to ensure the implementation of good governance principles in sport;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 67 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15 a (new)
15a. Calls on all sport stakeholders organisations to attain the appropriate levels of representativeness and professionalisation as a prerequisite for involvement in collective decision-making processes;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 69 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Calls for the EU institutions to promote the fundamental rights of athletes, including athlete representation in decision-making, freedom of association, collective bargaining and non- discrimination;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 75 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19 a (new)
19a. Acknowledges the recent reforms in the football transfer market, which include the establishment of a clearing house, licensing system and caps on agents’ commissions;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 76 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19 b (new)
19b. Notes that European frameworks are also necessary to improve player transfer systems and calls on relevant sports bodies and stakeholders to ensure the protection of players and strengthen labour market regulations to meet European specificities, standards and objectives;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 110 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 26
26. Calls on the Member States to step up efforts towards the inclusion in sports activities and programmes of persons with mental and physical disabilities, and to increase visibility in the media of competitions involving athletes with disabilities;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 114 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 26 a (new)
26a. Recalls that the EU population faces demographic challenges such as an ageing population, and that specific attention should be paid to encouraging active ageing through physical activity;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 135 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 31
31. Highlights the role of coaches and sport staff in developing the skills of and in educating young peoplechildren and young people and stresses that the adequate training plays a key role in encouraging participation in sport and in ensuring a safe environment for all;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 140 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 33
33. CRecognises the valuable contributions that sports volunteers bring to a society and calls on the Commission and the Member States to create a system for the recognition of qualifications gained by volunteers, including coaches working as volunteers;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 148 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 34
34. Insists on the need for support mechanisms to get the sport sector back on track in the wake of COVID-19, including through national support funds, the Recovery and Resilience Facility and the structural funds;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 168 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 36
36. Welcomes the higher budget for sport under the new Erasmus+ programme and supports further synergies between programmes and funds and make a better use of this tool to support recovery in sport;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 175 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 38
38. Calls on national, regional and local authorities to recognise the key role of sport and physical activity in fields such as urban regeneration, tourism and territorial cohesion and to prioritise them in cohesion policy a, specifically on European Social Fund Plus and on European Regional and Development Fund investments and under the Recovery and Resilience Facility;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 198 #

2021/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 46 a (new)
46a. Calls on the Commission to effectively tackle the growing problem of illegal streaming of live sport events without delay;
2021/09/14
Committee: CULT
Amendment 40 #

2021/2057(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A
A. whereas the negative consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic have disproportionately affected those from rasocially and ethnic minority communitieconomically disadvantaged populations, highlighting and exacerbating inequalities including in culture, media, education and sport;
2021/12/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 54 #

2021/2057(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas according to the EU Agency for Fundamental Rights, racial discrimination and harassment remain commonplace throughout the European Union; whereas rasocially and ethnic minoritieconomically disadvantaged populations are subjected to harassment, violence and hate speech, both online and offline; whereas rasocially and ethnic minorities face structuralconomically disadvantaged populations face discrimination in the EU in allsome areas, including housing, healthcare, employment and education;
2021/12/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 64 #

2021/2057(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C a (new)
Ca. whereas solidarity, respect for life and other people are values that are passed down from generation to generation; whereas school education plays a crucial role in this process
2021/12/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 69 #

2021/2057(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D
D. whereas the fight against racism and discrimination in our societies needs to be stepped up and is a shared responsibility; whereas the European Union needs to fpurther reflect on and commit to tackling the structuralsue its work against racism and discrimination faced by many minority groups;
2021/12/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 75 #

2021/2057(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E
E. whereas access to education and educational attainment is an issue for racialised communitiemany families among socially and economically disadvantaged populations throughout Europe; whereas segregation in education remains an issue in certain Member States;
2021/12/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 89 #

2021/2057(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G
G. whereas although sport has the power to unite communities, there is a serious issue of racismhave been racist incidents within sporting organisations across Europe;
2021/12/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 98 #

2021/2057(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Acknowledges the EU anti-racism action plan; welcomes the inclusion of specific sections on education and media; calls on the Commission to provide adequate funding and resources to ensure the achievement of the outlined commitments; with the condition that the European funds will finance only organizations that strictly respect all European values, including freedom of thought, freedom of speech, equality between men and women;
2021/12/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 120 #

2021/2057(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Welcomes the publication and implementation of specific EU guidelines on the collection of equality data based on racial or ethnic origin; calls on the Member States to adapt national statistics and to remove barriers in order to facilitate the collection of quality data on equality; calls on the Commission and the Member States to use this data to develop policies to attain racial justice;
2021/12/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 129 #

2021/2057(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Welcomes the Commission’s acknowledgement of the need for an intersectional approach to policymaking; calls on the Commission and the Member States to ensure that the relevant anti- racism objectives are implemented across allthe relevant policy areas;
2021/12/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 141 #

2021/2057(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. Acknowledges that racism is inherently a matter of culture, heritage and norms; highlights, therefore, thee important role that culture can play in combating discrimination and racism;
2021/12/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 147 #

2021/2057(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Calls for the Commission and the Member States to foster a more diverse cultural sector by removing barriers to participation in culture for racialised communitiesocially and economically disadvantaged populations through funding from all the relevant programmes; encourages the creation of support networks and outreach activities, especially for those in rural and outermost regions;
2021/12/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 178 #

2021/2057(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Underlines the lasting negative impact of European colonialismracist manifestations on today’s society, including in the development of educational curriculaeducation systems;
2021/12/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 181 #

2021/2057(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 a (new)
12a. Emphasises the role of education in promoting citizenship and the common values of freedom, tolerance and non- discrimination8a _________________ 8a https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/doc ument/A-9-2021-0291_EN.html
2021/12/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 185 #

2021/2057(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13
13. Calls on the Member States to foster the development of diverse educational curricula to ensure that authors, historians, scientists and artists among other figures from diverse raciintellectual, philosophical and ethnicsocial backgrounds are included in key materials;
2021/12/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 191 #

2021/2057(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14
14. Calls for deepening of common humanities studies, history, philosophy, languages, literature, that might help promote the spirit of European concord taking into account the history of all racial and ethnic communities livingthat lived in Europe to be included in all history curricula in order to encourage a broader perspective on world history centred ontaking into account their interactions between different continents before and after European colonisation;
2021/12/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 221 #

2021/2057(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Calls on the Member States to ensure that qualified teaching staff from minority groups are recruited at all levels and are protected from racialare recruited and adequately trained at all levels as to combat discrimination in the school system;
2021/12/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 257 #

2021/2057(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19
19. Welcomes the Commission’s commitment to launching a communication campaign to foster diversity in the audiovisual sector; calls for this campaign to be centred on the diversity and history of racialised communitiesintellectual, cultural and social diversity and on how achieving racial justice can contribute to a more democratic Europe;
2021/12/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 260 #

2021/2057(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20
20. Welcomes the practice established by certain international audiovisual providers to add disclaimers about harmful and racist content ahead of media broadcasts; encourages the development of such practices within the European audiovisual sphereConsiders that, when a content has not been banned by a proper judiciary decision, it should be opened to consultation, discussion and free criticism ; recalls that it is by an open public debate that democracies handle the disagreements that happen in a society ; is concerned about the new censorship implemented by certain international audiovisual providers, publishers or social networks, as well as in some schools and universities ;
2021/12/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 276 #

2021/2057(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23
23. CRecalls on the Commission to open a specific call for funding for grassroots sports initiatives focused that sport is in itself a way to create a sense of belon ginclusion and the fight against racism; cg, connecting individualls on the Commission, furthermore, to systematically monitor the number and type of sports projects whose main focus is the fight against racism, and the amount of funding allocated to themand developing the social and civic conscience;
2021/12/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 25 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 21 a (new)
— having regard to Regulation (EU) 2021/523 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 March 2021 establishing the InvestEU programme,
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 26 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 22 a (new)
— having regard to the Council conclusions on safeguarding a free and pluralistic media system of 18 November 2020,
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 27 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 22 b (new)
— having regard to the Council conclusions on "Europe's media in the Digital Decade: An Action Plan to Support Recovery and Transformation" of 18 May 2021,
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 29 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A
A. whereas the cultural and creative sectors, of which news media and audiovisual sectors are an integral part, have been among the hardest hit by the fallout from COVID-19, especially small and medium enterprises; whereas these sectors are also expected to recover at a more moderate pace than the general economy; whereas the major impact of the pandemic on those sectors has caused damages and significant losses in revenues, creating further uncertainties which accelerated their ongoing digital transition and highlighted their deep fragmentation;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 35 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A a (new)
A a. whereas the film and audiovisual sector has suffered a massive loss of revenues – a drop of almost 70% in box office for cinemas and distributors, a drop of activity of 30% for the production and a total halt of coproductions, while facing an increase in operation costs because of new health and safety measures;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 38 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas, according to early estimates, the entire news media sector saw its advertising revenues drop by 20 % to 80 %; whereas media organisations face liquidity issues;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 46 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C
C. whereas quality, well-financed and independent news media and professional journalism are an essential pillar of democracy; whereas every effort must be made to increase media pluralism3 , independency, transparency, media literacy, better journalistic profession standards and safety of journalists, both offline and online; _________________ 3 No EU country registers a low level of risk in the market plurality area according to ‘Monitoring Media Pluralism in the Digital Era’, p. 50:https://cadmus.eui.eu/bitstream/handle/ 1814/67828/MPM2020- PolicyReport.pdf?sequence=5&isAllowed =y
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 55 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D
D. whereas the news media and audiovisual sector s plays a vital part in fostering the resilience and inclusiveness of our democratic societies; whereas the heterogeneity of thenews media and audiovisual sector is valso one of its strengths, helping to promote and strengthenue chain is made up of a variety of industries and sectors, all of whom contribute significantly to Europe’s cultural, linguistic, social and political diversity;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 62 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D a (new)
D a. whereas the objective of the Plan should be to foster cultural, artistic and industrial diversity across the value chain to ensure recovery and sustainability of the film sector through artistic and industry autonomy for the purpose of providing audiences with culturally diverse content;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 71 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Stresses the fallout of the economic downturn, and strongly reiterates its call on the Commission and the Member States to increase support available for the news media and audiovisual sectors, and the cultural and creative sectors more broadly; considers that allocations for the news media and audiovisual sectors should be increased across various multiannual financial framework (MFF) programmes; calls on the Commission to strongly encourage Member States to increase support for the sectors via the Recovery and Resilience Fund and their national recovery plans; notes the sectors' need of EU's and Member States' support to fully recover from the pandemic, become more sustainable and continue their green and digital transition;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 86 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. HWelcomes the adoption of the new Creative Europe programme and its budgetary increase; highlights the importance of the cross-sectoral strand in the Creative Europe programme, which for the first time provides for actions focused on the news media;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 89 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Notes that the film and audiovisual sector urgently need strong and sustainable support via the various EU funding programmes such as Horizon Europe, the Creative Europe MEDIA programme and the Cohesion Funds; recalls that the administrative barriers should be lowered and more flexibility should be provided to applicants to access funds, in particular to SMEs that represent the vast majority of the stakeholders of the sector;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 92 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 b (new)
3 b. Recalls that access to support and the swift delivery of that support will be crucial to allow the sector to create and bring unique and divers stories to the European audiences for years to come;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 105 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. Invites the Commission to conduct a study, develop guidelines and share among Member States the best practices in public financing mechanisms on news media funding support in the EU, reiterates that the study should be carried out by independent bodies; calls on the Commission to develop guidelines and share among Member States the best practices in public financing mechanisms that will help the sector get back on its feet; highlights that distribution of public funding needs to be clear, independent and transparent;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 117 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Believes that tax policies can help recovery and resilience of these sectors; encourages Member States with adequate fiscal scope to help boost media and cinema consumptioncreation, production, distribution and consumption of news media and audiovisual works, including cinema through VAT rates that accommodate this;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 127 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7 a. Recalls that Creative Europe MEDIA should endeavor to balance funding between the Member States, between its different strands and genres; recalls that it is essential to the sector that Member States nurture an ecosystem of independent players as a key driver to diversity of creation;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 140 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Notes with concern that global online platforms have a vast disruptive impact on the media sector, as they dominate the data and advertising market, and have radically changed audience consumption patterns; underlines that current legislation does not regulate pivotal issues in the information ecosystem such as access to data, digital advertising, algorithmic transparency, platform accountability, must-show and other questions; considers that transparency is needed to ensure fairer presence of European works on online platforms and to provide real consumer choice within the platforms’ recommendation system, including the possibility to refuse biases encoded in algorithms; considers that timely adoption of legislation to help address these shortcomings is a matter of urgency;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 144 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9
9. Notes with concern that global online platforms have a vast disruptive impact on the media sector, as they dominate the data and advertising market, and have radically changed audience consumption patterns; underlines that current legislation does not regulate pivotal issues in the information ecosystem such as access to and transparency of data, digital advertising, algorithmic transparency, platform accountability, must-show and other questions; considers that timely adoption of legislation to help address these shortcomings is a matter of urgency;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 151 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 a (new)
9a. Considers the transposition of the European Audiovisual Media Services Directive and the Copyright Directive to be essential for cultural diversity in the digital sector and for the sustainability of audiovisual services, in that these directives tighten up copyright protection and increase the visibility of European works;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 154 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 b (new)
9b. Points out that the fight against pirating of copyrighted content is also essential for the proper functioning of the European media market; stresses the need to adopt clear and legally binding measures to combat online piracy, and to propagate the means available for combating multiple intermediaries so as to better counteract all forms of circumvention;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 155 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 c (new)
9c. Points to the European Council conclusions of 27 November 2020 on the on safeguarding a free and pluralistic media system, which stress that 'territorial and exclusive allocation of licensing rights can often be crucial for the audiovisual media sector'; views the principle of territoriality as one of the cornerstones of the European audiovisual industry, not least when it comes to funding audiovisual works and protecting copyright, but also as regards cultural diversity; believes that maintaining the principle of territoriality will prevent the concentration of dominant players on the market, which would be detrimental to alternative and independent offers;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 176 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Expresses concern about the disruptive trends created by the platforms, as they can undermine competition in the long term, and reduce opportunities for other actors; notes that such actions can create unfair competition conditions with an impact on independent production and distribution of audiovisual works; asks the Commission to monitor the situation closely and, if appropriate, take necessary action to make conditions for competition more equitable;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 181 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12 a (new)
12 a. Expresses concern regarding the practices of global online platforms with local production, including their disproportionate economic power and marketing ability to reach large audience, at the expense of local stakeholders;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 194 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14
14. Calls on the Commission and Member States to elaborate comprehensive European news media and audiovisual sector strategies that will provide tailored support measures for the entire news media and audiovisual sectors;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 195 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14 – subparagraph 1 (new)
Calls on Member States to properly implement Article 13.1. of the AVMSD that will ensure that media service providers of on-demand audiovisual media services under their jurisdiction secure at least 30 percent share of European works in their catalogues whilst also promoting it; highlights the importance of this for smaller cultural and linguistic markets, as it will boost cultural diversity in the broadest sense possible;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 202 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Stresses the need for transformation in the entire news media sector, including through the digitalisation of newsrooms, the uptake of artificial intelligence (AI), changes and improvements to content creation and presentation, as well as better distribution and subscription models, including micro-payments; notes that the above require additional investment and skills that news media sector players often lack, especially those with small market share; calls on the Commission and the Member States to provide tailored support for the digital transformation of the sector;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 209 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Acknowledges the importance of independent freelance journalism and its potential for growth due to lower entry costs and easier ways to reach an audience, facilitated by innovative publishing and payment solutions, which can improve the economic situation and working conditions for freelance professionals;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 221 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18
18. Considers that in order to help spur competition, the EU also needs to promote the creation and growth of small and medium enterprises and digital media start-ups through easier access to finance and a supportive framework that enables scalability;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 228 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19
19. Acknowledges that the existing creation and distribution models in the European audiovisual sector are largely based on territorial exclusivity, andUnderlines the need for territorial exclusivity for the sustainability of the audiovisual sector, notes that ownership of intellectual property rights is often held by independent producers and creators, creators and distributors; reiterates the fact that independent cinemas and independent film festivals are of key importance for the resilience of the sector;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 232 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19 – subparagraph 1 (new)
Highlights the fact that VOD and TVOD currently dominate the audiovisual sector market; highlights the importance of territorial exclusivity and licensing rights for the survival and sufficient functioning of the audiovisual sector;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 237 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20
20. Is of the view that targeted measures to support co- production, translation, subtitling, pre-sale of future distribution rights and co-distribution could contribute to increasing the availability of diverse European audiovisual content;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 244 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21
21. Underlines that video on demand (VOD) platforms and other innovations are reshaping there now fully part of the film and audiovisual media landscape, and by extension creating challenges and also opportunities for incumbent players; notes that in many respects, an irreversible transformation is under way; encouragbelieves the sector’s legacy players to enter new markets and embrace innovative business modelestablished players are also innovating constantly to engage with and offer the best works to their audiences;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 246 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 – subparagraph 1 (new)
Urges the Commission and Member States to create tools and support actions that pay attention to low audiovisual production capacity of some Member States; by encouraging investments to fulfil the VOD platform obligation to secure a 30 percent share of European works in their catalogue; notes that this is crucial for smaller cultural and linguistic markets within Member States;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 247 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 a (new)
21a. Notes that the weak regulation of the digital space has been exploited to disseminate content harmful to minors, particularly on video-sharing platforms; considers it important, therefore, to shield minors from harmful content on video- sharing platforms by ensuring full implementation of the current legal framework, and in particular the European Audiovisual Media Services Directive, through the introduction of financial penalties for platforms that do not comply with current obligations, the strengthening of judicial systems to effectively combat the offences identified and the promotion of coordinated preventive action by public and private stakeholders;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 251 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 a (new)
21 a. Acknowledges that fair market competition between broadcasters and video on demand companies is paramount for the future existence of the sectors, as confirmed with the Audiovisual Media Services Directive; encourages the Commission to conduct a study on the impact of video on demand platforms on the European audiovisual market;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 252 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 a (new)
21 a. Encourages the European Commission to look into the impact of VOD platforms on the European film and audiovisual market, in particular on the relationships between the different actors in the value chain;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 255 #

2021/2017(INI)

21 b. Reiterates the need for tailored support, investment and public funding schemes that will help production, boost the circulation of European works in the European Union and beyond, and promote diverse European film across all distribution platforms, including cinemas, DVD, TV and online platforms;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 256 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 c (new)
21 c. Emphasises the necessity to promote synergies between different EU funding schemes with specific amounts dedicated to the entire news media and audiovisual sectors, such as Creative Europe, Horizon Europe, InvestEU and Digital Europe;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 257 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 21 d (new)
21 d. Notes the fact that ensuring a better level playing field that respects copyright and intellectual property rights will boost the economic component of the sectors, save thousands of jobs and safeguard and promote Europe's rich cultural and linguistic diversity;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 259 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 22
22. Stresses the importance of reducing the audiovisual sector’s carbon footprint, especially at the production stage, which accounts for most CO2 emissions; notes that digital solutions such as virtual production techniques can facilitate this reduction; believes that the current MFF provides a unique opportunity for funding greening projects and reaching net zero emissions within this decade; calls on the Commission and Member States to exchange good practices and voluntary standards for the audiovisual sector in order to meet EU's target to become climate neutral by 2050;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 267 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 23
23. Highlights that film literacy is particularly important for making younger audiences aware of European cultural diversity; notes that European creators, producers, distributors and cinema have a key role to play; considers it necessary to develop a film literacy toolkit;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 273 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24 – subparagraph 1 (new)
Calls on the Commission to elaborate more comprehensive strategies for the European news media and audiovisual sectors and establish a regulatory level playing field to sustain investments in both sectors, including online platforms;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 274 #

2021/2017(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24 a (new)
24 a. Calls on the Commission and Member States to further support the recovery and transformation of the entire news media and audiovisual sectors and to strengthen their resilience and market competitiveness in order to tackle future crises as effectively as possible; including financial and structural support for workers and SME's within the entire news media and audiovisual sectors;
2021/06/08
Committee: CULT
Amendment 5 #

2021/2012(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 23 a (new)
— having regard to the European Environment Agency report No 3/2015 on “Marine protected areas in Europe's seas”
2021/07/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 6 #

2021/2012(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 23 b (new)
— having regard to the initiative report on the impact on the fishing sector of offshore wind farms and other renewable energy systems on offshore, adopted by the European Parliament on 6 July 2021;
2021/07/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 21 #

2021/2012(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Recalls that offshore renewable energy has an impact on fisheries and aquaculture; calls for the compulsory establishment of dialogue and cooperation with fishers at an early stage; emphasises the need to take into account local ecosystems and specificities, with an integrated management approach via marine spatial planning; welcomes the Commission’s further analysis on the interactions between offshore renewable energy and other sea activities;
2021/04/26
Committee: PECH
Amendment 33 #

2021/2012(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C
C. whereas the dramatic fallecrease in renewable offshore energy prices has made it one of the cheapestan affordable sources of energy and consequently a criticaln element in the green transition, paving the way for a modern, resource-efficient and competitive economy, and has also made it one of the most important pillars of the EU’s climate ambitions;
2021/07/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 41 #

2021/2012(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital C a (new)
C a. whereas offshore renewable energy has a strong negative impact on biodiversity, as well as on fisheries activities;
2021/07/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 44 #

2021/2012(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Underlines that offshore renewable energy could be deployed in marine protected areas ifmust be in line with conservation objectives, in order to reduce impact on fisheries;
2021/04/26
Committee: PECH
Amendment 72 #

2021/2012(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1
1. Stresses that a net-zero emissions economy requires renewable energy to be deployed on an unprecedented scale; emphasises that if no further actions are taken to accelerate the deployment of offshore renewable energy (ORE), the EU will not be able to live up to its climate commitments;
2021/07/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 89 #

2021/2012(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Recalls that the offshore wind technology is not yet fully mastered notably its long term effect on biodiversity, marine life and environment; considers that all ORE shall be deployed in respect of the do no significant harm principle;
2021/07/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 90 #

2021/2012(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2 b (new)
2 b. recalls that there is a deficit of knowledge and expertise regarding the technology and the costs of recycling and dismantling of ORE plants;
2021/07/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 91 #

2021/2012(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2 c (new)
2 c. recalls that the impact of ORE, and particularly offshore wind power, on biodiversity is not fully known and estimated; considers that the fight against climate change shall be done in the full respect of biodiversity and shall not be responsible of any ecological harm; warns that no energy strategy will be sustainable if it has a significant negative impact on the environment and on economic, social and territorial cohesion;
2021/07/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 93 #

2021/2012(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2 d (new)
2 d. Recalls that the intermittent aspect of ORE implies to combine its production with controllable sources of energy such as gas, coal, hydroelectric or nuclear power, in order to avoid any black-out;
2021/07/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 97 #

2021/2012(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Notes the competitive advantage of EU companies and technologies in the ORE sector; underlines the potential for exponential growth of the sector and its contribution to the EU economy, including technology and systems exports;
2021/07/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 116 #

2021/2012(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4
4. Stresses the urgency of improving and expanding existing infrastructure to enable the increased flow of electricity from offshore sites to inland-based consumers;
2021/07/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 129 #

2021/2012(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. Welcomes the Commission’s proposal for a revision of the TEN-E Regulation and the attention it gives to the offshore renewables sector’s needs and priorities; stresses that the development of sustainable and efficient transmission infrastructure requires forward-looking investment; believes strongly that regulatory frameworks should facilitate anticipatoryguarantee safe, environment friendly and long term investments;
2021/07/07
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 210 #