BETA

167 Amendments of Carina OHLSSON

Amendment 14 #

2022/2147(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital -A c (new)
-Ac. whereas the outermost regions (ORs) offer major assets to the EU; whereas many of the ORs have a young population, extensive maritime economic zones, unique biodiversity, rich renewable energy sources, location and climate suitable for space sciences and astrophysics activities, important space infrastructure and proximity to other countries while at the same time, they are facing challenges to their development such as remoteness, insularity, small size, vulnerability to climate change, and economic dependence on a few sectors;
2023/01/18
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 16 #

2022/2147(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital A
A. whereas social inequalities are at the heart of theone of the greatest social challenges facing the outermost regions (ORs) of the EU; whereas the ORs collectively are disproportionately affected by high poverty, unemployment and school dropout rates and these issues are exacerbated by the particularities that are common to these regions; a gross domestic product (GDP), which is significantly below EU and national averages (60% in the ORs if the EU-27 average is put at 100%)1a; whereas these issues are exacerbated by the particularities that are common to these regions; _________________ 1a The Commission’s report: “Outermost regions at a glance – assets, challenges and opportunities” from May 2022 illustrates a GDP PPS per inhabitant percentage in 2020 of 60% in the ORs. https://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/sourc es/policy/themes/outermost-regions/rup- 2022/comm-rup-2022-glance_en.pdf
2023/01/18
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 27 #

2022/2147(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital C
C. whereas the number of young people who are not in employment, education or training is at an alarming level in the ORs; (22% compared to 11% in the EU-27)2a; _________________ 2a The Commission’s report: “Outermost regions at a glance – assets, challenges and opportunities” from May 2022 illustrates average young people rates of early leavers, NEETs (not in employment, education and training double the rate on EU Level. https://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/sourc es/policy/themes/outermost-regions/rup- 2022/comm-rup-2022-glance_en.pdf
2023/01/18
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 29 #

2022/2147(INI)

Draft opinion
Recital C a (new)
Ca. whereas young people from the outermost regions frequently need to travel and move to other regions to obtain specific training and education; whereas many who have moved away are not coming back later on;
2023/01/18
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 38 #

2022/2147(INI)

D. whereas women in the ORs too often face unstable and short-term employment; the employment rate of women in the ORs is significantly below the EU and national averages (47% compared to 62% in the EU-27)3a; _________________ 3a The Commission’s report: “Outermost regions at a glance – assets, challenges and opportunities” from May 2022 illustrates the female employment rates in the ORs compared to the average European levels. https://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/sourc es/policy/themes/outermost-regions/rup- 2022/comm-rup-2022-glance_en.pdf
2023/01/18
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 67 #

2022/2147(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Stresses that the social situation of young people is a central concern forin the ORs; calls, in this regard, for the reinforced Youth Guarantee to be fully deployed in the ORs; believes that an evaluation of the guarantee’s implementation is necessary in these territories is necessary, including an assessment of the existing barriers for young people;
2023/01/18
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 68 #

2022/2147(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Calls on the Member States as well as the regional and local authorities concerned to put in place or strengthen measures to fight unemployment, poverty and social exclusion in the ORs, including through the strengthening of public employment services, the promotion of lifelong learning and other measures focused on professional development;
2023/01/18
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 70 #

2022/2147(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 b (new)
1b. Highlights that education and training as well as the integration into the labour market is an important instrument to combat poverty and inequalities; urges the Commission and the Member States, therefore, to support measures aimed at disadvantaged and low-skilled groups in the ORs, with emphasis on education and training that allow for the development of social, scientific and professional skills, in particular basic digital skills; calls on the Member States as well as the regional and local authorities concerned to ensure the diversification of the education and training offers, according to the needs of the regions and to ensure equal opportunities;
2023/01/18
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 71 #

2022/2147(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 c (new)
1c. Stresses the importance of enhancing public services in the ORs, through strengthened regional cooperation, economic diversification, investments in R&D and digitalisation, reinforced vocational education and training, upskilling and reskilling opportunities and active labour market policies, to tackle long-term unemployment and youth unemployment in particular (45,82% compared to 16,8% in the EU-27);4a _________________ 4a The Commission’s report: “Outermost regions at a glance – assets, challenges and opportunities” from May 2022 illustrates a comparison between the youth employment rates in the ORs in relation to the average EU-27 level. https://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/sourc es/policy/themes/outermost-regions/rup- 2022/comm-rup-2022-glance_en.pdf
2023/01/18
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 74 #

2022/2147(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to support youth employment in the ORs by working with local stakeholders, including within the private sector, universities and local authorities, to establish a digital one-stop shop in order to help young peoplejobseekers who are seelooking for their first job or lookingwant to establish or take over a businesses;
2023/01/18
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 90 #

2022/2147(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Stresses the need to ensure the empowerment of women in the ORs by promoting access to stable, high-quality jobs, including equal pay and fair remuneration;
2023/01/18
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 98 #

2022/2147(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Calls on the Commission to facilitate the establishment of special economic zones in order to promote economic and social recovery, job creation and skills development in the ORs, and to support the Member States in the evaluation, renewal and adaptation of existing special economic zones;deleted
2023/01/18
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 107 #

2022/2147(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Calls on the Commission to improve access toand the Member States to improve access to information regarding the European Social Fund Plus in the ORs by setting up masslaunching information campaigns aimed at institutional and associative partners, providing a support services for project leaders and financing training for managing authorities.;
2023/01/18
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 108 #

2022/2147(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6a. Highlights that the outermost regions' economies are heavily dependent on the tourism and transport sectors, which were severely impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic; calls therefore on Member-States as well as regional and local authorities concerned to work together to best ensure the socio-economic recovery of the ORs, taking into account challenges such as rising prices due to inflation and disruption of supply chains;
2023/01/18
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 115 #

2022/2147(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 b (new)
6b. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to improve access to Union funding for the ORs and to advance with the implementation of the European Pillar of Social Rights, including in the areas of quality employment, education, skills, social inclusion, and equal access to healthcare;
2023/01/18
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 117 #

2022/2147(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6 c (new)
6c. Welcomes the Commission’s intention to provide tailored support to the ORs to ensure they can make the most out of EU opportunities, as well as to organise specific workshops on EU programmes and strengthen the dialogue with relevant stakeholders in the ORs;
2023/01/18
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 2 #

2022/2134(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1
1. Stresses the valuable role played by Union agencies in helping Union institutions to design and implement policies, especially by carrying out specific technical, scientific and managerial tasks; appreciates the high quality expertise and work performed by CEDEFOP, Eurofound, EU-OSHA, ETF and ELA, the agencies working in the area of employment, social affairs and inclusion; reiterates in this regard the need of ensuring adequate human and financial resources allowing them to continue implementing their work programmes with a very high activity completion rate; stresses the importance and added value of each agency in their field of expertise and their autonomy;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 4 #

2022/2134(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. Notes with concern that the final budgets of some agencies have been frozen in nominal terms for 6 years and due to accumulated inflation the real purchasing power of the budget decreases; notes that the continuation of this trend puts at risk the agencies' abilities to perform their functions in an effective and timely manner ;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 5 #

2022/2134(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Recalls that the yearly exchange of views in the EMPL committee regarding the annual work programmes and the multiannual strategies of the agencies is instrumental in ensuring that the programmes and strategies are aligned to the actual political priorities, especially in the context of the implementation of the principles enshrined in the European Pillar of Social Rights and the achievements of the Porto targets;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 13 #

2022/2134(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. Recalls that gender balance must be ensured within the Agencies in accordance with the basic regulations establishing them; regrets the fact that gender equality is absent in the multiannual strategy 2021-2027 for the EUAN; calls on the agencies and the EUAN to integrate gender equality in their strategies, to align the ambition of agencies with the aim of the Commission to reach a gender balance of 50 % at all levels of its management by the end of 2024 and to pursue gender mainstreaming in all fields;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 2 #

2022/2119(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Appreciates the Foundation’s work to enhance and disseminate knowledge, and provide evidence and expertise to support policies concerning the improvement of living and working conditions in Europe; and in particular the very timely and useful actions to communicate findings relevant to the COVID-19 pandemic drawing on the Living, working and COVID-19 e-survey and the COVID-19 EU PolicyWatch; stresses its importance, autonomy and added value in its field of expertise;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 4 #

2022/2119(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Notes that, the final budget of the Foundation for the financial year has been frozen in nominal terms for 6 years and from 2019 is indexed with the EU inflation rate to reach 21.6 million euro in2021, was the same as for the financial year 2020 and amounted to EUR 27 million; a result of which, and due to the accumulated inflation, the real purchasing power of the budget decreases and the share of the operational budget decreases from 39% in 2010 to 28% in 2021; stresses that the continuation of this trend puts at risk the ability of Eurofound to collect sufficient, timely and reliable data; expresses its satisfaction that the Foundation’s budget for 2021 was executed by 100%;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 6 #

2022/2119(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Reiterates the importance of high- quality data provided by Eurofound’s ongoing monitoring tools for evidence- based policymaking, especially the Europe-wide surveys conducted by the Foundation;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 7 #

2022/2119(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 b (new)
3 b. Highly appreciates the flexibility Eurofound demonstrated by using new tools of as the e-survey and focusing the research on the most pertinent issues such as the implication of COVID-19, telework, the problems of care services and care workers and lastly – the implications of the Russian invasion of Ukraine; highlights that this research is timely, relevant and extremely useful for decision makers and social partners at EU and national levels;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 8 #

2022/2119(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 c (new)
3 c. Notes with satisfaction the active cooperation of Eurofound with the other agencies partnering with DG Employment but also with EEA, FRA, EIGE, ECDC, as this cooperation increases the relevance of research, the visibility, brings additional cross-sectoral value and to a much lower extend brings to efficiency of financial and human resources;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 9 #

2022/2119(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 d (new)
3 d. Appreciates the Foundation’s leadership in seeking close cooperation with other European Union Agencies, including Cedefop, EU-OSHA, ETF, EIGE, FRA, and EEA, which aims at strengthening the synergies between these agencies and avoid overlaps; welcomes the Foundation’s active participation in the EU Agencies Network, including chairing the sub-network on Scientific Advice;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 10 #

2022/2119(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 e (new)
3 e. Welcomes the cooperation with the European Environmental Agency in the area of anticipating and managing the impact of the transition to a carbon- neutral economy especially joint work on socio-economic impacts of climate policies, including their distributional effects;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 11 #

2022/2119(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 f (new)
3 f. Notes and welcomes the investment made by the Foundation in digital communication during this period and in particular the development of innovative channels and digital outputs to enhance and expand communication and dissemination in the context of the new ways of working;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 12 #

2022/2119(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3 g (new)
3 g. Welcomes the work done by the Foundation to enhance awareness of its work and increase accessibility at EU and national level, not least through its work input and support provided in 2021 to the Interinstitutional Conference on the Future of Europe;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 2 #

2022/2118(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Appreciates the Agency’s activities to develop, gather and provide reliable and relevant information, analysis and tools on occupational safety and health, which contribute to the Union policy aiming to promote healthy and safe work places across the Union; welcomes in particular the increased efforts and contribution during the Covid-19 crisis; stresses its importance, autonomy and added value in its field of expertise;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 3 #

2022/2118(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Notes the prominent role that the Agency has been given when implementing the principles enshrined in the European Pillar of Social Rights and achievements of Porto targets; welcomes the Agency’s strong commitment to ensuring that all workers enjoy the same occupational health and safety rights regardless of the size of the company, the type of contract or the employment relationship and delivering on the Vision Zero approach to work-related deaths;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 4 #

2022/2118(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 b (new)
2 b. Highlights the need of ensuring adequate human and financial resources allowing the Agency to continue implementing its work programme with a very high activity completion rate, in particular in the light of the implementation of the new EU Strategic Framework on Health and Safety at Work (2021-2027);
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 2 #

2022/2116(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Appreciates the Foundation’s activities in helping transition and developing EU neighbouring countries, enlargement countries and Central Asian countries harness the potential of their human capital through the reform of education, training, and labour market systems, in the context of the Union’s external relations policies; highlights the need of ensuring adequate human and financial resources allowing the Foundation to continue implementing its work programme with a very high activity completion rate;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 5 #

2022/2116(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Recognises that the Foundation’s objectives and actions are closely aligned with EU policies and activities in the field of vocational education and training, human development, skills and migration; welcomes the Foundation’s continued cooperation and sharing of resources with other agencies, in particular with CEDEFOP and Eurofound, which enables significant knowledge sharing; stresses its importance, autonomy and added value in its field of expertise;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 1 #

2022/2108(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. Notes that the European Labour Authority gained financial autonomy in May 2021 and that the Authority is still in a growing stage reaching full resources only in 2024;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 3 #

2022/2108(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Appreciates the Authority’s work to assist Member States and the Commission in ensuring a fair and effective enforcement of Union rules on labour mobility and social security, and in facilitating effective labour mobility in Europe through European Employment Services (EURES) activities; stresses its importance, autonomy and added value in its field of expertise;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 4 #

2022/2108(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. Highlights that the Authority has the highest proportion of seconded national experts (SNEs) posts in its staff structure (60 SNEs, including 27 national liaison officers, out of 144 staff)compared to all EU decentralised agencies; calls for the conversion of 15 SNEs posts into temporary agents posts (TAs) to ensure the need for appropriate staffing for the Authority to be able to continue fulfilling its mission;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 9 #

2022/2108(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 4
4. Is worried aboutTakes note of the fact that the Court reported that the Authority has not yet adopted an appropriate risk management and control strategy, nor a charter of the authorizing officer or a charter of the authorizing officers by sub- delegation, or a charter of the accountant; notes that these gaps hinder the implementation of Authority’s internal control framework;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 10 #

2022/2108(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Is worried aboutTakes note of the fact that the Court reported the absence of complete and updated inventories specifying the location of the Authority’s tangible assets;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 13 #

2022/2108(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 6
6. Is worried aboutTakes note of the fact that the Court reported that the lack of formalized procedures based on direct evidence in relation to training activities in 2021;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 4 #

2022/2095(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 3
3. Notes that the final budget of the Centre for thAppreciates the Centre’s activities, providing research, analyses and technical advice and expertise financial year 2021 was the same as for the financial year 2020 and amounted to EUR 25 million; expresses its satisfaction that the Centre’s budget for 2021 was executed by 100% vocational education and training (VET), qualifications and skills policies; highlights the need of ensuring adequate human and financial resources allowing the Centre to continue implementing its work programme with a very high activity completion rate; stresses its importance, autonomy and added value in its field of expertise;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 9 #

2022/2095(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 5
5. Is worried aboutTakes note of the fact that the Court reported two weaknesses in the Centre’s move to the ABAC accounting system of 23 June 2021; however, welcomes the fact that the Centre accepted the Court ’s finding and took immediate action to address the Court ’s recommendation;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 1 #

2022/2081(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 2
2. Takes note that the implementation of the 2021 budget was significantly impacted by the delays in the adoption of new legal bases and the new rules for structural funds, as well as the ongoing Covid-19 crisis and its social consequences, and their impact on the budget in the social area that was adopted before the crisis;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 11 #

2022/2081(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 11 a (new)
11 a. Stresses the importance of the ESF and the ESF+ to encourage high level of employment, the creation of quality jobs and fight against poverty and social exclusion; expresses the need to provide them with the continued financial and political support of the EU, national and regional institutions in the delivery of their targets in the years to come, in particular to reflect the particular needs in the current crises and contribute to the implementation of the principles of the European Pillar of Social Rights and the achievements of the Porto targets;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 12 #

2022/2081(DEC)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 11 b (new)
11 b. Notes that, on average, more than one out of five persons and one out of four children are still at risk of poverty or social exclusion in the European Union; recalls the EU commitment to the support for the most deprived through FEAD and the ESF+, alleviating the worst forms of poverty in the Union, such as food deprivation, homelessness, and child poverty; notes that about 13 million people, including approximately 4 million children under the age of 15 are supported by FEAD annually;
2022/12/06
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 157 #

2022/2048(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 a (new)
6a. Urges the Commission and the EEAS to suggest new initiatives in order to respond to climate-related security risks while advancing the European Green Deal in international fora; believes that the EU should support ambitious CO2 reduction targets in third countries in order to implement the Paris Agreement, hence stresses the need for climate diplomacy to be put at the core of union's external action in order to safeguard global peace and security;
2022/10/24
Committee: AFET
Amendment 159 #

2022/2048(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6 b (new)
6b. Urges the need to fully implementing and systematically integrating gender mainstreaming and the EU gender action plan III (GAP III) in all its external action; calls for the EU and the Member States to exercise leadership in the implementation of UN Security Council resolution 1325 (2000) on women, peace and security; underlines that women play a key role in the prevention of conflicts, peace negotiations, peace-building, peace keeping, humanitarian response and post- conflict reconstruction. Consequently, stresses the need for the EU to ensure women’s equal participation and full involvement in all efforts to maintain peace and security, while including a gender perspective in all its external action;
2022/10/24
Committee: AFET
Amendment 305 #

2022/2048(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16 a (new)
16a. Condemns in the strongest possible terms the Chinese government- led system of forced labour in Xinjiang; urges the Chinese government to end the systematic persecution of Uyghurs, including the excruciating fact that Uyghur women are specifically targeted by the authorities, implementing an official scheme of targeted birth prevention measures, including forcing women of childbearing age to abortions, intrauterine injections and sterilisation, measures that could meet the criteria for belonging to the worst crimes against humanity;
2022/10/24
Committee: AFET
Amendment 26 #

2022/0326(COD)

(1) A skilled workforce isCitizens with skills for the participation in a democratic society and the pursuit of personal development as well as a skilled workforce and quality jobs are crucial to ensuring socially fair and just green and digital transitions, and to strengthening the Union’s sustainable competitiveness and resilience in the face of adverse external shocks such as the COVID-19 pandemic or the fallout of Russia’s war of aggression against Ukraine. More and better skills, knowledge and qualifications, whether acquired in informal, non-formal or informal settings, open up new opportunities and empower individuals to fully participate in the labour market, society and democracy, to harness and benefit from the opportunities of the green and digital transitions and to exercise their rights.
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 38 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Recital 2
(2) Across the Union, companies report difficulties to find workers with the necessary skills while for many workers it is difficult to find quality jobs which match their skills levels and qualifications. In 2021, 28 occupations were classified as having shortages, including the healthcare, hospitality, construction and service sectors, in addition to shortages of IT and security specialists, in particular cybersecurity experts, and workers with science, technology, engineering and mathematics background, as well as specialists that can support the societal adaptation to the green transition.22 Increasingly, the biggest constraint to a successful digital and green transition is the lack of quality job offers with decent wages and working conditions which results in a lack of workers with the rightnecessary skills22a. In many Member States, demographic ageing is expectedchange has been and is expected to continue to accelerate over the coming decade as “baby boom” cohorts retire, reinforcing the need to make use of the full potential of all working-age adults through continuous investments in their skills, knowledge and qualifications as well as activitating more people, in particular women, people with a migration background, low-skilled and low-qualified adults, and young people especially those not in education, employment or training (NEETs). Against this background, decent working conditions and access to social security systems, quality social services and an attractive living environment will play an even more prominent role in retaining and attracting skilled workers. Strengthening personal development and learning guidance from an early age and supporting equal access to information can help people to choose suitable learning pathways to quality employment opportunities. _________________ 22 European Labour Authority, Report on labour shortages and surpluses 2021 and ENISA, Cybersecurity skills development in the EU, March 2020. The ENISA studies identify that there is a gap of 291,000 professionals in cybersecurity. 22a According to CEDEFOP, 45 % of workers think that their skills do not fully match the job they do, while 70% of the companies suffer from skills shortages but few of them link this to obstacles they create to find skilled workers, e.g. recruitment processes, geographical location, salary levels and working conditions: European Skills and Jobs survey, CEDEFOP 2015 and Skills qualifications and jobs in the EU: the making of a perfect match? CEDEFOP 2015.
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 53 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Recital 4
(4) Low skills of working-age adults remain a significant challenge for the Union, pointing to considerable untapped potential of upskilling and reskilling to help mitigate increasing labour shortages in sectors such as manufacturing and services, and in particular in economic activities related to hospitality and manufacturing of computer and electronic equipment, and the care sector.25 For care work in particular, the Commission should follow the ILO ‘5R’ Framework for Decent Care Work25a - recognize, reduce, redistribute, reward and representation. However, participation in adult learning in the Union has stagnated over the last decade and 21 Member States fell short of the 2020 EU- level target. For many adults, such as those in atypical forms of work, employees of small and medium-sized enterprises, the unemployed, the inactive and the low- qualified, skills development opportunities are too often out of reach. Increasing the upskilling and reskilling opportunities for these groups, and all working-age adults, also contributes to reaching the EU employment target of 78%, with employment rate in the EU in 2021 being at 73.1%.26 Further efforts are needed to provide effective support to low-skilled and low qualified workers and the unemployed in line with the Council recommendations on Upskilling Pathways: New Opportunities for Adults (2016) and on the Integration of the Long-term Unemployed into the Labour Market (2016). _________________ 25 European Commission, 2021 Labour Market and Wage Developments in Europe, p. 26 25a ILO’s ‘Care work and care jobs for the future of decent work’ 26 Eurostat, Employment (as % of the population aged 20 to 64), (LFSI_EMP_A)
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 64 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Recital 6
(6) Principle 3 of the European Pillar of Social Rights underlines that regardless of gender, racial or ethnic origin, religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation, everyone has the right to equal treatment and opportunities, and this includes employment and education. The European Year of Skills should be carried out in a way that is inclusive and actively promotes equality for all. The European Pillar of Social Rights Action Plan29 points out that by increasing participation of groups which are currently under-presented in the labour market, we can it is possible to achieve a more inclusive employment growth. _________________ 29 The European Pillar of Social Rights Action Plan (europa.eu)
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 69 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Recital 7
(7) The European Skills Agenda30 , adopted in July 2020, calls for a skills revolution to ensure the recovery of our economy, strengthen Europe’s global competitiveness and turn the green and digital transitions into opportunities for all. It aims to foster collective action on skills, ensure that training content is alignedto improve the overall qualifications of people in view of a more active and engaged citizenship, to increase the alignment of training content with the evolving labour market needs, and better match training opportunities with people's aspirations to incentivise their uptake across the working-age population. The European Parliament welcomed the objectives and actions of the European Skills Agenda in its Resolution of 11 February 2021.31 _________________ 30 Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions - European Skills Agenda for sustainable competitiveness, social fairness and resilience (COM(2021)274 final) 31 European Parliament, European Parliament resolution of 11 February 2021 on the Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions European Skills Agenda for sustainable competitiveness, social fairness and resilience (2020/2818(RSP))
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 78 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Recital 9 – paragraph 3
The Year of Skills follows the 2022 European Year of Youth which sought to empower, honour, support and engage with young people, including those with fewer opportunities, in a post-COVID-19 pandemic perspective with a view to having a long-term positive impact for young people. The European Year of Youth already emphasised the importance of skills to find good quality employment for young people.
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 94 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Recital 11
(11) The Council Recommendations on Individual Learning Accounts34 and Micro- credentials for lifelong learning and employability35 help people to update or complete their skill-sets, also in response to emerging skills needs in the labour market, in a more flexible and targeted way. The Council Resolution from December 2021 on a new European Agenda for Adult Learning 2021-203036 promotes formal, non-formal and informal learning opportunities capable of providing all the necessary knowledge, skills and competences to create an inclusive, sustainable, socially just and more resilient Europe, as well as upskilling and reskilling that can in turn reduce skills mismatches and labour shortages. SkillsQuality career guidance and skills self-assessment opportunities are among the measures whichneeded to support people in their up- and reskilling. _________________ 34 Council Recommendation of 16 June 2022 on individual learning accounts (OJ C 243, 27.6.2022, p. 26) 35 Council Recommendation of 16 June 2022 on a European approach to micro- credentials for lifelong learning and employability (OJ C 243, 27.6.2022, p. 10) 36 Council Resolution on a new European agenda for adult learning 2021-2030 (OJ C 504, 14.12.2021, p. 9)
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 99 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Recital 12
(12) The strengthened active labour market policies advocated for by the EASE (Effective Active Support to Employment) Commission Recommendation37 aim to support transitions into new employment amid the recovery from the COVID-19 crisis and the better matching of skills in the labour market, supported by employment services with a sufficient administrative capacity. _________________ 37 Commission Recommendation of 4.3.2021on an effective active support to employment following the COVID-19 crisis (EASE) (OJ L 80, 8.3.2021, p. 1)
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 107 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Recital 13
(13) The Council Recommendation on vocational education and training (VET)38 supports modernisation of VET systems to equip young people and adults with the knowledge, skills and competences they need to thrive in the evolving labour market and society, to manage the recovery and the just transitions to the green and digital economy, in times of demographic change and throughout all economic cycles. It promotes VET as a potential driver for innovation and growth, which is agile in adapting to labour market changes and providing skills for occupations in high demand. _________________ 38 Council Recommendation of 24 November 2020 on vocational education and training (VET) for sustainable competitiveness, social fairness and resilience (OJ C 417 2.12.2020, p. 1)
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 115 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Recital 14
(14) Skills for the greenjust, green and digital transition and the upskilling and reskilling of the workforce will be needed in the context of the shift to a modern, resource- efficient and competitive economy, as laid out under the European Green Deal39 setting the path towards EU climate neutrality by 2050. The Commission Communication “Fit for 55”40 recognises that the green transition can only succeed if the Union has the skilled workforce it needs to stay competitive and points to the flagship actions of the Skills Agenda to equip people with the skills that are needed for the green and digital transitions. _________________ 39 Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the European Council, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions - The European Green Deal (COM/2019/640 final) 40 Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions – Fit for 55: delivering the EU's 2030 Climate Target on the way to climate neutrality (COM(2021) 550 final)
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 118 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Recital 15
(15) The Digital Decade Policy Programme 203041 reiterates the objective of ensuring that at least 80% of the EU population have at least basic digital skills by 2030, and sets the target of 20 million employed ICT specialists, with the aim of achieving gender convergence, by 2030, also by creating a cooperation framework between the Member States and the Commission. The Digital Decade42 stresses the lack of capacity of specialised education and training programmes to train additional ICT experts. The Digital Education Action Plan 2021-202743 emphasises that technological means should be used to ease accessibility and strengthen flexibility of learning opportunities, including upskilling and reskilling. Platform work can provide opportunities for employment and for accessing the labour market more easily, especially for disadvantaged groups, gaining additional income through a secondary activity or enjoying some flexibility in the organisation of working time. Most persons performing platform work have another job or other source of income and tend to be low paid. At the same time, platform work brings challenges, as it can result in unpredictable working hours and blur the boundaries between employment relationships and self-employed activities on one hand and the responsibilities of employers and workers on the other. Misclassification of the employment status has consequences for the persons affected as it restricts access to existing labour and social rights. It can also lead to labour exploitation and an uneven playing field with respect to businesses that classify their workers correctly, especially affecting SMEs. More over, it has implications for Member States’ industrial relations systems, their tax base and the coverage and sustainability of their social protection systems. While such challenges are broader than platform work, they are particularly acute and pressing in the platform economy. _________________ 41 Proposal for a Decision of the European Parliament and of the Council establishing the 2030 Policy Programme “Path to the Digital Decade” (COM/2021/574 final) 42 Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the regions; 2030 Digital Compass: the European way for the Digital Decade (COM (2021)118 final) 43 Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions on the Digital Education Action Plan (COM/2018/022 final)
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 130 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Recital 17
(17) AttImproving the Union’s labour migractingon framework could help to attract skilled third-country nationals can contribute toin view of tackling the Union’s skills and labour shortages. In October 2021, the revised EU Blue Card Directive45 entered into force, a key achievement for attracting highly skilled talent into the labour market. The New Pact on Migration and Asylum46 also places a strong emphasis ones labour migration and on integration of third country nationals. Against this background, the Commission adopted a Skills and Talent Package47 in April 2022 to reinforce the legal framework and Union action in this area. Proposals to recast the Long- Term Residents Directive and the Single Permit Directive will allow to simplify the procedures for the admission of workers of all skill levels to the Union and to provide better protection and rights. The Commission will also continue to roll out an EU Talent Pool to facilitate labour matching with non-EU nationals, with the involvement of social partners. The Commission is also working towards the launch of tailor-made Talent Partnerships with specific key partner countries to boost international labour mobility and development of talent in a mutually beneficial and circular way. Social partners should be involved in the development, implementation and monitoring of these partnerships. In addition, the Union continues to be the leading contributor to global funding for education focusing especially on teacher training, girls education and vocational education and training. This work, under the umbrella of the Global Gateway strategy48 , is complementary to the objectives of this proposal. Fair remuneration, social protection and full disclosure of workers’ rights must be ensured for all migrant workers according to the existing Union and national legislation. _________________ 45 Directive (EU) 2021/1883 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 October 2021 on the conditions of entry and residence of third-country nationals for the purpose of highly qualified employment, and repealing Council Directive 2009/50/EC (OJ L 382, 28.10.2021, p. 1) 46 Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions on a New Pact on Migration and Asylum (COM/2020/609 final) 47 Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions Attracting skills and talent to the EU (COM/2022/657 final) 48 Joint Communication to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee, the Committee of the Regions and the European Investment Bank The Global Gateway (JOIN/2021/30 final)
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 144 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Recital 19
(19) Overall public and private investments in upskilling and reskilling are insufficient. Most job-related training in the Union is employer-sponsored or supported by social partners’ funds. However, many companies, in particular SMEs, do not provide or fund training for their staff, and individuals in atypical work have less or no access to employer- sponsored training. Such inequalities undermine individuals’ welfare and health, reduce economic competitiveness, result in missed opportunities and barriers to innovation and risk leaving people behind in the transition to more sustainable economic activities. An enabling framework unlocking and incentivising employers’ financial investments in skills and giving visibility to the economic value of upskilling and reskilling is neededduring working time is needed. In addition, it is important to recall that decent working conditions are essential to retain and to attract skilled workers. Training provided to workers by their companies must not affect their remuneration and should include a more general and broad set of skills and competences that can be combined with the specific needs of training of each company.
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 161 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 1 – paragraph 1
The year 2023period 9 May 2023 until 8 May 2024 shall be designated as the ‘European Year of Skills 2023’ (hereinafter referred to as the ‘European Year’).
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 163 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
In line with principles 1, 4 and 5 of the European Pillar of Social Rights, contributing to the objectives set out in the 2020 European Skills Agenda and the EU headline targets set by the European Pillar of Social Rights Action Plan, the overall objective of the European Year shall be to further promote a mindset of reskilling and upskilling as well as investing in the overall skills, knowledge and qualifications of workers, thereby boosting competitiveness of European companies, in particular small and medium-sized entreprises, realising the full potential of the digital and green transitions in a socially fair, inclusive and just manner, namely through access to fair remuneration that guarantees a decent standard of living, including through collective agreements and minimum wages. More specifically, the activities of the Year will promote skills policies and investments to empower people to participate in social, political and professional life, and to ensure that nobody is left behind in the twin transition and the economic recovery, and to notably address labourskill shortages for a better skilledof citizens and the workforce in the Union that is able to seize the opportunities of this process, by:
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 173 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 1
1. Promoting increased, more effective and inclusive investment into training and upskilling to harness the full potential of the European current and future workforce and, to support people in managing job-to-job transitions, active ageingto encourage personal development, and to benefiting from the new opportunities brought by the ongoing economic and societal transformations, especially supporting via targeted actions those most disadvantaged to engage in lifelong learning opportunities and to remain in employment until retirement.
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 182 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 2
2. Strengthening skills relevance by closely cooperating with provision and access to upskilling and reskilling by closely cooperating with and promoting cooperation between social partners, public and private employment services, companies, education and training providers and civil society organisations, and developing joined-up approaches with all branches of governments. Social dialogue plays a key role in this context.
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 192 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 3
3. Matching people’s aspirations and skills-set with labour market opportunities especially those offered by the green and digital transitions and the core sectors in need of recovery from the pandemic. A special focus will be given to activate more people for the labour market, in particular women, people with a migration background, low-skilled and low-qualified adults and young people especially those not in education, employment or training (NEETs).
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 198 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 4
4. Attracting people from third countries with the skills needed by the Union, including by strengthening learning opportunities and mobility, and by facilitating the recognition of qualificationsvalidation of their skills and competences and the recognition of qualifications. Supporting migrants, asylum seekers and refugees to upskill and reskill and to access quality jobs and information regarding working conditions and social protection is essential in this regard.
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 203 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 4 a (new)
4a. Promoting decent working conditions at company level to retain and attract skilled workers.
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 204 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 4 b (new)
4b. Promoting support and solutions for people who are not able to reskill or upskill in order to ensure that no one is left behind.
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 209 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) conferences, forum discussions and further events to promote debate on the role and contribution of skills policies to achieve competitive, sustainable and fair economic growth in light ofan active citizenship for resilient democracies as well as competitive, sustainable and fair economic growth, based on decent wages, mental well-being, inclusion and remuneration of internships, traineeships and apprenticeships to avoid exploitation, to tackle major challenges such as climate change and the demographic change, and to mobilise relevant stakeholders to ensure access to training is a reality on the ground;
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 223 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point e
(e) increasing dialogue inwith existing stakeholder groups and networks, also via established online platformincluding tripartite advisory committees, also via established online platforms, and promoting cooperation between European cross-sectoral and sectoral social partners;
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 227 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point g
(g) promoting and further implementing tools and instruments for increased transparency and mutual validation and recognition of qualifications, including qualifications awarded outside the Union, and for the validation and recognition of skills acquired in non-formal or informal settings;
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 232 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point h
(h) promoting programmes, funding opportunities, projects, actions and networks of relevance to public, private and non-governmental stakeholders, involved in the design, dissemination and implementation of upskilling and reskilling opportunities, learning and education and vocational training;
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 244 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 4 – paragraph 1
The organisation of participation in the European Year at national and regional level shall be a responsibility of the Member States. To that end, each Member State shall appoint a national coordinator that can represent the different branches of government in a holistic manner. The national coordinators shall ensure the coordination of relevant activities at national and regional level and with policy makers, social partners and relevant stakeholders, including national and regional parliaments.
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 248 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 5 – paragraph 2
2. The Commission shall rely on the expertise and assistance of relevant Union Agencies in implementing the European Year, in particular the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions (Eurofound), the European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training (CEDEFOP) and the European Training Foundation (ETF).
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 255 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 5 – paragraph 4
4. The Commission shall engage with social partners, labour market bodies, civil society organisations and representatives of organisations or bodies active in the field of skills, education and training to assist in implementing the European Year at Union level.
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 259 #

2022/0326(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Article 7 – paragraph 1
By 31 December8 May 20245, the Commission shall present a report to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions on the implementation, results and overall assessment of the initiatives provided for in this Decision.
2022/12/13
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 68 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 32
(32) In line with international standards, prevention and mitig, tracking, mitigation, remediation as well as bringing to an end and minimisation of actual and potential adverse impacts should take into accountfocus on the interests of those adversely impacted. In order to enable continuous engagement with the value chain business partner instead of termination of business relations (disengagement) and possibly exacerbating adverse impacts, this Directive should ensure that disengagement is a last-resort action, in line with the Unall persons, groups of persons and entities adversely impacted. In line with the Union’s policy of zero-tolerance on child labour, Union’s Strategy on the rights of the child1a and the target date of 2025 proclaimed by the United Nation`s policy of zero- tolerancefor the full elimination onf child labour. Terminat worldwide, when ending a business relationship in which child labour was found could expose the child to even more severe adverse human rights impacts. This should therefore be taken into account when deciding on the appropriate action to take. s, the company should act in the best interest of the child. _________________ 1a https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal- content/en/TXT/?uri=CELEX%3A52021 DC0142
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 81 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 42
(42) Companies should provide thestablish the effective possibility for persons and organisations to submit complaints directly to them in case of legitimate concerns regarding actual or potential human rights and environmental adverse impacts. Organisations who could submit such complaints should include trade unions and other workers’ representatives representing individuals working in the value chain concerned and civil society organisations active in the areas related to the value chain concerned where they have knowledge about a potential or actual adverse impact. Companies should establish a procedure for dealing with those complaints and comprehensively inform workers, trade unions and other workers’ representatives, where relevant, in due time about such processes and related measures. Recourse to the complaints and remediation mechanism should not prevent the complainant from having recourse to judicial remedies and enforcement. In accordance with international standards, complaints should be entitled to request from the company appropriate follow-up on the complaint and to meet with the company’s representatives at an appropriate level to discuss potential or actual severe adverse impacts that are the subject matter of the complaint. This access should not lead to unreasonable solicitations of companies.
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 105 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 64 a (new)
(64 a) The obligations for companies set out in this Directive, regarding actual and potential human rights adverse impacts and environmental adverse impacts, should not have a negative impact on those very rights, including the right to freedom of association, assembly, the rights to organize and collective bargaining. This Directive should not apply when certain companies (insurance undertaking as defined in Article 13, point (1), of Directive 2009/138/EC and institution for occupational retirement provision as defined in Article 1, point (6) of Directive 2016/2341) enter, for the purpose of providing occupational pensions, into a relationship with a legal entity that is required take out occupational pension provisions for its employees. Excluding these specific relationships will ensure that companies in their provision of occupational pensions and legal entities acting as employers always can fulfill their obligations, including those following from collective agreements, to provide workers with their occupational pensions.
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 116 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
1. This Directive shall apply to all companies which are formed in accordance with thin the Union, as referred to in principles 11 and 14 of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGP) and standards of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), regardless of: (i) their size, both in terms of number of workers and turnover; (ii) whether they are lregislation of a Member State and which fulfil one of the following conditions:tered in the Union or in a third country; (iii) whether they operate in the public or private sector; (iv) whether the activity which they carry out is high risk or not; (v) the context in which they operate; (vi) their legal form;or (vii) their ownership or structure.
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 122 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) the company had more than 500 employees on average and had a net worldwide turnover of more than EUR 150 million in the last financial year for which annual financial statements have been prepardeleted;
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 128 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point b
(b) the company did not reach the thresholds under point (a), but had more than 250 employees on average and had a net worldwide turnover of more than EUR 40 million in the last financial year for which annual financial statements have been prepared, provided that at least 50% of this net turnover was generated in one or more of the following sectors: (i) the manufacture of textiles, leather and related products (including footwear), and the wholesale trade of textiles, clothing and footwear; (ii) agriculture, forestry, fisheries (including aquaculture), the manufacture of food products, and the wholesale trade of agricultural raw materials, live animals, wood, food, and beverages; (iii) the extraction of mineral resources regardless from where they are extracted (including crude petroleum, natural gas, coal, lignite, metals and metal ores, as well as all other, non-metallic minerals and quarry products), the manufacture of basic metal products, other non-metallic mineral products and fabricated metal products (except machinery and equipment), and the wholesale trade of mineral resources, basic and intermediate mineral products (including metals and metal ores, construction materials, fuels, chemicals and other intermediate products).deleted
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 148 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. The following activities are considered high-risk: (a) the manufacture of textiles, wearing apparel, leather and related products (including footwear), and the wholesale trade of textiles, clothing, retail and footwear; (b) agriculture, forestry, fisheries (including aquaculture), the manufacture of food products, marketing and advertising of food and beverages, and the wholesale trade of agricultural raw materials, live animals, animal products, wood, food, and beverages; (c) energy, the extraction, quarrying, transport and handling of mineral resources regardless from where they are extracted (including crude petroleum, natural gas, coal, lignite, metals and metal ores, as well as all other, non- metallic minerals and quarry products),the manufacture of basic metal products, other non-metallic mineral products and fabricated metal products (except machinery and equipment), and the wholesale trade of mineral resources, basic and intermediate mineral products (including metals and metal ores, construction materials, fuels, chemicals and other intermediate products); (d) construction and related activities; (e) the provision of financial services, such as loans, credits, financing, pensions, market funding, risk management, payment services, securitisation, insurance or reinsurance, investment services and activities and other financial services; (f) the production, provision and distribution of information and communication technologies or related services, including hardware, device or component manufacturers, software solutions, including artificial intelligence, surveillance, facial recognition, data storage or processing, telecommunication services, including internet service providers or exchange points, web-based and cloud-based services, including social media and networking, messaging, e- commerce, delivery, mobility, and other platform services; (g) employment activities as well as cleaning and household services, tourism and hospitality; (h) supply of water, gas, steam, air conditioning as well as sewage and waste management; (i) the delivery of audit and certification services regarding compliance with requirements resulting from the provisions of this Directive as well as the delivery of audit and certification services regarding compliance with industry initiatives.
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 151 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 2 – introductory part
2. This Directive shall also apply to all companies which are formed in accordance with the legislation of a third country, and fulfil one of the following conditions: in line with UNGP principles 11 and 14.
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 153 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 2 – point a
(a) generated a net turnover of more than EUR 150 million in the Union in the financial year preceding the last financial year;deleted
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 157 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 2 – point b
(b) generated a net turnover of more than EUR 40 million but not more than EUR 150 million in the Union in the financial year preceding the last financial year, provided that at least 50% of its net worldwide turnover was generated in one or more of the sectors listed in paragraph 1, point (b).deleted
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 164 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. This Directive shall not apply to the following companies in Article 3 (a) (iv): ⎯ an insurance undertaking as defined in Article 13, point (1), of Directive 2009/138/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council ⎯ an institution for occupational retirement provision as defined in Article 1, point (6) of Directive 2016/2341 of the European Parliament and of the Council when they, for the purpose of providing occupational pensions, enter a relationship with a legal entity that is, in its role as an employer, required by a contract, agreement, or any legislative, regulatory, or administrative provision to take out occupational pension provisions for the employees of the legal entity.
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 170 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point c
(c) ‘adverse human rights impact’ means any adverse impact on protectedersons or groups of persons resulting from the violation, unjustified restriction or removal of the enjoyment of one of the rights or prohibitions listed in the Annex, Part I Section 1, as enshrinend in the international conventionand European Human Rights instruments listed in the Annex, Part I Section 2 which should be reviewed biennially including the subsequent case law;
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 181 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point n
(n) ‘stakeholders’ means the company’s employees, the employees of its subsidiaries, and other individuals, groups, communities or individuals or groups of individuals as well as their representiatives whose rights or interests are or could be affected by the the products, services and operations of that company, its subsidiaries and its business relationshipa company and its branches, its subsidies and all entities with whom the company or any of its subsidiaries or branches have business relationships. These stakeholders can be organisations whose statutory purpose is the defence of human rights, social and labour rights, the environment or good governance, including workers and their representatives, trade unions, whistleblowers, civil society organisations, non profit organisations, citizens’ associations, local communities and public entities, indigenous peoples, human rights defenders and the undertakings’ shareholders;
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 187 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point n a (new)
(n a) (a) 'trade union representatives' means representatives designated or elected by trade unions or by members of such unions according to national law or practice;or (b) 'elected representatives' means representatives who are freely elected by the workers of the undertaking in accordance with provisions of national laws or regulations or of collective agreements and whose functions do not include activities which are recognised as the exclusive prerogative of trade unions in the country concerned.
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 194 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 4 – paragraph 2
2. Member States shall ensure that, for the purposes of due diligence, companies are entitled to share resourcany of the actions described above, the undertakings will ensure that the involvement, information, consultation and participation rights of trade unions and workers’ representatives, and information within their respective groups of companies and with other legal s provided for in Union law, national law and practice are fully respected and applied. Member States shall also ensure that trade unions and workers’ representiatives in compliance with applicable competition lawhave access to the relevant resources, in particular in the form of training, to exercise their rights.
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 196 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 5 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
1. Member States shall ensure that companies integrate due diligence into all their corporate policies and have in place a functioning due diligence policy for the company, its subsidiaries, its branches and all entities with whom the company or any of its subsidiaries or branches have business relationships established with the comprehensive and effective involvement, consultation and information of workers, their representatives and trade unions. The due diligence policy shall contain in particular all of the following:
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 200 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 5 – paragraph 1 – point b
(b) a code of conduct describing rules and principles to be followed by the company’s employees and subsidiarieacross all functions and operations by the company’s management, its workers as well as its subsidiaries, its branches and all entities with whom the company or any of its subsidiaries or branches have business relationships;
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 221 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 – paragraph 4
4. Member States shall ensure that, for the purposes of identifying and assessing the adverse impacts referred to in paragraph 1 based on, where appropriate, quantitative and qualitative information, companies are entitled toshall make use of appropriate resources, including independent reports and information gathered through the complaints procedure provided for in Article 9. Companies shall, where relevant, also carry out consultations with potentially affected grouptrade unions and workers’ representatives, potentially affected persons and groups of persons including workers and other relevant stakeholders, to gather information on as well as identify and assess actual or potential adverse impacts. Trade unions and workers’ representatives shall be kept informed throughout the process.
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 227 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 7 – paragraph 2 – introductory part
2. Companies shall be required to take the following actions, where relevant:
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 232 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 7 – paragraph 2 – point a
(a) where necessary due to the nature or complexity of the measures required for prevention, develop and implement a prevention action plan, with reasonable and clearly defined timelines for action and qualitative and quantitative indicators for measuring improvement. The prevention action plan shall be developed in consultation with trade unions, workers’ representatives and other affected stakeholders;
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 253 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 3 – introductory part
3. Companies shall be required to take the following actions, where relevant:
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 256 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 3 – point a
(a) fully neutralise and reverse the adverse impact or minimise its extentwithout undue delay or, if reversal or neutralisation is not possible, minimise its extent and mitigate its impact as quickly as possible by appropriate remedies, including inter alia by the full payment of damages to the affected persons, groups of persons or entities and ofull financial compensation to the affected communities. The action shall be proportionate to the significance and scale of the adverse impact and to the contribution of the company’s conduct to the adverse impactpersons, groups of persons or entities;
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 259 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 3 – point b
(b) where necessary due to the fact that the adverse impact cannot be immediately brought to an end, develop and implement a corrective action plan with reasonable and clearly defined timelines for action and qualitative and quantitative indicators for measuring improvement. Where relevant, tThe corrective action plan shall be developed in consultation with affected stakeholders, including trade unions and workers’ representatives, and shall be publicly available;
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 295 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 9 – paragraph 2 – point b
(b) trade unions and other workers’ representatives, including those representing individuals working in the value chain concerned, or those otherwise affected,
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 313 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 9 – paragraph 4 – point a
(a) to requestceive appropriate follow-up without undue delay on the complaint from the company with which they have filed a complaint pursuant to paragraph 1, and
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 316 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 9 – paragraph 4 – point b
(b) to meet with the company’s representatives at an appropriate level to discuss potential or actual severe adverse impacts as well as adequate remedy that are the subject matter of the complaint., and
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 321 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 9 – paragraph 4 – point b a (new)
(b a) to request timely full and effective remedy of the situation.
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 327 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 9 – paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. Recourse to the complaints and remediation mechanism at company level shall not prevent the complainant from having recourse to judicial remedies.
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 333 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 13 – paragraph 1
In order to provide support to companies or to Member State authorities on how companies should fulfil their due diligence obligations, the Commission, in consultation with Member States and, the European cross-industry and sectoral social partners, other relevant stakeholders, the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights, the European Environment Agency, the European Labour Authority and where appropriate with international bodies like the UN, the ILO and the Council of Europe having expertise in due diligence, mayshall issue guidelines, including for specific sectors or specific adverse impacts and guidance on identifying high-risk activities.
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 345 #

2022/0051(COD)

1. Member States shall lay down the rules on sanctions applicable to infringements of national provisions adopted pursuant to this Directive, and. Sanctions should include exclusion award/renewal of public contracts/procurement and other public support/funding. Repeated violations should also be considered as an aggravating circumstance and thus higher sanction. Member States shall take all measures necessary to ensure that they are implemented. The sanctions provided for shall be effective, proportionate and dissuasive.
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 361 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Annex I – Part I – subheading 1
Violations and restrictions of enjoyment of rights and prohibitions included in international and European human rights agreeinstruments
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 362 #
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 372 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Annex I – Part I – point 21 a (new)
21 a. Violation of the right to work (for example article 6 ICECR)
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 373 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Annex I – Part I – point 21 b (new)
21 b. Violation of the prohibition of violating or harassing women (for example ILO Convention 190, CoE ‘Istanbul Convention’)
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 374 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Annex I – Part I – point 21 c (new)
21 c. Violation of rights without discrimination between men and women as expressed (for example in articles 1 and 2 of the CEDAW and article 3 of the ICCPR)
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 375 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Annex I – Part I – subheading 2
Human rights and fundamental freedoms conventionInternational and European Human rights instruments
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 386 #
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 387 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Annex I – Part I – indent 15 b (new)
- Occupational Safety and Health Convention, 1981 (155) and its 2002 Protocol
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 388 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Annex I – Part I – indent 15 c (new)
- Promotional Framework for Occupational Safety and Health Convention, 2006 (187)
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 389 #
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 390 #
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 391 #
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 392 #
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 393 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Annex I – Part I – indent 15 h (new)
- Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence (‘Istanbul Convention’)
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 394 #
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 395 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Annex I – Part I – indent 15 j (new)
- Convention for the Protection of Individuals with regard to Automatic Processing of Personal Data
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 404 #
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 405 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Annex I – Part I – indent 23 b (new)
- International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of their Families
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 407 #

2022/0051(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Annex I – Part I – indent 23 c (new)
- International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance
2022/11/15
Committee: EMPL
Amendment 2 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 4 a (new)
— having regard to the Explanatory Report to the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence,
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 4 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 7
— having regard to Council Directive 2004/113/EC of 13 December 2004 implementing the principle of equal opportunities and equal treatment of men and women in the access to and supply of goods and services4 , which defines and condemns harassment and sexual harassment, _________________ 4 OJ L 373, 21.12.2004, p. 37.
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 7 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 11 a (new)
— having regard to the Council of Europe Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, signed in Rome on 4 November 195030, and in particular to Articles 2, 3, 8, 14, and the Protocol No. 12 to the Convention,
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 10 #
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 12 #
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 15 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 14 a (new)
— having regard to the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action adopted by the Fourth World Conference on Women in 1995, and to the subsequent monitoring reports adopted at the United Nations Beijing + 5(2000), Beijing + 10 (2005), Beijing + 15 (2010), Beijing + 20 (2015) and2020 UN Women Report ‘Gender equality: women’s rights in review 25 years after Beijing’,
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 21 #
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 35 #
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 48 #
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 49 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 30 b (new)
— having regard to the 2021 report of the European Institutefor Gender Equality entitled ‘The costs of gender- based violence in the European Union’,
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 51 #
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 52 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 30 d (new)
30 d having regard to the European Commission proposal for a Directive of the European Parliament and the Council on combating violence against women and domestic violence,
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 66 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas gender-based violence against women and girls is a severe form of gender inequality and discrimination; is a violation of women’s human rights, and is a serious obstacle to the participation of women in social, public and political life and in the labour market and make them unable to fully enjoy their rights and fundamental freedoms;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 70 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B a (new)
B a. whereas gender-based violence against women and girls is a structural and widespread problem throughout Europe and the world, and is a phenomenon that involves victims and perpetrators irrespective of their age, education, income, social status, cultural backgrounds and is linked to the unequal and unfair distribution of power between women and men in our societies; and whereas anyone can be a victim of potential gender-based violence, women are disproportionately affected by all forms of such violence, including domestic violence, due to structural gender discrimination and unequal distribution of power and resources between women and men in public and private spheres;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 86 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D
D. whereas gender-based violence against women and girls can affect many fundamental rights enshrined in the Charter; which include the right to human dignity (Article 1), the right to life (Article 2), the right to the integrity of the person (Article 3), the prohibition of torture and inhuman or degrading treatment (Article 4), the right to liberty and security (Article 6), the right to freedom from discrimination, including on the grounds of sex (Article 21), and the right to an effective remedy and to a fair trial;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 102 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

E a. whereas gender-based violence, in particular sexual violence, directly and indirectly affects its victims and has long- lasting negative impact on their physical, emotional and mental well-being and whereas gender-based violence affects one third of women and girls in the EU and whereas a new survey by the Fundamental Rights Agency is being conducted to update this data;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 118 #
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 119 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F b (new)
F b. whereas the 1993 United Nations Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women and the Beijing UN Platform for Action defined violence against as any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual or psychological harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or private life;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 123 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G a (new)
G a. whereas the Victims’ Rights Directive defines gender-based violence as violence that is directed against a person because of that person’s gender, gender identity or gender expression or that affects persons of a particular gender disproportionately, and it may result in physical, sexual, emotional or psychological harm or economic loss to the victim;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 126 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G b (new)
G b. whereas gender-based violence against women and girls has been recognized by the international community as a violation of human rights which should be addressed comprehensively, and despite all the efforts which have been made by the international organizations, civil society, and state authorities to eradicate gender- based violence against women and girls, it remains pervasive and manifests in new forms such as cyber violence, cyber harassment, cyber stalking and non- consensual distribution of intimate material (photos and videos) through social media;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 178 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Strongly condemns all forms of gender-based violence, including the denial of access to sexual and reproductive health and rights, against women and girls and against LGBTIQ+ persons; deplores the fact that women and girls are often exposed to domestic violence, sexual harassment, psychological and physical violence, stalking, sexual violence, rape, forced marriage, female genital mutilation (FGM), forced abortion, forced sterilisation, sexual exploitation and human trafficking and other forms of violence, which constitute a serious violation of their human rights and dignity; stresses that the Istanbul Convention lays down that culture, custom, religion, tradition or so-called ‘honour’ cannot be a justification of any acts of violence against women; denounces the fact that women and girls are victims of gender-based violence on the internet and on social media; calls on the Member States to adopt concrete measures to address these new forms of crime, including sex-extortion, grooming, voyeurism and revenge pornography, and to protect the victims, who can experience serious trauma leading sometimes even to suicide;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 189 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. Reaffirms its commitment to pursue a comprehensive approach to gender-based violence against women and girls and LGBTIQ+ persons at EU level and to ensure a follow-up of its recommendations which have been proposed in a number of resolutions;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 206 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. Notes that the Istanbul Convention benefits from 10 years of functioning and practice through its unique monitoring and implementation system through GREVIO; Stresses the importance of this interactive exchange and process between GREVIO and the participating members;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 209 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. Recalls that, in order to ensure effective implementation of the Istanbul Convention, a two-pillar monitoring mechanism was established: GREVIO which conducts a country by country report and the Committee of the Parties;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 211 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 b (new)
5 b. Points out that also women with disabilities and mothers of children with disabilities encountered obstacles in reporting violence and gaining access to justice system, and as GREVIO reported it, including the inaccessibility of police premises, a lack of training and stereotypes of law enforcement officials as well as the lack of information in accessible formats about the assistance to victims of violence and available services;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 213 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 6
6. Takes note of the CJEU Opinion of 6 October 2021, following up on Parliament’s request, which allowStrongly demands the Council to proceed with the ratification of the Istanbul Convention by the European Union without a prior common agreement, as declared by the CJEU Opinion of 6 October 2021 following up on Parliament’s request;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 221 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Calls for a constructive dialogue with the Council and Member States in cooperation with the Council of Europe to address Member States’ reservations, objections and concerns and clarify misleading interpretations of the Istanbul Convention in order to make progress in this area; Urges Member States to speed up negotiations on the ratification and implementation of the Istanbul Convention and to strongly condemn all attempts to retract measures already taken in implementing the Istanbul Convention and in combating violence against women;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 234 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Points out that while all Member States have already signed the Istanbul Convention, six have not ratified it yet; underlines that the EU’s accession to the Istanbul Convention does not exempt Member States from national ratification and thus strongly encourages the remaining Member States that have not already done so to ratify the Convention without delay and strongly condemns any attempt of Member States to withdraw from the ratification itself;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 235 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10
10. Points out that while all Member States have already signed the Istanbul Convention, six have not ratified it yet; underlines that the EU’s accession to the Istanbul Convention does not exempt Member States from national ratification and thus strongly encourages the remaining Member States Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania and Slovakia that have not already done so to ratify the Convention without delay;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 240 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10 a (new)
10 a. Strongly condemns all initiatives that pursue to replace the Istanbul Convention with any alternative document which is not based on the same approach towards gender discrimination and gender power relations;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 246 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Notes with concern the growing opposition towards the Istanbul Convention in some Member States and the attempts to disparage the Convention and its positive impact on the eradication of gender-based violence; condemns all attempts to spread disinformation about the Istanbul Convention; and to evoke fears among societies about the allegedly destructive impact of the Convention on family and traditional gender roles;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 251 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

12. Calls on Member States to take into account the conclusions of the Mid-term Horizontal Review of GREVIO baseline evaluation reports24 ; and to improve their national frameworks for preventing and combating gender-based violence, including their national laws, in order to ensure proper implementation and enforcement of the Istanbul Convention; _________________ 24 https://rm.coe.int/prems-010522-gbr- grevio-mid-term-horizontal-review-rev- february-2022/1680a58499
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 256 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 14
14. Welcomes the Commission’s proposal for a directive on combating violence against women and domestic violence, which will be the first EU act comprehensively to address gender-based violence, thus helping to harmonise Member States’ differing approaches towards violence against women and domestic violence and to lay down common minimum standards for the protection of victims and survivors of gender-based violence and for improving their access to justice; stresses that this legislative act does not substitute the Convention, as it only covers some part of it and thus the Convention remains an essential tool for the EU strategy against gender-based violence;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 270 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15 a (new)
15 a. Considering the extent and gravity of gender-based violence and sexual harassment in the workplace, calls on the Member States to ratify and implement ILO Violence and Harassment Convention No. 190;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 277 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16 a (new)
16 a. Reiterates that the denial of sexual and reproductive health and rights, including safe and legal abortion, is a form of gender-based violence and a violation of women’s and girls' fundamental human rights; reiterates that women and girls must have control over their bodies and sexualities; calls on all the Member States to guarantee comprehensive sexuality education and universal access to the full range of reproductive and sexual health services, including ready access to family planning, modern contraceptive methods and free, safe and legal abortion"; Is therefore deeply concerned that in some Member States sexual and reproductive rights of women are under threat, as in Poland the illegitimate Constitutional Tribunal ruled on 22 October 2020 to reverse long- established rights of Polish women entailing a de facto abortion ban, abortion is banned in Malta, medical abortion in early pregnancy is not legal in Slovakia and is not available in Hungary and access to abortion is also being eroded in Italy.
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 278 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16 a (new)
16 a. Calls on Member States to continue and strengthen the protection of children who are victims of or witness episodes of domestic and intimate partner violence; in particular condemns the use, assertion and acceptance of non-scientific theories and concepts in custody cases which punish mothers who attempt to report cases of child abuse or gender- based violence by preventing them from obtaining custody or by restricting their parental rights, such as the so-called parental alienation syndrome;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 288 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17
17. Urges the Council to step up procedures in order to ensure the EU’s swift ratification of the Istanbul Convention and to ensure a broad EU accession to the Convention without any limitations;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 290 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 a (new)
17 a. Calls the Member States to enforce the Istanbul Convention and allocate adequate financial and human resources to preventing and combating violence against women and gender-based violence, including domestic and intimate violence, empowering women and girls, and protecting victims and enabling them to be compensated, especially in the case of those living in areas where protection services for victims do not exist or are very limited;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM
Amendment 292 #

2016/0062R(NLE)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 b (new)
17 b. Calls the Commission to draw up a holistic EU strategy on combating violence against women and gender-based violence that includes a comprehensive plan to combat all forms of gender inequalities, integrating all EU efforts to eradicate gender based violence;
2022/12/08
Committee: LIBEFEMM