BETA


2014/2239(INI) Follow up to the European citizens' initiative Right2Water

Progress: Procedure completed

RoleCommitteeRapporteurShadows
Lead ENVI HERRANZ GARCÍA Esther (icon: PPE PPE), GARCÍA PÉREZ Iratxe (icon: S&D S&D), FARIA José Inácio (icon: ALDE ALDE), TURMES Claude (icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE), AFFRONTE Marco (icon: EFDD EFDD)
Committee Opinion DEVE PREDA Cristian Dan (icon: PPE PPE) Beatriz BECERRA BASTERRECHEA (icon: ALDE ALDE)
Committee Opinion IMCO
Committee Opinion PETI AUKEN Margrete (icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE) Notis MARIAS (icon: ECR ECR), József NAGY (icon: PPE PPE), Ángela VALLINA (icon: GUE/NGL GUE/NGL)
Lead committee dossier:
Legal Basis:
RoP 54

Events

2016/02/24
   EC - Commission response to text adopted in plenary
Documents
2015/09/08
   EP - Results of vote in Parliament
2015/09/08
   EP - Decision by Parliament
Details

The European Parliament adopted by 363 votes to 96, with 231 abstentions, a resolution on the follow-up to the European Citizens’ Initiative Right2Water.

Parliament recalled that ‘Right2Water’ is the first European Citizens’ Initiative (ECI) to have met the requirements set out in Regulation (EU) No 211/2011 on the citizens’ initiative and to have been heard by Parliament after receiving the support of almost 1.9 million citizens. According to Parliament, the full implementation of the human right to water and sanitation, as recognised by the UN and supported by the EU Member States, is essential for life.

The ECI as an instrument of participatory democracy : Parliament stated that the ECI is a unique democratic mechanism which promotes participatory democracy at the EU level . It stressed that the Commission should ensure the utmost transparency during the two-month analysis phase, that a successful ECI should receive proper legal support and advice from the Commission and should be properly publicised, and that promoters and supporters should be kept fully informed and updated throughout the ECI process. It considered it regrettable that the communication lacks ambition , does not meet the specific demands made in the ECI. It reiterated the commitment already taken. According to plenary, the response given by the Commission to the Right2Water ECI is insufficient , as it does not make any fresh contribution and does not introduce all the measures that might help to achieve the goals . It asked the Commission, with regard to this particular ECI, to lead a comprehensive information campaign on the measures that have already been taken in the field of water and how these measures could contribute to the achievements of the objectives of the Right2Water ECI.

It called on the Commission to come forward with legislative proposals, and, if appropriate, a revision of the WFD , that would recognise universal access and the human right to water . It advocated, moreover, that universal access to safe drinking water and sanitation be recognised in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union.

The right to water and sanitation : Parliament recalled that, according to the UN, the human right to water and sanitation entitles everyone to water for personal and domestic uses which is of good quality, safe, physically accessible, affordable, sufficient and acceptable. In accordance with a further UN recommendation, 3% of household income should be seen as a maximum for water payments where payments apply. In this regard, it deplored the fact that in the EU-28 more than 1 million people still lack access to a safe and clean drinking water supply and nearly 2% of the population lacks access to sanitation.

Whilst calling on the Commission to recognise the importance of the human right to water and sanitation and of water as a public good, Parliament rejected water cut-offs and the enforced switching-off of the water supply as a violation of human rights. It asked Member States to put an immediate end to these situations when they are due to socioeconomic factors in low-income households . Parliament also called on the Commission to identify areas in which water shortage is an existing or potential issue, and to help the Member States, regions and areas concerned, in particular rural areas and deprived urban areas, to address this issue properly.

Parliament called on the Commission, given the effects of the recent economic crisis, to collaborate with the Member States and regional and local authorities to conduct a study on water poverty issues.

The resolution recalled that, as stated in the WFD, water is not a commodity but a public good that is vital to human life and dignity. Therefore, the Commission should by no means promote the privatisation of water undertakings in the context of an economic adjustment programme or any other EU procedure of economic policy coordination given that these are services of general interest and are thus mainly in the public interest.

Moreover, with regard to regulation and control, Parliament considered that the public ownership of water needs to be protected by encouraging public, transparent and participatory management models.

In addition, Member States are called upon to ensure non-discrimination in access to water services, ensuring their provision to all, including marginalised user groups.

As regards the quality of water , Member States are called upon to:

impose an obligation on water suppliers to indicate the physicochemical characteristics of the water on water bills; draft urban plans according to the availability of water resources; increase controls and monitoring of pollutants, and plan immediate actions aimed at the removal and sanitisation of toxic substances; take action to reduce the considerable leakages from pipes in Europe and to renew the inadequate water supply networks.

Parliament stressed that support for the Right2Water ECI and its objectives has been further demonstrated by the large numbers of citizens in countries such as Germany, Austria, Belgium, Slovakia, Slovenia, Greece, Finland, Spain, Luxembourg, Italy and Ireland who have spoken out on the issue of water and its ownership and provision.

Water services and the internal market : Parliament noted that countries across the EU, including Spain, Portugal, Greece, Ireland, Germany and Italy, have seen the potential or actual loss of public ownership of water services become a major issue of concern to citizens. It recalled that water supply and sewerage enterprises are services of general interest and have the general mission of ensuring that the entire population is provided with high quality water at socially acceptable prices and minimising the negative environmental impacts of waste water.

In line with the principle of subsidiarity, the Commission should remain neutral regarding Member States’ decisions relating to the ownership of water services and should not promote the privatisation of water services either through legislation or in any other way.

Members stressed that the special character of water and sanitation services, such as production, distribution and treatment, ma kes it imperative that they be excluded from any trade agreements the EU is negotiating or considering . Therefore, the Commission is urged to grant a legally binding exclusion for water services , sanitation services and wastewater disposal services in the ongoing negotiations for the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the Trade in Services Agreement.

According to Parliament, the production, distribution and treatment of water and sanitation services must remain excluded from the Concessions Directive also in any future revision thereof. It recalled that Directive 2006/123/EC on services in the internal market attracted strong opposition from civil society in many respects, including matters relating to services of general economic interest such as water distribution and supply services and wastewater management.

Re-municipalising water services : Parliament recalled that the option of re-municipalising water services should continue to be ensured in the future without any restriction, and may be kept under local management if so chosen by the competent public authorities. It urged the Member States and regional and local authorities to move towards a genuine Social Agreement for Water , with the aim of guaranteeing the availability, stability and safe management of the resource, in particular by enacting policies such as the establishment of water solidarity funds and other mechanisms for social action to support people who are unable to afford access to water and sanitation services. Social action mechanisms should be put in place such as those that already exist in some EU countries to safeguard the provision of drinking water for citizens in genuine hardship.

Parliament also condemned the fact that denial of the provision of water and sanitation to disadvantaged and vulnerable communities is being used in a coercive manner in some Member States. In this regard, it called on each Member State to appoint a water services Ombudsman in order to ensure that water-related issues such as complaints and suggestions on water service quality and access can be processed by an independent body.

Water companies are encouraged to reinvest economic revenues generated from the water management cycle in maintaining and improving water services and protecting water resources. Members recommended putting an end to practices where economic resources are diverted from the water sector to finance other policies .

The Commission was also called upon to monitor carefully the use of direct and indirect EU funding for water management projects and to ensure that such funding is used only for the projects for which it was intended.

The Commission is encouraged to draw up a European legislative framework for the reuse of treated effluent in order, in particular, to protect sensitive activities and areas.

Internalisation of the cost of pollution : Parliament recalled that, through water bills, EU citizens are bearing the cost of purification of water and water treatment. More than 40 % of rivers and coastal waters are affected by diffuse pollution caused by agriculture, while between 20% and 25% are subjected to pollution deriving from point sources such as industrial structures, sewage systems and wastewater management networks. It stressed the importance of effective implementation of the WFD and the Drinking Water Directive, better coordination as regards their implementation, more coherence when drafting legislation and more proactive measures for saving water resources and substantially increasing water use efficiency across all sectors (industries, households, agriculture, distribution networks).

EU external policy and development policy in the water sector : Parliament stressed that EU development policies should fully integrate universal access to water and sanitation via the promotion of public-public partnerships based on not-for-profit principles. It reaffirmed that access to drinking water in a sufficient quantity and of a sufficient quality is a basic human right . Member called on governments, international aid agencies, non-governmental organisations and local communities to work to provide all humans with a basic water requirement and to guarantee that water is a human right.

They called on the Commission to ensure adequate financial support to capacity-development actions in the water domain, relying on and cooperating with existing international platforms and initiatives.

The resolution underlined that assistance in providing safe drinking water and sanitation should be given high priority in the allocation of EU funds and in assistance programming. The water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sector in developing countries should be given high priority in both official development aid (ODA) and national budgets .

Parliament stressed that although progress towards the Millennium Development Goal on safe drinking water is on track, 748 million people worldwide lack access to an improved water supply and it is estimated that at least 1.8 billion people drink water that is faecally contaminated, and the sanitation target is far from being met. Therefore, it is necessary to ensure adequate financial support to capacity-development actions in the water domain.

It also called for the creation of a global monitoring mechanism to track progress in achieving universal access to safe drinking water , the sustainable use and development of water resources and the strengthening of equitable, participatory and accountable water governance in all countries.

It recalled that the World Health Organisation has stated that between 100 and 200 litres of water per day per person is optimal, while noting that 50 to 100 litres is required to ensure that basic needs are met and few health concerns arise. Members States are called upon to introduce a pricing policy that respects people’s right to a minimum quantity of water for living and cracks down on waste . In this regard, Parliament called on the Commission to make renewal of ageing drinking water networks a priority in the Investment Plan for Europe, as well as measures to better inform the consumers about water and to contribute to more economical management of water resources.

Lastly, Parliament supported the Global Water Solidarity Platform launched by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in order to engage local authorities in finding solutions to water challenges as well as the ‘1% solidarity for water and sanitation’ and other initiatives taken by citizens and authorities in some Member States in order to support projects in developing countries.

It should be noted that an alternative motion for a resolution, tabled by the EPP-ECR groups, was rejected in plenary.

Documents
2015/09/08
   EP - End of procedure in Parliament
2015/09/07
   EP - Debate in Parliament
2015/07/15
   EP - Committee report tabled for plenary
Details

The Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety adopted an own-initiative report by Lynn Boylan (GUE/NGL, IE) on the follow-up to the European Citizens’ Initiative Right2Water.

Members recalled that ‘Right2Water’ is the first European Citizens’ Initiative (ECI) to have met the requirements set out in Regulation (EU) No 211/2011 on the citizens’ initiative and to have been heard by Parliament after receiving the support of almost 1.9 million citizens. According to Members, the full implementation of the human right to water and sanitation, as recognised by the UN and supported by the EU Member States, is essential for life.

The ECI as an instrument of participatory democracy : Members stated that the ECI is a unique democratic mechanism which promotes participatory democracy at the EU level . They stressed that that an admissible and appropriate ECI should in principle result in a new Commission legislative proposal that meets the demands set out in the ECI, at least when the Commission has committed itself to presenting such a proposal, as in the case of the Right2Water ECI. Members considered it regrettable that the communication lacks any real ambition , does not meet the specific demands made in the ECI and limits itself to reiterating existing commitments. It should introduce all the measures that might help to achieve the goals. The Commission is also asked to make a clear political commitment and come forward with legislative proposals, and, if appropriate, a revision of the WFD, that would recognise universal access and the human right to water .

The right to water and sanitation : Members recalled that, according to the UN, the human right to water and sanitation entitles everyone to water for personal and domestic uses which is of good quality, safe, physically accessible, affordable, sufficient and acceptable. In accordance with a further UN recommendation, 3% of household income should be seen as a maximum for water payments where payments apply. In this regard, Members deplored the fact that in the EU-28 more than 1 million people still lack access to a safe and clean drinking water supply and nearly 2% of the population lacks access to sanitation.

Whilst calling on the Commission to recognise the importance of the human right to water and sanitation and of water as a public good, Members rejected water cut-offs and the enforced switching-off of the water supply as a violation of human rights. They asked Member States to put an immediate end to these situations when they are due to socioeconomic factors in low-income households .

Members also called on the Commission to identify areas in which water shortage is an existing or potential issue, and to help the Member States, regions and areas concerned, in particular rural areas and deprived urban areas, to address this issue properly.

The report recalled that, as stated in the WFD, water is not a commodity but a public good that is vital to human life and dignity. Therefore, the Commission should by no means promote the privatisation of water undertakings in the context of an economic adjustment programme or any other EU procedure of economic policy coordination given that these are services of general interest and are thus mainly in the public interest.

In addition, Member States are called upon to ensure non-discrimination in access to water services, ensuring their provision to all, including marginalised user groups.

As regards the quality of water , Member States are called upon to:

impose an obligation on water suppliers to indicate the physicochemical characteristics of the water on water bills; draft urban plans according to the availability of water resources; increase controls and monitoring of pollutants, and plan immediate actions aimed at the removal and sanitisation of toxic substances; take action to reduce the considerable leakages from pipes in Europe and to renew the inadequate water supply networks.

They stressed that support for the Right2Water ECI and its objectives has been further demonstrated by the large numbers of citizens in countries such as Germany, Austria, Belgium, Slovakia, Slovenia, Greece, Finland, Spain, Luxembourg, Italy and Ireland who have spoken out on the issue of water and its ownership and provision.

Water services and the internal market : Members noted that countries across the EU, including Spain, Portugal, Greece, Ireland, Germany and Italy, have seen the potential or actual loss of public ownership of water services become a major issue of concern to citizens. They recalled that water supply and sewerage enterprises are services of general interest and have the general mission of ensuring that the entire population is provided with high quality water at socially acceptable prices and minimising the negative environmental impacts of waste water.

In line with the principle of subsidiarity, the Commission should remain neutral regarding Member States’ decisions relating to the ownership of water services and should not promote the privatisation of water services either through legislation or in any other way.

Members stressed that the special character of water and sanitation services, such as production, distribution and treatment, ma kes it imperative that they be excluded from any trade agreements the EU is negotiating or considering . Therefore, the Commission is urged to grant a legally binding exclusion for water services , sanitation services and wastewater disposal services in the ongoing negotiations for the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the Trade in Services Agreement.

According to Members, the production, distribution and treatment of water and sanitation services must remain excluded from the Concessions Directive also in any future revision thereof. They recalled that Directive 2006/123/EC on services in the internal market attracted strong opposition from civil society in many respects, including matters relating to services of general economic interest such as water distribution and supply services and wastewater management.

Members urged the Member States and regional and local authorities to move towards a genuine Social Agreement for Water , with the aim of guaranteeing the availability, stability and safe management of the resource, in particular by enacting policies such as the establishment of water solidarity funds and other mechanisms for social action to support people who are unable to afford access to water and sanitation services. Social action mechanisms should be put in place such as those that already exist in some EU countries to safeguard the provision of drinking water for citizens in genuine hardship.

Members also condemned the fact that denial of the provision of water and sanitation to disadvantaged and vulnerable communities is being used in a coercive manner in some Member States. In this regard, they called on each Member State to appoint a water services Ombudsman in order to ensure that water-related issues such as complaints and suggestions on water service quality and access can be processed by an independent body.

Water companies are encouraged to reinvest economic revenues generated from the water management cycle in maintaining and improving water services and protecting water resources. Members recommended putting an end to practices where economic resources are diverted from the water sector to finance other policies .

The Commission was also called upon to monitor carefully the use of direct and indirect EU funding for water management projects and to ensure that such funding is used only for the projects for which it was intended.

Internalisation of the cost of pollution : the report recalled that, through water bills, EU citizens are bearing the cost of purification of water and water treatment. More than 40 % of rivers and coastal waters are affected by diffuse pollution caused by agriculture, while between 20 % and 25 % are subjected to pollution deriving from point sources such as industrial structures, sewage systems and wastewater management networks. It stressed the importance of effective implementation of the WFD and the Drinking Water Directive, better coordination as regards their implementation, more coherence when drafting legislation and more proactive measures for saving water resources and substantially increasing water use efficiency across all sectors (industries, households, agriculture, distribution networks).

EU external policy and development policy in the water sector : Members stressed that EU development policies should fully integrate universal access to water and sanitation via the promotion of public-public partnerships based on not-for-profit principles. They reaffirmed that access to drinking water in a sufficient quantity and of a sufficient quality is a basic human right .

They called on the Commission to ensure adequate financial support to capacity-development actions in the water domain, relying on and cooperating with existing international platforms and initiatives.

The report underlined that assistance in providing safe drinking water and sanitation should be given high priority in the allocation of EU funds and in assistance programming. The water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sector in developing countries should be given high priority in both official development aid (ODA) and national budgets .

It stressed that although progress towards the Millennium Development Goal on safe drinking water is on track, 748 million people worldwide lack access to an improved water supply and it is estimated that at least 1.8 billion people drink water that is faecally contaminated, and the sanitation target is far from being met. Therefore, it is necessary to ensure adequate financial support to capacity-development actions in the water domain.

They called for the creation of a global monitoring mechanism to track progress in achieving universal access to safe drinking water , the sustainable use and development of water resources and the strengthening of equitable, participatory and accountable water governance in all countries.

They recalled that the World Health Organisation has stated that between 100 and 200 litres of water per day per person is optimal, while noting that 50 to 100 litres is required to ensure that basic needs are met and few health concerns arise. They called on governments, international aid agencies, non-governmental organisations and local communities to work to provide all humans with a basic water requirement and to guarantee that water is a human right. Members States are called upon to introduce a pricing policy that respects people’s right to a minimum quantity of water for living and cracks down on waste . In this regard, Members called on the Commission to make renewal of ageing drinking water networks a priority in the Investment Plan for Europe, as well as measures to better inform the consumers about water and to contribute to more economical management of water resources.

Lastly, Members supported the Global Water Solidarity Platform launched by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in order to engage local authorities in finding solutions to water challenges as well as the ‘1% solidarity for water and sanitation’ and other initiatives taken by citizens and authorities in some Member States in order to support projects in developing countries.

Documents
2015/06/25
   EP - Vote in committee
2015/05/27
   EP - Amendments tabled in committee
Documents
2015/05/27
   EP - Amendments tabled in committee
Documents
2015/05/13
   EP - Committee opinion
Documents
2015/05/12
   EP - Committee opinion
Documents
2015/03/10
   EP - Committee draft report
Documents
2015/02/05
   EP - AUKEN Margrete (Verts/ALE) appointed as rapporteur in PETI
2015/01/15
   EP - Committee referral announced in Parliament
2014/12/11
   EP - PREDA Cristian Dan (PPE) appointed as rapporteur in DEVE
2014/09/15
   RO_CHAMBER - Contribution
Documents
2014/06/10
   CZ_SENATE - Contribution
Documents
2014/03/19
   EC - Non-legislative basic document published
Details

PURPOSE: to examine the follow-up on the European Citizens' Initiative "Water and sanitation are a human right! Water is a public good, not a commodity!"

BACKGROUND: "Right2Water" is the first European Citizens' Initiative to have met the requirements set out in the Regulation of the European Parliament and Council on the Citizens' Initiative . It was officially submitted to the Commission by its organisers on 20 December 2013, after having received the support of more than 1.6 million citizens .

The Right2Water initiative invites the Commission "to propose legislation implementing the human right to water and sanitation , as recognized by the United Nations, and promoting the provision of water and sanitation as essential public services for all". The initiative urges that:

· The EU institutions and Member States be obliged to ensure that all inhabitants enjoy the right to water and sanitation;

· Water supply and management of water resources not be subject to internal market rules and that water services be excluded from liberalization;

· The EU increases its efforts to achieve universal access to water and sanitation.

In line with the provisions of the Regulation on the Citizens' Initiative, the Commission has three months to present its response to this initiative in a Communication setting out its legal and political conclusions on the initiative.

CONTENT: the Communication first describes the work done by the EU in the field of water and sanitation.

The EU has also reaffirmed that "all States bear human rights obligations regarding access to safe drinking water, which must be available, physically accessible, affordable and acceptable". The EU Water Framework Directive recognises that " water is not a commercial product like any other but, rather, a heritage which must be protected, defended and treated as such".

The EU has in particular:

· established ambitious water quality standards , guaranteeing a high level of protection for both public health and the environment. The Water Framework Directive, the Drinking Water Directive and the Urban Wastewater Treatment Directive are the key pieces of EU law in this field;

· provided financial support to expand and improve water infrastructures in the Member States. Over the past seven years (2007-2013), EU financial support for investments in drinking water supply and wastewater-related works and infrastructure reached almost EUR 22 billion;

· based its policy on the principle that affordability of water services is critical.

EU legislation has consistently acknowledged the specificity of water and sanitation services and their importance in satisfying the basic needs of the population:

· drinking water concessions , as well as certain concessions for waste water treatment and disposal are therefore excluded from the scope of the new EU rules on the award of concession contracts;

· water distribution and supply and wastewater services are expressly excluded from the application of the cross-border freedom to provide services , as established in the Services Directive .

At the global level, the EU and its Member States currently provide close to 1.5 billion EUR every year for Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) programmes in developing countries, making the Union the largest single donor in the water sector.

Measures to be undertaken : in response to the citizens' call for action, the Commission is committed to take concrete steps and work on a number of new actions in areas that are of direct relevance to the initiative and its goals:

· to reinforce implementation of its water quality legislation, building on the commitments presented in the 7th Environment Action Programme (EAP) and the Water Blueprint;

· to launch an EU-wide public consultation on the Drinking Water Directive, notably in view of improving access to quality water in the EU;

· to continue to ensure EU neutrality as regards national, regional and local choices for the provision of water services, while taking care that key Treaty principles such as transparency and equal treatment are observed;

· to develop new initiatives to improve information to citizens so that the consumer enjoys greater transparency in relation to the quality of drinking water;

· to explore the idea of comparative evaluation of water quality;

· to promote a more structured dialogue between stakeholders - bringing together public and private service operators - and to cooperate with existing initiatives - to provide a wider set of indicators and benchmarks for water services;

· to stimulate innovative approaches for development assistance (e.g. support to partnerships between water operators and to public-public partnerships); promote sharing of best practices between Member States (e.g. on solidarity instruments) and identify new opportunities for cooperation;

· to advocate universal access to safe drinking water and sanitation as a priority area in the post-2015 development framework.

The Commission invites the Member States, acting within their competences, to take account of the concerns raised by citizens through this initiative and encourages them to step up their own efforts to guarantee the provision of safe, clean and affordable drinking water and sanitation to all .

Documents

Activities

Votes

A8-0228/2015 - Lynn Boylan - Am 1 #

2015/09/08 Outcome: -: 368, +: 329, 0: 9
PL BG CZ BE SK LV LT FI DK HR HU SI LU EE NL MT RO IE PT CY ES SE DE AT EL FR GB IT
Total
49
14
21
19
13
8
11
11
13
11
19
7
6
6
25
6
31
10
19
6
49
20
91
18
18
71
64
69
icon: PPE PPE
206

Belgium PPE

Against (1)

4
2

Finland PPE

2

Denmark PPE

For (1)

1

Luxembourg PPE

3

Estonia PPE

For (1)

1

Cyprus PPE

Abstain (1)

2
icon: ECR ECR
63

Czechia ECR

2

Latvia ECR

For (1)

1

Lithuania ECR

1

Finland ECR

For (1)

1

Croatia ECR

For (1)

1

Netherlands ECR

2

Greece ECR

Against (1)

1

Italy ECR

2
icon: ALDE ALDE
66

Bulgaria ALDE

3

Latvia ALDE

1

Denmark ALDE

3

Croatia ALDE

For (1)

Against (1)

2

Slovenia ALDE

Against (1)

1

Luxembourg ALDE

For (1)

1

Estonia ALDE

3

Romania ALDE

3

Ireland ALDE

Against (1)

1

Portugal ALDE

2

Austria ALDE

For (1)

1

United Kingdom ALDE

1
icon: NI NI
11

Poland NI

Abstain (1)

1

Hungary NI

2

Netherlands NI

Against (1)

1

Germany NI

For (1)

1

France NI

2

United Kingdom NI

For (1)

1
icon: ENF ENF
38

Poland ENF

2

Belgium ENF

Against (1)

1

Netherlands ENF

3

Romania ENF

Against (1)

1

United Kingdom ENF

Against (1)

1
icon: EFDD EFDD
41

Poland EFDD

1

Czechia EFDD

Against (1)

1

Lithuania EFDD

Against (1)

1

Sweden EFDD

2

France EFDD

Against (1)

1
icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE
48

Belgium Verts/ALE

2

Latvia Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Lithuania Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Finland Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Denmark Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Croatia Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Hungary Verts/ALE

2

Slovenia Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Luxembourg Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Estonia Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Netherlands Verts/ALE

2
4

Austria Verts/ALE

3

United Kingdom Verts/ALE

5
icon: GUE/NGL GUE/NGL
49

Finland GUE/NGL

Against (1)

1

Denmark GUE/NGL

Against (1)

1

Netherlands GUE/NGL

3
4

Portugal GUE/NGL

3

Cyprus GUE/NGL

2

Sweden GUE/NGL

Against (1)

1

United Kingdom GUE/NGL

Against (1)

1

Italy GUE/NGL

3
icon: S&D S&D
183

Czechia S&D

4

Belgium S&D

3

Latvia S&D

Against (1)

1

Lithuania S&D

2

Finland S&D

2
3

Croatia S&D

2

Luxembourg S&D

Against (1)

1

Estonia S&D

Against (1)

1

Netherlands S&D

3

Malta S&D

3

Ireland S&D

Against (1)

1

Cyprus S&D

2

A8-0228/2015 - Lynn Boylan - Am 16 #

2015/09/08 Outcome: -: 373, +: 272, 0: 63
PL HU BG SI NL CZ BE LT LU EE SK LV FI HR MT PT DK SE IE RO CY AT ES EL DE FR IT GB
Total
49
20
13
7
26
21
19
11
6
6
13
7
12
11
6
19
13
20
10
31
6
18
49
18
91
71
69
65
icon: PPE PPE
206

Belgium PPE

4
2

Luxembourg PPE

3

Estonia PPE

For (1)

1

Finland PPE

Against (1)

3

Denmark PPE

For (1)

1

Cyprus PPE

Against (1)

2
icon: ALDE ALDE
67

Bulgaria ALDE

3

Slovenia ALDE

For (1)

1

Luxembourg ALDE

For (1)

1

Estonia ALDE

3

Croatia ALDE

2

Denmark ALDE

3

Ireland ALDE

Against (1)

1

Romania ALDE

3

Austria ALDE

For (1)

1

United Kingdom ALDE

1
icon: ECR ECR
64

Netherlands ECR

2

Czechia ECR

2

Lithuania ECR

Abstain (1)

1

Latvia ECR

Abstain (1)

1

Finland ECR

Abstain (1)

1

Croatia ECR

Against (1)

1

Greece ECR

Against (1)

1

Italy ECR

2
icon: NI NI
11

Poland NI

Against (1)

1

Hungary NI

For (1)

Abstain (1)

2

Netherlands NI

Abstain (1)

1

Germany NI

For (1)

1

France NI

2

United Kingdom NI

For (1)

1
icon: ENF ENF
38

Poland ENF

2

Netherlands ENF

3

Belgium ENF

Against (1)

1

Romania ENF

Against (1)

1

United Kingdom ENF

Against (1)

1
icon: EFDD EFDD
41

Poland EFDD

1

Czechia EFDD

Against (1)

1

Lithuania EFDD

Against (1)

1

Sweden EFDD

2

France EFDD

1
icon: GUE/NGL GUE/NGL
49

Netherlands GUE/NGL

3

Finland GUE/NGL

Against (1)

1

Portugal GUE/NGL

3

Denmark GUE/NGL

Against (1)

1

Sweden GUE/NGL

Against (1)

1
4

Cyprus GUE/NGL

2

Italy GUE/NGL

3

United Kingdom GUE/NGL

1
icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE
48

Hungary Verts/ALE

2

Slovenia Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Netherlands Verts/ALE

2

Belgium Verts/ALE

2

Lithuania Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Luxembourg Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Estonia Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Latvia Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Finland Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Croatia Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Denmark Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1
4

Austria Verts/ALE

3

United Kingdom Verts/ALE

5
icon: S&D S&D
183

Netherlands S&D

3

Czechia S&D

4

Belgium S&D

3

Lithuania S&D

2

Luxembourg S&D

Against (1)

1

Estonia S&D

Against (1)

1

Latvia S&D

Against (1)

1

Finland S&D

2

Croatia S&D

2

Malta S&D

3
3

Ireland S&D

Against (1)

1

Cyprus S&D

2

A8-0228/2015 - Lynn Boylan - § 10/1 #

2015/09/08 Outcome: +: 416, -: 240, 0: 53
IT FR ES SE DE BE GB AT RO FI DK LT NL PT EE EL IE CZ HR BG LU MT HU SK LV CY SI PL
Total
68
71
50
20
91
19
65
18
31
12
13
11
26
19
6
18
10
21
11
14
6
6
20
13
7
6
7
49
icon: S&D S&D
182

Netherlands S&D

3

Estonia S&D

For (1)

1

Ireland S&D

For (1)

1

Croatia S&D

2

Luxembourg S&D

For (1)

1

Malta S&D

3

Latvia S&D

1

Cyprus S&D

2
icon: ALDE ALDE
67

United Kingdom ALDE

1

Austria ALDE

For (1)

1

Romania ALDE

3

Denmark ALDE

3

Estonia ALDE

3

Ireland ALDE

For (1)

1

Croatia ALDE

2

Bulgaria ALDE

3

Luxembourg ALDE

For (1)

1

Slovenia ALDE

For (1)

1
icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE
48

Belgium Verts/ALE

2

United Kingdom Verts/ALE

5

Austria Verts/ALE

3

Finland Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Denmark Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Lithuania Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Netherlands Verts/ALE

2

Estonia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Croatia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Luxembourg Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Hungary Verts/ALE

2

Latvia Verts/ALE

1

Slovenia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1
icon: GUE/NGL GUE/NGL
49

Sweden GUE/NGL

For (1)

1

United Kingdom GUE/NGL

1

Finland GUE/NGL

For (1)

1

Denmark GUE/NGL

For (1)

1

Netherlands GUE/NGL

3

Portugal GUE/NGL

3

Cyprus GUE/NGL

2
icon: ENF ENF
38

Belgium ENF

For (1)

1

United Kingdom ENF

Against (1)

1

Romania ENF

1

Netherlands ENF

3

Poland ENF

2
icon: EFDD EFDD
41

France EFDD

1

Sweden EFDD

2

Lithuania EFDD

For (1)

1

Czechia EFDD

Against (1)

1

Poland EFDD

1
icon: NI NI
11

France NI

2

Germany NI

Against (1)

1

United Kingdom NI

For (1)

1

Netherlands NI

Against (1)

1

Hungary NI

2

Poland NI

Against (1)

1
icon: ECR ECR
64

Italy ECR

2

Finland ECR

Abstain (1)

1

Lithuania ECR

Abstain (1)

1

Netherlands ECR

2

Greece ECR

For (1)

1

Czechia ECR

2

Croatia ECR

Against (1)

1

Latvia ECR

Abstain (1)

1
icon: PPE PPE
208

Belgium PPE

4

Finland PPE

3

Denmark PPE

Against (1)

1

Lithuania PPE

2

Estonia PPE

Against (1)

1

Luxembourg PPE

3

Cyprus PPE

2

A8-0228/2015 - Lynn Boylan - § 10/2 #

2015/09/08 Outcome: -: 348, +: 324, 0: 26
IT SE PT AT DE EL ES CY RO IE MT LT BE HR HU LU EE LV DK FI SK SI BG CZ GB NL PL FR
Total
67
20
19
17
91
18
49
6
30
10
6
10
18
10
20
6
6
6
13
12
13
7
14
21
64
26
48
70
icon: S&D S&D
180

Cyprus S&D

2

Ireland S&D

For (1)

1

Malta S&D

3

Croatia S&D

2

Luxembourg S&D

For (1)

1

Estonia S&D

For (1)

1

Latvia S&D

1

Netherlands S&D

3
icon: GUE/NGL GUE/NGL
49

Sweden GUE/NGL

For (1)

1

Portugal GUE/NGL

3

Cyprus GUE/NGL

2

Denmark GUE/NGL

For (1)

1

Finland GUE/NGL

For (1)

1

United Kingdom GUE/NGL

1

Netherlands GUE/NGL

3
icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE
48

Austria Verts/ALE

3

Lithuania Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Belgium Verts/ALE

2

Croatia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Hungary Verts/ALE

2

Luxembourg Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Estonia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Latvia Verts/ALE

1

Denmark Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Finland Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Slovenia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

United Kingdom Verts/ALE

5

Netherlands Verts/ALE

2
icon: EFDD EFDD
40

Sweden EFDD

2

Lithuania EFDD

For (1)

1

Czechia EFDD

Against (1)

1

Poland EFDD

1

France EFDD

1
icon: NI NI
11

Germany NI

For (1)

1

Hungary NI

2

United Kingdom NI

Against (1)

1

Netherlands NI

Against (1)

1

Poland NI

1

France NI

2
icon: ENF ENF
36

Romania ENF

Abstain (1)

1

United Kingdom ENF

Against (1)

1

Netherlands ENF

3
2
icon: ECR ECR
64

Italy ECR

2

Greece ECR

For (1)

1

Lithuania ECR

Abstain (1)

1

Croatia ECR

Abstain (1)

1

Latvia ECR

Against (1)

1

Finland ECR

Against (1)

1

Slovakia ECR

Abstain (1)

3

Czechia ECR

2

Netherlands ECR

2
icon: ALDE ALDE
67

Portugal ALDE

Against (1)

2

Austria ALDE

Against (1)

1

Romania ALDE

3

Ireland ALDE

Against (1)

1

Croatia ALDE

2

Luxembourg ALDE

Against (1)

1

Estonia ALDE

3

Denmark ALDE

3

Slovenia ALDE

Against (1)

1

Bulgaria ALDE

3

United Kingdom ALDE

Against (1)

1
icon: PPE PPE
202

Cyprus PPE

2

Lithuania PPE

Against (1)

1

Belgium PPE

4
4

Luxembourg PPE

3

Estonia PPE

Against (1)

1

Denmark PPE

Against (1)

1

A8-0228/2015 - Lynn Boylan - Am 2 #

2015/09/08 Outcome: -: 391, +: 304, 0: 11
PL SI GB SK HU LV HR LU MT BG AT SE FI CZ CY IE DK PT EL EE BE LT RO NL DE ES FR IT
Total
48
7
65
13
20
6
11
6
6
14
17
20
12
21
6
10
13
19
18
6
19
11
31
26
91
50
71
68
icon: PPE PPE
207

Luxembourg PPE

3

Denmark PPE

For (1)

1

Estonia PPE

For (1)

1
2
icon: ECR ECR
63

Croatia ECR

For (1)

1

Finland ECR

For (1)

1

Czechia ECR

2

Greece ECR

Against (1)

1

Lithuania ECR

1

Netherlands ECR

2

Italy ECR

2
icon: EFDD EFDD
40

Poland EFDD

1

Sweden EFDD

2

Czechia EFDD

Abstain (1)

1

Lithuania EFDD

Against (1)

1

France EFDD

1
icon: NI NI
11

Poland NI

1

United Kingdom NI

Against (1)

1

Hungary NI

2

Netherlands NI

Abstain (1)

1

Germany NI

Against (1)

1

France NI

2
icon: ENF ENF
38
2

United Kingdom ENF

For (1)

1

Austria ENF

4

Belgium ENF

Against (1)

1

Romania ENF

Against (1)

1

Netherlands ENF

3
icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE
48

Slovenia Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

United Kingdom Verts/ALE

5

Hungary Verts/ALE

2

Latvia Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Croatia Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Luxembourg Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Austria Verts/ALE

3
4

Finland Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Denmark Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Estonia Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Belgium Verts/ALE

2

Lithuania Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Netherlands Verts/ALE

2
icon: GUE/NGL GUE/NGL
49

United Kingdom GUE/NGL

Against (1)

1

Sweden GUE/NGL

Against (1)

1

Finland GUE/NGL

Against (1)

1

Cyprus GUE/NGL

2
4

Denmark GUE/NGL

Against (1)

1

Portugal GUE/NGL

3

Netherlands GUE/NGL

3

Italy GUE/NGL

3
icon: ALDE ALDE
67

Slovenia ALDE

For (1)

1

United Kingdom ALDE

Against (1)

1

Croatia ALDE

2

Luxembourg ALDE

Against (1)

1

Bulgaria ALDE

3

Austria ALDE

Against (1)

1

Ireland ALDE

Against (1)

1

Denmark ALDE

3

Portugal ALDE

2

Estonia ALDE

3

Romania ALDE

Abstain (1)

3
icon: S&D S&D
182

Latvia S&D

Against (1)

1

Croatia S&D

Against