BETA


2016/2030(INI) EU strategic communication to counteract propaganda against it by third parties

Progress: Procedure completed

RoleCommitteeRapporteurShadows
Lead AFET FOTYGA Anna (icon: ECR ECR) UNGUREANU Traian (icon: PPE PPE), FREUND Eugen (icon: S&D S&D), AUŠTREVIČIUS Petras (icon: ALDE ALDE), COUSO PERMUY Javier (icon: GUE/NGL GUE/NGL), HARMS Rebecca (icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE)
Committee Opinion CULT ZDROJEWSKI Bogdan Andrzej (icon: PPE PPE) Nikolaos CHOUNTIS (icon: GUE/NGL GUE/NGL), Helga TRÜPEL (icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE)
Lead committee dossier:
Legal Basis:
RoP 54

Events

2016/11/23
   EP - Results of vote in Parliament
2016/11/23
   EP - Decision by Parliament, 1st reading/single reading
Details

The European Parliament adopted by 304 votes to 179, with 208 abstentions, a resolution on the EU strategic communication to counteract propaganda against it by third parties.

The resolution stressed that the EU, its Member States and citizens are under growing, systematic pressure to tackle information, disinformation and misinformation campaigns and propaganda from countries and non-state actors, such as transnational terrorist and criminal organisations in its neighbourhood.

Hostile propaganda against the EU comes in many different forms and uses various tools, often tailored to match EU Member States’ profiles, with the goal of distorting truths, provoking doubt, dividing Member States, engineering a strategic split between the European Union and its North American partners and paralysing the decision-making process, discrediting the EU institutions and undermining the European narrative based on democratic values.

EU strategic communication to counteract propaganda against it by third parties : Members called on the EU institutions to recognise that strategic communication and information warfare is not only an external EU issue but also an internal one , and voiced their concern at the number of hostile propaganda multipliers existing within the Union.

Noting that disinformation and propaganda are part of hybrid warfare, Parliament stressed the need to raise awareness and demonstrate assertiveness through institutional / political communication, think tank / academia research, social media campaigns, civil society initiatives, media literacy and other useful actions.

Members called for more cooperation and exchange of information between the EU institutions, the Member States, various NATO and UN bodies, NGOs and civic organisations.

Exposing Russian disinformation and propaganda warfare : with Russia’s annexation of Crimea and the Russian-led hybrid war in the Donbass, the Kremlin has escalated the confrontation with the EU.

Parliament recognised that the Russian Government is employing a wide range of tools and instruments, such as think tanks and special foundations (e.g . Russkiy Mir ), special authorities ( Rossotrudnichestvo ), multilingual TV stations (e.g. RT), pseudo news agencies and multimedia services (e.g. Sputnik ), social media and internet trolls to challenge democratic values, divide Europe.

Members argued that Russian strategic communication is part of a larger subversive campaign to weaken EU cooperation and the sovereignty. A large part of the Kremlin’s propaganda is aimed at describing some European countries as belonging to ‘Russia’s traditional sphere of influence’.

Members also expressed strong criticism of Russian efforts to disrupt the EU integration process and deplores, in this respect, Russian backing of anti-EU forces in the EU with regard, in particular, to extreme-right parties, populist forces and movements that deny the basic values of liberal democracies.

Understanding and tackling ISIL/Daesh’s information warfare : ISIS/Daesh, Al-Qaeda and many other violent jihadi terrorist groups systematically use communication strategies and direct propaganda both offline and online as part of the justification of their actions against the EU and also with the aim of boosting recruitment of young Europeans.

Parliament called on the EU and its Member States to develop a counter-narrative to ISIL/Daesh involving the education system and including through the empowerment and increased visibility of mainstream Muslim scholars who have the credibility to delegitimise ISIL/Daesh propaganda and to develop and disseminate a counter-narrative to jihadist propaganda.

The resolution underlined the importance of:

including the counterpropaganda strategy against ISIL/Daesh in a broader, comprehensive regional strategy that combines diplomatic, socio-economic, development and conflict-prevention tools; focusing more on improving EU tools and methods, mostly in the cyber area; put in place institutional multi-dimensional arrangements (linking university research, prison administrations, the police, the courts, social services and education systems) to combat radicalisation; cutting ISIL/Daesh’s access to financing and funding ; the EU and Member States cooperating with social media service providers to counter ISIL/Daesh propaganda being spread through social media channels.

EU strategy to counteract propaganda : welcoming the joint communication on the ‘Joint Framework on countering hybrid threats’ , Parliament called for the endorsement and implementation of its recommendations without delay and called on the HR/VP to ensure frequent communication at political level with the Member States in order to better coordinate EU actions. It called for strategic communication to be strengthened.

The resolution underlined the importance of:

strengthening media plurality and the objectivity , impartiality and independence of the media within the EU and its neighbourhood, including non-state actors, inter alia through support for journalists and the development of capacity-building programmes for media actors; enhancing cooperation among the Member States’ intelligence services with a view to assessing the influence exerted by third countries seeking to undermine the democratic foundation and values of the EU; reinforcing the Strategic Communication Task Force , thus reinforced as proposed and under the Twitter username @EUvsDisInfo, to establish an online space where the public at large can find a range of tools for identifying disinformation, with an explanation of how they work, and which can act as a relay for the many civil society initiatives focused on this issue; of communicating EU policies coherently and effectively , internally as well as externally, and of providing tailored communications to specific regions, including access to information in local languages; of awareness raising, education , online media and information literacy in the EU and in the Neighbourhood.

Parliament called on the Commission to advance certain legal initiatives in order to be more effective and accountable in dealing with disinformation and propaganda and to use the midterm review of the European Neighbourhood Instrument to promote the strengthening of the resilience of the media as a strategic priority.

Lastly, Parliament stated that an efficient strategy to counteract anti-EU propaganda could be the adoption of measures to provide a target audience with adequate and interesting information about EU activities , European values and other issues of public interest, and underlines that modern technologies and social networks could be used for these purposes.

Documents
2016/11/23
   EP - End of procedure in Parliament
2016/11/22
   EP - Debate in Parliament
2016/10/14
   EP - Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading
Details

The Committee on Foreign Affairs adopted an own-initiative report by Anna Elżbieta FOTYGA (ECR, PL) on the EU strategic communication to counteract propaganda against it by third parties.

Members considered that the EU, its Member States and citizens are under growing, systematic pressure to tackle information, disinformation and misinformation campaigns and propaganda from countries and non-state actors, such as transnational terrorist and criminal organisations in its neighbourhood.

Hostile propaganda against the EU comes in many different forms and uses various tools, often tailored to match EU Member States’ profiles, with the goal of distorting truths, provoking doubt, dividing Member States, engineering a strategic split between the European Union and its North American partners and paralysing the decision-making process, discrediting the EU institutions and undermining the European narrative based on democratic values.

EU strategic communication to counteract propaganda against it by third parties : Members called on the EU institutions to recognise that strategic communication and information warfare is not only an external EU issue but also an internal one , and voiced their concern at the number of hostile propaganda multipliers existing within the Union.

The report called on the EU actors to address the current lack of clarity and agreement on what is to be considered propaganda and disinformation, to develop in cooperation with media representatives and experts from the EU Member States a shared set of definitions and to compile data and facts about the consumption of propaganda.

Members therefore stressed the need to raise awareness and demonstrate assertiveness through institutional / political communication, think tank / academia research, social media campaigns, civil society initiatives, media literacy and other useful actions.

Recognising and exposing Russian disinformation and propaganda warfare : targeted information warfare against the West was extensively used by the Soviet Union during the Cold War, and has since been an integral part of modern hybrid warfare.

Members argued that Russian strategic communication is part of a larger subversive campaign to weaken EU cooperation and the sovereignty, political independence and territorial integrity of the Union and its Member States. They urged Member State governments to be vigilant towards Russian information operations on European soil and to incr ease capacity sharing and counter intelligence efforts aimed at countering such operations.

The report criticised Russian efforts to disrupt the EU integration process and deplored, in this respect, Russian backing of anti-EU forces in the EU with regard, in particular, to extreme-right parties, populist forces and movements that deny the basic values of liberal democracies.

Understanding and tackling ISIL/Daesh’s information warfare : ISIS/Daesh, Al-Qaeda and many other violent jihadi terrorist groups systematically use communication strategies and direct propaganda both offline and online as part of the justification of their actions against the EU.

Members called on the EU and its Member States to develop a counter-narrative to ISIL/Daesh involving the education system and including through the empowerment and increased visibility of mainstream Muslim scholars who have the credibility to delegitimise ISIL/Daesh propaganda and to develop and disseminate a counter-narrative to jihadist propaganda.

The report underlined the importance of:

including the counterpropaganda strategy against ISIL/Daesh in a broader, comprehensive regional strategy that combines diplomatic, socio-economic, development and conflict-prevention tools; focusing more on improving EU tools and methods, mostly in the cyber area; put in place institutional multi-dimensional arrangements (linking university research, prison administrations, the police, the courts, social services and education systems) to combat radicalisation; cutting ISIL/Daesh’s access to financing and funding; the EU and Member States cooperating with social media service providers to counter ISIL/Daesh propaganda being spread through social media channels.

EU strategy to counteract propaganda : welcoming the joint communication on the ‘Joint Framework on countering hybrid threats’ , Members called for the endorsement and implementation of its recommendations without delay and called on the HR/VP to ensure frequent communication at political level with the Member States in order to better coordinate EU actions.

The report underlined the importance:

enhancing cooperation among the Member States’ intelligence services with a view to assessing the influence exerted by third countries seeking to undermine the democratic foundation and values of the EU; reinforcing the Strategic Communication Task Force , thus reinforced as proposed and under the Twitter username @EUvsDisInfo, to establish an online space where the public at large can find a range of tools for identifying disinformation, with an explanation of how they work, and which can act as a relay for the many civil society initiatives focused on this issue; of communicating EU policies coherently and effectively , internally as well as externally, and of providing tailored communications to specific regions, including access to information in local languages; of awareness raising, education , online media and information literacy in the EU and in the Neighbourhood.

The report called on the Commission to advance certain legal initiatives in order to be more effective and accountable in dealing with disinformation and propaganda and to use the midterm review of the European Neighbourhood Instrument to promote the strengthening of the resilience of the media as a strategic priority.

Lastly, Members stated that an efficient strategy to counteract anti-EU propaganda could be the adoption of measures to provide a target audience with adequate and interesting information about EU activities , European values and other issues of public interest, and underlines that modern technologies and social networks could be used for these purposes.

Documents
2016/10/10
   EP - Vote in committee, 1st reading/single reading
2016/06/23
   EP - Committee opinion
Documents
2016/05/30
   EP - Amendments tabled in committee
Documents
2016/05/02
   EP - Committee draft report
Documents
2016/03/10
   EP - Committee referral announced in Parliament, 1st reading/single reading
2016/03/10
   EP - ZDROJEWSKI Bogdan Andrzej (PPE) appointed as rapporteur in CULT
2015/12/07
   EP - FOTYGA Anna (ECR) appointed as rapporteur in AFET

Documents

Activities

Votes

A8-0290/2016 - Anna Elżbieta Fotyga - Résolution

2016/11/23 Outcome: +: 304, 0: 208, -: 179
DE PL RO NL HU SE HR BE SK LT CZ ES SI EE DK LU MT GB FI AT BG IE LV CY PT EL IT FR
Total
88
50
32
25
19
19
11
21
13
10
18
51
8
6
11
4
6
59
13
18
15
9
6
5
20
18
68
67
icon: PPE PPE
203

Estonia PPE

For (1)

1

Denmark PPE

For (1)

1

Luxembourg PPE

2

Cyprus PPE

1

Greece PPE

Against (1)

3
icon: ECR ECR
66

Romania ECR

For (1)

1

Netherlands ECR

2

Croatia ECR

For (1)

1

Slovakia ECR

3

Lithuania ECR

1

Czechia ECR

2
2

Bulgaria ECR

Abstain (1)

1

Greece ECR

Against (1)

1

Italy ECR

For (1)

Abstain (1)

2
icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE
46

Netherlands Verts/ALE

2

Hungary Verts/ALE

For (1)

Abstain (1)

2

Sweden Verts/ALE

4

Croatia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Belgium Verts/ALE

2

Lithuania Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Spain Verts/ALE

Against (1)

Abstain (1)

4

Slovenia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Estonia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Denmark Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

United Kingdom Verts/ALE

4

Finland Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Austria Verts/ALE

3

Latvia Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

France Verts/ALE

For (1)

5
icon: S&D S&D
178

Netherlands S&D

3
4

Croatia S&D

2

Slovakia S&D

For (1)

4

Czechia S&D

For (1)

Against (2)

3

Slovenia S&D

Abstain (1)

1

Estonia S&D

For (1)

1
3

Luxembourg S&D

Abstain (1)

1

Malta S&D

Against (1)

3

Finland S&D

Against (1)

2

Ireland S&D

Abstain (1)

1

Latvia S&D

Against (1)

1

Cyprus S&D

Against (1)

Abstain (1)

2

Greece S&D

Abstain (1)

4
icon: ALDE ALDE
64

Germany ALDE

Abstain (1)

3

Romania ALDE

For (1)

3

Sweden ALDE

2

Croatia ALDE

For (1)

Against (1)

2

Lithuania ALDE

Against (1)

3

Slovenia ALDE

Against (1)

1

Estonia ALDE

Against (1)

3

Denmark ALDE

For (1)

Abstain (1)

2

Luxembourg ALDE

Abstain (1)

1

United Kingdom ALDE

1

Austria ALDE

Abstain (1)

1

Ireland ALDE

Against (1)

1

Latvia ALDE

1

Portugal ALDE

2
icon: NI NI
13

Germany NI

2

Poland NI

Against (1)

1

Hungary NI

2

United Kingdom NI

Against (2)

2

France NI

2
icon: EFDD EFDD
36

Germany EFDD

Against (1)

1

Poland EFDD

1

Sweden EFDD

2

Lithuania EFDD

Against (1)

1

Czechia EFDD

Against (1)

1

France EFDD

Against (1)

1
icon: ENF ENF
35

Germany ENF

Against (1)

1

Poland ENF

2

Romania ENF

Against (1)

1

Netherlands ENF

3

Belgium ENF

Against (1)

1

United Kingdom ENF

Against (1)

1
icon: GUE/NGL GUE/NGL
49

Netherlands GUE/NGL

Against (1)

3

Sweden GUE/NGL

Abstain (1)

1

Czechia GUE/NGL

2

Denmark GUE/NGL

Abstain (1)

1

United Kingdom GUE/NGL

Against (1)

1

Finland GUE/NGL

Abstain (1)

1

Ireland GUE/NGL

3

Cyprus GUE/NGL

2

Italy GUE/NGL

3
AmendmentsDossier
411 2016/2030(INI)
2016/05/03 CULT 53 amendments...
source: 582.242
2016/05/30 AFET 358 amendments...
source: 583.932

History

(these mark the time of scraping, not the official date of the change)

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events/2/docs/0/url
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New
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events/5/docs/0/url
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New
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CULT
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2016-03-10T00:00:00
rapporteur
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CULT
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activities
  • date: 2016-03-10T00:00:00 body: EP type: Committee referral announced in Parliament, 1st reading/single reading committees: body: EP shadows: group: EPP name: UNGUREANU Traian group: S&D name: FREUND Eugen group: ALDE name: AUŠTREVIČIUS Petras group: GUE/NGL name: COUSO PERMUY Javier group: Verts/ALE name: HARMS Rebecca responsible: True committee: AFET date: 2015-12-07T00:00:00 committee_full: Foreign Affairs rapporteur: group: ECR name: FOTYGA Anna Elżbieta body: EP responsible: False committee: CULT date: 2016-03-10T00:00:00 committee_full: Culture and Education rapporteur: group: EPP name: ZDROJEWSKI Bogdan Andrzej
  • date: 2016-10-10T00:00:00 body: EP type: Vote in committee, 1st reading/single reading committees: body: EP shadows: group: EPP name: UNGUREANU Traian group: S&D name: FREUND Eugen group: ALDE name: AUŠTREVIČIUS Petras group: GUE/NGL name: COUSO PERMUY Javier group: Verts/ALE name: HARMS Rebecca responsible: True committee: AFET date: 2015-12-07T00:00:00 committee_full: Foreign Affairs rapporteur: group: ECR name: FOTYGA Anna Elżbieta body: EP responsible: False committee: CULT date: 2016-03-10T00:00:00 committee_full: Culture and Education rapporteur: group: EPP name: ZDROJEWSKI Bogdan Andrzej
  • date: 2016-10-14T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=REPORT&mode=XML&reference=A8-2016-0290&language=EN type: Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading title: A8-0290/2016 body: EP type: Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading
  • date: 2016-11-22T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?secondRef=TOC&language=EN&reference=20161122&type=CRE type: Debate in Parliament title: Debate in Parliament body: EP type: Debate in Parliament
  • date: 2016-11-23T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=TA&language=EN&reference=P8-TA-2016-0441 type: Decision by Parliament, 1st reading/single reading title: T8-0441/2016 body: EP type: Decision by Parliament, 1st reading/single reading
committees/0
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Responsible Committee
body
EP
associated
False
committee_full
Foreign Affairs
committee
AFET
date
2015-12-07T00:00:00
rapporteur
name: FOTYGA Anna group: European Conservatives and Reformists abbr: ECR
shadows
committees/0
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shadows
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committee
AFET
date
2015-12-07T00:00:00
committee_full
Foreign Affairs
rapporteur
group: ECR name: FOTYGA Anna Elżbieta
committees/1
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EP
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committee_full
Culture and Education
committee
CULT
date
2016-03-10T00:00:00
rapporteur
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committees/1
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EP
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CULT
date
2016-03-10T00:00:00
committee_full
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docs
  • date: 2016-05-02T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=COMPARL&mode=XML&language=EN&reference=PE582.060 title: PE582.060 type: Committee draft report body: EP
  • date: 2016-05-30T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=COMPARL&mode=XML&language=EN&reference=PE583.932 title: PE583.932 type: Amendments tabled in committee body: EP
  • date: 2016-06-23T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=COMPARL&mode=XML&language=EN&reference=PE580.505&secondRef=02 title: PE580.505 committee: CULT type: Committee opinion body: EP
events
  • date: 2016-03-10T00:00:00 type: Committee referral announced in Parliament, 1st reading/single reading body: EP
  • date: 2016-10-10T00:00:00 type: Vote in committee, 1st reading/single reading body: EP
  • date: 2016-10-14T00:00:00 type: Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading body: EP docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=REPORT&mode=XML&reference=A8-2016-0290&language=EN title: A8-0290/2016 summary: The Committee on Foreign Affairs adopted an own-initiative report by Anna Elżbieta FOTYGA (ECR, PL) on the EU strategic communication to counteract propaganda against it by third parties. Members considered that the EU, its Member States and citizens are under growing, systematic pressure to tackle information, disinformation and misinformation campaigns and propaganda from countries and non-state actors, such as transnational terrorist and criminal organisations in its neighbourhood. Hostile propaganda against the EU comes in many different forms and uses various tools, often tailored to match EU Member States’ profiles, with the goal of distorting truths, provoking doubt, dividing Member States, engineering a strategic split between the European Union and its North American partners and paralysing the decision-making process, discrediting the EU institutions and undermining the European narrative based on democratic values. EU strategic communication to counteract propaganda against it by third parties : Members called on the EU institutions to recognise that strategic communication and information warfare is not only an external EU issue but also an internal one , and voiced their concern at the number of hostile propaganda multipliers existing within the Union. The report called on the EU actors to address the current lack of clarity and agreement on what is to be considered propaganda and disinformation, to develop in cooperation with media representatives and experts from the EU Member States a shared set of definitions and to compile data and facts about the consumption of propaganda. Members therefore stressed the need to raise awareness and demonstrate assertiveness through institutional / political communication, think tank / academia research, social media campaigns, civil society initiatives, media literacy and other useful actions. Recognising and exposing Russian disinformation and propaganda warfare : targeted information warfare against the West was extensively used by the Soviet Union during the Cold War, and has since been an integral part of modern hybrid warfare. Members argued that Russian strategic communication is part of a larger subversive campaign to weaken EU cooperation and the sovereignty, political independence and territorial integrity of the Union and its Member States. They urged Member State governments to be vigilant towards Russian information operations on European soil and to incr ease capacity sharing and counter intelligence efforts aimed at countering such operations. The report criticised Russian efforts to disrupt the EU integration process and deplored, in this respect, Russian backing of anti-EU forces in the EU with regard, in particular, to extreme-right parties, populist forces and movements that deny the basic values of liberal democracies. Understanding and tackling ISIL/Daesh’s information warfare : ISIS/Daesh, Al-Qaeda and many other violent jihadi terrorist groups systematically use communication strategies and direct propaganda both offline and online as part of the justification of their actions against the EU. Members called on the EU and its Member States to develop a counter-narrative to ISIL/Daesh involving the education system and including through the empowerment and increased visibility of mainstream Muslim scholars who have the credibility to delegitimise ISIL/Daesh propaganda and to develop and disseminate a counter-narrative to jihadist propaganda. The report underlined the importance of: including the counterpropaganda strategy against ISIL/Daesh in a broader, comprehensive regional strategy that combines diplomatic, socio-economic, development and conflict-prevention tools; focusing more on improving EU tools and methods, mostly in the cyber area; put in place institutional multi-dimensional arrangements (linking university research, prison administrations, the police, the courts, social services and education systems) to combat radicalisation; cutting ISIL/Daesh’s access to financing and funding; the EU and Member States cooperating with social media service providers to counter ISIL/Daesh propaganda being spread through social media channels. EU strategy to counteract propaganda : welcoming the joint communication on the ‘Joint Framework on countering hybrid threats’ , Members called for the endorsement and implementation of its recommendations without delay and called on the HR/VP to ensure frequent communication at political level with the Member States in order to better coordinate EU actions. The report underlined the importance: enhancing cooperation among the Member States’ intelligence services with a view to assessing the influence exerted by third countries seeking to undermine the democratic foundation and values of the EU; reinforcing the Strategic Communication Task Force , thus reinforced as proposed and under the Twitter username @EUvsDisInfo, to establish an online space where the public at large can find a range of tools for identifying disinformation, with an explanation of how they work, and which can act as a relay for the many civil society initiatives focused on this issue; of communicating EU policies coherently and effectively , internally as well as externally, and of providing tailored communications to specific regions, including access to information in local languages; of awareness raising, education , online media and information literacy in the EU and in the Neighbourhood. The report called on the Commission to advance certain legal initiatives in order to be more effective and accountable in dealing with disinformation and propaganda and to use the midterm review of the European Neighbourhood Instrument to promote the strengthening of the resilience of the media as a strategic priority. Lastly, Members stated that an efficient strategy to counteract anti-EU propaganda could be the adoption of measures to provide a target audience with adequate and interesting information about EU activities , European values and other issues of public interest, and underlines that modern technologies and social networks could be used for these purposes.
  • date: 2016-11-22T00:00:00 type: Debate in Parliament body: EP docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?secondRef=TOC&language=EN&reference=20161122&type=CRE title: Debate in Parliament
  • date: 2016-11-23T00:00:00 type: Results of vote in Parliament body: EP docs: url: https://oeil.secure.europarl.europa.eu/oeil/popups/sda.do?id=27715&l=en title: Results of vote in Parliament
  • date: 2016-11-23T00:00:00 type: Decision by Parliament, 1st reading/single reading body: EP docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=TA&language=EN&reference=P8-TA-2016-0441 title: T8-0441/2016 summary: The European Parliament adopted by 304 votes to 179, with 208 abstentions, a resolution on the EU strategic communication to counteract propaganda against it by third parties. The resolution stressed that the EU, its Member States and citizens are under growing, systematic pressure to tackle information, disinformation and misinformation campaigns and propaganda from countries and non-state actors, such as transnational terrorist and criminal organisations in its neighbourhood. Hostile propaganda against the EU comes in many different forms and uses various tools, often tailored to match EU Member States’ profiles, with the goal of distorting truths, provoking doubt, dividing Member States, engineering a strategic split between the European Union and its North American partners and paralysing the decision-making process, discrediting the EU institutions and undermining the European narrative based on democratic values. EU strategic communication to counteract propaganda against it by third parties : Members called on the EU institutions to recognise that strategic communication and information warfare is not only an external EU issue but also an internal one , and voiced their concern at the number of hostile propaganda multipliers existing within the Union. Noting that disinformation and propaganda are part of hybrid warfare, Parliament stressed the need to raise awareness and demonstrate assertiveness through institutional / political communication, think tank / academia research, social media campaigns, civil society initiatives, media literacy and other useful actions. Members called for more cooperation and exchange of information between the EU institutions, the Member States, various NATO and UN bodies, NGOs and civic organisations. Exposing Russian disinformation and propaganda warfare : with Russia’s annexation of Crimea and the Russian-led hybrid war in the Donbass, the Kremlin has escalated the confrontation with the EU. Parliament recognised that the Russian Government is employing a wide range of tools and instruments, such as think tanks and special foundations (e.g . Russkiy Mir ), special authorities ( Rossotrudnichestvo ), multilingual TV stations (e.g. RT), pseudo news agencies and multimedia services (e.g. Sputnik ), social media and internet trolls to challenge democratic values, divide Europe. Members argued that Russian strategic communication is part of a larger subversive campaign to weaken EU cooperation and the sovereignty. A large part of the Kremlin’s propaganda is aimed at describing some European countries as belonging to ‘Russia’s traditional sphere of influence’. Members also expressed strong criticism of Russian efforts to disrupt the EU integration process and deplores, in this respect, Russian backing of anti-EU forces in the EU with regard, in particular, to extreme-right parties, populist forces and movements that deny the basic values of liberal democracies. Understanding and tackling ISIL/Daesh’s information warfare : ISIS/Daesh, Al-Qaeda and many other violent jihadi terrorist groups systematically use communication strategies and direct propaganda both offline and online as part of the justification of their actions against the EU and also with the aim of boosting recruitment of young Europeans. Parliament called on the EU and its Member States to develop a counter-narrative to ISIL/Daesh involving the education system and including through the empowerment and increased visibility of mainstream Muslim scholars who have the credibility to delegitimise ISIL/Daesh propaganda and to develop and disseminate a counter-narrative to jihadist propaganda. The resolution underlined the importance of: including the counterpropaganda strategy against ISIL/Daesh in a broader, comprehensive regional strategy that combines diplomatic, socio-economic, development and conflict-prevention tools; focusing more on improving EU tools and methods, mostly in the cyber area; put in place institutional multi-dimensional arrangements (linking university research, prison administrations, the police, the courts, social services and education systems) to combat radicalisation; cutting ISIL/Daesh’s access to financing and funding ; the EU and Member States cooperating with social media service providers to counter ISIL/Daesh propaganda being spread through social media channels. EU strategy to counteract propaganda : welcoming the joint communication on the ‘Joint Framework on countering hybrid threats’ , Parliament called for the endorsement and implementation of its recommendations without delay and called on the HR/VP to ensure frequent communication at political level with the Member States in order to better coordinate EU actions. It called for strategic communication to be strengthened. The resolution underlined the importance of: strengthening media plurality and the objectivity , impartiality and independence of the media within the EU and its neighbourhood, including non-state actors, inter alia through support for journalists and the development of capacity-building programmes for media actors; enhancing cooperation among the Member States’ intelligence services with a view to assessing the influence exerted by third countries seeking to undermine the democratic foundation and values of the EU; reinforcing the Strategic Communication Task Force , thus reinforced as proposed and under the Twitter username @EUvsDisInfo, to establish an online space where the public at large can find a range of tools for identifying disinformation, with an explanation of how they work, and which can act as a relay for the many civil society initiatives focused on this issue; of communicating EU policies coherently and effectively , internally as well as externally, and of providing tailored communications to specific regions, including access to information in local languages; of awareness raising, education , online media and information literacy in the EU and in the Neighbourhood. Parliament called on the Commission to advance certain legal initiatives in order to be more effective and accountable in dealing with disinformation and propaganda and to use the midterm review of the European Neighbourhood Instrument to promote the strengthening of the resilience of the media as a strategic priority. Lastly, Parliament stated that an efficient strategy to counteract anti-EU propaganda could be the adoption of measures to provide a target audience with adequate and interesting information about EU activities , European values and other issues of public interest, and underlines that modern technologies and social networks could be used for these purposes.
  • date: 2016-11-23T00:00:00 type: End of procedure in Parliament body: EP
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    • group: EPP name: UNGUREANU Traian
    • group: S&D name: FREUND Eugen
    • group: ALDE name: AUŠTREVIČIUS Petras
    • group: GUE/NGL name: COUSO PERMUY Javier
    • group: Verts/ALE name: HARMS Rebecca
    committees/0/shadows
    • group: EPP name: UNGUREANU Traian
    • group: S&D name: FREUND Eugen
    • group: ALDE name: AUŠTREVIČIUS Petras
    • group: GUE/NGL name: COUSO PERMUY Javier
    • group: Verts/ALE name: HARMS Rebecca
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    • body: EP responsible: True committee: AFET date: 2015-12-07T00:00:00 committee_full: Foreign Affairs rapporteur: group: ECR name: FOTYGA Anna Elżbieta
    • body: EP responsible: False committee: CULT date: 2016-03-10T00:00:00 committee_full: Culture and Education rapporteur: group: EPP name: ZDROJEWSKI Bogdan Andrzej
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      procedure
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      2016/2030(INI)
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      EU strategic communication to counteract propaganda against it by third parties
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