BETA


2018/2060(INI) Proposal to open negotiations on the Commission recommendation for a Council decision authorising the opening of negotiations for an agreement between the EU and Jordan on the exchange of personal data between Europol and the Jordanian competent authorities for fighting serious crime and terrorism

Progress: Procedure completed

RoleCommitteeRapporteurShadows
Lead LIBE MORAES Claude (icon: S&D S&D) METSOLA Roberta (icon: PPE PPE), STEVENS Helga (icon: ECR ECR), PETERSEN Morten (icon: ALDE ALDE), ERNST Cornelia (icon: GUE/NGL GUE/NGL), TERRICABRAS Josep-Maria (icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE)
Committee Opinion AFET
Committee Opinion BUDG
Committee Opinion CONT
Committee Opinion AFCO
Lead committee dossier:
Legal Basis:
RoP 114

Events

2018/07/04
   EP - Results of vote in Parliament
2018/07/04
   EP - Decision by Parliament, 1st reading/single reading
Details

The European Parliament adopted by 542 votes to 89, with 35 abstentions, a resolution on the recommendation, by the Commission, for a Council decision authorising the opening of negotiations for an agreement between the European Union and the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan on the exchange of personal data between the European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation (Europol) and the Jordanian competent authorities for fighting serious crime and terrorism.

Assessing the risks : Parliament considered that the necessity of the cooperation with Jordan in the field of law enforcement for the European Union’s security interests, as well as its proportionality , needs to be properly assessed and called on the Commission, in this context, to conduct a thorough impact assessment. Members highlighted that due caution is needed while defining the negotiating mandate for an agreement between the European Union and Jordan. They called on the Commission to carry out an appropriate impact assessment so as to define the necessary safeguards to be integrated in the agreement.

Ensuring equivalent protection : full consistency with Articles 7 and 8 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights and with the other fundamental rights and freedoms enshrined in the Charter should be fully ensured in the receiving third country to which it is addressed. Parliament insisted that the level of protection resulting from the agreement should be substantially equivalent to the level of protection offered by Union legislation. If such a level of protection cannot be guaranteed, both in legislation and in practice, the agreement should not be concluded.

In particular, the Agreement shall contain:

strict and specific provisions imposing respect for the principle of purpose limitation with clear conditions for the processing of personal data transmitted; a clear and precise provision setting out the data retention period of personal data that have been transferred and requiring the erasure of the personal data transferred at the end of the data retention period; data subjects’ right to information, rectification and erasure as provided for in other Union legislation on data protection; a clear definition of the categories of offences for which personal data shall be exchanged; a clear reference to the name of the independent supervisory authority in charge of supervising the implementation of the international agreement; a monitoring mechanism to be subject to periodic assessments.

Members insisted on the need to:

expressly indicate that onward transfers of information from the competent authorities of Jordan to other authorities in Jordan can only be allowed to fulfil the original purpose of the transfer by Europol and should always be communicated to the independent authority, the EDPS and Europol. To this end, an exhaustive list of the competent authorities in Jordan to which Europol can transfer data should be drawn up. Any modification to such a list that would replace or add a new competent authority would require a review of the international agreement; expressly indicate that onward transfers of information from the competent authorities of Jordan to other countries are prohibited and would result in the immediate ending of the international agreement.

Sensitive data : taking into account Jordan's different societal characteristics and cultural background compared to the EU and the fact that criminal acts are defined differently in the EU than in Jordan, Parliament considered that the transfer of personal data revealing racial or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious or philosophical beliefs, trade union membership, genetic data or data concerning a person’s health and sex life should only take place in very exceptional cases and be subject to clear safeguards for the data subject and persons linked to the data subject.

Lastly, the resolution stressed that the European Parliament’s consent to the conclusion of the agreement shall be conditional upon satisfactory involvement of the European Parliament at all stages of the procedure.

Documents
2018/07/04
   EP - End of procedure in Parliament
2018/06/27
   EP - Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading
Details

The Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs adopted the report by Claude MORAES (S&D, UK) on the recommendation, by the Commission, for a Council decision authorising the opening of negotiations for an agreement between the European Union and the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan on the exchange of personal data between the European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation (Europol) and the Jordanian competent authorities for fighting serious crime and terrorism.

The report stressed the need for cooperation with Jordan in the field of law enforcement for the European Union’s security interests to be properly assessed and called on the Commission to conduct a thorough impact assessment on this issue.

Consequently, Members considered that due caution is needed while defining the negotiating mandate for an EU-Jordan agreement. They called on the Commission to carry out an appropriate impact assessment so as to define the necessary safeguards to be integrated in the agreement.

The report insisted that the level of protection resulting from the agreement should be essentially equivalent to the level of protection in EU law. If such level cannot be guaranteed both in law and in practice, the agreement cannot be concluded.

In particular, the Agreement shall contain:

strict and specific provisions imposing respect for the principle of purpose limitation with clear conditions for the processing of personal data transmitted; a clear and precise provision setting out the data retention period of personal data that have been transferred and requiring the erasure of the personal data transferred at the end of the data retention period; data subjects’ right to information, rectification and erasure as provided for in other Union legislation on data protection; a clear definition of the categories of offences for which personal data shall be exchanged; a monitoring mechanism to be subject to periodic assessments.

Members insisted on the need to:

expressly indicate that onward transfers of information from the competent authorities of Jordan to other authorities in Jordan can only be allowed to fulfil the original purpose of the transfer by Europol and should always be communicated to the independent authority, the EDPS and Europol. To this end, an exhaustive list of the competent authorities in Jordan to which Europol can transfer data should be drawn up. Any modification to such a list that would replace or add a new competent authority would require a review of the international agreement; expressly indicate that onward transfers of information from the competent authorities of Jordan to other countries are prohibited and would result in the immediate ending of the international agreement.

Taking into account Jordan's different societal characteristics and cultural background compared to the EU and the fact that criminal acts are defined differently in the EU than in Jordan, Members considered that the transfer of personal data revealing racial or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious or philosophical beliefs, trade union membership, genetic data or data concerning a person’s health and sex life should only take place in very exceptional cases and be subject to clear safeguards for the data subject and persons linked to the data subject.

Lastly, the report stressed that the European Parliament’s consent to the conclusion of the agreement will be conditional upon satisfactory involvement of the European Parliament at all stages of the procedure.

Documents
2018/06/20
   EP - Vote in committee, 1st reading/single reading
2018/06/14
   EP - Committee referral announced in Parliament, 1st reading/single reading
2018/06/01
   EP - Amendments tabled in committee
Documents
2018/05/18
   EP - Committee draft report
Documents
2018/03/19
   EP - MORAES Claude (S&D) appointed as rapporteur in LIBE
2017/12/20
   EC - Non-legislative basic document published
Details

PURPOSE: to open negotiations for an agreement between the European Union and Jordan on the exchange of personal data between the European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation (Europol) and the Jordanian competent authorities for fighting serious crime and terrorism.

BACKGROUND: in a globalised world where serious crime and terrorism are increasingly transnational and polyvalent, Europol should therefore be able to exchange personal data with law enforcement authorities of third countries to the extent necessary for the accomplishment of its tasks.

Regulation (EU) 2016/794 establishes a legal framework for Europol. It sets out the rules for the transfer of personal data from Europol to third countries and international organisations. Since the entry into application of the Regulation (1 May 2017), and pursuant to the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), the Commission is responsible, on behalf of the Union, for negotiating international agreements with third countries for the exchange of personal data with Europol.

Taking into account the political strategy as outlined in the European agenda on security and the potential benefits of closer cooperation in this area, the Commission considers it necessary to start negotiations in the short-term with eight countries , as identified in the 11th progress report towards a genuine and effective Security Union.

The 2016-2020 Europol strategy identifies the Mediterranean region as priority for enhanced partnerships. The 2017-2020 Europol external strategy also stresses the need for closer cooperation between Europol and the Middle East/North Africa (MENA) due to the current terrorist threat and migration-related challenges.

Jordan is a key partner for the EU in particular for its role in promoting stability, moderation and inter-faith tolerance in the Middle East. The EU and Jordan have a strong partnership across many sectors and have been linked by an Association Agreement since 2002 (advanced status since 2010). Jordan is facing difficult economic, social and security challenges. In particular, Jordan is hosting more than 650 000 registered Syrian refugees (around 10% of the Jordanian population before the Syria crisis), as well as other refugee populations.

Based on data available as well as Europol's in-house expert knowledge, cooperation with Jordan is needed in particular to counter the following crime phenomena:

terrorism : the destabilisation of Syria and Iraq, the spread of Da'esh and other terrorist groups pose a direct security threat to Jordan and the EU; migration-related challenges : there are a number of migration-related challenges related to the ongoing conflict in Syria. Areas surrounding refugee camps and close to the Syrian border are susceptible to weapons, human and sex trafficking; firearms trafficking : bordering Syria, Jordan can play a major role in preventing the entry of firearms into theatres of armed conflict, and making sure illicit shipments are intercepted, in particular on their way back to the EU; drug trafficking : the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) is a major source, transit point, and consumer of illicit drugs.

CONTENT: the purpose of this Recommendation for a Council Decision is to obtain from the Council an authorisation from the Council for the Commission to negotiate, on behalf of the European Union, an agreement between the European Union and Jordan on the exchange of personal data between the European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation (Europol) and the Jordanian competent authorities for fighting serious crime and terrorism.

In order to respect the principle of purpose limitation , cooperation under the agreement shall only cover forms of crime and related criminal offences for which Europol is competent. In particular, cooperation should aim to combat terrorism and prevent radicalisation, disrupt organised crime, including trafficking of migrants, firearms and drugs, and combat cybercrime.

The agreement should respect fundamental rights and observe the principles recognised by the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, in particular the right to private and family life, the right to the protection of personal data, and the right to effective remedy and fair trial.

Documents

Votes

A8-0232/2018 - Claude Moraes - résolution 04/07/2018 13:21:22.000

2018/07/04 Outcome: +: 542, -: 89, 0: 35
DE IT FR RO PL ES BG GB BE PT CZ HU AT FI HR SK EL LT DK NL SI MT SE LU EE LV IE CY ??
Total
93
62
67
30
44
42
17
56
21
20
19
19
17
13
11
11
18
9
13
22
8
6
15
6
6
4
10
5
1
icon: PPE PPE
191

United Kingdom PPE

1

Lithuania PPE

1

Denmark PPE

For (1)

1

Sweden PPE

For (1)

1

Luxembourg PPE

3

Estonia PPE

For (1)

1
icon: S&D S&D
179
4

Croatia S&D

2

Netherlands S&D

3

Slovenia S&D

For (1)

1

Malta S&D

3

Luxembourg S&D

For (1)

1

Estonia S&D

For (1)

1

Ireland S&D

For (1)

1

Cyprus S&D

2
icon: ALDE ALDE
63

Romania ALDE

2

United Kingdom ALDE

1

Portugal ALDE

1

Croatia ALDE

2

Slovenia ALDE

For (1)

1

Luxembourg ALDE

For (1)

1

Estonia ALDE

3

Ireland ALDE

For (1)

1
icon: ECR ECR
62

Italy ECR

2

Romania ECR

2

Bulgaria ECR

2

Czechia ECR

1
2

Croatia ECR

For (1)

1

Slovakia ECR

Against (1)

2

Greece ECR

Against (1)

1

Lithuania ECR

1

Netherlands ECR

For (1)

1

Sweden ECR

2

Latvia ECR

For (1)

1

Cyprus ECR

1
icon: ENF ENF
31

Germany ENF

Against (1)

1

Poland ENF

2

Belgium ENF

For (1)

1

Netherlands ENF

4
icon: NI NI
18

Germany NI

2

France NI

Abstain (1)

1

United Kingdom NI

For (1)

Abstain (1)

4

Hungary NI

2

Denmark NI

1

NI

For (1)

1
icon: EFDD EFDD
34

Germany EFDD

Against (1)

1

Czechia EFDD

Against (1)

1

Lithuania EFDD

For (1)

1
icon: GUE/NGL GUE/NGL
43

Germany GUE/NGL

Against (1)

6

Italy GUE/NGL

2

United Kingdom GUE/NGL

Against (1)

1

Portugal GUE/NGL

For (1)

4

Czechia GUE/NGL

Abstain (1)

2

Finland GUE/NGL

For (1)

1

Denmark GUE/NGL

Against (1)

1

Netherlands GUE/NGL

3

Sweden GUE/NGL

Against (1)

1

Ireland GUE/NGL

Abstain (1)

4

Cyprus GUE/NGL

2
icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE
44

Italy Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1
3

United Kingdom Verts/ALE

4

Belgium Verts/ALE

For (1)

Against (1)

2

Hungary Verts/ALE

Against (1)

2

Austria Verts/ALE

Against (1)

3

Finland Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Croatia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Lithuania Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Denmark Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Netherlands Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Slovenia Verts/ALE

Against (1)

1

Sweden Verts/ALE

3

Luxembourg Verts/ALE

Abstain (1)

1

Estonia Verts/ALE

Abstain (1)

1
AmendmentsDossier
47 2018/2060(INI)
2018/06/01 LIBE 47 amendments...
source: 622.307

History

(these mark the time of scraping, not the official date of the change)

events/3/docs/0/url
Old
http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=REPORT&mode=XML&reference=A8-2018-0232&language=EN
New
http://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/A-8-2018-0232_EN.html
events/5/docs/0/url
Old
http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=TA&language=EN&reference=P8-TA-2018-0295
New
http://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/TA-8-2018-0295_EN.html
committees/0
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EP
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LIBE
rapporteur
name: MORAES Claude date: 2018-03-19T00:00:00 group: Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats abbr: S&D
shadows
committees/0
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rapporteur
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shadows
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  • date: 2017-12-20T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/docs_autres_institutions/commission_europeenne/com/2017/0798/COM_COM(2017)0798_EN.pdf title: COM(2017)0798 type: Non-legislative basic document published celexid: CELEX:52017PC0798:EN body: EC commission: DG: url: http://ec.europa.eu/info/departments/migration-and-home-affairs_en title: Migration and Home Affairs Commissioner: AVRAMOPOULOS Dimitris type: Non-legislative basic document published
  • date: 2018-06-14T00:00:00 body: EP type: Committee referral announced in Parliament, 1st reading/single reading committees: body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Constitutional Affairs committee: AFCO body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Foreign Affairs committee: AFET body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Budgets committee: BUDG body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Budgetary Control committee: CONT body: EP shadows: group: EPP name: METSOLA Roberta group: ECR name: STEVENS Helga group: ALDE name: PETERSEN Morten Helveg group: GUE/NGL name: ERNST Cornelia group: Verts/ALE name: TERRICABRAS Josep-Maria responsible: True committee: LIBE date: 2018-03-19T00:00:00 committee_full: Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs rapporteur: group: S&D name: MORAES Claude
  • date: 2018-06-20T00:00:00 body: EP type: Vote in committee, 1st reading/single reading committees: body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Constitutional Affairs committee: AFCO body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Foreign Affairs committee: AFET body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Budgets committee: BUDG body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Budgetary Control committee: CONT body: EP shadows: group: EPP name: METSOLA Roberta group: ECR name: STEVENS Helga group: ALDE name: PETERSEN Morten Helveg group: GUE/NGL name: ERNST Cornelia group: Verts/ALE name: TERRICABRAS Josep-Maria responsible: True committee: LIBE date: 2018-03-19T00:00:00 committee_full: Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs rapporteur: group: S&D name: MORAES Claude
  • date: 2018-06-27T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=REPORT&mode=XML&reference=A8-2018-0232&language=EN type: Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading title: A8-0232/2018 body: EP type: Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading
  • date: 2018-07-04T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=TA&language=EN&reference=P8-TA-2018-0295 type: Decision by Parliament, 1st reading/single reading title: T8-0295/2018 body: EP type: Decision by Parliament, 1st reading/single reading
commission
  • body: EC dg: Migration and Home Affairs commissioner: AVRAMOPOULOS Dimitris
committees/0
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rapporteur
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shadows
committees/0
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AFCO
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responsible
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committee_full
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committee
LIBE
date
2018-03-19T00:00:00
committee_full
Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs
rapporteur
group: S&D name: MORAES Claude
docs
  • date: 2018-05-18T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=COMPARL&mode=XML&language=EN&reference=PE621.019 title: PE621.019 type: Committee draft report body: EP
  • date: 2018-06-01T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=COMPARL&mode=XML&language=EN&reference=PE622.307 title: PE622.307 type: Amendments tabled in committee body: EP
events
  • date: 2017-12-20T00:00:00 type: Non-legislative basic document published body: EC docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/docs_autres_institutions/commission_europeenne/com/2017/0798/COM_COM(2017)0798_EN.pdf title: COM(2017)0798 url: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexplus!prod!DocNumber&lg=EN&type_doc=COMfinal&an_doc=2017&nu_doc=0798 title: EUR-Lex summary: PURPOSE: to open negotiations for an agreement between the European Union and Jordan on the exchange of personal data between the European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation (Europol) and the Jordanian competent authorities for fighting serious crime and terrorism. BACKGROUND: in a globalised world where serious crime and terrorism are increasingly transnational and polyvalent, Europol should therefore be able to exchange personal data with law enforcement authorities of third countries to the extent necessary for the accomplishment of its tasks. Regulation (EU) 2016/794 establishes a legal framework for Europol. It sets out the rules for the transfer of personal data from Europol to third countries and international organisations. Since the entry into application of the Regulation (1 May 2017), and pursuant to the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), the Commission is responsible, on behalf of the Union, for negotiating international agreements with third countries for the exchange of personal data with Europol. Taking into account the political strategy as outlined in the European agenda on security and the potential benefits of closer cooperation in this area, the Commission considers it necessary to start negotiations in the short-term with eight countries , as identified in the 11th progress report towards a genuine and effective Security Union. The 2016-2020 Europol strategy identifies the Mediterranean region as priority for enhanced partnerships. The 2017-2020 Europol external strategy also stresses the need for closer cooperation between Europol and the Middle East/North Africa (MENA) due to the current terrorist threat and migration-related challenges. Jordan is a key partner for the EU in particular for its role in promoting stability, moderation and inter-faith tolerance in the Middle East. The EU and Jordan have a strong partnership across many sectors and have been linked by an Association Agreement since 2002 (advanced status since 2010). Jordan is facing difficult economic, social and security challenges. In particular, Jordan is hosting more than 650 000 registered Syrian refugees (around 10% of the Jordanian population before the Syria crisis), as well as other refugee populations. Based on data available as well as Europol's in-house expert knowledge, cooperation with Jordan is needed in particular to counter the following crime phenomena: terrorism : the destabilisation of Syria and Iraq, the spread of Da'esh and other terrorist groups pose a direct security threat to Jordan and the EU; migration-related challenges : there are a number of migration-related challenges related to the ongoing conflict in Syria. Areas surrounding refugee camps and close to the Syrian border are susceptible to weapons, human and sex trafficking; firearms trafficking : bordering Syria, Jordan can play a major role in preventing the entry of firearms into theatres of armed conflict, and making sure illicit shipments are intercepted, in particular on their way back to the EU; drug trafficking : the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) is a major source, transit point, and consumer of illicit drugs. CONTENT: the purpose of this Recommendation for a Council Decision is to obtain from the Council an authorisation from the Council for the Commission to negotiate, on behalf of the European Union, an agreement between the European Union and Jordan on the exchange of personal data between the European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation (Europol) and the Jordanian competent authorities for fighting serious crime and terrorism. In order to respect the principle of purpose limitation , cooperation under the agreement shall only cover forms of crime and related criminal offences for which Europol is competent. In particular, cooperation should aim to combat terrorism and prevent radicalisation, disrupt organised crime, including trafficking of migrants, firearms and drugs, and combat cybercrime. The agreement should respect fundamental rights and observe the principles recognised by the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, in particular the right to private and family life, the right to the protection of personal data, and the right to effective remedy and fair trial.
  • date: 2018-06-14T00:00:00 type: Committee referral announced in Parliament, 1st reading/single reading body: EP
  • date: 2018-06-20T00:00:00 type: Vote in committee, 1st reading/single reading body: EP
  • date: 2018-06-27T00:00:00 type: Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading body: EP docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=REPORT&mode=XML&reference=A8-2018-0232&language=EN title: A8-0232/2018 summary: The Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs adopted the report by Claude MORAES (S&D, UK) on the recommendation, by the Commission, for a Council decision authorising the opening of negotiations for an agreement between the European Union and the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan on the exchange of personal data between the European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation (Europol) and the Jordanian competent authorities for fighting serious crime and terrorism. The report stressed the need for cooperation with Jordan in the field of law enforcement for the European Union’s security interests to be properly assessed and called on the Commission to conduct a thorough impact assessment on this issue. Consequently, Members considered that due caution is needed while defining the negotiating mandate for an EU-Jordan agreement. They called on the Commission to carry out an appropriate impact assessment so as to define the necessary safeguards to be integrated in the agreement. The report insisted that the level of protection resulting from the agreement should be essentially equivalent to the level of protection in EU law. If such level cannot be guaranteed both in law and in practice, the agreement cannot be concluded. In particular, the Agreement shall contain: strict and specific provisions imposing respect for the principle of purpose limitation with clear conditions for the processing of personal data transmitted; a clear and precise provision setting out the data retention period of personal data that have been transferred and requiring the erasure of the personal data transferred at the end of the data retention period; data subjects’ right to information, rectification and erasure as provided for in other Union legislation on data protection; a clear definition of the categories of offences for which personal data shall be exchanged; a monitoring mechanism to be subject to periodic assessments. Members insisted on the need to: expressly indicate that onward transfers of information from the competent authorities of Jordan to other authorities in Jordan can only be allowed to fulfil the original purpose of the transfer by Europol and should always be communicated to the independent authority, the EDPS and Europol. To this end, an exhaustive list of the competent authorities in Jordan to which Europol can transfer data should be drawn up. Any modification to such a list that would replace or add a new competent authority would require a review of the international agreement; expressly indicate that onward transfers of information from the competent authorities of Jordan to other countries are prohibited and would result in the immediate ending of the international agreement. Taking into account Jordan's different societal characteristics and cultural background compared to the EU and the fact that criminal acts are defined differently in the EU than in Jordan, Members considered that the transfer of personal data revealing racial or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious or philosophical beliefs, trade union membership, genetic data or data concerning a person’s health and sex life should only take place in very exceptional cases and be subject to clear safeguards for the data subject and persons linked to the data subject. Lastly, the report stressed that the European Parliament’s consent to the conclusion of the agreement will be conditional upon satisfactory involvement of the European Parliament at all stages of the procedure.
  • date: 2018-07-04T00:00:00 type: Results of vote in Parliament body: EP docs: url: https://oeil.secure.europarl.europa.eu/oeil/popups/sda.do?id=31354&l=en title: Results of vote in Parliament
  • date: 2018-07-04T00:00:00 type: Decision by Parliament, 1st reading/single reading body: EP docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=TA&language=EN&reference=P8-TA-2018-0295 title: T8-0295/2018 summary: The European Parliament adopted by 542 votes to 89, with 35 abstentions, a resolution on the recommendation, by the Commission, for a Council decision authorising the opening of negotiations for an agreement between the European Union and the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan on the exchange of personal data between the European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation (Europol) and the Jordanian competent authorities for fighting serious crime and terrorism. Assessing the risks : Parliament considered that the necessity of the cooperation with Jordan in the field of law enforcement for the European Union’s security interests, as well as its proportionality , needs to be properly assessed and called on the Commission, in this context, to conduct a thorough impact assessment. Members highlighted that due caution is needed while defining the negotiating mandate for an agreement between the European Union and Jordan. They called on the Commission to carry out an appropriate impact assessment so as to define the necessary safeguards to be integrated in the agreement. Ensuring equivalent protection : full consistency with Articles 7 and 8 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights and with the other fundamental rights and freedoms enshrined in the Charter should be fully ensured in the receiving third country to which it is addressed. Parliament insisted that the level of protection resulting from the agreement should be substantially equivalent to the level of protection offered by Union legislation. If such a level of protection cannot be guaranteed, both in legislation and in practice, the agreement should not be concluded. In particular, the Agreement shall contain: strict and specific provisions imposing respect for the principle of purpose limitation with clear conditions for the processing of personal data transmitted; a clear and precise provision setting out the data retention period of personal data that have been transferred and requiring the erasure of the personal data transferred at the end of the data retention period; data subjects’ right to information, rectification and erasure as provided for in other Union legislation on data protection; a clear definition of the categories of offences for which personal data shall be exchanged; a clear reference to the name of the independent supervisory authority in charge of supervising the implementation of the international agreement; a monitoring mechanism to be subject to periodic assessments. Members insisted on the need to: expressly indicate that onward transfers of information from the competent authorities of Jordan to other authorities in Jordan can only be allowed to fulfil the original purpose of the transfer by Europol and should always be communicated to the independent authority, the EDPS and Europol. To this end, an exhaustive list of the competent authorities in Jordan to which Europol can transfer data should be drawn up. Any modification to such a list that would replace or add a new competent authority would require a review of the international agreement; expressly indicate that onward transfers of information from the competent authorities of Jordan to other countries are prohibited and would result in the immediate ending of the international agreement. Sensitive data : taking into account Jordan's different societal characteristics and cultural background compared to the EU and the fact that criminal acts are defined differently in the EU than in Jordan, Parliament considered that the transfer of personal data revealing racial or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious or philosophical beliefs, trade union membership, genetic data or data concerning a person’s health and sex life should only take place in very exceptional cases and be subject to clear safeguards for the data subject and persons linked to the data subject. Lastly, the resolution stressed that the European Parliament’s consent to the conclusion of the agreement shall be conditional upon satisfactory involvement of the European Parliament at all stages of the procedure.
  • date: 2018-07-04T00:00:00 type: End of procedure in Parliament body: EP
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  • body: EC dg: url: http://ec.europa.eu/info/departments/migration-and-home-affairs_en title: Migration and Home Affairs commissioner: AVRAMOPOULOS Dimitris
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  • LIBE/8/12856
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  • 1.20.09 Protection of privacy and data protection
  • 7.30.20 Action to combat terrorism
  • 7.30.30 Action to combat crime
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1.20.09
Protection of privacy and data protection
7.30.20
Action to combat terrorism
7.30.30
Action to combat crime
activities/3/docs/0/text
  • The Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs adopted the report by Claude MORAES (S&D, UK) on the recommendation, by the Commission, for a Council decision authorising the opening of negotiations for an agreement between the European Union and the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan on the exchange of personal data between the European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation (Europol) and the Jordanian competent authorities for fighting serious crime and terrorism.

    The report stressed the need for cooperation with Jordan in the field of law enforcement for the European Union’s security interests to be properly assessed and called on the Commission to conduct a thorough impact assessment on this issue.

    Consequently, Members considered that due caution is needed while defining the negotiating mandate for an EU-Jordan agreement. They called on the Commission to carry out an appropriate impact assessment so as to define the necessary safeguards to be integrated in the agreement.

    The report insisted that the level of protection resulting from the agreement should be essentially equivalent to the level of protection in EU law. If such level cannot be guaranteed both in law and in practice, the agreement cannot be concluded.

    In particular, the Agreement shall contain:

    • strict and specific provisions imposing respect for the principle of purpose limitation with clear conditions for the processing of personal data transmitted;
    • a clear and precise provision setting out the data retention period of personal data that have been transferred and requiring the erasure of the personal data transferred at the end of the data retention period;
    • data subjects’ right to information, rectification and erasure as provided for in other Union legislation on data protection;
    • a clear definition of the categories of offences for which personal data shall be exchanged;
    • a monitoring mechanism to be subject to periodic assessments.

    Members insisted on the need to:

    • expressly indicate that onward transfers of information from the competent authorities of Jordan to other authorities in Jordan can only be allowed to fulfil the original purpose of the transfer by Europol and should always be communicated to the independent authority, the EDPS and Europol. To this end, an exhaustive list of the competent authorities in Jordan to which Europol can transfer data should be drawn up. Any modification to such a list that would replace or add a new competent authority would require a review of the international agreement;
    • expressly indicate that onward transfers of information from the competent authorities of Jordan to other countries are prohibited and would result in the immediate ending of the international agreement.

    Taking into account Jordan's different societal characteristics and cultural background compared to the EU and the fact that criminal acts are defined differently in the EU than in Jordan, Members considered that the transfer of personal data revealing racial or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious or philosophical beliefs, trade union membership, genetic data or data concerning a person’s health and sex life should only take place in very exceptional cases and be subject to clear safeguards for the data subject and persons linked to the data subject.

    Lastly, the report stressed that the European Parliament’s consent to the conclusion of the agreement will be conditional upon satisfactory involvement of the European Parliament at all stages of the procedure.

activities/4/docs
  • url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=TA&language=EN&reference=P8-TA-2018-0295 type: Decision by Parliament, 1st reading/single reading title: T8-0295/2018
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  • PURPOSE: to open negotiations for an agreement between the European Union and Jordan on the exchange of personal data between the European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation (Europol) and the Jordanian competent authorities for fighting serious crime and terrorism.

    BACKGROUND: in a globalised world where serious crime and terrorism are increasingly transnational and polyvalent, Europol should therefore be able to exchange personal data with law enforcement authorities of third countries to the extent necessary for the accomplishment of its tasks.

    Regulation (EU) 2016/794 establishes a legal framework for Europol. It sets out the rules for the transfer of personal data from Europol to third countries and international organisations. Since the entry into application of the Regulation (1 May 2017), and pursuant to the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), the Commission is responsible, on behalf of the Union, for negotiating international agreements with third countries for the exchange of personal data with Europol.

    Taking into account the political strategy as outlined in the European agenda on security and the potential benefits of closer cooperation in this area, the Commission considers it necessary to start negotiations in the short-term with eight countries, as identified in the 11th progress report towards a genuine and effective Security Union.

    The 2016-2020 Europol strategy identifies the Mediterranean region as priority for enhanced partnerships. The 2017-2020 Europol external strategy also stresses the need for closer cooperation between Europol and the Middle East/North Africa (MENA) due to the current terrorist threat and migration-related challenges.

    Jordan is a key partner for the EU in particular for its role in promoting stability, moderation and inter-faith tolerance in the Middle East. The EU and Jordan have a strong partnership across many sectors and have been linked by an Association Agreement since 2002 (advanced status since 2010). Jordan is facing difficult economic, social and security challenges. In particular, Jordan is hosting more than 650 000 registered Syrian refugees (around 10% of the Jordanian population before the Syria crisis), as well as other refugee populations. 

    Based on data available as well as Europol's in-house expert knowledge, cooperation with Jordan is needed in particular to counter the following crime phenomena:

    • terrorism: the destabilisation of Syria and Iraq, the spread of Da'esh and other terrorist groups pose a direct security threat to Jordan and the EU;
    • migration-related challenges: there are a number of migration-related challenges related to the ongoing conflict in Syria. Areas surrounding refugee camps and close to the Syrian border are susceptible to weapons, human and sex trafficking;
    • firearms trafficking: bordering Syria, Jordan can play a major role in preventing the entry of firearms into theatres of armed conflict, and making sure illicit shipments are intercepted, in particular on their way back to the EU;
    • drug trafficking: the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) is a major source, transit point, and consumer of illicit drugs.

    CONTENT: the purpose of this Recommendation for a Council Decision is to obtain from the Council an authorisation from the Council for the Commission to negotiate, on behalf of the European Union, an agreement between the European Union and Jordan on the exchange of personal data between the European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation (Europol) and the Jordanian competent authorities for fighting serious crime and terrorism.

    In order to respect the principle of purpose limitation, cooperation under the agreement shall only cover forms of crime and related criminal offences for which Europol is competent. In particular, cooperation should aim to combat terrorism and prevent radicalisation, disrupt organised crime, including trafficking of migrants, firearms and drugs, and combat cybercrime.

    The agreement should respect fundamental rights and observe the principles recognised by the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, in particular the right to private and family life, the right to the protection of personal data, and the right to effective remedy and fair trial.

activities/3
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2018-06-27T00:00:00
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  • date: 2017-12-20T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/docs_autres_institutions/commission_europeenne/com/2017/0798/COM_COM(2017)0798_EN.pdf title: COM(2017)0798 type: Non-legislative basic document published celexid: CELEX:52017PC0798:EN type: Non-legislative basic document published body: EC commission: DG: url: http://ec.europa.eu/info/departments/migration-and-home-affairs_en title: Migration and Home Affairs Commissioner: AVRAMOPOULOS Dimitris
  • date: 2018-06-14T00:00:00 body: EP type: Committee referral announced in Parliament, 1st reading/single reading committees: body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Constitutional Affairs committee: AFCO body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Foreign Affairs committee: AFET body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Budgets committee: BUDG body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Budgetary Control committee: CONT body: EP shadows: group: EPP name: METSOLA Roberta group: ECR name: STEVENS Helga group: ALDE name: PETERSEN Morten Helveg group: GUE/NGL name: ERNST Cornelia group: Verts/ALE name: TERRICABRAS Josep-Maria responsible: True committee: LIBE date: 2018-03-19T00:00:00 committee_full: Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs rapporteur: group: S&D name: MORAES Claude
  • date: 2018-07-04T00:00:00 body: EP type: Vote in plenary scheduled
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  • body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Constitutional Affairs committee: AFCO
  • body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Foreign Affairs committee: AFET
  • body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Budgets committee: BUDG
  • body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Budgetary Control committee: CONT
  • body: EP shadows: group: EPP name: METSOLA Roberta group: ECR name: STEVENS Helga group: ALDE name: PETERSEN Morten Helveg group: GUE/NGL name: ERNST Cornelia group: Verts/ALE name: TERRICABRAS Josep-Maria responsible: True committee: LIBE date: 2018-03-19T00:00:00 committee_full: Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs rapporteur: group: S&D name: MORAES Claude
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  • body: EC dg: url: http://ec.europa.eu/info/departments/migration-and-home-affairs_en title: Migration and Home Affairs commissioner: AVRAMOPOULOS Dimitris
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LIBE/8/12856
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Jordan
reference
2018/2060(INI)
title
Proposal to open negotiations on the Commission recommendation for a Council decision authorising the opening of negotiations for an agreement between the EU and Jordan on the exchange of personal data between Europol and the Jordanian competent authorities for fighting serious crime and terrorism
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Rules of Procedure EP 108
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