BETA


Events

2009/10/15
   EC - Follow-up document
Details

The EU Integrated Maritime Policy (IMP) has established itself as new approach to enhance the optimal development of all sea-related activities in a sustainable manner. It has confirmed the vision that, by joining up policies towards seas and oceans, Europe can draw much higher returns from them with a far lesser impact on the environment.

Essentially the framework provided by the IMP seeks to achieve (and has started to do so)

four objectives:

to promote integration of governance structures by making them more inclusive and cooperative; to build the knowledge base and cross cutting tools necessary to enable the implementation of integrated policies; to improve the quality of sectoral policies, through an active search for synergies and increased coherence across sectors; in implementing all above, to take account of specificities of the regional seas around Europe, through tailor-made solutions.

When it endorsed the EU IMP and the Blue Paper ( SEC(2007)1278 ), the European Council of 14 December 2007 asked the Commission to report within two years on the achievements of the policy. The present Communication sums up these achievements and charts the course for the next phase of the IMP. It also highlights how joined-up policy-making towards our seas, maritime sectors and coastal areas can contribute to addressing challenges posed by the current global economic crisis and by the need to take decisive action against climate change and environmental degradation.

The implementation of the Action plan has progressed well. Of the 65 actions in the plan, 56 have been launched or completed (mostly in the form of Commission or Council acts). On 9 actions various initiatives have been undertaken, although no formal documents are adopted yet. Following the first phase, the Commission and Member States are now focusing efforts on effective implementation on the ground , with additional activities in all relevant policy areas pursued where needed.

The report notes that the last two years have confirmed the IMP as a highly promising policy providing a significant contribution to growth, jobs and environmental sustainability for Europe’s coastal areas and beyond. Despite its young age, this new EU policy has already changed the way in which Europe deals with its maritime and coastal assets.

The Commission considers that these objectives will be best achieved through a combination of progress in six strategic directions :

Integrated maritime governance must be further enhanced. The progress registered over recent years needs to be turned into effective integrated structures at all levels of government. EU institutions, Member States and coastal regions have a particular responsibility in ensuring upstream policy integration and in adopting coherent, joined up agendas for maritime affairs, further counteracting the prevalence of isolated sectoral policy thinking. Stakeholder involvement in maritime policy-making should also be enshrined more permanently in governance structures. This should also lead to a more intense dialogue between the EU, Member State's Governments and coastal regions, which often hold key expertise necessary for an integrated approach to Maritime Affairs. For the same reason the formation of a crosssectoral platform for stakeholder dialogue on maritime affairs should be supported. Cross-cutting policy tools are of utmost importance to enhance economic development, environmental monitoring, safety, security and law enforcement on Europe’s oceans and seas. In particular, maritime spatial planning, in combination with increased marine knowledge, can unblock considerable economic investment and drastically improve the way we manage our maritime spaces, preserving their ecosystems. It must become a practical instrument on all relevant levels of governance , including with the relevant mechanisms to ensure joined-up decision-making over cross-border investments. The integration of maritime surveillance has the potential of making a difference to the way key policy objectives such as the fight against illegal immigration, the safeguard of commercial shipping and the protection of natural resources are carried out by national authorities. Member States and the Commission will have to continue to work together on these items so that the processes which were initiated in the last two years will bear their intended fruit. The definition of the boundaries of sustainability of human activities that have an impact on the marine environment in the years ahead, in the framework of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive , will provide clarity and design a platform for the successful development of all maritime activities, paying due attention to their cumulative impacts. Hence, the implementation of this Directive will remain a key objective of the IMP, which should also develop the necessary cooperation between all relevant sectors and services to this end, including inter-alia between marine science and the marine environment policy. Sea-basin strategies are key to a successful implementation of the IMP. This is where the priorities and the tools of the policy can be adapted to the specific geographic, economic and political contexts of each large maritime region. Co-operation with and among Member States and regions sharing a sea basin is a crucial element of success and, whenever necessary, this should be accompanied with proper dialogue with third countries sharing a sea basin with the EU. Action at the level of sub-basins can also be useful in establishing positive examples and best practices. The international dimension of the IMP will also require more attention, as illustrated by the dedicated Communication published together with this report. Europe must take a leading role in improving global maritime governance, as it has done in the matter of piracy or with regard to destructive fishing practices. The Commission intends to strengthen dialogue with a limited number of major maritime partners and its participation in international fora and informal processes. Renewed focus on economic growth, employment and innovation , in the present context of economic downturn, the implementation of the IMP should explore synergies between the European Energy Policy and the IMP, promoting energy generation from the sea, including renewable forms of energy, and use the sea more for energy transportation through pipelines, underwater grids and vessels. It will also be necessary to further link the EU's Climate Change Policy with IMP, by developing a strategy for adaptation to climate change in coastal and maritime areas, aiming at protecting coastal infrastructure and preserving marine biodiversity. As part of the developing debate on territorial cohesion, it will be important to ensure that maritime and coastal areas are fully taken into account.

The EU will also have to promote better maritime transport in order to foster co-modality , to implement the concept of the Motorways of the Sea , and to improve the EU programme for short sea shipping .

Still aiming at the economic development of maritime activities, it will be necessary to find ways and means of further stimulating maritime employment and investment in EU–flagged shipping, while remaining determined to advance the idea of clean ships . Indeed, support for innovation and research towards very low or even zero emission ships will continue to be a major part of the Community's response to the strategically important shipbuilding sector.

Lastly, the Commission is examining the future funding needs that IMP-related actions may involve as part of its overall reflection on the next financial perspective. The Commission intends to produce in 2010 a policy document detailing projects and initiatives aimed at further developing the above six strategic directions, following consultations with stakeholders.

2009/10/15
   EC - Follow-up document
2008/07/17
   EC - Commission response to text adopted in plenary
Documents
2008/06/12
   EC - Commission response to text adopted in plenary
Documents
2008/05/20
   EP - Results of vote in Parliament
2008/05/20
   EP - Debate in Parliament
2008/05/20
   EP - Decision by Parliament, 1st reading/single reading
Details

The European Parliament adopted by 587 votes to 20, with 38 abstentions, a resolution on an integrated maritime policy for the European Union, in response to the Commission’s communication on the subject.

The own-initiative report had been tabled for consideration in plenary by Willi PIECYK (PES, DE) on behalf of the Committee on Transport and Tourism.

While MEPs welcome the Commission’s communication, they take the overall view that the Action Plan includes too few practical measures . The Commission is invited to be more ambitious in future in using the instruments at its disposal under the Treaties. MEPs regret the fact that the Action Plan addresses the challenges of climate change only in a non-binding way : in their opinion, one task of a European maritime policy has to be to lay down the adjustment measures required, as a matter of urgency, especially in view of the melting of glaciers leading to the rise in sea levels, together with the increased risk of flooding of ports and coastal regions. As a result, they welcome the Commission's intention to put forward an Arctic Initiative and call on the scientific community and decision makers to further explore possibilities for protecting the polar ice caps.

The Resolution recalls that maritime policy must make a substantial contribution to reducing greenhouse gas emissions , notably by incorporating shipping into the emissions trading scheme and enhancing research efforts both with regard to exploiting the seas as a source of renewable energy and with a view to developing cleaner new ship propulsion technologies. It calls emphatically on the Commission to be more ambitious in combating sulphur and nitrogen oxide emissions, as well as solid waste from ships, and to cooperate more closely with the International Maritime Organization (IMO), which particularly concerns:

introducing nitrogen oxide emission standards for ships using EU ports; designating the Mediterranean Sea, the Black Sea and the North-East Atlantic as Sulphur Emission Control Areas (SECAs) under the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL Convention); reducing the maximum permitted sulphur content in marine fuels used in SECAs by passenger vessels from 1,5 % to 0,5 %; introducing fiscal measures, such as taxes or charges on sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions from ships and identifying ways of imposing such measures and charges on all ships, regardless of flag, putting into Community ports or sailing within the waters of EU Member States; promoting the introduction of differentiated harbour and waterway charges to favour ships with low sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions; gradually introducing a requirement for ships at ports to use land-based electricity; proposing an EU directive on the quality of marine fuels.

MEPs point out that land-based pollution of the seas constitutes a significant proportion of overall maritime pollution and that the Commission has so far not got to grips with this issue. They reiterate their call for the Commission to put forward an action plan to reduce such pollution, and call for the Member States to act promptly to transpose the legislation in this field, such as the water framework Directive, into national law. They also urge the Commission to help Member States to launch a plan to survey and map wrecked ships and submerged archaeological sites – since these form part of the Community's historic and cultural heritage.

The Resolution welcomes the Commission's stocktaking with regard to the exclusion of seafarers from a number of areas of European social and labour protection rules (e.g. collective redundancies, the safeguarding of employees' rights in the event of transfers of undertakings, the informing, consulting and posting of workers). MEPs propose that these directives be revised in close cooperation with the social partners. They urge those Member States which have not yet done so to ratify, as soon as possible, the Maritime Labour Convention (2006) adopted with a view to improving the living and working conditions of seafarers and to preventing unfair competition in the shipping industry by updating and codifying the entire body of international labour standards in force.

In terms of international piracy , MEPs call upon the Commission and the Member States to actively support, in the framework of the UN and the IMO, the initiative promoted by several Member States, to extend the right of sea and air pursuit to the territorial waters of the coastal states, provided the countries concerned agree, as well as to develop a mechanism of mutual assistance against cases of maritime piracy. The Commission is called to set up a Community system for coordination and mutual assistance, which would allow naval vessels flying the flag of a Member State deployed in international waters, to protect fishing and merchant vessels from other Member States.

In the fishing sector, the key objective of the integrated maritime policy for the European Union should be to promote the modernisation and sustainable, balanced and fair development of the industry. MEPs are of the opinion that creating more and better seafaring jobs, particularly in the fishing industry, also depends on a guarantee of a fair and adequate income, proper working conditions (including health and safety) and access to training for people working in the industry. Member States are asked to work towards the mutual recognition of intermediate diplomas for the occupations of steersman and mechanic for fishing vessels.

Lastly, MEPs su pport the proposal to establish an annual ' European Maritime Day ', which should be used to highlight the significance of maritime policy outside maritime circles, with the participation of ordinary citizens, schools, universities and non-governmental organisations.

Documents
2008/05/20
   EP - End of procedure in Parliament
2008/04/21
   EP - Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading
Documents
2008/04/21
   EP - Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading
Documents
2008/04/08
   EP - Vote in committee, 1st reading/single reading
Details

The Committee on Transport and Tourism adopted the own-initiative report by Willi PIECYK (PES, DE) on an integrated maritime policy for the European Union, in response to a communication on this subject.

While welcoming the Commission’s communication, MEPs believe that, on the whole, the Action Plan includes too few practical measures . The Commission is called to be more ambitious in future in using the instruments at its disposal under the Treaties. MEPs also regret the fact that the Action Plan addresses the challenges of climate change only in a non-binding way : in their opinion, one task of the European maritime policy has to be to lay down, as a matter of urgency, the adjustment measures required, especially in view of the melting of glaciers leading to the rise in sea levels, together with the increased risk of flooding of ports and coastal regions. In this respect, they call for all relevant policies, and research policy in particular, to play their part.

The parliamentary committee reaffirms its call for maritime policy to make a substantial contribution to reducing greenhouse gas emissions , in particular by incorporating shipping into emissions trading and enhancing research efforts both with regard to exploiting the seas as a source of renewable energy and with a view to developing new, cleaner ship propulsion technologies. It calls emphatically on the Commission to be more ambitious in combating sulphur and nitrogen oxide emissions, as well as solid waste from ships, and to cooperate more closely with the IMO (International Maritime Organisation) on this issue.

MEPs point out that land-based pollution of the seas constitutes a significant proportion of overall maritime pollution in Europe and indicate the absence of a solution to this issue from the Commission. They reiterate their call for the Commission to put forward an action plan to reduce such pollution, and ask Member States to act promptly to transpose the legislation in this field, such as the water framework directive. They also urge the Commission to help Member States to launch a plan to survey and map wrecked ships and submerged archaeological sites since these form part of the Community’s historic and cultural heritage.

The report welcomes the Commission's stocktaking with regard to the exclusion of seafarers from a number of areas of European social and labour protection rules . MEPs propose that these directives be revised in close cooperation with the social partners. They urge those Member States which have not yet done so to ratify, as soon as possible, the Maritime Labour Convention, 2006, adopted with a view to improving the living and working conditions of seafarers and to preventing unfair competition in the shipping industry by updating and codifying the entire body of international labour standards in force .

In the fishing sector , the key objective of the maritime policy for the European Union should be to promote the modernisation and sustainable, balanced and fair development of the industry. MEPs believe that creating more and better seafaring jobs, particularly in the fishing industry, also depends on a guarantee of a fair and adequate income, proper working conditions (including health and safety) and access to training for people working in the industry. Member States are called to mutually recognise intermediate diplomas for the occupations of steersman and mechanic for fishing vessels.

The report emphatically supports the Commission's intention to exploit the potential of short sea shipping and inland waterway transport between the Member States and to integrate this rapidly into the single market. In addition, it welcomes the Commission’s intention to speed up its proposals for a common maritime transport area together with a comprehensive maritime transport strategy for 2008-2018.

Lastly, MEPs support the proposal to establish an annual ' European Maritime Day ', which should be used to highlight the significance of maritime policy outside maritime circles, with the participation of ordinary citizens, schools, universities and non-governmental organisations.

2008/04/03
   EP - Committee opinion
Documents
2008/04/02
   EP - Committee opinion
Documents
2008/03/13
   EP - Amendments tabled in committee
Documents
2008/02/13
   EP - Committee draft report
Documents
2008/01/17
   EP - Committee referral announced in Parliament, 1st reading/single reading
2007/11/22
   EP - GUERREIRO Pedro (GUE/NGL) appointed as rapporteur in PECH
2007/11/20
   EP - PIECYK Willi (PSE) appointed as rapporteur in TRAN
2007/11/20
   EP - MARQUES Sérgio (PPE-DE) appointed as rapporteur in REGI
2007/10/10
   EC - Document attached to the procedure
Details

The Commission presented a communication on the conclusions from the consultation on a European maritime policy which followed the adoption of the Green Paper on Maritime Policy.

The consultation lasted one year and received a response that was unprecedented both in terms of the scope and in the depth of the participation in the consultation process. The Commission received over 490 contributions and over 230 events were held where maritime policy was discussed with stakeholders.

The main conclusions are as follows:

The Search for Added Value: stakeholders are in favour of an integrated approach to Maritime Policy in the European Union, because it integrates the needs and concerns of linked sectors that are currently dealt with in separate policy activities. The consultation process confirms the scope for developing the relationship between those who live and work in day-to-day contact with the seas, including seafarers and fishermen, as well as other related sectors of economic activity. Operators point out the need for the integration of systems and standards in the area of maritime monitoring and surveillance. Researchers point to the economic benefits of the combined use of expensive assets for their work.

Certain stakeholders urge that the development of an integrated approach should not lead the EU to re- or over-regulate, or to over-centralise. A significant number do not want to see an integrated policy change existing competences.

Subsidiarity means Responsibility: The response to the Green Paper confirms that a European Maritime Policy must build on the existing distribution of competences within the EU. The subsidiarity principle and the involvement of stakeholders will play a key role in the future initiatives taken in the area of the EU’s maritime policy.

The European Union's role is seen as facilitator rather than integrator per se. This is particularly the case as far as spatial planning and offshore government activities are concerned. There is little support for a European Coast Guard, but there is interest in cooperation between Member States' assets to achieve similar objectives without changing competences.

Much emphasis has been placed on the necessity that existing policies and legal frameworks are better implemented and interact in a more consistent way. Calls were made in favour of specific regulatory initiatives in order to close gaps in EU legislation. The broad participation of local and regional government bodies indicates an enthusiasm to learn from others, share experience and contribute ideas. Industry, on the other hand, calls for less regulation and more self-regulation.

Global Issues and Responsibilities: the global nature of maritime activities, such as shipping and fisheries, became apparent in the course of the consultation. Several stakeholders thought that the EU should promote measures to protect the global ecosystem, including on the high seas.

Here, the majority of stakeholders agree on the need for multilateral rules and standards and their implementation and enforcement. Views on how to achieve this differ; some insist on developing standards only in the multilateral context, and are opposed to the EU developing standards first. However, a significant number of stakeholders believe that the EU has an important role to play in leading by example.

The consultation process thus confirms the importance of developing an international dimension to a European Maritime Policy. Stakeholders want to ensure that the current system is used to its fullest extent before trying out new solutions.

Sustainable Use of Resources: t he consultation process highlights how much Europe's prosperity relies on the availability of safe and efficient shipping services. Stakeholders agree that European shipping services and ports are sectors with high growth potential and that the EU's international and internal performance in the maritime sectors is built on delivering higher quality – not in being cheaper. The technologies of the future will be crucial building blocks for a more sustainable economy, e.g. the development of renewable energy, in particular wind and wave energy.

The consultation process has revealed strong support for the better collection and use of (real-time and other) data on oceans and seas. There is a need for high standards to ensure high quality and thus competitiveness, and standards that support sustainability. Industry points out that competitiveness on the basis of high standards will only work if these standards are applied across the board, securing a level playing field. They also point out that voluntary approaches may sometimes bring better results than prescriptive regulation.

Stakeholders indicate that there is scope for improvement in skills and training. There are divergences on whether, and which, exclusions concerning maritime sectors in EU social legislation are justified, but there is agreement on the need to contribute to a global level playing field for the sector and the role that EU legislation can play in this context.

There is very little dispute about the need to set up marine protected areas – but there is discussion about their designation. The development of blue biotechnology or other uses of genetic resources is seen as an opportunity, demonstrating the need for an integrated approach linking research, sustainability, and international rule-making. Stakeholders point out that up to 80% of the pollution of the marine environment is land-based and call for more action on this.

The importance of linkages between existing environmental instruments and the implementation of the marine thematic strategy is mentioned. Coherence and compatibility are underscored as essential for the implementation of all these instruments. Some stakeholders highlight the need to go beyond the Marine Thematic Strategy to embrace broader environment protection objectives, while others want to ensure that the impacts of environmental measures and legislation take economic priorities duly into account.

Working on the basis of ecosystems and eco-regions is fundamental for the sustainable management of sea and coastal spaces. Stakeholders point to the need for cooperation between coastal regions and neighbouring Member States – as well as neighbouring countries. There are many voices calling for a stronger integration of environmental concerns within fisheries combined with stronger integration of fisheries within maritime policy. Lastly, according to stakeholders, without improvements in training, working conditions and job opportunities for fishermen, developing a sustainable approach to fisheries is not realistic.

Maritime Management: stakeholders emphasise the need for coordinated management and planning for competing uses of the seas. They agree that maritime spatial planning would be a good tool to apply across the EU, but should remain a Member State competence.

The initiative to develop a European Data Network is generally welcomed, and many proposals are made as to practical ways and means of taking on this task. Very few stakeholders dispute the potential to achieve cost savings through standardisation, interlinking and communication between existing sectoral systems.

Regional stakeholders, including the Committee of the Regions, call, for the adoption of specific and targeted approaches to funding in coastal regions, through more transparency, and the linking of existing financial tools, under the umbrella of a European Coastal Fund.

Europeans and the Sea: Participation and Involvement: contributions call for consultation and dialogue, and for more information to be made available to all affected by maritime policy.

Individual citizens and civil society respond with mixed messages. There is some concern that the EU should not take over national or local competences but overall the reactions indicate of the public's concern for the planet's marine ecosystem and their impression that insufficient government action is being taken against practices that damage it.

T here is a general consensus that the overall image of the maritime sectors needs to be enhanced. Ideas abound for the organisation of exchanges of best practice, conferences, the involvement of experts in th e maritime world, such as fishermen, or small-scale projects aimed at informing local communities or tourists.

2007/10/10
   EC - Document attached to the procedure
2007/10/10
   EC - Document attached to the procedure
2007/10/10
   EC - Document attached to the procedure
2007/10/10
   EC - Document attached to the procedure
2007/10/10
   EC - Non-legislative basic document published
Details

PURPOSE: to set out an “Integrated Maritime Policy” for the EU.

CONTENT: Europe’s maritime spaces and its coasts are central to its well-being and prosperity – they are Europe’s trade routes, climate regulator, source of food, energy and resources, and a favoured site for recreational and residence purposes. Yet the strain is showing and Europe stands at a cross-roads. The accumulated effect of over-activity in the maritime spaces is leading to conflicts of use and to a deterioration in the marine environment. In the face of rapid globalisation and climate change the need for Europe to address these challenges is great.

In a bid to address these challenges the Commission held a series of consultation exercises on how Europe relates to the sea. Based on the results of this exercise the Commission, in this report, sets out its vision of an “Integrated Maritime Policy” for the EU. This policy is based on the assumption that all matters relating to Europe’s oceans and seas are interlinked and that sea-related policies must be developed in order to reap the desired results.

The integrated policy will:

Alter the way policies are adopted and decisions are made. This requires the development of common tools and the identification of synergies Develop and deliver a programme of work. This will require the differing sectoral polices to develop in a coherent policy framework.

The report lays down a foundation for the governance framework and the cross-sectoral tools needed for an effective Maritime Policy. It also sets out the main actions that the Commission will pursue during the course of this mandate. These actions will be guided by the principles of subsidiarity and competitiveness, the ecosystem approach and stakeholder participation.

As far as the governance framework for a maritime policy is concerned, the application of an integrated approach to Maritime governance (for example, better regulation) is analysed; and the kind of tools needed to deliver an integrated policy-making is set out. Tools that include a European network for maritime surveillance; maritime spatial planning an integrated coastal zone management system (ICZM); and data information.

In terms of the kind of actions that will be undertaken in order to implement the policy, this paper proposes:

Maximising the sustainable use of the oceans and seas : The policy’s first goal will be to create optimal conditions for the sustainable use of the oceans and seas. This approach requires a new strategic vision for the development of shipping; the use of European sea ports, shipbuilding, repair and marine equipment industries, maritime jobs and the quality of the marine environment. Building a knowledge and innovation base for the maritime policy : Marine science, technology and research are crucial for the sustainable development of sea-based activities. The development of the Marine Observation and Data Network is an important tool for this strategy. Deliver a high standard and qualify of living in coastal region s: Population growth in coastal regions and islands has been double the EU average over the last decade. The coastal regions also absorb large numbers of European tourists. Regional authorities and coastal communities have an important role to play in the regulation of coastal and maritime activities. The Committee of the Regions, coastal regions and their networks are thus key partners in the development of an EU Integrated Maritime Policy. Promote Europe’s leadership in International Maritime Affairs : The EU will work towards a more efficient international governance of maritime affairs and effective enforcement of international maritime law. It will urge the Member States to ratify any relevant instruments and will promote the coordination of European interests in key international fora. Raise Europe’s maritime visibility . The integrated Maritime policy will seek to raise the visibility of a Maritime Europe and improve the image of maritime activities and the seafaring professions. It will also seek to promote Europe’s maritime heritage, support maritime communities, support traditional skills and promote links between the various maritime communities.

To conclude this Communication, the Commission notes that an integrated maritime policy has the support of the Council which invited the Commission to present an Action Plan. Through this Communication and Action Plan the Commission has responded to this request whilst taking account of the views and opinions expressed by interested parties during the consultation round.

Documents

Activities

Votes

Rapport Piecyk A6-0163/2008 - am. 1

2008/05/20 Outcome: -: 526, +: 128, 0: 16
FI SE EE LU MT LV SK CY SI CZ BG AT DK IE LT NL EL BE PT PL HU RO IT ES FR GB DE
Total
13
18
5
5
4
8
10
6
7
23
17
16
13
9
12
25
19
20
19
46
23
24
52
46
70
69
91
icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE
37

Finland Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Sweden Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Luxembourg Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Latvia Verts/ALE

1

Austria Verts/ALE

2

Denmark Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Belgium Verts/ALE

2

Italy Verts/ALE

2

United Kingdom Verts/ALE

4
icon: GUE/NGL GUE/NGL
34

Finland GUE/NGL

For (1)

1

Sweden GUE/NGL

2

Cyprus GUE/NGL

2

Denmark GUE/NGL

1

Netherlands GUE/NGL

2

Greece GUE/NGL

Against (1)

2

Portugal GUE/NGL

2
2

United Kingdom GUE/NGL

1
icon: UEN UEN
31

Latvia UEN

For (1)

3

Denmark UEN

Against (1)

1

Lithuania UEN

2
icon: IND/DEM IND/DEM
20

Sweden IND/DEM

2

Czechia IND/DEM

Against (1)

1

Denmark IND/DEM

Abstain (1)

1

Netherlands IND/DEM

2

Greece IND/DEM

1

Poland IND/DEM

Abstain (1)

3
icon: NI NI
26

Slovakia NI

For (1)

Against (1)

2

Czechia NI

Against (1)

1

Austria NI

1

Belgium NI

Abstain (1)

3
2

Italy NI

Abstain (1)

3

United Kingdom NI

Abstain (1)

6
icon: ALDE ALDE
84

Sweden ALDE

Against (2)

2

Estonia ALDE

Against (2)

2

Latvia ALDE

Against (1)

1

Cyprus ALDE

Against (1)

1

Slovenia ALDE

2

Austria ALDE

Abstain (1)

1

Ireland ALDE

Against (1)

1

Hungary ALDE

2

Spain ALDE

1
icon: PSE PSE
192

Finland PSE

For (1)

3

Estonia PSE

For (1)

Against (1)

2

Luxembourg PSE

Against (1)

1

Malta PSE

Against (1)

Abstain (1)

2

Slovakia PSE

Against (1)

2

Slovenia PSE

Against (1)

1

Czechia PSE

2

Lithuania PSE

2
icon: PPE-DE PPE-DE
246

Estonia PPE-DE

Against (1)

1

Luxembourg PPE-DE

3

Malta PPE-DE

Against (2)

2

Latvia PPE-DE

3

Slovenia PPE-DE

4

Denmark PPE-DE

Against (1)

1

Ireland PPE-DE

4

Lithuania PPE-DE

2

Rapport Piecyk A6-0163/2008 - résolution

2008/05/20 Outcome: +: 587, 0: 38, -: 20
DE FR IT ES PL GB NL RO HU BG EL PT AT BE FI DK CZ SE LT IE LV SK SI EE LU MT CY
Total
83
68
50
48
41
65
25
24
22
17
19
21
16
18
13
13
22
18
11
10
8
8
5
5
5
4
6
icon: PPE-DE PPE-DE
241

Denmark PPE-DE

1
2

Estonia PPE-DE

For (1)

1

Luxembourg PPE-DE

3

Malta PPE-DE

2
icon: PSE PSE
181

Czechia PSE

2

Lithuania PSE

For (1)

1

Slovakia PSE

1

Estonia PSE

2

Luxembourg PSE

For (1)

1

Malta PSE

2
icon: ALDE ALDE
81

Spain ALDE

1
2

Austria ALDE

1

Sweden ALDE

2

Ireland ALDE

For (1)

1

Latvia ALDE

1

Slovenia ALDE

1

Estonia ALDE

2

Cyprus ALDE

For (1)

1
icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE
33

Italy Verts/ALE

2

United Kingdom Verts/ALE

4

Austria Verts/ALE

2

Belgium Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Finland Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Denmark Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Sweden Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Latvia Verts/ALE

1

Luxembourg Verts/ALE

For (1)

1
icon: UEN UEN
31

Denmark UEN

For (1)

1

Lithuania UEN

2
icon: GUE/NGL GUE/NGL
34
2

United Kingdom GUE/NGL

1

Netherlands GUE/NGL

2

Greece GUE/NGL

Against (1)

2

Portugal GUE/NGL

For (1)

3

Finland GUE/NGL

For (1)

1

Denmark GUE/NGL

1

Sweden GUE/NGL

2

Cyprus GUE/NGL

2
icon: NI NI
25

Poland NI

1

United Kingdom NI

6

Austria NI

1

Belgium NI

3

Czechia NI

Abstain (1)

1

Slovakia NI

For (1)

1
icon: IND/DEM IND/DEM
19

France IND/DEM

Against (1)

3

Poland IND/DEM

3

Netherlands IND/DEM

2

Greece IND/DEM

1

Denmark IND/DEM

For (1)

1

Czechia IND/DEM

Against (1)

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Sweden IND/DEM

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Ireland IND/DEM

For (1)

1
AmendmentsDossier
89 2008/2009(INI)
2008/03/05 REGI 18 amendments...
source: PE-402.835
2008/03/12 PECH 14 amendments...
source: PE-404.386
2008/03/13 TRAN 57 amendments...
source: PE-402.775

History

(these mark the time of scraping, not the official date of the change)

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  • date: 2007-10-10T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/registre/docs_autres_institutions/commission_europeenne/com/2007/0575/COM_COM(2007)0575_EN.pdf title: COM(2007)0575 type: Non-legislative basic document published celexid: CELEX:52007DC0575:EN body: EC commission: DG: url: http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/maritimeaffairs_fisheries/ title: Maritime Affairs and Fisheries Commissioner: BORG Joe type: Non-legislative basic document published
  • date: 2008-01-17T00:00:00 body: EP type: Committee referral announced in Parliament, 1st reading/single reading committees: body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Environment, Public Health and Food Safety committee: ENVI body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Industry, Research and Energy committee: ITRE body: EP responsible: False committee: PECH date: 2007-11-22T00:00:00 committee_full: Fisheries rapporteur: group: GUE/NGL name: GUERREIRO Pedro body: EP responsible: False committee: REGI date: 2007-11-20T00:00:00 committee_full: Regional Development rapporteur: group: PPE-DE name: MARQUES Sérgio body: EP responsible: True committee: TRAN date: 2007-11-20T00:00:00 committee_full: Transport and Tourism rapporteur: group: PSE name: PIECYK Willi
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docs
  • date: 2007-10-10T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/docs_autres_institutions/commission_europeenne/com/2007/0574/COM_COM(2007)0574_EN.pdf title: COM(2007)0574 url: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexplus!prod!DocNumber&lg=EN&type_doc=COMfinal&an_doc=2007&nu_doc=574 title: EUR-Lex summary: The Commission presented a communication on the conclusions from the consultation on a European maritime policy which followed the adoption of the Green Paper on Maritime Policy. The consultation lasted one year and received a response that was unprecedented both in terms of the scope and in the depth of the participation in the consultation process. The Commission received over 490 contributions and over 230 events were held where maritime policy was discussed with stakeholders. The main conclusions are as follows: The Search for Added Value: stakeholders are in favour of an integrated approach to Maritime Policy in the European Union, because it integrates the needs and concerns of linked sectors that are currently dealt with in separate policy activities. The consultation process confirms the scope for developing the relationship between those who live and work in day-to-day contact with the seas, including seafarers and fishermen, as well as other related sectors of economic activity. Operators point out the need for the integration of systems and standards in the area of maritime monitoring and surveillance. Researchers point to the economic benefits of the combined use of expensive assets for their work. Certain stakeholders urge that the development of an integrated approach should not lead the EU to re- or over-regulate, or to over-centralise. A significant number do not want to see an integrated policy change existing competences. Subsidiarity means Responsibility: The response to the Green Paper confirms that a European Maritime Policy must build on the existing distribution of competences within the EU. The subsidiarity principle and the involvement of stakeholders will play a key role in the future initiatives taken in the area of the EU’s maritime policy. The European Union's role is seen as facilitator rather than integrator per se. This is particularly the case as far as spatial planning and offshore government activities are concerned. There is little support for a European Coast Guard, but there is interest in cooperation between Member States' assets to achieve similar objectives without changing competences. Much emphasis has been placed on the necessity that existing policies and legal frameworks are better implemented and interact in a more consistent way. Calls were made in favour of specific regulatory initiatives in order to close gaps in EU legislation. The broad participation of local and regional government bodies indicates an enthusiasm to learn from others, share experience and contribute ideas. Industry, on the other hand, calls for less regulation and more self-regulation. Global Issues and Responsibilities: the global nature of maritime activities, such as shipping and fisheries, became apparent in the course of the consultation. Several stakeholders thought that the EU should promote measures to protect the global ecosystem, including on the high seas. Here, the majority of stakeholders agree on the need for multilateral rules and standards and their implementation and enforcement. Views on how to achieve this differ; some insist on developing standards only in the multilateral context, and are opposed to the EU developing standards first. However, a significant number of stakeholders believe that the EU has an important role to play in leading by example. The consultation process thus confirms the importance of developing an international dimension to a European Maritime Policy. Stakeholders want to ensure that the current system is used to its fullest extent before trying out new solutions. Sustainable Use of Resources: t he consultation process highlights how much Europe's prosperity relies on the availability of safe and efficient shipping services. Stakeholders agree that European shipping services and ports are sectors with high growth potential and that the EU's international and internal performance in the maritime sectors is built on delivering higher quality – not in being cheaper. The technologies of the future will be crucial building blocks for a more sustainable economy, e.g. the development of renewable energy, in particular wind and wave energy. The consultation process has revealed strong support for the better collection and use of (real-time and other) data on oceans and seas. There is a need for high standards to ensure high quality and thus competitiveness, and standards that support sustainability. Industry points out that competitiveness on the basis of high standards will only work if these standards are applied across the board, securing a level playing field. They also point out that voluntary approaches may sometimes bring better results than prescriptive regulation. Stakeholders indicate that there is scope for improvement in skills and training. There are divergences on whether, and which, exclusions concerning maritime sectors in EU social legislation are justified, but there is agreement on the need to contribute to a global level playing field for the sector and the role that EU legislation can play in this context. There is very little dispute about the need to set up marine protected areas – but there is discussion about their designation. The development of blue biotechnology or other uses of genetic resources is seen as an opportunity, demonstrating the need for an integrated approach linking research, sustainability, and international rule-making. Stakeholders point out that up to 80% of the pollution of the marine environment is land-based and call for more action on this. The importance of linkages between existing environmental instruments and the implementation of the marine thematic strategy is mentioned. Coherence and compatibility are underscored as essential for the implementation of all these instruments. Some stakeholders highlight the need to go beyond the Marine Thematic Strategy to embrace broader environment protection objectives, while others want to ensure that the impacts of environmental measures and legislation take economic priorities duly into account. Working on the basis of ecosystems and eco-regions is fundamental for the sustainable management of sea and coastal spaces. Stakeholders point to the need for cooperation between coastal regions and neighbouring Member States – as well as neighbouring countries. There are many voices calling for a stronger integration of environmental concerns within fisheries combined with stronger integration of fisheries within maritime policy. Lastly, according to stakeholders, without improvements in training, working conditions and job opportunities for fishermen, developing a sustainable approach to fisheries is not realistic. Maritime Management: stakeholders emphasise the need for coordinated management and planning for competing uses of the seas. They agree that maritime spatial planning would be a good tool to apply across the EU, but should remain a Member State competence. The initiative to develop a European Data Network is generally welcomed, and many proposals are made as to practical ways and means of taking on this task. Very few stakeholders dispute the potential to achieve cost savings through standardisation, interlinking and communication between existing sectoral systems. Regional stakeholders, including the Committee of the Regions, call, for the adoption of specific and targeted approaches to funding in coastal regions, through more transparency, and the linking of existing financial tools, under the umbrella of a European Coastal Fund. Europeans and the Sea: Participation and Involvement: contributions call for consultation and dialogue, and for more information to be made available to all affected by maritime policy. Individual citizens and civil society respond with mixed messages. There is some concern that the EU should not take over national or local competences but overall the reactions indicate of the public's concern for the planet's marine ecosystem and their impression that insufficient government action is being taken against practices that damage it. T here is a general consensus that the overall image of the maritime sectors needs to be enhanced. Ideas abound for the organisation of exchanges of best practice, conferences, the involvement of experts in th e maritime world, such as fishermen, or small-scale projects aimed at informing local communities or tourists. type: Document attached to the procedure body: EC
  • date: 2007-10-10T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/docs_autres_institutions/commission_europeenne/sec/2007/1278/COM_SEC(2007)1278_EN.pdf title: SEC(2007)1278 url: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexplus!prod!DocNumber&lg=EN&type_doc=SECfinal&an_doc=2007&nu_doc=1278 title: EUR-Lex type: Document attached to the procedure body: EC
  • date: 2007-10-10T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/docs_autres_institutions/commission_europeenne/sec/2007/1279/COM_SEC(2007)1279_EN.pdf title: SEC(2007)1279 url: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexplus!prod!DocNumber&lg=EN&type_doc=SECfinal&an_doc=2007&nu_doc=1279 title: EUR-Lex type: Document attached to the procedure body: EC
  • date: 2007-10-10T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/registre/docs_autres_institutions/commission_europeenne/sec/2007/1280/COM_SEC(2007)1280_EN.pdf title: SEC(2007)1280 url: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexplus!prod!DocNumber&lg=EN&type_doc=SECfinal&an_doc=2007&nu_doc=1280 title: EUR-Lex type: Document attached to the procedure body: EC
  • date: 2007-10-10T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/docs_autres_institutions/commission_europeenne/sec/2007/1283/COM_SEC(2007)1283_EN.pdf title: SEC(2007)1283 url: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexplus!prod!DocNumber&lg=EN&type_doc=SECfinal&an_doc=2007&nu_doc=1283 title: EUR-Lex type: Document attached to the procedure body: EC
  • date: 2008-02-13T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=COMPARL&mode=XML&language=EN&reference=PE400.605 title: PE400.605 type: Committee draft report body: EP
  • date: 2008-03-13T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=COMPARL&mode=XML&language=EN&reference=PE402.775 title: PE402.775 type: Amendments tabled in committee body: EP
  • date: 2008-04-02T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=COMPARL&mode=XML&language=EN&reference=PE400.597&secondRef=03 title: PE400.597 committee: REGI type: Committee opinion body: EP
  • date: 2008-04-03T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=COMPARL&mode=XML&language=EN&reference=PE400.644&secondRef=02 title: PE400.644 committee: PECH type: Committee opinion body: EP
  • date: 2008-04-21T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=REPORT&mode=XML&reference=A6-2008-163&language=EN title: A6-0163/2008 type: Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading body: EP
  • date: 2008-06-12T00:00:00 docs: url: /oeil/spdoc.do?i=14927&j=1&l=en title: SP(2008)3593/2 type: Commission response to text adopted in plenary
  • date: 2008-07-17T00:00:00 docs: url: /oeil/spdoc.do?i=14927&j=0&l=en title: SP(2008)4116 type: Commission response to text adopted in plenary
  • date: 2009-10-15T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/registre/docs_autres_institutions/commission_europeenne/com/2009/0540/COM_COM(2009)0540_EN.pdf title: COM(2009)0540 url: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexplus!prod!DocNumber&lg=EN&type_doc=COMfinal&an_doc=2009&nu_doc=540 title: EUR-Lex summary: The EU Integrated Maritime Policy (IMP) has established itself as new approach to enhance the optimal development of all sea-related activities in a sustainable manner. It has confirmed the vision that, by joining up policies towards seas and oceans, Europe can draw much higher returns from them with a far lesser impact on the environment. Essentially the framework provided by the IMP seeks to achieve (and has started to do so) four objectives: to promote integration of governance structures by making them more inclusive and cooperative; to build the knowledge base and cross cutting tools necessary to enable the implementation of integrated policies; to improve the quality of sectoral policies, through an active search for synergies and increased coherence across sectors; in implementing all above, to take account of specificities of the regional seas around Europe, through tailor-made solutions. When it endorsed the EU IMP and the Blue Paper ( SEC(2007)1278 ), the European Council of 14 December 2007 asked the Commission to report within two years on the achievements of the policy. The present Communication sums up these achievements and charts the course for the next phase of the IMP. It also highlights how joined-up policy-making towards our seas, maritime sectors and coastal areas can contribute to addressing challenges posed by the current global economic crisis and by the need to take decisive action against climate change and environmental degradation. The implementation of the Action plan has progressed well. Of the 65 actions in the plan, 56 have been launched or completed (mostly in the form of Commission or Council acts). On 9 actions various initiatives have been undertaken, although no formal documents are adopted yet. Following the first phase, the Commission and Member States are now focusing efforts on effective implementation on the ground , with additional activities in all relevant policy areas pursued where needed. The report notes that the last two years have confirmed the IMP as a highly promising policy providing a significant contribution to growth, jobs and environmental sustainability for Europe’s coastal areas and beyond. Despite its young age, this new EU policy has already changed the way in which Europe deals with its maritime and coastal assets. The Commission considers that these objectives will be best achieved through a combination of progress in six strategic directions : Integrated maritime governance must be further enhanced. The progress registered over recent years needs to be turned into effective integrated structures at all levels of government. EU institutions, Member States and coastal regions have a particular responsibility in ensuring upstream policy integration and in adopting coherent, joined up agendas for maritime affairs, further counteracting the prevalence of isolated sectoral policy thinking. Stakeholder involvement in maritime policy-making should also be enshrined more permanently in governance structures. This should also lead to a more intense dialogue between the EU, Member State's Governments and coastal regions, which often hold key expertise necessary for an integrated approach to Maritime Affairs. For the same reason the formation of a crosssectoral platform for stakeholder dialogue on maritime affairs should be supported. Cross-cutting policy tools are of utmost importance to enhance economic development, environmental monitoring, safety, security and law enforcement on Europe’s oceans and seas. In particular, maritime spatial planning, in combination with increased marine knowledge, can unblock considerable economic investment and drastically improve the way we manage our maritime spaces, preserving their ecosystems. It must become a practical instrument on all relevant levels of governance , including with the relevant mechanisms to ensure joined-up decision-making over cross-border investments. The integration of maritime surveillance has the potential of making a difference to the way key policy objectives such as the fight against illegal immigration, the safeguard of commercial shipping and the protection of natural resources are carried out by national authorities. Member States and the Commission will have to continue to work together on these items so that the processes which were initiated in the last two years will bear their intended fruit. The definition of the boundaries of sustainability of human activities that have an impact on the marine environment in the years ahead, in the framework of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive , will provide clarity and design a platform for the successful development of all maritime activities, paying due attention to their cumulative impacts. Hence, the implementation of this Directive will remain a key objective of the IMP, which should also develop the necessary cooperation between all relevant sectors and services to this end, including inter-alia between marine science and the marine environment policy. Sea-basin strategies are key to a successful implementation of the IMP. This is where the priorities and the tools of the policy can be adapted to the specific geographic, economic and political contexts of each large maritime region. Co-operation with and among Member States and regions sharing a sea basin is a crucial element of success and, whenever necessary, this should be accompanied with proper dialogue with third countries sharing a sea basin with the EU. Action at the level of sub-basins can also be useful in establishing positive examples and best practices. The international dimension of the IMP will also require more attention, as illustrated by the dedicated Communication published together with this report. Europe must take a leading role in improving global maritime governance, as it has done in the matter of piracy or with regard to destructive fishing practices. The Commission intends to strengthen dialogue with a limited number of major maritime partners and its participation in international fora and informal processes. Renewed focus on economic growth, employment and innovation , in the present context of economic downturn, the implementation of the IMP should explore synergies between the European Energy Policy and the IMP, promoting energy generation from the sea, including renewable forms of energy, and use the sea more for energy transportation through pipelines, underwater grids and vessels. It will also be necessary to further link the EU's Climate Change Policy with IMP, by developing a strategy for adaptation to climate change in coastal and maritime areas, aiming at protecting coastal infrastructure and preserving marine biodiversity. As part of the developing debate on territorial cohesion, it will be important to ensure that maritime and coastal areas are fully taken into account. The EU will also have to promote better maritime transport in order to foster co-modality , to implement the concept of the Motorways of the Sea , and to improve the EU programme for short sea shipping . Still aiming at the economic development of maritime activities, it will be necessary to find ways and means of further stimulating maritime employment and investment in EU–flagged shipping, while remaining determined to advance the idea of clean ships . Indeed, support for innovation and research towards very low or even zero emission ships will continue to be a major part of the Community's response to the strategically important shipbuilding sector. Lastly, the Commission is examining the future funding needs that IMP-related actions may involve as part of its overall reflection on the next financial perspective. The Commission intends to produce in 2010 a policy document detailing projects and initiatives aimed at further developing the above six strategic directions, following consultations with stakeholders. type: Follow-up document body: EC
  • date: 2009-10-15T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/docs_autres_institutions/commission_europeenne/sec/2009/1343/COM_SEC(2009)1343_EN.pdf title: SEC(2009)1343 url: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexplus!prod!DocNumber&lg=EN&type_doc=SECfinal&an_doc=2009&nu_doc=1343 title: EUR-Lex type: Follow-up document body: EC
events
  • date: 2007-10-10T00:00:00 type: Non-legislative basic document published body: EC docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/registre/docs_autres_institutions/commission_europeenne/com/2007/0575/COM_COM(2007)0575_EN.pdf title: COM(2007)0575 url: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexplus!prod!DocNumber&lg=EN&type_doc=COMfinal&an_doc=2007&nu_doc=575 title: EUR-Lex summary: PURPOSE: to set out an “Integrated Maritime Policy” for the EU. CONTENT: Europe’s maritime spaces and its coasts are central to its well-being and prosperity – they are Europe’s trade routes, climate regulator, source of food, energy and resources, and a favoured site for recreational and residence purposes. Yet the strain is showing and Europe stands at a cross-roads. The accumulated effect of over-activity in the maritime spaces is leading to conflicts of use and to a deterioration in the marine environment. In the face of rapid globalisation and climate change the need for Europe to address these challenges is great. In a bid to address these challenges the Commission held a series of consultation exercises on how Europe relates to the sea. Based on the results of this exercise the Commission, in this report, sets out its vision of an “Integrated Maritime Policy” for the EU. This policy is based on the assumption that all matters relating to Europe’s oceans and seas are interlinked and that sea-related policies must be developed in order to reap the desired results. The integrated policy will: Alter the way policies are adopted and decisions are made. This requires the development of common tools and the identification of synergies Develop and deliver a programme of work. This will require the differing sectoral polices to develop in a coherent policy framework. The report lays down a foundation for the governance framework and the cross-sectoral tools needed for an effective Maritime Policy. It also sets out the main actions that the Commission will pursue during the course of this mandate. These actions will be guided by the principles of subsidiarity and competitiveness, the ecosystem approach and stakeholder participation. As far as the governance framework for a maritime policy is concerned, the application of an integrated approach to Maritime governance (for example, better regulation) is analysed; and the kind of tools needed to deliver an integrated policy-making is set out. Tools that include a European network for maritime surveillance; maritime spatial planning an integrated coastal zone management system (ICZM); and data information. In terms of the kind of actions that will be undertaken in order to implement the policy, this paper proposes: Maximising the sustainable use of the oceans and seas : The policy’s first goal will be to create optimal conditions for the sustainable use of the oceans and seas. This approach requires a new strategic vision for the development of shipping; the use of European sea ports, shipbuilding, repair and marine equipment industries, maritime jobs and the quality of the marine environment. Building a knowledge and innovation base for the maritime policy : Marine science, technology and research are crucial for the sustainable development of sea-based activities. The development of the Marine Observation and Data Network is an important tool for this strategy. Deliver a high standard and qualify of living in coastal region s: Population growth in coastal regions and islands has been double the EU average over the last decade. The coastal regions also absorb large numbers of European tourists. Regional authorities and coastal communities have an important role to play in the regulation of coastal and maritime activities. The Committee of the Regions, coastal regions and their networks are thus key partners in the development of an EU Integrated Maritime Policy. Promote Europe’s leadership in International Maritime Affairs : The EU will work towards a more efficient international governance of maritime affairs and effective enforcement of international maritime law. It will urge the Member States to ratify any relevant instruments and will promote the coordination of European interests in key international fora. Raise Europe’s maritime visibility . The integrated Maritime policy will seek to raise the visibility of a Maritime Europe and improve the image of maritime activities and the seafaring professions. It will also seek to promote Europe’s maritime heritage, support maritime communities, support traditional skills and promote links between the various maritime communities. To conclude this Communication, the Commission notes that an integrated maritime policy has the support of the Council which invited the Commission to present an Action Plan. Through this Communication and Action Plan the Commission has responded to this request whilst taking account of the views and opinions expressed by interested parties during the consultation round.
  • date: 2008-01-17T00:00:00 type: Committee referral announced in Parliament, 1st reading/single reading body: EP
  • date: 2008-04-08T00:00:00 type: Vote in committee, 1st reading/single reading body: EP summary: The Committee on Transport and Tourism adopted the own-initiative report by Willi PIECYK (PES, DE) on an integrated maritime policy for the European Union, in response to a communication on this subject. While welcoming the Commission’s communication, MEPs believe that, on the whole, the Action Plan includes too few practical measures . The Commission is called to be more ambitious in future in using the instruments at its disposal under the Treaties. MEPs also regret the fact that the Action Plan addresses the challenges of climate change only in a non-binding way : in their opinion, one task of the European maritime policy has to be to lay down, as a matter of urgency, the adjustment measures required, especially in view of the melting of glaciers leading to the rise in sea levels, together with the increased risk of flooding of ports and coastal regions. In this respect, they call for all relevant policies, and research policy in particular, to play their part. The parliamentary committee reaffirms its call for maritime policy to make a substantial contribution to reducing greenhouse gas emissions , in particular by incorporating shipping into emissions trading and enhancing research efforts both with regard to exploiting the seas as a source of renewable energy and with a view to developing new, cleaner ship propulsion technologies. It calls emphatically on the Commission to be more ambitious in combating sulphur and nitrogen oxide emissions, as well as solid waste from ships, and to cooperate more closely with the IMO (International Maritime Organisation) on this issue. MEPs point out that land-based pollution of the seas constitutes a significant proportion of overall maritime pollution in Europe and indicate the absence of a solution to this issue from the Commission. They reiterate their call for the Commission to put forward an action plan to reduce such pollution, and ask Member States to act promptly to transpose the legislation in this field, such as the water framework directive. They also urge the Commission to help Member States to launch a plan to survey and map wrecked ships and submerged archaeological sites since these form part of the Community’s historic and cultural heritage. The report welcomes the Commission's stocktaking with regard to the exclusion of seafarers from a number of areas of European social and labour protection rules . MEPs propose that these directives be revised in close cooperation with the social partners. They urge those Member States which have not yet done so to ratify, as soon as possible, the Maritime Labour Convention, 2006, adopted with a view to improving the living and working conditions of seafarers and to preventing unfair competition in the shipping industry by updating and codifying the entire body of international labour standards in force . In the fishing sector , the key objective of the maritime policy for the European Union should be to promote the modernisation and sustainable, balanced and fair development of the industry. MEPs believe that creating more and better seafaring jobs, particularly in the fishing industry, also depends on a guarantee of a fair and adequate income, proper working conditions (including health and safety) and access to training for people working in the industry. Member States are called to mutually recognise intermediate diplomas for the occupations of steersman and mechanic for fishing vessels. The report emphatically supports the Commission's intention to exploit the potential of short sea shipping and inland waterway transport between the Member States and to integrate this rapidly into the single market. In addition, it welcomes the Commission’s intention to speed up its proposals for a common maritime transport area together with a comprehensive maritime transport strategy for 2008-2018. Lastly, MEPs support the proposal to establish an annual ' European Maritime Day ', which should be used to highlight the significance of maritime policy outside maritime circles, with the participation of ordinary citizens, schools, universities and non-governmental organisations.
  • date: 2008-04-21T00:00:00 type: Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading body: EP docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=REPORT&mode=XML&reference=A6-2008-163&language=EN title: A6-0163/2008
  • date: 2008-05-20T00:00:00 type: Results of vote in Parliament body: EP docs: url: https://oeil.secure.europarl.europa.eu/oeil/popups/sda.do?id=14927&l=en title: Results of vote in Parliament
  • date: 2008-05-20T00:00:00 type: Debate in Parliament body: EP docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?secondRef=TOC&language=EN&reference=20080520&type=CRE title: Debate in Parliament
  • date: 2008-05-20T00:00:00 type: Decision by Parliament, 1st reading/single reading body: EP docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=TA&language=EN&reference=P6-TA-2008-213 title: T6-0213/2008 summary: The European Parliament adopted by 587 votes to 20, with 38 abstentions, a resolution on an integrated maritime policy for the European Union, in response to the Commission’s communication on the subject. The own-initiative report had been tabled for consideration in plenary by Willi PIECYK (PES, DE) on behalf of the Committee on Transport and Tourism. While MEPs welcome the Commission’s communication, they take the overall view that the Action Plan includes too few practical measures . The Commission is invited to be more ambitious in future in using the instruments at its disposal under the Treaties. MEPs regret the fact that the Action Plan addresses the challenges of climate change only in a non-binding way : in their opinion, one task of a European maritime policy has to be to lay down the adjustment measures required, as a matter of urgency, especially in view of the melting of glaciers leading to the rise in sea levels, together with the increased risk of flooding of ports and coastal regions. As a result, they welcome the Commission's intention to put forward an Arctic Initiative and call on the scientific community and decision makers to further explore possibilities for protecting the polar ice caps. The Resolution recalls that maritime policy must make a substantial contribution to reducing greenhouse gas emissions , notably by incorporating shipping into the emissions trading scheme and enhancing research efforts both with regard to exploiting the seas as a source of renewable energy and with a view to developing cleaner new ship propulsion technologies. It calls emphatically on the Commission to be more ambitious in combating sulphur and nitrogen oxide emissions, as well as solid waste from ships, and to cooperate more closely with the International Maritime Organization (IMO), which particularly concerns: introducing nitrogen oxide emission standards for ships using EU ports; designating the Mediterranean Sea, the Black Sea and the North-East Atlantic as Sulphur Emission Control Areas (SECAs) under the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL Convention); reducing the maximum permitted sulphur content in marine fuels used in SECAs by passenger vessels from 1,5 % to 0,5 %; introducing fiscal measures, such as taxes or charges on sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions from ships and identifying ways of imposing such measures and charges on all ships, regardless of flag, putting into Community ports or sailing within the waters of EU Member States; promoting the introduction of differentiated harbour and waterway charges to favour ships with low sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions; gradually introducing a requirement for ships at ports to use land-based electricity; proposing an EU directive on the quality of marine fuels. MEPs point out that land-based pollution of the seas constitutes a significant proportion of overall maritime pollution and that the Commission has so far not got to grips with this issue. They reiterate their call for the Commission to put forward an action plan to reduce such pollution, and call for the Member States to act promptly to transpose the legislation in this field, such as the water framework Directive, into national law. They also urge the Commission to help Member States to launch a plan to survey and map wrecked ships and submerged archaeological sites – since these form part of the Community's historic and cultural heritage. The Resolution welcomes the Commission's stocktaking with regard to the exclusion of seafarers from a number of areas of European social and labour protection rules (e.g. collective redundancies, the safeguarding of employees' rights in the event of transfers of undertakings, the informing, consulting and posting of workers). MEPs propose that these directives be revised in close cooperation with the social partners. They urge those Member States which have not yet done so to ratify, as soon as possible, the Maritime Labour Convention (2006) adopted with a view to improving the living and working conditions of seafarers and to preventing unfair competition in the shipping industry by updating and codifying the entire body of international labour standards in force. In terms of international piracy , MEPs call upon the Commission and the Member States to actively support, in the framework of the UN and the IMO, the initiative promoted by several Member States, to extend the right of sea and air pursuit to the territorial waters of the coastal states, provided the countries concerned agree, as well as to develop a mechanism of mutual assistance against cases of maritime piracy. The Commission is called to set up a Community system for coordination and mutual assistance, which would allow naval vessels flying the flag of a Member State deployed in international waters, to protect fishing and merchant vessels from other Member States. In the fishing sector, the key objective of the integrated maritime policy for the European Union should be to promote the modernisation and sustainable, balanced and fair development of the industry. MEPs are of the opinion that creating more and better seafaring jobs, particularly in the fishing industry, also depends on a guarantee of a fair and adequate income, proper working conditions (including health and safety) and access to training for people working in the industry. Member States are asked to work towards the mutual recognition of intermediate diplomas for the occupations of steersman and mechanic for fishing vessels. Lastly, MEPs su pport the proposal to establish an annual ' European Maritime Day ', which should be used to highlight the significance of maritime policy outside maritime circles, with the participation of ordinary citizens, schools, universities and non-governmental organisations.
  • date: 2008-05-20T00:00:00 type: End of procedure in Parliament body: EP
links
other
  • body: EC dg: url: http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/maritimeaffairs_fisheries/ title: Maritime Affairs and Fisheries commissioner: BORG Joe
procedure/dossier_of_the_committee
Old
TRAN/6/58012
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  • TRAN/6/58012
procedure/legal_basis/0
Rules of Procedure EP 052
procedure/legal_basis/0
Rules of Procedure of the European Parliament EP 052
procedure/subject
Old
  • 3.15 Fisheries policy
  • 3.20.03 Maritime transport: passengers and freight
  • 3.20.03.01 Maritime safety
  • 3.20.09 Ports policy
  • 3.40.04 Shipbuilding, nautical industry
  • 3.60 Energy policy
  • 3.70.05 Marine and coastal pollution, pollution from ships, oil pollution
  • 3.70.20 Sustainable development
  • 4.70 Regional policy
New
3.15
Fisheries policy
3.20.03
Maritime transport: passengers and freight
3.20.03.01
Maritime safety
3.20.09
Ports policy
3.40.04
Shipbuilding, nautical industry
3.60
Energy policy
3.70.05
Marine and coastal pollution, pollution from ships, oil pollution
3.70.20
Sustainable development
4.70
Regional policy
procedure/subtype
Old
Initiative
New
  • Initiative
  • See also 2010/2040(INI)
procedure/summary
  • See also
procedure/subject/1
Old
3.20.03 Sea transport: passengers and freight
New
3.20.03 Maritime transport: passengers and freight
procedure/title
Old
An integrated maritime policy for the EU
New
Integrated maritime policy for the EU
activities
  • date: 2007-10-10T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/registre/docs_autres_institutions/commission_europeenne/com/2007/0575/COM_COM(2007)0575_EN.pdf title: COM(2007)0575 type: Non-legislative basic document published celexid: CELEX:52007DC0575:EN body: EC type: Non-legislative basic document published commission: DG: url: http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/maritimeaffairs_fisheries/ title: Maritime Affairs and Fisheries Commissioner: BORG Joe
  • date: 2008-01-17T00:00:00 body: EP type: Committee referral announced in Parliament, 1st reading/single reading committees: body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Environment, Public Health and Food Safety committee: ENVI body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Industry, Research and Energy committee: ITRE body: EP responsible: False committee: PECH date: 2007-11-22T00:00:00 committee_full: Fisheries rapporteur: group: GUE/NGL name: GUERREIRO Pedro body: EP responsible: False committee: REGI date: 2007-11-20T00:00:00 committee_full: Regional Development rapporteur: group: PPE-DE name: MARQUES Sérgio body: EP responsible: True committee: TRAN date: 2007-11-20T00:00:00 committee_full: Transport and Tourism rapporteur: group: PSE name: PIECYK Willi
  • date: 2008-04-08T00:00:00 body: EP committees: body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Environment, Public Health and Food Safety committee: ENVI body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Industry, Research and Energy committee: ITRE body: EP responsible: False committee: PECH date: 2007-11-22T00:00:00 committee_full: Fisheries rapporteur: group: GUE/NGL name: GUERREIRO Pedro body: EP responsible: False committee: REGI date: 2007-11-20T00:00:00 committee_full: Regional Development rapporteur: group: PPE-DE name: MARQUES Sérgio body: EP responsible: True committee: TRAN date: 2007-11-20T00:00:00 committee_full: Transport and Tourism rapporteur: group: PSE name: PIECYK Willi type: Vote in committee, 1st reading/single reading
  • date: 2008-04-21T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=REPORT&mode=XML&reference=A6-2008-163&language=EN type: Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading title: A6-0163/2008 body: EP type: Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading
  • date: 2008-05-20T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/oeil/popups/sda.do?id=14927&l=en type: Results of vote in Parliament title: Results of vote in Parliament url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?secondRef=TOC&language=EN&reference=20080520&type=CRE type: Debate in Parliament title: Debate in Parliament url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=TA&language=EN&reference=P6-TA-2008-213 type: Decision by Parliament, 1st reading/single reading title: T6-0213/2008 body: EP type: Results of vote in Parliament
committees
  • body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Environment, Public Health and Food Safety committee: ENVI
  • body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Industry, Research and Energy committee: ITRE
  • body: EP responsible: False committee: PECH date: 2007-11-22T00:00:00 committee_full: Fisheries rapporteur: group: GUE/NGL name: GUERREIRO Pedro
  • body: EP responsible: False committee: REGI date: 2007-11-20T00:00:00 committee_full: Regional Development rapporteur: group: PPE-DE name: MARQUES Sérgio
  • body: EP responsible: True committee: TRAN date: 2007-11-20T00:00:00 committee_full: Transport and Tourism rapporteur: group: PSE name: PIECYK Willi
links
other
  • body: EC dg: url: http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/maritimeaffairs_fisheries/ title: Maritime Affairs and Fisheries commissioner: BORG Joe
procedure
dossier_of_the_committee
TRAN/6/58012
reference
2008/2009(INI)
title
An integrated maritime policy for the EU
legal_basis
Rules of Procedure of the European Parliament EP 052
stage_reached
Procedure completed
summary
See also
subtype
Initiative
type
INI - Own-initiative procedure
subject