BETA


2014/2243(INI) Safe use of remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS), commonly known as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), in the field of civil aviation

Progress: Procedure completed

RoleCommitteeRapporteurShadows
Lead TRAN FOSTER Jacqueline (icon: ECR ECR) MUSELIER Renaud (icon: PPE PPE), ZEMKE Janusz (icon: S&D S&D), VAN MILTENBURG Matthijs (icon: ALDE ALDE), KONEČNÁ Kateřina (icon: GUE/NGL GUE/NGL), ŠKRLEC Davor (icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE), PAKSAS Rolandas (icon: EFDD EFDD)
Committee Opinion ITRE
Committee Opinion LIBE POST Soraya (icon: S&D S&D) Marina ALBIOL GUZMÁN (icon: GUE/NGL GUE/NGL), Carlos COELHO (icon: PPE PPE), Louis MICHEL (icon: ALDE ALDE), Bodil VALERO (icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE)
Lead committee dossier:
Legal Basis:
RoP 54

Events

2015/10/29
   EP - Results of vote in Parliament
2015/10/29
   EP - Debate in Parliament
2015/10/29
   EP - Decision by Parliament, 1st reading/single reading
Details

The European Parliament adopted by 581 votes to 31, with 21 abstentions, a resolution on safe use of remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS), commonly known as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), in the field of civil aviation.

Stressing the global dimension of piloted aircraft systems and that all the Member States have some RPAS activities, either in manufacturing and/or operationally, Members considered that the RPAS sector urgently requires European and global rules in order to ensure cross- border RPAS development.

The absence of harmonised rules at EU level might impede the development of a European drone market, given that national authorisations are generally not mutually recognised among the Member States. According to Parliament, a clear European legal framework is needed to ensure investment and development of a competitive European RPAS sector. Moreover, this framework might assist the discussions on global rule making for the use of drones.

Key issues : recalling the economic importance of this sector, Parliament stressed that all EU policies should take account of the following aspects:

the need to put in place suitable policies to protect privacy and ensure data protection, safety and security , which are proportionate to their aim while not imposing an unnecessary burden on SMEs; the establishment of a clear distinction between professional and recreational use of remotely piloted aircraft; the fact that safety and security are paramount for any RPAS operations and rules and that they must be commensurate with the risks

In this regard, the resolution supports the five essential principles for future RPAS development set out in the Riga Declaration, that is:

RPAS need to be treated as new types of aircraft with proportionate rules based on the risk of each operation ; EU rules for the safe provision of RPAS services need to be developed to enable the industry to invest; technology and standards need to be developed to enable the full integration of RPAS into European airspace; public acceptance is key to the growth of RPAS services; the operator of an RPAS is responsible for its use.

Stressing the importance of ‘out-of-sight’ flights for the development of the sector, Members considered that European legislation should favour this modus operandi. The question of identifying drones, of whatever size, being crucial, Members underlined that solutions should be found which take into account the recreational or commercial use to which drones are put.

Future solutions : Parliament supported the development of a clear, harmonised and proportionate European and global regulatory framework on a risk-assessed basis , which avoids disproportionate regulations for businesses that would deter investment and innovation in the RPAS industry, whilst adequately protecting citizens and creating sustainable and innovative jobs.

Thorough risk assessment should be based on the ‘concept of operations’ established by the EASA and should take into account characteristics of the RPAS (weight, scope of operation, speed) and the nature of their use (recreational or professional).

Concerned over potential illegal and unsafe uses of RPAS, Members called on the Commission to support the development of the necessary technology to ensure safety, security and privacy in the operation of RPAS.

Parliament considered that future European and global rules on RPAS should address the following points:

rules at EU and national level should clearly indicate the provisions applicable to RPAS in relation to the internal market and international commerce (production, sale, purchase, trade, and use of RPAS) and the fundamental rights of privacy and data protection; any person operating an RPAS should be made aware of the basic rules applicable to the use of RPAS , and that those rules should be specified in a notice for purchaser; training provided to professional users and owners of RPAS should include specific training on data protection and privacy; RPAS flying beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS) must be equipped with ‘ detect-and-avoid’ technology in order to detect aircraft using the same airspace, ensuring that RPAS do not put at risk the safety of manned aircraft, and in addition, take into account densely-populated areas, no-fly zones, such as airports or nuclear plants; RPAS should be equipped with an ID chip and registered to ensure traceability, accountability and a proper implementation of civil liability rules; the use of RPAS by law enforcement and intelligence services must respect the fundamental right to privacy, data protection, freedom of movement and freedom of expression.

Taking into account the expected economic spin-offs from this sector, the EU should favour the development of European technologies , for example through Horizon 2020.

In addition, the Joint Authorities for Rulemaking on Unmanned Systems (JARUS) which is an international voluntary membership body comprising national civil aviation authorities from 22 states (EU and non-EU countries) and regulatory agencies/bodies could ensure that any future EU rules will be coordinated with international arrangements in other countries, through a process of mutual recognition

Members called on the TRAN and LIBE committees to arrange a joint hearing with representatives of industry, national privacy protection organisations, the European Data Protection Supervisor, the Commission, and NGOs working in the area of fundamental rights.

Documents
2015/10/29
   EP - End of procedure in Parliament
2015/09/25
   EP - Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading
Details

The Committee on Transport and Tourism adopted an own-initiative report by Jacqueline FOSTER (ECR, UK) on the safe use of remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS), commonly known as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), in the field of civil aviation.

Stressing the global dimension of piloted aircraft systems and that all the Member States have some RPAS activities, either in manufacturing and/or operationally, Members considered that the RPAS sector urgently requires European and global rules in order to ensure cross-border RPAS development.

A clear European legal framework is needed to ensure investment and development of a competitive European RPAS sector. Moreover, Members believed that this framework might assist the discussions on global rule making for the use of drones.

Key issues : recalling the economic importance of this sector, Members stressed that all EU policies should take account of the following aspects:

the need to put in place suitable policies to protect privacy and ensure data protection, safety and security , which are proportionate to their aim while not imposing an unnecessary burden on SMEs;

the establishment of a clear distinction between professional and recreational use of remotely piloted aircraft;

the fact that safety and security are paramount for any RPAS operations and rules and that they must be commensurate with the risks.

In this regard, the report supports the five essential principles for future RPAS development set out in the Riga Declaration:

RPAS need to be treated as new types of aircraft with proportionate rules based on the risk of each operation ; EU rules for the safe provision of RPAS services need to be developed to enable the industry to invest; technology and standards need to be developed to enable the full integration of RPAS into European airspace; public acceptance is key to the growth of RPAS services; the operator of an RPAS is responsible for its use.

Stressing the importance of ‘out-of-sight’ flights for the development of the sector, Members considered that European legislation should favour this modus operandi.

In the long term, technical and regulatory solutions should preferably enable RPAS to use the airspace alongside any other airspace user without imposing on the latter new equipment requirements.

Future solutions : Members considered that future European and global rules on RPAS should address issues relating to:

airworthiness; certification specifications; commercial and recreational use; the identity of the drone and the owner/operator; the approval of training organisations for pilots; training and licensing of pilots; operations; liability and insurance; data protection and privacy; ‘geo-fencing’; no-fly (exclusion) zones.

Furthermore, the report concentrated on the following points:

training provided to professional users and owners of RPAS, it includes specific training on data protection and privacy; RPAS flying beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS) must be equipped with ‘ detect-and-avoid’ technology in order to detect aircraft using the same airspace, ensuring that RPAS do not put at risk the safety of manned aircraft, and in addition, take into account densely-populated areas, no-fly zones, such as airports; Taking into account the expected economic spin-offs from this sector, the EU should favour the development of European technologies , for example through Horizon 2020; RPAS in line with a risk-based approach should be equipped with an ID chip and registered to ensure traceability, accountability and a proper implementation of civil liability rules; the use of RPAS by law enforcement and intelligence services must respect the fundamental right to privacy, data protection, freedom of movement and freedom of expression; the data protection authorities of the Member States should share existing specific data protection guidance for commercial RPAS.

In addition, the Joint Authorities for Rulemaking on Unmanned Systems (JARUS) which is an international voluntary membership body comprising national civil aviation authorities from 22 EU and non-EU countries and regulatory agencies/bodies could ensure that any future EU rules will be coordinated with international arrangements in other countries, through a process of mutual recognition.

Members took the view that the Parliament must establish its position prior to the Commission’s adoption of its aviation package, thereby responding to the industry call for clear guidance. They called on the TRAN and LIBE committees to arrange a joint hearing with representatives of industry, national privacy protection organisations, the European Data Protection Supervisor, the Commission, and NGOs working in the area of fundamental rights.

Documents
2015/09/15
   EP - Vote in committee, 1st reading/single reading
2015/09/03
   EP - Committee opinion
Documents
2015/07/24
   EP - Amendments tabled in committee
Documents
2015/06/19
   EP - Committee draft report
Documents
2015/03/26
   UK_HOUSE-OF-LORDS - Contribution
Documents
2015/02/05
   EP - POST Soraya (S&D) appointed as rapporteur in LIBE
2015/01/15
   EP - Committee referral announced in Parliament, 1st reading/single reading
2014/12/15
   EP - FOSTER Jacqueline (ECR) appointed as rapporteur in TRAN
2014/04/08
   EC - Non-legislative basic document published
Details

PURPOSE: to open the aviation market to the civil use of remotely piloted aircraft systems .

BACKGROUND: the Commission considers that opening the European market for remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) - or the civilian use of drones - is an important step towards the aviation market of the future. The European Summit of 19 December 2013 called for action to enable the progressive integration of RPAS into civil airspace from 2016 onwards .

RPAS technology has matured rapidly in past years and is ready to make the shift from being purely military equipment to becoming a reliable new technology for civil use.

Member States are beginning to authorise RPAS operations in non-segregated airspace to respond to market demand. In the short term, the most promising market lies in areas such as infrastructure monitoring or photography; in a longer term future, it may be the transport of goods and eventually people.

According to an industry source, the global budget forecast in terms of research and development (R&D) and procurement, including military and governmental, is expected to grow from currently $5.2 bn to about $11.6 bn per year in 2023 . The number of jobs created through new RPAS activities in the US is estimated to exceed 100,000 by 2025. For Europe, about 150,000 jobs by 2050 are forecast.

Currently, the US and Israel dominate the global RPAS manufacturing sector. Other non-EU countries, such as Brazil, China, India and Russia, also show potential to become strong competitors. A strong common EU market should offer a solid basis to compete at the global level.

CONTENT: the Communication responds to the call of the European manufacturing and service industry to remove barriers to the introduction of RPAS in the European single market. It sets out the Commission's views on how to address RPAS operations in a European level policy framework which will enable the progressive development of the commercial RPAS market while safeguarding the public interest.

The European strategy aims at establishing a single RPAS market to reap the societal benefits of this innovative technology and at dealing with citizens' concerns through public debate and protective action wherever needed.

The Commission recalls that RPAS applications can only develop if the aircraft can fly in non-segregated airspace without affecting the safety and the operation of the wider civil aviation system. To this end, the EU should:

· put in place an enabling regulatory structure to which the major players at the European and national levels can contribute. The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) is best placed to develop common rules, using the proven EASA consultation process;

· increase and coordinate R&D efforts in order to keep lead times for promising technologies as short as possible (e.g. command and control; detect and avoid technologies; security protection against attacks; contingency procedures; human factor issues such as piloting). The SESAR Joint Undertaking (SJU) ( CE SESAR ) is the R&D platform building the future air traffic management system of the Single European Sky. So it is uniquely placed to coordinate this R&D);

· ensure that RPAS operations do not lead to fundamental rights being infringed : the progressive integration of RPAS into the airspace from 2016 onwards must be accompanied by adequate public debate on the development of measures which address societal concerns including safety, privacy and data protection, third-party liability and insurance or security;

· support market development and European industries by recourse to existing EU instruments such as the Horizon 2020 and COSME programmes.

This strategy should provide adequate legal certainty and offer a reliable timing , so that industry can take investment decisions and create employment. As the RPAS market is global by its very nature, the EU will also coordinate with international partners.

The European Commission also intends to bring forward, where appropriate, legislative proposals to remove legal uncertainties that hinder the development of the European market.

Documents

Activities

Votes

A8-0261/2015 - Jacqueline Foster - § 21

2015/10/29 Outcome: +: 564, -: 42, 0: 35
DE IT PL ES FR RO GB BE SE HU CZ PT AT NL FI SK BG HR DK LT SI IE LU LV EE MT EL CY
Total
84
61
49
48
59
24
56
20
19
18
16
21
18
22
12
11
10
10
9
8
8
10
6
6
6
5
18
6
icon: PPE PPE
186

Finland PPE

2

Denmark PPE

For (1)

1

Lithuania PPE

1

Luxembourg PPE

3

Latvia PPE

2

Estonia PPE

For (1)

1

Malta PPE

2
icon: S&D S&D
162

Netherlands S&D

For (1)

1

Slovakia S&D

2

Croatia S&D

2

Slovenia S&D

For (1)

1

Ireland S&D

For (1)

1

Luxembourg S&D

For (1)

1

Latvia S&D

1

Estonia S&D

For (1)

1

Malta S&D

3

Cyprus S&D

2
icon: ALDE ALDE
62

Romania ALDE

2

United Kingdom ALDE

1

Austria ALDE

For (1)

1

Bulgaria ALDE

2

Croatia ALDE

2

Denmark ALDE

2

Slovenia ALDE

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1

Ireland ALDE

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1

Luxembourg ALDE

For (1)

1

Latvia ALDE

1

Estonia ALDE

3
icon: ECR ECR
60

Italy ECR

2

Romania ECR

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1

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1

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For (1)

1
2

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1

Greece ECR

For (1)

1
icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE
43

United Kingdom Verts/ALE

4

Belgium Verts/ALE

2

Hungary Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Austria Verts/ALE

3

Netherlands Verts/ALE

2

Finland Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Croatia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Denmark Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Lithuania Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

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For (1)

1

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1

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1

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1
icon: GUE/NGL GUE/NGL
43

France GUE/NGL

Against (1)

3

Sweden GUE/NGL

Abstain (1)

1

Portugal GUE/NGL

Abstain (1)

4

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3

Finland GUE/NGL

For (1)

1

Ireland GUE/NGL

4

Cyprus GUE/NGL

2
icon: EFDD EFDD
39

Poland EFDD

1

France EFDD

1

Sweden EFDD

2

Lithuania EFDD

For (1)

1
icon: NI NI
11

Germany NI

For (1)

1

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1

France NI

Abstain (1)

1
icon: ENF ENF
34

Poland ENF

2

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1

Belgium ENF

Against (1)

1

Netherlands ENF

4

A8-0261/2015 - Jacqueline Foster - § 22

2015/10/29 Outcome: +: 558, -: 42, 0: 33
DE IT ES PL FR RO GB SE BE CZ PT NL AT HU FI SK BG IE HR DK LT SI LU LV EE EL MT CY
Total
84
62
48
48
58
24
55
18
19
15
21
22
17
18
11
11
10
10
10
9
8
8
6
6
6
18
4
6
icon: PPE PPE
183

Finland PPE

2

Denmark PPE

For (1)

1

Lithuania PPE

1

Luxembourg PPE

3

Latvia PPE

2

Estonia PPE

For (1)

1

Malta PPE

2
icon: S&D S&D
163

Netherlands S&D

For (1)

1

Slovakia S&D

2

Ireland S&D

For (1)

1

Croatia S&D

2

Slovenia S&D

For (1)

1

Luxembourg S&D

For (1)

1

Latvia S&D

1

Estonia S&D

For (1)

1

Malta S&D

2

Cyprus S&D

2
icon: ALDE ALDE
59

Romania ALDE

2

United Kingdom ALDE

1

Austria ALDE

For (1)

1
3

Bulgaria ALDE

2

Ireland ALDE

For (1)

1

Croatia ALDE

2

Denmark ALDE

2

Slovenia ALDE

For (1)

1

Luxembourg ALDE

For (1)

1

Latvia ALDE

1

Estonia ALDE

3
icon: ECR ECR
58

Italy ECR

2

Romania ECR

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1

Czechia ECR

1

Netherlands ECR

For (1)

1
2

Latvia ECR

For (1)

1

Greece ECR

Abstain (1)

1
icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE
43

United Kingdom Verts/ALE

4

Belgium Verts/ALE

2

Netherlands Verts/ALE

2

Austria Verts/ALE

3

Hungary Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Finland Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Croatia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Denmark Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Lithuania Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Slovenia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

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For (1)

1

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1

Estonia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1
icon: GUE/NGL GUE/NGL
43

France GUE/NGL

3

Sweden GUE/NGL

For (1)

1

Portugal GUE/NGL

Abstain (1)

4

Netherlands GUE/NGL

3

Finland GUE/NGL

For (1)

1

Cyprus GUE/NGL

2
icon: EFDD EFDD
39

Poland EFDD

1

France EFDD

1

Sweden EFDD

2

Lithuania EFDD

For (1)

1
icon: NI NI
11

Germany NI

For (1)

1

Poland NI

Against (1)

1

France NI

Abstain (1)

1
3
icon: ENF ENF
33

Poland ENF

2

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Against (1)

1

Belgium ENF

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1

Netherlands ENF

4

A8-0261/2015 - Jacqueline Foster - § 48

2015/10/29 Outcome: +: 582, -: 48, 0: 8
DE IT ES PL RO FR PT GB BE SE AT HU NL CZ FI BG IE HR DK LT SI SK EL LV EE CY LU MT
Total
84
62
47
49
23
60
21
56
20
19
18
18
21
16
12
10
10
10
9
8
8
10
18
6
6
6
5
5
icon: PPE PPE
183

Finland PPE

2

Denmark PPE

For (1)

1

Lithuania PPE

1

Latvia PPE

2

Estonia PPE

For (1)

1

Luxembourg PPE

3

Malta PPE

2
icon: S&D S&D
163

Netherlands S&D

For (1)

1

Ireland S&D

For (1)

1

Croatia S&D

2

Slovenia S&D

For (1)

1

Slovakia S&D

2

Latvia S&D

1

Estonia S&D

For (1)

1

Cyprus S&D

2

Malta S&D

3
icon: ALDE ALDE
62

Romania ALDE

2

United Kingdom ALDE

1

Austria ALDE

For (1)

1

Bulgaria ALDE

2

Ireland ALDE

For (1)

1

Croatia ALDE

2

Denmark ALDE

2

Slovenia ALDE

For (1)

1

Latvia ALDE

1

Estonia ALDE

3

Luxembourg ALDE

For (1)

1
icon: ECR ECR
60

Italy ECR

2

Romania ECR

For (1)

1

Netherlands ECR

For (1)

1

Czechia ECR

Against (1)

1
2

Slovakia ECR

Against (1)

3

Greece ECR

For (1)

1

Latvia ECR

For (1)

1
icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE
43

United Kingdom Verts/ALE

4

Belgium Verts/ALE

2

Austria Verts/ALE

3

Hungary Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Netherlands Verts/ALE

2

Finland Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Croatia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Denmark Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Lithuania Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Slovenia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Latvia Verts/ALE

1

Estonia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Luxembourg Verts/ALE

For (1)

1
icon: GUE/NGL GUE/NGL
43

France GUE/NGL

For (1)

3

Sweden GUE/NGL

For (1)

1

Netherlands GUE/NGL

3

Finland GUE/NGL

For (1)

1

Cyprus GUE/NGL

2
icon: EFDD EFDD
39

Poland EFDD

1

France EFDD

1

Sweden EFDD

2

Lithuania EFDD

For (1)

1
icon: NI NI
11

Germany NI

For (1)

1

Poland NI

Abstain (1)

1

France NI

Against (1)

1
icon: ENF ENF
33

Poland ENF

2

United Kingdom ENF

Against (1)

1

Belgium ENF

For (1)

1

Netherlands ENF

3

A8-0261/2015 - Jacqueline Foster - Résolution

2015/10/29 Outcome: +: 581, -: 31, 0: 21
DE IT FR PL ES RO GB BE HU PT SE CZ AT NL FI SK BG HR DK LT SI LU LV IE EL EE MT CY
Total
83
61
60
49
47
24
55
19
18
21
18
16
17
22
11
11
10
10
9
8
8
6
6
9
18
5
5
6
icon: PPE PPE
183

Finland PPE

2

Denmark PPE

For (1)

1

Lithuania PPE

1

Luxembourg PPE

3

Latvia PPE

2
3

Estonia PPE

For (1)

1

Malta PPE

2
icon: S&D S&D
160

Netherlands S&D

For (1)

1

Finland S&D

1

Slovakia S&D

2

Croatia S&D

2

Slovenia S&D

For (1)

1

Luxembourg S&D

For (1)

1

Latvia S&D

1

Ireland S&D

For (1)

1

Estonia S&D

For (1)

1

Malta S&D

3

Cyprus S&D

2
icon: ALDE ALDE
61

Romania ALDE

2

United Kingdom ALDE

1

Austria ALDE

For (1)

1

Bulgaria ALDE

2

Croatia ALDE

2

Denmark ALDE

2

Slovenia ALDE

For (1)

1

Luxembourg ALDE

For (1)

1

Latvia ALDE

1

Ireland ALDE

For (1)

1

Estonia ALDE

2
icon: ECR ECR
60

Italy ECR

2

Romania ECR

For (1)

1

Czechia ECR

1

Netherlands ECR

For (1)

1
2

Latvia ECR

For (1)

1

Greece ECR

For (1)

1
icon: Verts/ALE Verts/ALE
43

United Kingdom Verts/ALE

4

Belgium Verts/ALE

2

Hungary Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Austria Verts/ALE

3

Netherlands Verts/ALE

2

Finland Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Croatia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Denmark Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Lithuania Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Slovenia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Luxembourg Verts/ALE

For (1)

1

Latvia Verts/ALE

1

Estonia Verts/ALE

For (1)

1
icon: ENF ENF
34
2

United Kingdom ENF

Against (1)

1

Belgium ENF

For (1)

1

Austria ENF

Abstain (1)

4

Netherlands ENF

4
icon: GUE/NGL GUE/NGL
43

France GUE/NGL

Abstain (1)

3

Sweden GUE/NGL

Abstain (1)

1

Netherlands GUE/NGL

For (1)

3

Finland GUE/NGL

For (1)

1

Ireland GUE/NGL

4

Cyprus GUE/NGL

2
icon: EFDD EFDD
38

France EFDD

1

Poland EFDD

1

Sweden EFDD

2

Lithuania EFDD

For (1)

1
icon: NI NI
10

France NI

For (1)

1

Poland NI

1
AmendmentsDossier
208 2014/2243(INI)
2015/06/15 LIBE 55 amendments...
source: 560.679
2015/07/24 TRAN 153 amendments...
source: 565.046

History

(these mark the time of scraping, not the official date of the change)

committees/0
type
Responsible Committee
body
EP
associated
False
committee_full
Transport and Tourism
committee
TRAN
rapporteur
name: FOSTER Jacqueline date: 2014-12-15T00:00:00 group: European Conservatives and Reformists abbr: ECR
shadows
committees/0
type
Responsible Committee
body
EP
associated
False
committee_full
Transport and Tourism
committee
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  • date: 2014-04-08T00:00:00 docs: url: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexplus!prod!DocNumber&lg=EN&type_doc=COMfinal&an_doc=2014&nu_doc=0207 title: COM(2014)0207 type: Non-legislative basic document published celexid: CELEX:52014DC0207:EN body: EC commission: DG: url: http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/transport/index_en.htm title: Mobility and Transport Commissioner: BULC Violeta type: Non-legislative basic document published
  • date: 2015-01-15T00:00:00 body: EP type: Committee referral announced in Parliament, 1st reading/single reading committees: body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Industry, Research and Energy committee: ITRE body: EP responsible: False committee: LIBE date: 2015-02-05T00:00:00 committee_full: Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs rapporteur: group: S&D name: POST Soraya body: EP shadows: group: EPP name: MUSELIER Renaud group: S&D name: ZEMKE Janusz group: ALDE name: VAN MILTENBURG Matthijs group: GUE/NGL name: KONEČNÁ Kateřina group: Verts/ALE name: ŠKRLEC Davor group: EFD name: PAKSAS Rolandas responsible: True committee: TRAN date: 2014-12-15T00:00:00 committee_full: Transport and Tourism rapporteur: group: ECR name: FOSTER Jacqueline
  • date: 2015-09-15T00:00:00 body: EP type: Vote in committee, 1st reading/single reading committees: body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Industry, Research and Energy committee: ITRE body: EP responsible: False committee: LIBE date: 2015-02-05T00:00:00 committee_full: Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs rapporteur: group: S&D name: POST Soraya body: EP shadows: group: EPP name: MUSELIER Renaud group: S&D name: ZEMKE Janusz group: ALDE name: VAN MILTENBURG Matthijs group: GUE/NGL name: KONEČNÁ Kateřina group: Verts/ALE name: ŠKRLEC Davor group: EFD name: PAKSAS Rolandas responsible: True committee: TRAN date: 2014-12-15T00:00:00 committee_full: Transport and Tourism rapporteur: group: ECR name: FOSTER Jacqueline
  • date: 2015-09-25T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=REPORT&mode=XML&reference=A8-2015-0261&language=EN type: Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading title: A8-0261/2015 body: EP type: Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading
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  • date: 2015-06-19T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=COMPARL&mode=XML&language=EN&reference=PE554.997 title: PE554.997 type: Committee draft report body: EP
  • date: 2015-07-24T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=COMPARL&mode=XML&language=EN&reference=PE565.046 title: PE565.046 type: Amendments tabled in committee body: EP
  • date: 2015-09-03T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=COMPARL&mode=XML&language=EN&reference=PE549.364&secondRef=02 title: PE549.364 committee: LIBE type: Committee opinion body: EP
  • date: 2015-03-26T00:00:00 docs: url: http://www.connefof.europarl.europa.eu/connefof/app/exp/COM(2014)0207 title: COM(2014)0207 type: Contribution body: UK_HOUSE-OF-LORDS
events
  • date: 2014-04-08T00:00:00 type: Non-legislative basic document published body: EC docs: url: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexplus!prod!DocNumber&lg=EN&type_doc=COMfinal&an_doc=2014&nu_doc=0207 title: EUR-Lex title: COM(2014)0207 summary: PURPOSE: to open the aviation market to the civil use of remotely piloted aircraft systems . BACKGROUND: the Commission considers that opening the European market for remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) - or the civilian use of drones - is an important step towards the aviation market of the future. The European Summit of 19 December 2013 called for action to enable the progressive integration of RPAS into civil airspace from 2016 onwards . RPAS technology has matured rapidly in past years and is ready to make the shift from being purely military equipment to becoming a reliable new technology for civil use. Member States are beginning to authorise RPAS operations in non-segregated airspace to respond to market demand. In the short term, the most promising market lies in areas such as infrastructure monitoring or photography; in a longer term future, it may be the transport of goods and eventually people. According to an industry source, the global budget forecast in terms of research and development (R&D) and procurement, including military and governmental, is expected to grow from currently $5.2 bn to about $11.6 bn per year in 2023 . The number of jobs created through new RPAS activities in the US is estimated to exceed 100,000 by 2025. For Europe, about 150,000 jobs by 2050 are forecast. Currently, the US and Israel dominate the global RPAS manufacturing sector. Other non-EU countries, such as Brazil, China, India and Russia, also show potential to become strong competitors. A strong common EU market should offer a solid basis to compete at the global level. CONTENT: the Communication responds to the call of the European manufacturing and service industry to remove barriers to the introduction of RPAS in the European single market. It sets out the Commission's views on how to address RPAS operations in a European level policy framework which will enable the progressive development of the commercial RPAS market while safeguarding the public interest. The European strategy aims at establishing a single RPAS market to reap the societal benefits of this innovative technology and at dealing with citizens' concerns through public debate and protective action wherever needed. The Commission recalls that RPAS applications can only develop if the aircraft can fly in non-segregated airspace without affecting the safety and the operation of the wider civil aviation system. To this end, the EU should: · put in place an enabling regulatory structure to which the major players at the European and national levels can contribute. The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) is best placed to develop common rules, using the proven EASA consultation process; · increase and coordinate R&D efforts in order to keep lead times for promising technologies as short as possible (e.g. command and control; detect and avoid technologies; security protection against attacks; contingency procedures; human factor issues such as piloting). The SESAR Joint Undertaking (SJU) ( CE SESAR ) is the R&D platform building the future air traffic management system of the Single European Sky. So it is uniquely placed to coordinate this R&D); · ensure that RPAS operations do not lead to fundamental rights being infringed : the progressive integration of RPAS into the airspace from 2016 onwards must be accompanied by adequate public debate on the development of measures which address societal concerns including safety, privacy and data protection, third-party liability and insurance or security; · support market development and European industries by recourse to existing EU instruments such as the Horizon 2020 and COSME programmes. This strategy should provide adequate legal certainty and offer a reliable timing , so that industry can take investment decisions and create employment. As the RPAS market is global by its very nature, the EU will also coordinate with international partners. The European Commission also intends to bring forward, where appropriate, legislative proposals to remove legal uncertainties that hinder the development of the European market.
  • date: 2015-01-15T00:00:00 type: Committee referral announced in Parliament, 1st reading/single reading body: EP
  • date: 2015-09-15T00:00:00 type: Vote in committee, 1st reading/single reading body: EP
  • date: 2015-09-25T00:00:00 type: Committee report tabled for plenary, single reading body: EP docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=REPORT&mode=XML&reference=A8-2015-0261&language=EN title: A8-0261/2015 summary: The Committee on Transport and Tourism adopted an own-initiative report by Jacqueline FOSTER (ECR, UK) on the safe use of remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS), commonly known as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), in the field of civil aviation. Stressing the global dimension of piloted aircraft systems and that all the Member States have some RPAS activities, either in manufacturing and/or operationally, Members considered that the RPAS sector urgently requires European and global rules in order to ensure cross-border RPAS development. A clear European legal framework is needed to ensure investment and development of a competitive European RPAS sector. Moreover, Members believed that this framework might assist the discussions on global rule making for the use of drones. Key issues : recalling the economic importance of this sector, Members stressed that all EU policies should take account of the following aspects: the need to put in place suitable policies to protect privacy and ensure data protection, safety and security , which are proportionate to their aim while not imposing an unnecessary burden on SMEs; the establishment of a clear distinction between professional and recreational use of remotely piloted aircraft; the fact that safety and security are paramount for any RPAS operations and rules and that they must be commensurate with the risks. In this regard, the report supports the five essential principles for future RPAS development set out in the Riga Declaration: RPAS need to be treated as new types of aircraft with proportionate rules based on the risk of each operation ; EU rules for the safe provision of RPAS services need to be developed to enable the industry to invest; technology and standards need to be developed to enable the full integration of RPAS into European airspace; public acceptance is key to the growth of RPAS services; the operator of an RPAS is responsible for its use. Stressing the importance of ‘out-of-sight’ flights for the development of the sector, Members considered that European legislation should favour this modus operandi. In the long term, technical and regulatory solutions should preferably enable RPAS to use the airspace alongside any other airspace user without imposing on the latter new equipment requirements. Future solutions : Members considered that future European and global rules on RPAS should address issues relating to: airworthiness; certification specifications; commercial and recreational use; the identity of the drone and the owner/operator; the approval of training organisations for pilots; training and licensing of pilots; operations; liability and insurance; data protection and privacy; ‘geo-fencing’; no-fly (exclusion) zones. Furthermore, the report concentrated on the following points: training provided to professional users and owners of RPAS, it includes specific training on data protection and privacy; RPAS flying beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS) must be equipped with ‘ detect-and-avoid’ technology in order to detect aircraft using the same airspace, ensuring that RPAS do not put at risk the safety of manned aircraft, and in addition, take into account densely-populated areas, no-fly zones, such as airports; Taking into account the expected economic spin-offs from this sector, the EU should favour the development of European technologies , for example through Horizon 2020; RPAS in line with a risk-based approach should be equipped with an ID chip and registered to ensure traceability, accountability and a proper implementation of civil liability rules; the use of RPAS by law enforcement and intelligence services must respect the fundamental right to privacy, data protection, freedom of movement and freedom of expression; the data protection authorities of the Member States should share existing specific data protection guidance for commercial RPAS. In addition, the Joint Authorities for Rulemaking on Unmanned Systems (JARUS) which is an international voluntary membership body comprising national civil aviation authorities from 22 EU and non-EU countries and regulatory agencies/bodies could ensure that any future EU rules will be coordinated with international arrangements in other countries, through a process of mutual recognition. Members took the view that the Parliament must establish its position prior to the Commission’s adoption of its aviation package, thereby responding to the industry call for clear guidance. They called on the TRAN and LIBE committees to arrange a joint hearing with representatives of industry, national privacy protection organisations, the European Data Protection Supervisor, the Commission, and NGOs working in the area of fundamental rights.
  • date: 2015-10-29T00:00:00 type: Results of vote in Parliament body: EP docs: url: https://oeil.secure.europarl.europa.eu/oeil/popups/sda.do?id=26162&l=en title: Results of vote in Parliament
  • date: 2015-10-29T00:00:00 type: Debate in Parliament body: EP docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?secondRef=TOC&language=EN&reference=20151029&type=CRE title: Debate in Parliament
  • date: 2015-10-29T00:00:00 type: Decision by Parliament, 1st reading/single reading body: EP docs: url: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=TA&language=EN&reference=P8-TA-2015-0390 title: T8-0390/2015 summary: The European Parliament adopted by 581 votes to 31, with 21 abstentions, a resolution on safe use of remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS), commonly known as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), in the field of civil aviation. Stressing the global dimension of piloted aircraft systems and that all the Member States have some RPAS activities, either in manufacturing and/or operationally, Members considered that the RPAS sector urgently requires European and global rules in order to ensure cross- border RPAS development. The absence of harmonised rules at EU level might impede the development of a European drone market, given that national authorisations are generally not mutually recognised among the Member States. According to Parliament, a clear European legal framework is needed to ensure investment and development of a competitive European RPAS sector. Moreover, this framework might assist the discussions on global rule making for the use of drones. Key issues : recalling the economic importance of this sector, Parliament stressed that all EU policies should take account of the following aspects: the need to put in place suitable policies to protect privacy and ensure data protection, safety and security , which are proportionate to their aim while not imposing an unnecessary burden on SMEs; the establishment of a clear distinction between professional and recreational use of remotely piloted aircraft; the fact that safety and security are paramount for any RPAS operations and rules and that they must be commensurate with the risks In this regard, the resolution supports the five essential principles for future RPAS development set out in the Riga Declaration, that is: RPAS need to be treated as new types of aircraft with proportionate rules based on the risk of each operation ; EU rules for the safe provision of RPAS services need to be developed to enable the industry to invest; technology and standards need to be developed to enable the full integration of RPAS into European airspace; public acceptance is key to the growth of RPAS services; the operator of an RPAS is responsible for its use. Stressing the importance of ‘out-of-sight’ flights for the development of the sector, Members considered that European legislation should favour this modus operandi. The question of identifying drones, of whatever size, being crucial, Members underlined that solutions should be found which take into account the recreational or commercial use to which drones are put. Future solutions : Parliament supported the development of a clear, harmonised and proportionate European and global regulatory framework on a risk-assessed basis , which avoids disproportionate regulations for businesses that would deter investment and innovation in the RPAS industry, whilst adequately protecting citizens and creating sustainable and innovative jobs. Thorough risk assessment should be based on the ‘concept of operations’ established by the EASA and should take into account characteristics of the RPAS (weight, scope of operation, speed) and the nature of their use (recreational or professional). Concerned over potential illegal and unsafe uses of RPAS, Members called on the Commission to support the development of the necessary technology to ensure safety, security and privacy in the operation of RPAS. Parliament considered that future European and global rules on RPAS should address the following points: rules at EU and national level should clearly indicate the provisions applicable to RPAS in relation to the internal market and international commerce (production, sale, purchase, trade, and use of RPAS) and the fundamental rights of privacy and data protection; any person operating an RPAS should be made aware of the basic rules applicable to the use of RPAS , and that those rules should be specified in a notice for purchaser; training provided to professional users and owners of RPAS should include specific training on data protection and privacy; RPAS flying beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS) must be equipped with ‘ detect-and-avoid’ technology in order to detect aircraft using the same airspace, ensuring that RPAS do not put at risk the safety of manned aircraft, and in addition, take into account densely-populated areas, no-fly zones, such as airports or nuclear plants; RPAS should be equipped with an ID chip and registered to ensure traceability, accountability and a proper implementation of civil liability rules; the use of RPAS by law enforcement and intelligence services must respect the fundamental right to privacy, data protection, freedom of movement and freedom of expression. Taking into account the expected economic spin-offs from this sector, the EU should favour the development of European technologies , for example through Horizon 2020. In addition, the Joint Authorities for Rulemaking on Unmanned Systems (JARUS) which is an international voluntary membership body comprising national civil aviation authorities from 22 states (EU and non-EU countries) and regulatory agencies/bodies could ensure that any future EU rules will be coordinated with international arrangements in other countries, through a process of mutual recognition Members called on the TRAN and LIBE committees to arrange a joint hearing with representatives of industry, national privacy protection organisations, the European Data Protection Supervisor, the Commission, and NGOs working in the area of fundamental rights.
  • date: 2015-10-29T00:00:00 type: End of procedure in Parliament body: EP
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  • The Committee on Transport and Tourism adopted an own-initiative report by Jacqueline FOSTER (ECR, UK) on the safe use of remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS), commonly known as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), in the field of civil aviation.

    Stressing the global dimension of piloted aircraft systems and that all the Member States have some RPAS activities, either in manufacturing and/or operationally, Members considered that the RPAS sector urgently requires European and global rules in order to ensure cross-border RPAS development.

    A clear European legal framework is needed to ensure investment and development of a competitive European RPAS sector. Moreover, Members believed that this framework might assist the discussions on global rule making for the use of drones.

    Key issues: recalling the economic importance of this sector, Members stressed that all EU policies should take account of the following aspects:

    the need to put in place suitable policies to protect privacy and ensure data protection, safety and security, which are proportionate to their aim while not imposing an unnecessary burden on SMEs;

    the establishment of a clear distinction between professional and recreational use of remotely piloted aircraft;

    the fact that safety and security are paramount for any RPAS operations and rules and that they must be commensurate with the risks.

    In this regard, the report supports the five essential principles for future RPAS development set out in the Riga Declaration:

    1. RPAS need to be treated as new types of aircraft with proportionate rules based on the risk of each operation;
    2. EU rules for the safe provision of RPAS services need to be developed to enable the industry to invest;
    3. technology and standards need to be developed to enable the full integration of RPAS into European airspace;
    4. public acceptance is key to the growth of RPAS services;
    5. the operator of an RPAS is responsible for its use.

    Stressing the importance of ‘out-of-sight’ flights for the development of the sector, Members considered that European legislation should favour this modus operandi.

    In the long term, technical and regulatory solutions should preferably enable RPAS to use the airspace alongside any other airspace user without imposing on the latter new equipment requirements.

    Future solutions: Members considered that future European and global rules on RPAS should address issues relating to:

    • airworthiness;
    • certification specifications;
    • commercial and recreational use;
    • the identity of the drone and the owner/operator;
    • the approval of training organisations for pilots;
    • training and licensing of pilots;
    • operations;
    • liability and insurance;
    • data protection and privacy; ‘geo-fencing’;
    • no-fly (exclusion) zones.

    Furthermore, the report concentrated on the following points:

    • training provided to professional users and owners of RPAS, it includes specific training on data protection and privacy;
    • RPAS flying beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS) must be equipped with ‘detect-and-avoid’ technology in order to detect aircraft using the same airspace, ensuring that RPAS do not put at risk the safety of manned aircraft, and in addition, take into account densely-populated areas, no-fly zones, such as airports;
    • Taking into account the expected economic spin-offs from this sector, the EU should favour the development of European technologies, for example through Horizon 2020;
    • RPAS in line with a risk-based approach should be equipped with an ID chip and registered to ensure traceability, accountability and a proper implementation of civil liability rules;
    • the use of RPAS by law enforcement and intelligence services must respect the fundamental right to privacy, data protection, freedom of movement and freedom of expression;
    • the data protection authorities of the Member States should share existing specific data protection guidance for commercial RPAS.

    In addition, the Joint Authorities for Rulemaking on Unmanned Systems (JARUS) which is an international voluntary membership body comprising national civil aviation authorities from 22 EU and non-EU countries and regulatory agencies/bodies could ensure that any future EU rules will be coordinated with international arrangements in other countries, through a process of mutual recognition.

    Members took the view that the Parliament must establish its position prior to the Commission’s adoption of its aviation package, thereby responding to the industry call for clear guidance. They called on the TRAN and LIBE committees to arrange a joint hearing with representatives of industry, national privacy protection organisations, the European Data Protection Supervisor, the Commission, and NGOs working in the area of fundamental rights.

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  • PURPOSE: to open the aviation market to the civil use of remotely piloted aircraft systems.

    BACKGROUND: the Commission considers that opening the European market for remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) - or the civilian use of drones - is an important step towards the aviation market of the future. The European Summit of 19 December 2013 called for action to enable the progressive integration of RPAS into civil airspace from 2016 onwards.

    RPAS technology has matured rapidly in past years and is ready to make the shift from being purely military equipment to becoming a reliable new technology for civil use.

    Member States are beginning to authorise RPAS operations in non-segregated airspace to respond to market demand. In the short term, the most promising market lies in areas such as infrastructure monitoring or photography; in a longer term future, it may be the transport of goods and eventually people.

    According to an industry source, the global budget forecast in terms of research and development (R&D) and procurement, including military and governmental, is expected to grow from currently $5.2 bn to about $11.6 bn per year in 2023. The number of jobs created through new RPAS activities in the US is estimated to exceed 100,000 by 2025.  For Europe, about 150,000 jobs by 2050 are forecast.

    Currently, the US and Israel dominate the global RPAS manufacturing sector. Other non-EU countries, such as Brazil, China, India and Russia, also show potential to become strong competitors. A strong common EU market should offer a solid basis to compete at the global level.

    CONTENT: the Communication responds to the call of the European manufacturing and service industry to remove barriers to the introduction of RPAS in the European single market. It sets out the Commission's views on how to address RPAS operations in a European level policy framework which will enable the progressive development of the commercial RPAS market while safeguarding the public interest.

    The European strategy aims at establishing a single RPAS market to reap the societal benefits of this innovative technology and at dealing with citizens' concerns through public debate and protective action wherever needed.

    The Commission recalls that RPAS applications can only develop if the aircraft can fly in non-segregated airspace without affecting the safety and the operation of the wider civil aviation system. To this end, the EU should:

    ·        put in place an enabling regulatory structure to which the major players at the European and national levels can contribute. The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) is best placed to develop common rules, using the proven EASA consultation process;

    ·        increase and coordinate R&D efforts in order to keep lead times for promising technologies as short as possible (e.g. command and control; detect and avoid technologies; security protection against attacks; contingency procedures; human factor issues such as piloting). The SESAR Joint Undertaking (SJU) (CE SESAR) is the R&D platform building the future air traffic management system of the Single European Sky. So it is uniquely placed to coordinate this R&D);

    ·        ensure that RPAS operations do not lead to fundamental rights being infringed: the progressive integration of RPAS into the airspace from 2016 onwards must be accompanied by adequate public debate on the development of measures which address societal concerns including safety, privacy and data protection, third-party liability and insurance or security;

    ·        support market development and European industries by recourse to existing EU instruments such as the Horizon 2020 and COSME programmes.

    This strategy should provide adequate legal certainty and offer a reliable timing, so that industry can take investment decisions and create employment. As the RPAS market is global by its very nature, the EU will also coordinate with international partners.

    The European Commission also intends to bring forward, where appropriate, legislative proposals to remove legal uncertainties that hinder the development of the European market.

activities/1/committees/1
body
EP
responsible
False
committee
LIBE
date
2015-02-05T00:00:00
committee_full
Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs
rapporteur
group: S&D name: POST Soraya
activities/1/committees/2/shadows/3
group
GUE/NGL
name
KONEČNÁ Kateřina
activities/2
date
2015-09-15T00:00:00
body
EP
type
Vote scheduled in committee, 1st reading/single reading
committees/1
body
EP
responsible
False
committee
LIBE
date
2015-02-05T00:00:00
committee_full
Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs
rapporteur
group: S&D name: POST Soraya
committees/2/shadows/3
group
GUE/NGL
name
KONEČNÁ Kateřina
activities
  • date: 2014-04-08T00:00:00 docs: url: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexplus!prod!DocNumber&lg=EN&type_doc=COMfinal&an_doc=2014&nu_doc=0207 celexid: CELEX:52014DC0207:EN type: Non-legislative basic document published title: COM(2014)0207 body: EC commission: DG: url: http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/transport/index_en.htm title: Mobility and Transport Commissioner: BULC Violeta type: Non-legislative basic document published
  • date: 2015-01-15T00:00:00 body: EP type: Committee referral announced in Parliament, 1st reading/single reading committees: body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Industry, Research and Energy committee: ITRE body: EP shadows: group: EPP name: MUSELIER Renaud group: S&D name: ZEMKE Janusz group: ALDE name: VAN MILTENBURG Matthijs group: Verts/ALE name: ŠKRLEC Davor responsible: True committee: TRAN date: 2014-12-15T00:00:00 committee_full: Transport and Tourism rapporteur: group: ECR name: FOSTER Jacqueline
committees
  • body: EP responsible: False committee_full: Industry, Research and Energy committee: ITRE
  • body: EP shadows: group: EPP name: MUSELIER Renaud group: S&D name: ZEMKE Janusz group: ALDE name: VAN MILTENBURG Matthijs group: Verts/ALE name: ŠKRLEC Davor responsible: True committee: TRAN date: 2014-12-15T00:00:00 committee_full: Transport and Tourism rapporteur: group: ECR name: FOSTER Jacqueline
links
other
  • body: EC dg: url: http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/transport/index_en.htm title: Mobility and Transport commissioner: BULC Violeta
procedure
dossier_of_the_committee
TRAN/8/02303
reference
2014/2243(INI)
title
Safe use of remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS), commonly known as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), in the field of civil aviation
legal_basis
Rules of Procedure of the European Parliament EP 052
stage_reached
Awaiting committee decision
subtype
Initiative
type
INI - Own-initiative procedure
subject