BETA

Activities of Jeppe KOFOD

Plenary speeches (136)

Protecting the integrity of the European elections, with particular regard to international threats to cybersecurity (debate)
2016/11/22
Debate with the Prime Minister of Sweden, Stefan Löfven, on the Future of Europe (debate)
2016/11/22
Report on financial crimes, tax evasion and tax avoidance (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2018/2121(INI)
Report on financial crimes, tax evasion and tax avoidance (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2018/2121(INI)
Recommendations for opening of negotiations between the EU and the US (debate)
2016/11/22
Recommendations for opening of negotiations between the EU and the US (debate)
2016/11/22
Urgency for an EU blacklist of third countries in line with the Anti-Money Laundering Directive (debate)
2016/11/22
Fair taxation for a just society (topical debate)
2016/11/22
The future of the INF Treaty and the impact on the EU (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2019/2574(RSP)
Debate with the Prime Minister of Finland, Mr Juha Sipilä, on the Future of Europe (debate)
2016/11/22
Establishing the InvestEU Programme (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2018/0229(COD)
Common system of a digital services tax on revenues resulting from the provision of certain digital services - Corporate taxation of a significant digital presence (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2018/0072(CNS)
Debate with the Prime Minister of Denmark, Lars Løkke Rasmussen, on the Future of Europe (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Increasing EU resilience against the influence of foreign actors on the upcoming EP election campaign (topical debate)
2016/11/22
European security and the future of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (debate)
2016/11/22
The Cum Ex Scandal: financial crime and the loopholes in the current legal framework (debate)
2016/11/22
Risks of money laundering in the EU banking sector (debate)
2016/11/22
Harmonising and simplifying certain rules in the VAT system - Rates of value added tax (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2018/0005(CNS)
State of the Union (debate)
2016/11/22
The future of pensions: fighting privatisation and strengthening public universal social security systems (topical debate) DA
2016/11/22
State of EU-US relations (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2017/2271(INI)
US tariffs in the steel and aluminium sector and the EU's response (debate)
2016/11/22
US decision to impose tariffs on steel and aluminium (debate)
2016/11/22
Common Consolidated Corporate Tax Base - Common Corporate Tax Base (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/0337(CNS)
Cutting the sources of income for Jihadists - targeting the financing of terrorism (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2017/2203(INI)
European Council informal meeting of 23 February 2018 (debate)
2016/11/22
Removal of several third countries from the EU list of non-cooperative jurisdictions for tax purposes (debate)
2016/11/22
Removal of several third countries from the EU list of non-cooperative jurisdictions for tax purposes (debate)
2016/11/22
The consequences of rising socio-economic inequalities for European citizens (topical debate)
2016/11/22
Decision adopted on the Fair Taxation package II and III (debate)
2016/11/22
Debate with the Taoiseach of Ireland Leo Varadkar on the Future of Europe (debate)
2016/11/22
Russia - the influence of propaganda on EU countries (topical debate)
2016/11/22
Trade and sustainable development chapters in EU trade agreements (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2017/2988(RSP)
Draft recommendation following the inquiry on money laundering, tax avoidance and tax evasion (B8-0660/2017) (vote)
2016/11/22
Report on the inquiry into money laundering, tax avoidance and tax evasion (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2017/2013(INI)
Report on the inquiry into money laundering, tax avoidance and tax evasion (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2017/2013(INI)
Activities of the European Ombudsman in 2016 (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2017/2126(INI)
Paradise papers (debate)
2016/11/22
Framework for simple, transparent and standardised securitisation - Prudential requirements for credit institutions and investment firms (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/0226(COD)
Commission Work Programme 2018 (debate)
2016/11/22
State of play of negotiations with the United Kingdom (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2017/2847(RSP)
NordStream 2 (debate)
2016/11/22
Turkey-EU relationship (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Preparation of the G20 summit of 7 and 8 July 2017 (debate)
2016/11/22
Disclosure of income tax information by certain undertakings and branches (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/0107(COD)
Preparation of the Commission Work Programme for 2018 (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2017/2699(RSP)
President Trump's decision to withdraw the US from the COP 21 Climate agreement (debate)
2016/11/22
Panama Papers follow-up and the rule of law in Malta (debate)
2016/11/22
Conclusions of the European Council meeting of 29 April 2017 (debate)
2016/11/22
Preparation of the G7 Summit (debate)
2016/11/22
Harnessing globalisation by 2025 (debate)
2016/11/22
Negotiations with the United Kingdom following its notification that it intends to withdraw from the European Union (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2017/2593(RSP)
Conclusions of the European Council meeting of 9 and 10 March 2017, including the Rome Declaration (debate)
2016/11/22
Follow-up of TAXE recommendations and update on the reform of the Code of conduct Group on business taxation (debate)
2016/11/22
Statement by the President of the Commission on the White Paper on the future of the European Union
2016/11/22
EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement - Conclusion of the EU-Canada CETA - EU-Canada Strategic Partnership Agreement (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/0205(NLE)
Building a European Data Economy (debate) DA
2016/11/22
"Clean Energy for All" package (debate)
2016/11/22
New opportunities for small transport businesses (A8-0304/2016 - Dominique Riquet) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2349(INI)
Opinion from the Court of Justice on the compatibility with the Treaties of the proposed agreement between Canada and the European Union on a Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) (B8-1220/2016) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2981(RSP)
EU strategic communication to counteract anti-EU propaganda by third parties (A8-0290/2016 - Anna Elżbieta Fotyga) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2030(INI)
Access to anti-money-laundering information by tax authorities (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/0209(CNS)
European Defence Union (A8-0316/2016 - Urmas Paet) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2052(INI)
EU-Turkey relations (debate)
2016/11/22
Finalisation of Basel III (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2959(RSP)
Draft general budget of the European Union for 2017 - all sections DA
2016/11/22
General budget of the European Union for 2017 - all sections (A8-0287/2016 - Jens Geier, Indrek Tarand) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2047(BUD)
Fight against corruption and follow-up of the CRIM resolution (A8-0284/2016 - Laura Ferrara) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2110(INI)
EU mechanism on democracy, the rule of law and fundamental rights (A8-0283/2016 - Sophia in 't Veld) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2254(INL)
Corporate taxation package (debate)
2016/11/22
Avoiding conflicts of interest of past and present Commissioners - Bahamas leaks (debate)
2016/11/22
Creating labour market conditions favourable for work-life balance (A8-0253/2016 - Tatjana Ždanoka, Vilija Blinkevičiūtė) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2017(INI)
Draft amending budget No 2/2016: Surplus from 2015 (A8-0212/2016 - José Manuel Fernandes) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2051(BUD)
Energy efficiency labelling (A8-0213/2016 - Dario Tamburrano) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/0149(COD)
Preparation of the post-electoral revision of the MFF 2014-2020: Parliament's input ahead of the Commission's proposal (A8-0224/2016 - Jan Olbrycht, Isabelle Thomas) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2353(INI)
Tax rulings and other measures similar in nature or effect (TAXE 2) (A8-0223/2016 - Jeppe Kofod, Michael Theurer) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2038(INI)
Protection of whistle-blowers (debate)
2016/11/22
EU-Peru Agreement on the short-stay visa waiver (A8-0197/2016 - Mariya Gabriel) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/0199(NLE)
Tax rulings and other measures similar in nature or effect (TAXE 2) (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2038(INI)
Tax rulings and other measures similar in nature or effect (TAXE 2) (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2038(INI)
Energy efficiency labelling (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/0149(COD)
Outcome of the referendum in the United Kingdom (B8-0838/2016, B8-0839/2016, B8-0840/2016, B8-0841/2016) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2800(RSP)
Provisional measures in the area of international protection for the benefit of Sweden (A8-0170/2016 - Ska Keller) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/0314(NLE)
Poverty: a gender perspective (A8-0153/2016 - Maria Arena) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2228(INI)
The Single Market strategy (A8-0171/2016 - Lara Comi) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2354(INI)
Preventing and combating trafficking in human beings (A8-0144/2016 - Catherine Bearder) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2118(INI)
Mandatory automatic exchange of information in the field of taxation (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Impact of Nord Stream 2 on the gas market in the CEE region (debate)
2016/11/22
Meeting the antipoverty target in the light of increasing household costs (A8-0040/2016 - Tamás Meszerics) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2223(INI)
The EU in a changing global environment - a more connected, contested and complex world (A8-0069/2016 - Sandra Kalniete) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2272(INI)
Effectiveness of existing measures against tax evasion and money laundering in light of recent Panama papers revelations (debate)
2016/11/22
The situation of women refugees and asylum seekers in the EU (A8-0024/2016 - Mary Honeyball) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2325(INI)
Preparation of the European Council meeting of 18 and 19 February 2016 (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Commission decision adopted on the Corporate Tax package (debate)
2016/11/22
Refugee emergency, external borders control and future of Schengen - Respect for the international principle of non-refoulement - Financing refugee facility for Turkey - Increased racist hatred and violence against refugees and migrants across Europe (debate)
2016/11/22
Programme of activities of the Dutch Presidency (debate)
2016/11/22
Annual report on EU Competition Policy (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2140(INI)
Bringing transparency, coordination and convergence to corporate tax policies (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2010(INL)
Towards a European Energy Union - Making Europe's electricity grid fit for 2020 (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2108(INI)
Towards a European Energy Union - Making Europe's electricity grid fit for 2020 (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2108(INI)
Prevention of radicalisation and recruitment of European citizens by terrorist organisations (A8-0316/2015 - Rachida Dati) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2063(INI)
State of the Energy Union (debate)
2016/11/22
Tax rulings and other measures similar in nature or effect (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2066(INI)
A new animal welfare strategy for 2016-2020 (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Decision adopted on the Capital Markets Union package (debate)
2016/11/22
Doubling the capacity of the North Stream pipeline and impact on the energy union and the security of supply (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Provisional measures in the area of international protection for the benefit of Italy and Greece (A8-0245/2015 - Ska Keller) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/0125(NLE)
Negotiations for the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) (A8-0175/2015 - Bernd Lange) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/2228(INI)
Negotiations for the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/2228(INI)
Long-term shareholder engagement and corporate governance statement (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/0121(COD)
Long-term shareholder engagement and corporate governance statement (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/0121(COD)
ACER - Human resources for monitoring wholesale energy markets (debate)
2016/11/22
Financing for development (A8-0143/2015 - Pedro Silva Pereira) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2044(INI)
Implementation of the Common Security and Defence Policy - Financing the Common Security and Defence Policy - Security and defence capabilities in Europe (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/2220(INI)
Preparations for the European Council meeting (19-20 March 2015) (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Guidelines for the 2016 budget - Section III (A8-0027/2015 - José Manuel Fernandes) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2008(BUD)
European Semester for economic policy coordination: employment and social aspects in the Annual Growth Survey 2015 (A8-0043/2015 - Sergio Gutiérrez Prieto) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/2222(INI)
Annual report from the High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy to the European Parliament (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/2219(INI)
European long-term investment funds (debate)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2013/0214(COD)
Progress on equality between women and men in the EU in 2013 (A8-0015/2015 - Marc Tarabella) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/2217(INI)
Annual report on EU competition policy (A8-0019/2015 - Morten Messerschmidt) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/2158(INI)
Annual report on EU competition policy (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/2158(INI)
Decision adopted on a Strategic framework for the Energy Union (debate)
2016/11/22
Country of origin labelling for meat ingredients in processed food (B8-0097/2015) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/2543(RSP)
Situation in Yemen (debate)
2016/11/22
2015 Review Conference of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) (debate)
2016/11/22
Situation in Egypt (debate) DA
2016/11/22
New draft general budget of the European Union - 2015 financial year DA
2016/11/22
New general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2015 (A8-0067/2014 - Eider Gardiazabal Rubial, Monika Hohlmeier) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/2224(BUD)
Mobilisation of the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund: application EGF/2013/014 FR/Air France (A8-0065/2014 - Marco Zanni) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/2185(BUD)
2014 UN Climate Change Conference - COP 20 in Lima, Peru (1-12 December 2014) (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/2777(RSP)
Employment and social aspects of the EU2020 strategy (B8-0252/2014) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/2779(RSP)
Fight against tax avoidance (debate) DA
2016/11/22
General budget of the European Union for the financial year 2015 - all sections (A8-0014/2014 - Eider Gardiazabal Rubial, Monika Hohlmeier) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/2040(BUD)
Preparation of the European Council (23-24 October 2014) (debate) DA
2016/11/22
Adoption by Lithuania of the euro on 1 January 2015 (A8-0001/2014 - Werner Langen) DA
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/0170(NLE)

Reports (5)

REPORT on financial crimes, tax evasion and tax avoidance PDF (1001 KB) DOC (369 KB)
2016/11/22
Committee: TAX3
Dossiers: 2018/2121(INI)
Documents: PDF(1001 KB) DOC(369 KB)
REPORT on the proposal for a Council directive amending Directive 2006/112/EC as regards harmonising and simplifying certain rules in the value added tax system and introducing the definitive system for the taxation of trade between Member States PDF (667 KB) DOC (107 KB)
2016/11/22
Committee: ECON
Dossiers: 2017/0251(CNS)
Documents: PDF(667 KB) DOC(107 KB)
REPORT on the inquiry into money laundering, tax avoidance and tax evasion PDF (1 MB) DOC (264 KB)
2016/11/22
Committee: PANA
Dossiers: 2017/2013(INI)
Documents: PDF(1 MB) DOC(264 KB)
REPORT on tax rulings and other measures similar in nature or effect PDF (1 MB) DOC (506 KB)
2016/11/22
Committee: TAX2
Dossiers: 2016/2038(INI)
Documents: PDF(1 MB) DOC(506 KB)
REPORT on the draft Council decision on the conclusion, on behalf of the European Union, of the Amending Protocol to the Agreement between the European Community and the Swiss Confederation providing for measures equivalent to those laid down in Council Directive 2003/48/EC on taxation of savings income in the form of interest payments PDF (187 KB) DOC (251 KB)
2016/11/22
Committee: ECON
Dossiers: 2015/0076(NLE)
Documents: PDF(187 KB) DOC(251 KB)

Shadow reports (7)

REPORT on the proposal for a Council directive amending Directive 2006/112/EC as regards the introduction of the detailed technical measures for the operation of the definitive VAT system for the taxation of trade between Member States PDF (236 KB) DOC (103 KB)
2016/11/22
Committee: ECON
Dossiers: 2018/0164(CNS)
Documents: PDF(236 KB) DOC(103 KB)
REPORT on the proposal for a Council decision on the conclusion, on behalf of the European Union, of the Amending Protocol to the Agreement between the European Community and the Principality of Monaco providing for measures equivalent to those laid down in Council Directive 2003/48/EC PDF (342 KB) DOC (71 KB)
2016/11/22
Committee: ECON
Dossiers: 2016/0109(NLE)
Documents: PDF(342 KB) DOC(71 KB)
REPORT on the proposal for a Council decision on the conclusion, on behalf of the European Union, of the Amending Protocol to the Agreement between the European Community and the Principality of Andorra providing for measures equivalent to those laid down in Council Directive 2003/48/EC on taxation of savings income in the form of interest payments PDF (341 KB) DOC (71 KB)
2016/11/22
Committee: ECON
Dossiers: 2015/0285(NLE)
Documents: PDF(341 KB) DOC(71 KB)
REPORT on the proposal for a Council decision on the conclusion, on behalf of the European Union, of the Amending Protocol to the Agreement between the European Community and the Republic of San Marino providing for measures equivalent to those laid down in Council Directive 2003/48/EC on taxation of savings income in the form of interest payments PDF (341 KB) DOC (70 KB)
2016/11/22
Committee: ECON
Dossiers: 2015/0244(NLE)
Documents: PDF(341 KB) DOC(70 KB)
REPORT on the proposal for a Council decision on the conclusion, on behalf of the European Union, of the Amending Protocol to the Agreement between the European Community and the Principality of Liechtenstein providing for measures equivalent to those laid down in Council Directive 2003/48/EC on taxation of savings income in the form of interest payments PDF (155 KB) DOC (70 KB)
2016/11/22
Committee: ECON
Dossiers: 2015/0175(NLE)
Documents: PDF(155 KB) DOC(70 KB)
REPORT on green growth opportunities for SMEs PDF (196 KB) DOC (130 KB)
2016/11/22
Committee: ITRE
Dossiers: 2014/2209(INI)
Documents: PDF(196 KB) DOC(130 KB)
SUPPLEMENTARY REPORT on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on European Long-term Investment Funds PDF (719 KB) DOC (192 KB)
2016/11/22
Committee: ECON
Dossiers: 2013/0214(COD)
Documents: PDF(719 KB) DOC(192 KB)

Opinions (1)

OPINION on recommendations to the European Commission on the negotiations for the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP)
2016/11/22
Committee: ECON
Documents: PDF(116 KB) DOC(187 KB)

Shadow opinions (4)

OPINION on the proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council laying down rules facilitating the use of financial and other information for the prevention, detection, investigation or prosecution of certain criminal offences and repealing Council Decision 2000/642/JHA
2016/11/22
Committee: ECON
Dossiers: 2018/0105(COD)
Documents: PDF(248 KB) DOC(167 KB)
OPINION on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council establishing the InvestEU Programme
2016/11/22
Committee: ITRE
Dossiers: 2018/0229(COD)
Documents: PDF(1019 KB) DOC(203 KB)
OPINION on the proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on the protection of persons reporting on breaches of Union law
2016/11/22
Committee: ECON
Dossiers: 2018/0106(COD)
Documents: PDF(268 KB) DOC(188 KB)
OPINION on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on a framework for the free flow of non-personal data in the European Union
2016/11/22
Committee: ITRE
Dossiers: 2017/0228(COD)
Documents: PDF(603 KB) DOC(161 KB)

Institutional motions (100)

JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the cum-ex scandal: financial crime and loopholes in the current legal framework PDF (269 KB) DOC (48 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2018/2900(RSP)
Documents: PDF(269 KB) DOC(48 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the cum-ex scandal: financial crime and loopholes in the current legal framework PDF (204 KB) DOC (58 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2018/2900(RSP)
Documents: PDF(204 KB) DOC(58 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on animal welfare, antimicrobial use and the environmental impact of industrial broiler farming PDF (289 KB) DOC (56 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2018/2858(RSP)
Documents: PDF(289 KB) DOC(56 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on progress on the UN Global Compacts for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration and on Refugees PDF (394 KB) DOC (71 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2018/2642(RSP)
Documents: PDF(394 KB) DOC(71 KB)
EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT DRAFT RECOMMENDATION TO THE COUNCIL AND THE COMMISSION following the inquiry into money laundering, tax avoidance and tax evasion PDF (568 KB) DOC (104 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/3044(RSP)
Documents: PDF(568 KB) DOC(104 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the rule of law in Malta PDF (255 KB) DOC (44 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2017/2935(RSP)
Documents: PDF(255 KB) DOC(44 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the cases of the Larung Gar Tibetan Buddhist Academy and Ilham Tohti PDF (163 KB) DOC (52 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/3026(RSP)
Documents: PDF(163 KB) DOC(52 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation of the Rohingya minority in Myanmar PDF (157 KB) DOC (58 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/3027(RSP)
Documents: PDF(157 KB) DOC(58 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on mass graves in Iraq PDF (158 KB) DOC (57 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/3028(RSP)
Documents: PDF(158 KB) DOC(57 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation in Northern Iraq/Mosul PDF (161 KB) DOC (87 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2956(RSP)
Documents: PDF(161 KB) DOC(87 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation of journalists in Turkey PDF (152 KB) DOC (81 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2935(RSP)
Documents: PDF(152 KB) DOC(81 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Thailand, notably the situation of Andy Hall PDF (153 KB) DOC (80 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2912(RSP)
Documents: PDF(153 KB) DOC(80 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Sudan PDF (167 KB) DOC (89 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2911(RSP)
Documents: PDF(167 KB) DOC(89 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Rwanda, the case of Victoire Ingabire PDF (291 KB) DOC (83 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2910(RSP)
Documents: PDF(291 KB) DOC(83 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Bahrain PDF (355 KB) DOC (75 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2808(RSP)
Documents: PDF(355 KB) DOC(75 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation of albinos in Africa, notably in Malawi PDF (276 KB) DOC (72 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2807(RSP)
Documents: PDF(276 KB) DOC(72 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Tajikistan: situation of prisoners of conscience PDF (164 KB) DOC (86 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2754(RSP)
Documents: PDF(164 KB) DOC(86 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Vietnam PDF (167 KB) DOC (91 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2755(RSP)
Documents: PDF(167 KB) DOC(91 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Cambodia PDF (161 KB) DOC (87 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2753(RSP)
Documents: PDF(161 KB) DOC(87 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation in Venezuela PDF (160 KB) DOC (83 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2699(RSP)
Documents: PDF(160 KB) DOC(83 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Nigeria PDF (372 KB) DOC (74 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2649(RSP)
Documents: PDF(372 KB) DOC(74 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Honduras: situation of Human rights defenders PDF (335 KB) DOC (84 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2648(RSP)
Documents: PDF(335 KB) DOC(84 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Pakistan, in particular the attack in Lahore PDF (276 KB) DOC (74 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2644(RSP)
Documents: PDF(276 KB) DOC(74 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the Democratic Republic of the Congo PDF (164 KB) DOC (88 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2609(RSP)
Documents: PDF(164 KB) DOC(88 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Egypt, notably the case of Giulio Regeni PDF (168 KB) DOC (85 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2608(RSP)
Documents: PDF(168 KB) DOC(85 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on freedom of expression in Kazakhstan PDF (168 KB) DOC (88 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2607(RSP)
Documents: PDF(168 KB) DOC(88 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation in Eritrea PDF (163 KB) DOC (91 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2568(RSP)
Documents: PDF(163 KB) DOC(91 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the Democratic Republic of Congo PDF (285 KB) DOC (77 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2609(RSP)
Documents: PDF(285 KB) DOC(77 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Egypt, notably the case of Giulio Regeni PDF (291 KB) DOC (75 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2608(RSP)
Documents: PDF(291 KB) DOC(75 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Freedom of expression in Kazakhstan PDF (306 KB) DOC (75 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2607(RSP)
Documents: PDF(306 KB) DOC(75 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the case of the missing book publishers in Hong Kong PDF (157 KB) DOC (83 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2558(RSP)
Documents: PDF(157 KB) DOC(83 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Bahrain: the case of Mohammed Ramadan PDF (149 KB) DOC (82 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2557(RSP)
Documents: PDF(149 KB) DOC(82 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the human rights situation in Crimea, in particular of the Crimean Tatars PDF (155 KB) DOC (80 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2556(RSP)
Documents: PDF(155 KB) DOC(80 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the humanitarian situation in Yemen PDF (159 KB) DOC (84 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2515(RSP)
Documents: PDF(159 KB) DOC(84 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the systematic mass murder of religious minorities by the so-called ‘ISIS/Daesh’ PDF (168 KB) DOC (94 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2529(RSP)
Documents: PDF(168 KB) DOC(94 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation in Libya PDF (162 KB) DOC (88 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2537(RSP)
Documents: PDF(162 KB) DOC(88 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Bahrain: the case of Mohammed Ramadan PDF (271 KB) DOC (70 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2557(RSP)
Documents: PDF(271 KB) DOC(70 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the case of the missing book publishers in Hong Kong PDF (275 KB) DOC (74 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2558(RSP)
Documents: PDF(275 KB) DOC(74 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION in Crimea, in particular of the Crimean Tatars PDF (223 KB) DOC (69 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2556(RSP)
Documents: PDF(223 KB) DOC(69 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation in Ethiopia PDF (291 KB) DOC (84 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2520(RSP)
Documents: PDF(291 KB) DOC(84 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on EU citizens under detention in India, notably Italian, Estonian and UK citizens PDF (273 KB) DOC (70 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2522(RSP)
Documents: PDF(273 KB) DOC(70 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on North Korea PDF (277 KB) DOC (73 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2016/2521(RSP)
Documents: PDF(277 KB) DOC(73 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Malaysia PDF (157 KB) DOC (79 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/3018(RSP)
Documents: PDF(157 KB) DOC(79 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation in the Maldives PDF (285 KB) DOC (84 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/3017(RSP)
Documents: PDF(285 KB) DOC(84 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Ibrahim Halawa, potentially facing the death penalty PDF (287 KB) DOC (83 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/3016(RSP)
Documents: PDF(287 KB) DOC(83 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the 20th anniversary of the Dayton Peace Agreement PDF (271 KB) DOC (71 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2979(RSP)
Documents: PDF(271 KB) DOC(71 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on a new animal welfare strategy for 2016-2020 PDF (269 KB) DOC (71 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2957(RSP)
Documents: PDF(269 KB) DOC(71 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the political situation in Cambodia PDF (281 KB) DOC (78 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2969(RSP)
Documents: PDF(281 KB) DOC(78 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Afghanistan, in particular the killings in the province of Zabul PDF (286 KB) DOC (79 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2968(RSP)
Documents: PDF(286 KB) DOC(79 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on freedom of expression in Bangladesh PDF (292 KB) DOC (85 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2970(RSP)
Documents: PDF(292 KB) DOC(85 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the political situation in Cambodia PDF (147 KB) DOC (72 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2969(RSP)
Documents: PDF(147 KB) DOC(72 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation in Afghanistan, in particular the killings in the province of Zabul PDF (147 KB) DOC (70 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2968(RSP)
Documents: PDF(147 KB) DOC(70 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the freedom of expression in Bangladesh PDF (149 KB) DOC (71 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2970(RSP)
Documents: PDF(149 KB) DOC(71 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the mass displacement of children in Nigeria as a result of Boko Haram attacks PDF (158 KB) DOC (85 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2876(RSP)
Documents: PDF(158 KB) DOC(85 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation in Thailand PDF (166 KB) DOC (84 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2875(RSP)
Documents: PDF(166 KB) DOC(84 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the Central African Republic PDF (170 KB) DOC (97 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2874(RSP)
Documents: PDF(170 KB) DOC(97 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the death penalty PDF (155 KB) DOC (81 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2879(RSP)
Documents: PDF(155 KB) DOC(81 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the case of Ali Mohammed al-Nimr PDF (159 KB) DOC (80 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2883(RSP)
Documents: PDF(159 KB) DOC(80 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the case of Mr. Ali Mohammed Baqir al-Nimr, Saudi Arabia PDF (145 KB) DOC (69 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2883(RSP)
Documents: PDF(145 KB) DOC(69 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the mass displacement of children in Nigeria as a result of Boko Haram attacks PDF (161 KB) DOC (84 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2876(RSP)
Documents: PDF(161 KB) DOC(84 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the death penalty PDF (279 KB) DOC (77 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2879(RSP)
Documents: PDF(279 KB) DOC(77 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Azerbaijan PDF (155 KB) DOC (85 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2840(RSP)
Documents: PDF(155 KB) DOC(85 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Angola PDF (154 KB) DOC (84 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2839(RSP)
Documents: PDF(154 KB) DOC(84 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Azerbaijan PDF (147 KB) DOC (73 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2840(RSP)
Documents: PDF(147 KB) DOC(73 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Angola PDF (157 KB) DOC (74 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2839(RSP)
Documents: PDF(157 KB) DOC(74 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Russia in particular the case of Eston Kohver, Oleg Sentzov, and Alexander Kolchenko PDF (145 KB) DOC (73 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2838(RSP)
Documents: PDF(145 KB) DOC(73 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the EU’s role in the Middle East peace process PDF (296 KB) DOC (90 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2685(RSP)
Documents: PDF(296 KB) DOC(90 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the Srebrenica Commemoration PDF (174 KB) DOC (79 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2747(RSP)
Documents: PDF(174 KB) DOC(79 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation of two Christian pastors in Sudan PDF (146 KB) DOC (76 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2766(RSP)
Documents: PDF(146 KB) DOC(76 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Bahrain, in particular the case of Nabeel Rajab PDF (155 KB) DOC (80 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2758(RSP)
Documents: PDF(155 KB) DOC(80 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), in particular the case of the two detained human rights activists Yves Makwambala and Fred Bauma PDF (159 KB) DOC (89 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2757(RSP)
Documents: PDF(159 KB) DOC(89 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Cambodia’s draft laws on NGOs and trade unions PDF (153 KB) DOC (79 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2756(RSP)
Documents: PDF(153 KB) DOC(79 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the Srebrenica commemoration PDF (262 KB) DOC (67 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2747(RSP)
Documents: PDF(262 KB) DOC(67 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Situation of two Christian pastors in Sudan PDF (146 KB) DOC (70 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2766(RSP)
Documents: PDF(146 KB) DOC(70 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Bahrain, in particular the case of Nabeel Rajab PDF (148 KB) DOC (75 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2758(RSP)
Documents: PDF(148 KB) DOC(75 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), in particular the case of two detained human rights activists Yves Makwambala and Fred Bauma PDF (148 KB) DOC (74 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2757(RSP)
Documents: PDF(148 KB) DOC(74 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Cambodia's draft laws on NGOs and trade unions PDF (150 KB) DOC (73 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2756(RSP)
Documents: PDF(150 KB) DOC(73 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation in Nepal following the earthquakes PDF (178 KB) DOC (83 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2734(RSP)
Documents: PDF(178 KB) DOC(83 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Syria: situation in Palmyra and the case of Mazen Darwish PDF (191 KB) DOC (87 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2732(RSP)
Documents: PDF(191 KB) DOC(87 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Paraguay: legal aspects related to child pregnancy PDF (157 KB) DOC (82 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2733(RSP)
Documents: PDF(157 KB) DOC(82 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation in Nepal after the earthquakes PDF (151 KB) DOC (77 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2734(RSP)
Documents: PDF(151 KB) DOC(77 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Paraguay: the legal aspects related to the child pregnancy PDF (149 KB) DOC (74 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2733(RSP)
Documents: PDF(149 KB) DOC(74 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation Syria, in particular in Palmyra and the case of Mazen Darwish PDF (146 KB) DOC (72 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2732(RSP)
Documents: PDF(146 KB) DOC(72 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Swaziland, the case of human rights activists Thulani Maseko and Bheki Makhubu PDF (145 KB) DOC (72 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2712(RSP)
Documents: PDF(145 KB) DOC(72 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the plight of Rohingya refugees, including the mass graves in Thailand PDF (138 KB) DOC (68 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2711(RSP)
Documents: PDF(138 KB) DOC(68 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Zimbabwe, the case of human rights defender Itai Dzamara PDF (140 KB) DOC (68 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2710(RSP)
Documents: PDF(140 KB) DOC(68 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Swaziland, the case of human rights activists Thulani Maseko and Bheki Makhubu PDF (137 KB) DOC (64 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2712(RSP)
Documents: PDF(137 KB) DOC(64 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the plight of Rohingya refugees, including mass graves in Thailand PDF (140 KB) DOC (59 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2711(RSP)
Documents: PDF(140 KB) DOC(59 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on Zimbabwe, the case of human rights defender Itai Dzamara PDF (133 KB) DOC (57 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2710(RSP)
Documents: PDF(133 KB) DOC(57 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation of the Yarmouk refugee camp in Syria PDF (145 KB) DOC (70 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2664(RSP)
Documents: PDF(145 KB) DOC(70 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the Imprisonment of Workers and Human Rights Activists in Algeria PDF (148 KB) DOC (66 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2665(RSP)
Documents: PDF(148 KB) DOC(66 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation of the Yarmouk refugee camp in Syria PDF (131 KB) DOC (57 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2664(RSP)
Documents: PDF(131 KB) DOC(57 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the case of Nadiya Savchenko PDF (132 KB) DOC (56 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2663(RSP)
Documents: PDF(132 KB) DOC(56 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the murder of the Russian opposition leader Boris Nemtsov and the state of democracy in Russia PDF (150 KB) DOC (72 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2592(RSP)
Documents: PDF(150 KB) DOC(72 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the murder of the Russian opposition leader Boris Nemtsov and the state of democracy in Russia PDF (231 KB) DOC (57 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2592(RSP)
Documents: PDF(231 KB) DOC(57 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on relations between the EU and the League of Arab States to cooperate on counter-terrorism PDF (237 KB) DOC (68 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2015/2573(RSP)
Documents: PDF(237 KB) DOC(68 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation in Egypt PDF (160 KB) DOC (86 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/3017(RSP)
Documents: PDF(160 KB) DOC(86 KB)
JOINT MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation in Ukraine PDF (150 KB) DOC (81 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/2965(RSP)
Documents: PDF(150 KB) DOC(81 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation in Egypt PDF (244 KB) DOC (66 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/3017(RSP)
Documents: PDF(244 KB) DOC(66 KB)
MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on the situation in Ukraine PDF (248 KB) DOC (71 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2014/2965(RSP)
Documents: PDF(248 KB) DOC(71 KB)

Oral questions (4)

Animal welfare, antimicrobial use, and the environmental impact of industrial broiler farming PDF (198 KB) DOC (20 KB)
2016/11/22
Dossiers: 2018/2858(RSP)
Documents: PDF(198 KB) DOC(20 KB)
Animal welfare, antimicrobial use and the environmental impact of industrial broiler farming PDF (198 KB) DOC (20 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(198 KB) DOC(20 KB)
A new animal welfare strategy for 2016-2020 PDF DOC
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF DOC
Illegal trade in animals PDF DOC
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF DOC

Written explanations (30)

Amendments to Parliament's Rules of Procedure (A8-0462/2018 - Richard Corbett) DA

Vi danske socialdemokrater i Europa-Parlamentet støtter større kontrol med og revision af tillægget til generelle udgifter til kontorhold, som ofte kaldes blyantspenge.Socialdemokratiet mener, at forslaget i denne betænkning har en stor svaghed, idet revisionen er frivillig for europaparlamentarikere. Vi mener, revisionen skal være obligatorisk for alle.Det er for os afgørende, at der er klare, ens og kontrollerbare regler, at kontrollen udøves af fagprofessionelt personale, og at samtlige europaparlamentarikere underlægges ens og effektive kontrolsystemer.
2016/11/22
Common system of a digital services tax on revenues resulting from the provision of certain digital services (A8-0428/2018 - Paul Tang) DA

Socialdemokratiet mener, at det er EU’s medlemslande, der selv skal fastsætte og indkræve skatter. Sådan er det nu. Sådan skal det også være i fremtiden. Samtidigt er det klart, at EU-landene bliver nødt til at indlede et forpligtende samarbejde for at stoppe skatteræset mod bunden.Vi skal kort sagt lave en bundgrænse for, hvor lidt skat virksomheder kan slippe afsted med at betale i Europa, så vi kan aflyse skatteræset mod bunden og sikre, at lande som Danmark frit kan sætte vores skattesatser over dette niveau.Internetgiganterne tjener styrtende med penge på deres europæiske brugere. Det har gjort dem til nogle af verdens største og rigeste virksomheder. Men de betaler samtidig nærmest ingenting i skat i de europæiske lande, hvor de tjener deres penge.F.eks. har vi set hvordan Apple, Google og Facebook alle har betalt under 1% i skat af deres europæiske fortjenester. Det må og skal vi gøre op med. Derfor støtter Socialdemokratiet en særskat på digitale giganter i EU som en midlertidig ordning frem mod en global løsning.Det er de enkelte medlemslande, der suverænt selv skal stå for opkrævningen af særskatten, og provenuet herfra skal selvfølgelig tilfalde det enkelte medlemsland.
2016/11/22
Corporate taxation of a significant digital presence (A8-0426/2018 - Dariusz Rosati) DA

Socialdemokratiet mener, at det er EU’s medlemslande, der selv skal fastsætte og indkræve skatter. Sådan er det nu. Sådan skal det også være i fremtiden. Samtidigt er det klart, at EU-landene bliver nødt til at indlede et forpligtende samarbejde for at stoppe skatteræset mod bunden.Vi skal kort sagt lave en bundgrænse for, hvor lidt skat virksomheder kan slippe afsted med at betale i Europa, så vi kan aflyse skatteræset mod bunden og sikre, at lande som Danmark frit kan sætte vores skattesatser over dette niveau.Internetgiganterne tjener styrtende med penge på deres europæiske brugere. Det har gjort dem til nogle af verdens største og rigeste virksomheder. Men de betaler samtidig nærmest ingenting i skat i de europæiske lande, hvor de tjener deres penge.F.eks. har vi set hvordan Apple, Google og Facebook alle har betalt under 1% i skat af deres europæiske fortjenester. Det må og skal vi gøre op med. Derfor støtter Socialdemokratiet en særskat på digitale giganter i EU som en midlertidig ordning frem mod en global løsning.Det er de enkelte medlemslande, der suverænt selv skal stå for opkrævningen af særskatten, og provenuet herfra skal selvfølgelig tilfalde det enkelte medlemsland.
2016/11/22
Interim report on the Multiannual Financial Framework 2021-2027 – Parliament's position with a view to an agreement (A8-0358/2018 - Jan Olbrycht, Isabelle Thomas, Janusz Lewandowski, Gérard Deprez) DA

Vi danske socialdemokrater i Europa-Parlamentet er af den klare overbevisning, at der ikke er behov for flere penge i den flerårige finansielle ramme til EU-budgettet, end der allerede er fastsat. Yderligere vil briternes udmeldelse efterlade et økonomisk hul i EU-budgettet, og vi mener i denne forbindelse, at det vil være passende at reducere budgettet og prioritere bedre inden for disse budgetrammer, fremfor at øge medlemsstaternes bidrag. Vi mener, at styrkede tiltag såsom øget kontrol med de ydre grænser, fælles bekæmpelse af terror og investeringer til forskning og klima bør finansieres ved nedskæringer på andre budgetposter, f.eks. ved en gradvis udfasning af landbrugsstøtten og forenkling af eksisterende investerings- og støtteprogrammer samt de administrative udgifter i forbindelse hermed.Yderligere mener vi ikke, at den flerårige finansielle ramme skal suppleres med bidrag fra en indførelse af egne indtægter. For os er det vigtigt, at det er EU’s medlemsstater, der har det sidste ord i forhold til EU-budgettet. Vi støtter klart indførelsen af en finansiel transaktionsskat og en styrkelse af EU’s kvotehandelssystem. Men vi understreger, at indtægterne herfra bør tilfalde medlemsstaterne.
2016/11/22
Draft general budget of the European Union for 2019 - all sections DA

Vi danske socialdemokrater i Europa-Parlamentet støtter større kontrol med og revision af tillægget til generelle udgifter til kontorhold, som ofte kaldes blyantspenge. Det er afgørende, at der er klare, ens og kontrollerbare regler, at kontrollen udøves af fagprofessionelt personale, og at samtlige europaparlamentarikere underlægges ens og effektive kontrolsystemer. Vi støtter derfor ethvert konstruktivt og realistisk forslag, der sigter mod at opnå dette.Vi mener, at Europa-Parlamentet kun bør have ét hjemsted. Alene dette vurderes at kunne frigøre op mod 10 % af parlamentets budget.Vi støtter initiativer, der sigter mod at hjælpe ofre for seksuel chikane i Europa-Parlamentet. Vi mener dog, at disse initiativer kan iværksættes inden for den nuværende budgetramme og uden at forøge det samlede budget.Vi afviser ethvert forslag om markante forøgelser af parlamentets budget. Storbritanniens udmeldelse efterlader et økonomisk hul i EU-budgettet, og vi mener i denne forbindelse, at det vil være passende at reducere parlamentets budget og prioritere bedre inden for disse budgetrammer.
2016/11/22
Reform of the electoral law of the European Union (A8-0248/2018 - Jo Leinen, Danuta Maria Hübner) DA

Socialdemokratiet er af den klare opfattelse, at de gældende regler for afholdelse af valg til Europa-Parlamentet i Danmark fungerer efter hensigten. Afholdelse af valg er en kerneopgave for den enkelte medlemsstat. Samtidig må der selvsagt sikres en rimelig og passende fælles ramme ift. de praktiske forhold i forbindelse med valg til Europa-Parlamentet. Vi mener ikke, at europæiske valg skal ensartes for ensartethedens skyld, men at valgloven skal have respekt for medlemsstaters valgtraditioner og lovgivninger. Vi bemærker derfor med tilfredshed, at dette sikres med den vedtagne tekst.
2016/11/22
Annual Report on the functioning of the Schengen area (A8-0160/2018 - Carlos Coelho) DA

Socialdemokratiet byder betænkningens opfordringer velkommen, hvad angår forbedret politisamarbejde på tværs af grænser, herunder en mere effektiv deling af data gennem eksempelvis automatiske fingeraftryksidentifikationssystemer. Vi bakker desuden op om betænkningens bekymringer hvad angår Det Europæiske Agentur for Grænse- og Kystbevogtnings (FRONTEX) mangel på mandskabsressourcer og finansielle ressourcer.Det skal dog kraftigt understreges, at Socialdemokratiet står fast på, at den danske grænsekontrol skal opretholdes så længe, der ikke er kontrol med EU’s ydre grænser. Derfor påpeger vi også nødvendigheden af en gennemgribende reform af det eksisterende Schengensamarbejde, der skal sikre, at de enkelte medlemslande selv bestemmer, hvor længe og i hvilket omfang grænsekontroller bør opretholdes.Derfor stemte vi hverken for eller imod betænkningen.
2016/11/22
Estimates of revenue and expenditure for the financial year 2019 – Section I – European Parliament (A8-0146/2018 - Paul Rübig) DA

Vi danske socialdemokrater i Europa-Parlamentet støtter mere kontrol med og revision af tillægget til generelle udgifter til kontorhold, som ofte kaldes blyantspenge. Det er afgørende, at der er klare, ens og kontrollerbare regler, at kontrollen udøves af fagprofessionelt personale, og at samtlige europaparlamentarikere underlægges ens og effektive kontrolsystemer. Vi støtter ethvert konstruktivt og realistisk forslag, der kan bidrage til dette, men er bevidste om, at det er Præsidiet, der udformer reglerne herom. Vi støtter derfor det igangværende arbejde om en revision af reglerne for generelle udgifter til kontorhold, men kan derfor på forhånd ikke lægge os fast på en bestemt model for disse regler. Vi fastholder derudover at Europa-Parlamentet kun bør have ét hjemsted. Alene dette vurderes at kunne frigøre op mod 10 % af parlamentets budget. Afslutningsvist afviser vi ethvert forslag om markante forøgelser af parlamentets budget. Storbritanniens udmeldelse efterlader et økonomisk hul i EU-budgettet, og vi mener i denne forbindelse, at det vil være passende at reducere parlamentets budget og prioritere bedre inden for disse budgetrammer.
2016/11/22
Discharge 2016: EU general budget - European Parliament (A8-0105/2018 - Derek Vaughan) DA

Vi danske socialdemokrater i Europa-Parlamentet støtter mere kontrol med og revision af tillægget til generelle udgifter til kontorhold, som ofte kaldes blyantspenge. Det er afgørende, at der er klare, ens og kontrollerbare regler, at kontrollen udøves af fagprofessionelt personale, og at samtlige europaparlamentarikere underlægges ens og effektive kontrolsystemer. Vi støtter ethvert konstruktivt og realistisk forslag, der kan bidrage til dette, men er bevidste om, at det er Præsidiet, der udformer reglerne herom. Vi støtter derfor det igangværende arbejde om en revision af reglerne for generelle udgifter til kontorhold, men kan derfor på forhånd ikke lægge os fast på en bestemt model for disse regler.
2016/11/22
Guidelines for the 2019 budget - Section III (A8-0062/2018 - Daniele Viotti) DA

Vi danske socialdemokrater i Europa-Parlamentet arbejder for skabelse af vækst og arbejdspladser, og vi støtter derfor initiativer, der har til formål at bidrage til øget vækst, konkurrenceevne, jobskabelse, investeringer i grøn omstilling, forskning og innovation. Vi er yderligere af den klare overbevisning, at der ikke bør tilføres flere midler til EU-budgettet end allerede tildelt. Vi mener, at styrkede tiltag på nogle budgetposter bør finansieres ved nedskæringer på andre. Dette kan efter vores mening ske ved en gradvis udfasning af landbrugsstøtten samt en forenkling af eksisterende investerings- og støtteprogrammer og de administrative udgifter i forbindelse hermed.
2016/11/22
The next MFF: Preparing the Parliament’s position on the MFF post-2020 (A8-0048/2018 - Jan Olbrycht, Isabelle Thomas) DA

Vi danske socialdemokrater i Europa-Parlamentet er af den klare overbevisning, at der ikke er behov for flere penge i den flerårige finansielle ramme til EU-budgettet, end der allerede er fastsat. Yderligere vil briternes udmeldelse efterlade et økonomisk hul i EU-budgettet, og vi mener i denne forbindelse, at det vil være passende at reducere budgettet og prioritere bedre inden for disse budgetrammer, fremfor at øge medlemsstaternes bidrag. Yderligere mener vi ikke, at den flerårige finansielle ramme skal suppleres med bidrag fra en indførelse af egne indtægter.Vi mener, at styrkede tiltag såsom øget kontrol med de ydre grænser, fælles bekæmpelse af terror og investeringer til forskning og klima bør finansieres ved nedskæringer på andre budgetposter, f.eks. ved en gradvis udfasning af landbrugsstøtten og forenkling af eksisterende investerings- og støtteprogrammer samt de administrative udgifter i forbindelse hermed.
2016/11/22
Reform of the European Union’s system of own resources (A8-0041/2018 - Gérard Deprez, Janusz Lewandowski) DA

Vi danske socialdemokrater i Europa-Parlamentet er af den klare overbevisning, at der ikke er behov for flere penge i EU-budgettet, end der allerede er. Vi mener, at man både kan og bør prioritere bedre inden for de nuværende budgetrammer. Således mener vi, at styrkede tiltag som f.eks. øget kontrol med de ydre grænser og fælles bekæmpelse af terror bør finansieres ved nedskæringer på andre budgetposter. Yderligere bør EU-budgettet blive mindre efter Storbritanniens udmeldelse, fremfor at finde samme beløb gennem indførelsen af nye egne indtægter for EU.Vi afviser derfor blankt forslag om markante forøgelser af budgettet. For os er det vigtigt, at det er EU’s medlemslande, der har det sidste ord i forhold til EU-budgettet, og derfor kan vi ikke støtte forslag om egne ressourcer. Vi støtter indførelsen af eksempelvis en finansiel transaktionsskat, men vi understreger i denne forbindelse også, at indtægterne herfra bør tilfalde medlemslandene og ikke anvendes til finansiering af EU’s generelle budget.
2016/11/22
Composition of the European Parliament (A8-0007/2018 - Danuta Maria Hübner, Pedro Silva Pereira) DA

Vi danske socialdemokrater i Europa-Parlamentet støtter ikke en ny fordeling af Europa-Parlamentets mandater. I stedet er vi af den klare overbevisning, at Storbritanniens 73 mandater skal fjernes, når Storbritanniens udmeldelse træder i kraft. Dette skal ses i lyset af, at briternes udmeldelse efterlader et økonomisk hul i EU-budgettet, og vi mener derfor, at det vil være passende at fjerne de britiske mandater for at nedbringe Parlamentets omkostninger.Yderligere er vi imod indførelsen af transnationale lister. Vi mener, at forslaget om transnationale lister ikke bidrager til en styrkelse af demokratiet, men snarere vil øge afstanden mellem den enkelte borger og parlamentarikerne. Ligeledes mener vi, at transnationale lister vil være til særlig gavn for de største medlemsstater, der i dagens system i forvejen er godt repræsenteret.
2016/11/22
Revision of the Framework Agreement on relations between the European Parliament and the European Commission (A8-0006/2018 - Esteban González Pons) DA

Vi danske Socialdemokrater i Europa-Parlamentet mener, at de europæiske partifamilier bør have en international talsperson, der præger partiet i valgkampen op til valget i 2019 og styrker den europæiske demokratiske debat. Vi mener også, at disse kandidater selvfølgelig kan være blandt kandidaterne til posten som formand for Kommissionen. Men vi mener ikke, at rollen som europæisk talsperson for partierne automatisk skal gøre disse personer til de eneste kandidater til posten som formand for Kommissionen.Vi mener, at det vil være forkert på forhånd at udelukke egnede kandidater til posten på baggrund af kortsigtede processuelle beslutninger. Efter det næste valg til Europa-Parlamentet vil vi derfor, selvfølgelig, gøre aktivt brug af Europa-Parlamentets traktatfæstede ret til at afvise uegnede kandidater. Til gengæld vil vi ikke på forhånd bakke op om snævre regler, der udelukker egnede kandidater fra posten.
2016/11/22
2018 budgetary procedure (A8-0359/2017 - Siegfried Mureşan, Richard Ashworth) DA

Vi danske socialdemokrater i Europa-Parlamentet arbejder for skabelse af vækst og arbejdspladser, og vi går ind for investeringer i bl.a. grøn omstilling og forskning.Derfor støtter vi blandt andet, at der er blevet tilbageført flere midler til Horisont 2020-programmet.Vi er yderligere af den klare overbevisning, at der ikke bør tilføres flere midler til EU-budgettet end allerede tildelt.Vi mener, at styrkede tiltag såsom øget kontrol med de ydre grænser og fælles bekæmpelse af terror bør finansieres ved nedskæringer på andre budgetposter.Dette kan efter vores mening ske med en gradvis udfasning af landbrugsstøtten samt en forenkling af eksisterende investerings- og støtteprogrammer og de administrative udgifter i forbindelse hermed.
2016/11/22
Draft general budget of the European Union for 2018 - all sections DA

Socialdemokratiet støtter større kontrol med og revision af tillægget til generelle udgifter til kontorhold, som ofte fejlagtigt kaldes ”blyantspenge”. Det er afgørende for os, at der er klare, ens og kontrollerbare regler herfor, at kontrollen udøves af fagprofessionelt personale, og at samtlige europaparlamentarikere underlægges ens og effektive kontrolsystemer.Derfor støtter vi ethvert konstruktivt og realistisk forslag, der kan bidrage til dette, men er samtidig bevidste om, at det er præsidiet, der udformer reglerne herom, hvorfor vi ikke på forhånd kan lægge os fast på en bestemt model.Vi støtter også klart øget kontrol med de europæiske politiske partier og fonde. Mens langt de fleste af disse beviseligt udfører konkret og relevant politisk arbejde, er der nylige eksempler på konstruktioner, der udelukkende er sat i verden for at få penge fra EU-kassen til gavn for nationale partier. Dette misbrug skal der gribes særdeles hårdt ind overfor.Derimod kan vi ikke støtte krav om markante forøgelser af EU-budgettet, da vi mener at det nuværende niveau må være passende, og vi understreger, at der er mulighed for at prioritere bedre inden for rammen med henblik på at finansiere nødvendige nye tiltag som f.eks. styrket ekstern grænsekontrol.
2016/11/22
General budget of the European Union for 2018 - all sections (A8-0299/2017 - Siegfried Mureşan, Richard Ashworth) DA

Socialdemokratiet støtter større kontrol med og revision af tillægget til generelle udgifter til kontorhold, som ofte fejlagtigt kaldes ”blyantspenge”. Det er afgørende for os, at der er klare, ens og kontrollerbare regler herfor, at kontrollen udøves af fagprofessionelt personale, og at samtlige europaparlamentarikere underlægges ens og effektive kontrolsystemer.Derfor støtter vi ethvert konstruktivt og realistisk forslag, der kan bidrage til dette, men er samtidig bevidste om, at det er præsidiet, der udformer reglerne herom, hvorfor vi ikke på forhånd kan lægge os fast på en bestemt model.Vi støtter også klart øget kontrol med de europæiske politiske partier og fonde. Mens langt de fleste af disse beviseligt udfører konkret og relevant politisk arbejde, er der nylige eksempler på konstruktioner, der udelukkende er sat i verden for at få penge fra EU-kassen til gavn for nationale partier. Dette misbrug skal der gribes særdeles hårdt ind overfor.Derimod kan vi ikke støtte krav om markante forøgelser af EU-budgettet, da vi mener at det nuværende niveau må være passende, og vi understreger, at der er mulighed for at prioritere bedre inden for rammen med henblik på at finansiere nødvendige nye tiltag som f.eks. styrket ekstern grænsekontrol.
2016/11/22
Reflection paper on the future of EU finances (B8-0565/2017) DA

Vi danske socialdemokrater i Europa-Parlamentet er af den klare overbevisning, at der ikke behøves flere penge i EU-budgettet, end der allerede er. Vi mener tværtimod, at man både kan og bør prioritere bedre inden for de nuværende budgetrammer. Således mener vi, at styrkede tiltag, f.eks. øget kontrol med de ydre grænser og fælles bekæmpelse af terror, bør finansieres ved nedskæringer på andre budgetposter.F.eks. en gradvis udfasning af landbrugsstøtten og gennemgribende revision af de eksisterende investerings- og støtteprogrammer med henblik på at forenkle både programstrukturerne og de administrative udgifter i forbindelse hermed.Derfor bakker vi også op om Europa-Kommissionens forslag om at basere fremtidens EU-budget på princippet om merværdi. Vi skal, kort sagt, målrette budgettet, således at der for hver krone og euro investeret kommer flere ud, f.eks. i form af europæiske, herunder danske, arbejdspladser.Vi afviser derfor blankt de forslag, der ligger, om markante forøgelser af budgettet. For os er det vigtigt, at det er EU’s medlemslande der har det sidste ord i forhold til EU-budgettet, og derfor kan vi heller ikke støtte forslag om såkaldte egne ressourcer. Vi støtter klart indførelsen af en finansiel transaktionsskat og en styrkelse af EU’s kvotehandelssystem. Men vi understreger, at indtægterne herfra bør tilfalde medlemslandene.
2016/11/22
Minimum income policies as a tool for fighting poverty (A8-0292/2017 - Laura Agea) DA

De danske socialdemokrater i Europa-Parlamentet opfordrer til, at alle EU-lande får en mindsteindkomstordning, som effektivt forhindrer fattigdom. Det skal dog understreges, at det ikke er en EU-opgave at lovgive om eller finansiere mindsteindkomstordninger. Dette er udelukkende et national anliggende og EU skal hverken helt eller delvist overtage den opgave. Ligeledes opfordrer vi til indførelse af dækkende og passende mindsteindkomstordninger, og til, at sådanne ordninger monitoreres. Derimod mener vi ikke, at der er behov for et rammedirektiv på området. EU kan have en koordinerende og støttende rolle på området uden vedtagelsen af et rammedirektiv.
2016/11/22
Discharge 2015: EU general budget - European Parliament (A8-0153/2017 - Dennis de Jong) DA

Vi støtter større kontrol med og revision af tillægget til generelle udgifter til kontorhold, som ofte kaldes blyantspenge. Det er afgørende, at der er klare, ens og kontrollerbare regler, at kontrollen udøves af fagprofessionelt personale, og at samtlige europaparlamentarikere underlægges ens og effektive kontrolsystemer. Vi støtter ethvert konstruktivt og realistisk forslag, der kan bidrage til dette, men er bevidste om, at det er Præsidiet, der udformer reglerne herom, hvorfor vi ikke på forhånd kan lægge os fast på en bestemt model.Vi støtter klart øget kontrol med de europæiske politiske partier og fonde. Mens langt de fleste af disse beviseligt udfører konkret og relevant politisk arbejde, er der nylige eksempler på konstruktioner, der udelukkende er sat i verden for at få penge fra EU-kassen til gavn for nationale partier. Dette misbrug skal der gribes særdeles hårdt ind overfor.Endelig mener vi ikke, at decharge af Europa-Parlamentets budget skal bruges som en brik i den tyske valgkamp. Dechargen skal være saglig og ikke gå efter politiske modstandere. Derfor har vi valgt at støtte selve dechargen af Europa-Parlamentets budget, men ikke den tilhørende beslutning.
2016/11/22
European Solidarity Corps (B8-0238/2017) DA

Vi, de danske socialdemokrater i Europa-Parlamentet, støtter initiativer, der giver unge mulighed for at deltage aktivt i samfundet. Derfor bakker vi op om det europæiske solidaritetskorps. Dog mener vi også, at budgettet skal hænge sammen, og at man ikke bare kan øge udgifterne på et område uden at sætte dem ned på andre. Vi mener derfor, at finansieringen af solidaritetskorpset bør holdes inden for den nuværende budgetramme, og at det bør overvejes, hvordan solidaritetskorpset kan integreres i den nuværende europæiske volontørtjeneste.
2016/11/22
Multiannual financial framework for 2014-2020 (A8-0110/2017 - Jan Olbrycht, Isabelle Thomas) DA

Vi, de danske socialdemokrater i Europa-Parlamentet, støtter ikke stigninger i EU-budgettet. Vi mener tværtimod, at det nuværende budgetniveau er mere end tilstrækkeligt, og at nye eller øgede udgifter derfor skal finansieres ved at skære ned og bort på andre udgiftsposter. Med revisionen af EU’s flerårige budget tilfører vi nu flere penge til en række vækst- og beskæftigelsesfremmende tiltag, og vi gør det ved at omprioritere inden for den eksisterende budgetramme. Derfor støtter vi dette konkrete forslag.Samtidig fastholder vi, at der fortsat er et stort potentiale for at flytte midler fra støtteordninger til investeringsprogrammer i EU-budgettet, og vi fortsætter vores arbejde for at opnå dette.
2016/11/22
Multiannual financial framework for 2014-2020 (Resolution) (A8-0117/2017 - Jan Olbrycht, Isabelle Thomas) DA

Vi, de danske socialdemokrater i Europa-Parlamentet, støtter ikke stigninger i EU-budgettet. Vi mener tværtimod, at det nuværende budgetniveau er mere end tilstrækkeligt, og at nye eller øgede udgifter derfor skal finansieres ved at skære ned og bort på andre udgiftsposter. Med revisionen af EU’s flerårige budget tilfører vi nu flere penge til en række vækst- og beskæftigelsesfremmende tiltag, og vi gør det ved at omprioritere inden for den eksisterende budgetramme. Derfor støtter vi dette konkrete forslag.Samtidig fastholder vi, at der fortsat er et stort potentiale for at flytte midler fra støtteordninger til investeringsprogrammer i EU-budgettet, og vi fortsætter vores arbejde for at opnå dette.
2016/11/22
Mobilisation of the Contingency Margin (A8-0104/2017 - Jan Olbrycht, Isabelle Thomas) DA

Vi, de danske socialdemokrater i Europa-Parlamentet, støtter ikke stigninger i EU-budgettet. Vi mener tværtimod, at det nuværende budgetniveau er mere end tilstrækkeligt, og at nye eller øgede udgifter derfor skal finansieres ved at skære ned og bort på andre udgiftsposter. Med revisionen af EU’s flerårige budget tilfører vi nu flere penge til en række vækst- og beskæftigelsesfremmende tiltag, og vi gør det ved at omprioritere inden for den eksisterende budgetramme. Derfor støtter vi dette konkrete forslag.Samtidig fastholder vi, at der fortsat er et stort potentiale for at flytte midler fra støtteordninger til investeringsprogrammer i EU-budgettet, og vi fortsætter vores arbejde for at opnå dette.
2016/11/22
Estimates of revenue and expenditure for the financial year 2018 – Section I – European Parliament (A8-0156/2017 - Richard Ashworth) DA

Vi støtter større kontrol med og revision af tillægget til generelle udgifter til kontorhold, som ofte kaldes blyantspenge. Det er afgørende, at der er klare, ens og kontrollerbare regler, at kontrollen udøves af fagprofessionelt personale, og at samtlige europaparlamentarikere underlægges ens og effektive kontrolsystemer. Vi støtter ethvert konstruktivt og realistisk forslag, der kan bidrage til dette, men er bevidste om, at det er præsidiet, der udformer reglerne herom, hvorfor vi ikke på forhånd kan lægge os fast på en bestemt model.Vi finder det rimeligt, at Europa-Parlamentet yder en indsats for at fremme opmærksomheden omkring, og deltagelsen ved, europaparlamentsvalg. Samtidig står vi fast på, at dette selvsagt skal være af en rent informativ karakter.Vi fastholder at Europa-Parlamentet kun bør have ét hjemsted, og at det evindelige rejsecirkus skal stoppes. Alene dette vurderes at kunne frigøre op mod 10 % af parlamentets budget.Vi støtter klart øget kontrol med de europæiske politiske partier og fonde. Mens langt de fleste af disse beviseligt udfører konkret og relevant politisk arbejde, er der nylige eksempler på konstruktioner, der udelukkende er sat i verden for at få penge fra EU-kassen til gavn for nationale partier. Dette misbrug skal der gribes særdeles hårdt ind overfor.
2016/11/22
Addressing refugee and migrant movements: the role of EU External Action (A8-0045/2017 - Elena Valenciano, Agustín Díaz de Mera García Consuegra) DA

Asyl-, indvandrings- og integrationspolitik er og bliver et rent dansk anliggende. Det står Socialdemokratiet fast på, og dette ændres ikke på nogen måde af denne ikke-lovgivende og ikke-juridisk bindende initiativbetænkning fra Europa-Parlamentet.Selvom initiativbetænkningen ingen betydning har for hverken dansk lov eller danske forhold, kan vi ikke støtte denne ikke-lovgivende betænkning, da vi insisterer på i enhver henseende at stå værn om de danske forbehold på disse områder.
2016/11/22
EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (A8-0009/2017 - Artis Pabriks) DA

Fair handel uden toldbarrierer er en forudsætning for vækst, velfærd og beskæftigelse i Danmark. Derfor støtter Socialdemokratiet, at vi via vores EU-medlemskab åbner op for nye eksportmarkeder.Med CETA-aftalen fjerner vi 99% af alle toldtariffer mellem EU og Canada. Samtidig sikrer vi et paradigmeskift i international handel ved at lægge de skadelige ISDS-systemer i graven.Vi går ikke på kompromis med arbejdstagerrettigheder, miljøstandarder, folkesundhed, fødevaresikkerhed eller retten til at lovgive frit. Var der begrundet frygt om dette, ville vi ikke have støttet aftalen.Takket være pres fra den socialdemokratiske gruppe er der tvært imod blevet skrevet stærke og klare garantier ind i CETA-aftalen, der sikrer, at EU og Canada fastholder nuværende standarder og for fremtiden vil samarbejde om at hæve dem til et endnu højere niveau.Intet i aftalen forhindrer imidlertid Danmark, EU eller Canada i selv og egenhændigt at hæve f.eks. miljø-, arbejdssikkerheds- eller fødevaresikkerhedskrav. Ligeledes slås det fast, at landene på ingen måde er forpligtet til at udlicitere eller privatisere offentlige tjenester. Vi ville ikke have accepteret andet.Socialdemokrater har alle dage foretrukket resultater frem for resolutioner. Med CETA-aftalen tager vi konkret handling for bæredygtig, fair og ordnet frihandel til gavn for Danmark og danske arbejdere.
2016/11/22
Conclusion of the EU-Canada CETA (B8-0141/2017, B8-0142/2017, B8-0143/2017, B8-0144/2017, B8-0145/2017, B8-0146/2017) DA

Fair handel uden toldbarrierer er en forudsætning for vækst, velfærd og beskæftigelse i Danmark. Derfor støtter Socialdemokratiet, at vi via vores EU-medlemskab åbner op for nye eksportmarkeder.Med CETA-aftalen fjerner vi 99% af alle toldtariffer mellem EU og Canada. Samtidig sikrer vi et paradigmeskift i international handel ved at lægge de skadelige ISDS-systemer i graven.Vi går ikke på kompromis med arbejdstagerrettigheder, miljøstandarder, folkesundhed, fødevaresikkerhed eller retten til at lovgive frit. Var der begrundet frygt om dette, ville vi ikke have støttet aftalen.Takket være pres fra den socialdemokratiske gruppe er der tvært imod blevet skrevet stærke og klare garantier ind i CETA-aftalen, der sikrer, at EU og Canada fastholder nuværende standarder og for fremtiden vil samarbejde om at hæve dem til et endnu højere niveau.Intet i aftalen forhindrer imidlertid Danmark, EU eller Canada i selv og egenhændigt at hæve f.eks. miljø-, arbejdssikkerheds- eller fødevaresikkerhedskrav. Ligeledes slås det fast, at landene på ingen måde er forpligtet til at udlicitere eller privatisere offentlige tjenester. Vi ville ikke have accepteret andet.Socialdemokrater har alle dage foretrukket resultater frem for resolutioner. Med CETA-aftalen tager vi konkret handling for bæredygtig, fair og ordnet frihandel til gavn for Danmark og danske arbejdere.
2016/11/22
EU-Canada Strategic Partnership Agreement (A8-0028/2017 - Charles Tannock) DA

Fair handel uden toldbarrierer er en forudsætning for vækst, velfærd og beskæftigelse i Danmark. Derfor støtter Socialdemokratiet, at vi via vores EU-medlemskab åbner op for nye eksportmarkeder.Med CETA-aftalen fjerner vi 99% af alle toldtariffer mellem EU og Canada. Samtidig sikrer vi et paradigmeskift i international handel ved at lægge de skadelige ISDS-systemer i graven.Vi går ikke på kompromis med arbejdstagerrettigheder, miljøstandarder, folkesundhed, fødevaresikkerhed eller retten til at lovgive frit. Var der begrundet frygt om dette, ville vi ikke have støttet aftalen.Takket være pres fra den socialdemokratiske gruppe er der tvært imod blevet skrevet stærke og klare garantier ind i CETA-aftalen, der sikrer, at EU og Canada fastholder nuværende standarder og for fremtiden vil samarbejde om at hæve dem til et endnu højere niveau.Intet i aftalen forhindrer imidlertid Danmark, EU eller Canada i selv og egenhændigt at hæve f.eks. miljø-, arbejdssikkerheds- eller fødevaresikkerhedskrav. Ligeledes slås det fast, at landene på ingen måde er forpligtet til at udlicitere eller privatisere offentlige tjenester. Vi ville ikke have accepteret andet.Socialdemokrater har alle dage foretrukket resultater frem for resolutioner. Med CETA-aftalen tager vi konkret handling for bæredygtig, fair og ordnet frihandel til gavn for Danmark og danske arbejdere.
2016/11/22
Implementation of Erasmus + (A8-0389/2016 - Milan Zver) DA

Vi støtter Erasmus+ som et af EU's mest succesrige og vigtigste programmer og mener derfor nødvendigvis også, at der skal være tilstrækkelig finansiering. Dog mener vi også, at budgettet skal hænge sammen, og at man ikke bare kan øge udgifterne på et område uden at sætte dem ned på andre.Derudover mener vi, at man skal overveje, hvilken merværdi et europæisk solidaritetskorps vil have i forhold til den nuværende europæiske volontørtjeneste, og hvorvidt det kan integreres inden for den nuværende budgetramme.
2016/11/22

Written questions (83)

Prevention and punishment of false declarations of compliance with animal welfare eligibility criteria made in order to obtain promotional funding PDF (44 KB) DOC (19 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(44 KB) DOC(19 KB)
Banning companies involved in money laundering from public procurement PDF (40 KB) DOC (19 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(40 KB) DOC(19 KB)
The policy-tax gap in the EU PDF (42 KB) DOC (18 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(42 KB) DOC(18 KB)
Trade in rare and endangered parrots PDF (56 KB) DOC (16 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(56 KB) DOC(16 KB)
EU action to bring back jobs that have been relocated PDF (101 KB) DOC (19 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(101 KB) DOC(19 KB)
Export of surveillance technology to Belarus PDF (41 KB) DOC (17 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(41 KB) DOC(17 KB)
Force-feeding in foie gras production PDF (100 KB) DOC (19 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(100 KB) DOC(19 KB)
Energy saving targets for the period 2020-2030 PDF (98 KB) DOC (20 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(98 KB) DOC(20 KB)
Fair tax clauses in public procurement PDF (5 KB) DOC (18 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(18 KB)
VP/HR - Persecution of trade unions in Belarus: the cases of Gennady Fedynich and Igor Komlik PDF (100 KB) DOC (17 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(100 KB) DOC(17 KB)
Status of CbCR file within the Council PDF (101 KB) DOC (18 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(101 KB) DOC(18 KB)
Insufficient cooperation between authorities in cases of illegal arms trafficking PDF (103 KB) DOC (18 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(103 KB) DOC(18 KB)
Establishing the regulators responsible for dealing with international money laundering cases PDF (103 KB) DOC (21 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(103 KB) DOC(21 KB)
VP/HR - Saudi Arabia and the case of Raif Badawi PDF (103 KB) DOC (16 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(103 KB) DOC(16 KB)
Progress on initiatives to prevent tail biting and reduce tail docking of pigs PDF (104 KB) DOC (19 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(104 KB) DOC(19 KB)
Compliance with and enforcement of pig welfare provisions PDF (103 KB) DOC (20 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(103 KB) DOC(20 KB)
Pig welfare and castrations PDF (102 KB) DOC (20 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(102 KB) DOC(20 KB)
Sufficient monitoring and labelling of the energy consumption of white goods and other major electrical articles PDF (102 KB) DOC (20 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(102 KB) DOC(20 KB)
Protection and maintenance of local and traditional coastal tourism industry PDF (102 KB) DOC (19 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(102 KB) DOC(19 KB)
The Commission's animal welfare strategy 2012-2015 and the Animal Health Law PDF (100 KB) DOC (16 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(100 KB) DOC(16 KB)
Effective prohibition of shell companies PDF (102 KB) DOC (18 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(102 KB) DOC(18 KB)
Rejection of Nord Stream 2 project on grounds of European security PDF (100 KB) DOC (16 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(100 KB) DOC(16 KB)
Systematic money laundering via European banks PDF (6 KB) DOC (18 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(6 KB) DOC(18 KB)
Incomplete answers to questions on Commissioners' failure to declare financial interests PDF (104 KB) DOC (16 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(104 KB) DOC(16 KB)
Stop the terrible cruelty while exporting and transporting live animals PDF (6 KB) DOC (16 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(6 KB) DOC(16 KB)
The primary energy factor for renewables PDF (4 KB) DOC (15 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(4 KB) DOC(15 KB)
Routine tail-docking of pigs PDF (103 KB) DOC (16 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(103 KB) DOC(16 KB)
Commissioners' failure to declare financial interests PDF (5 KB) DOC (16 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(16 KB)
Purchase by the authorities of leaked information for investigation purposes PDF (99 KB) DOC (16 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(99 KB) DOC(16 KB)
VP/HR - Russian incursions into European airspace PDF (5 KB) DOC (15 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(15 KB)
Possibility for other countries to reclaim unpaid tax in current state aid case PDF (98 KB) DOC (16 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(98 KB) DOC(16 KB)
A European animal welfare strategy for 2016-2020 PDF (4 KB) DOC (15 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(4 KB) DOC(15 KB)
Ban on ivory imports PDF (4 KB) DOC (14 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(4 KB) DOC(14 KB)
Systematic securities lending to avoid capital gains tax PDF (6 KB) DOC (17 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(6 KB) DOC(17 KB)
EU subsidies for the mink industry PDF (5 KB) DOC (15 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(15 KB)
Land requirements for mink production and subsidies PDF (5 KB) DOC (17 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(17 KB)
Animal welfare and the mink industry PDF (104 KB) DOC (17 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(104 KB) DOC(17 KB)
Import from third countries of leather products produced under unacceptable animal welfare conditions PDF (5 KB) DOC (15 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(15 KB)
Possibility of a 'looser relationship' with the EU than full membership PDF (101 KB) DOC (15 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(101 KB) DOC(15 KB)
Action against prosecution of whistle-blowers by Member States PDF (5 KB) DOC (16 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(16 KB)
Panama Papers - UK agreement on access to information on beneficial ownership PDF (6 KB) DOC (25 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(6 KB) DOC(25 KB)
Trade in animals leaving the EU PDF (95 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(95 KB) DOC(24 KB)
Illegal State aid from the British Film Fund PDF (100 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(100 KB) DOC(24 KB)
Inadequate answer to question about Nord Stream PDF (101 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(101 KB) DOC(24 KB)
Council Regulation 3254/91 - Use of leghold traps PDF (5 KB) DOC (23 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(23 KB)
VP/HR - Reaction to Israel's destruction of development projects funded by the UK, Denmark and the EU PDF (108 KB) DOC (26 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(108 KB) DOC(26 KB)
Mistreatment of animals at the Peropalo Festival in Spain PDF (5 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(24 KB)
VAT fraud in the food industry PDF (5 KB) DOC (23 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(23 KB)
Nord Stream II PDF (100 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(100 KB) DOC(24 KB)
On recommendations from the European Court of Auditors on the internal energy market PDF (101 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(101 KB) DOC(24 KB)
Parallel agreements PDF (5 KB) DOC (22 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(22 KB)
Official complaints about Commissioners' political activities PDF (97 KB) DOC (22 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(97 KB) DOC(22 KB)
Breeding of mink for use in fur production PDF (5 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(24 KB)
Illegal conditions in Danish pig rearing PDF (5 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(24 KB)
Danger of unnecessary cost increases for Danish real estate loans PDF (99 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(99 KB) DOC(24 KB)
Relocation of jobs PDF (5 KB) DOC (23 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(23 KB)
Harmonisation of provisions on gas cylinders / closure devices for use when camping, sailing, etc. PDF (5 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(24 KB)
EFSI support for better mobile and broadband projects PDF (5 KB) DOC (23 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(23 KB)
Commission's overall approach to current telecoms mergers PDF (5 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(24 KB)
Painful hammer-tattooing of pigs PDF (5 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(24 KB)
VP/HR - Warning shots against likely Russian submarine in Finnish territorial waters PDF (100 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(100 KB) DOC(24 KB)
Commission's new communication policy: request for clarification PDF (101 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(101 KB) DOC(24 KB)
Loss of jobs as a result of EU or State aid for unlawful relocation PDF (5 KB) DOC (23 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(23 KB)
Automatic safety systems to avoid aircraft crashes PDF (5 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(24 KB)
Prevention of price rises for consumers on telecomms mergers PDF (101 KB) DOC (23 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(101 KB) DOC(23 KB)
Combating dangerous chemicals in everyday life PDF (5 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(24 KB)
Mobile and internet cover in rural and outlying areas PDF (102 KB) DOC (23 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(102 KB) DOC(23 KB)
Guarantee of EU support for the Fehmarn Belt Fixed Link PDF (5 KB) DOC (25 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(25 KB)
Support for workers and undertakings affected by the Russian embargo PDF (100 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(100 KB) DOC(24 KB)
Illegal trade in Barbary macaques PDF (190 KB) DOC (25 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(190 KB) DOC(25 KB)
Use of regional aid funding to relocate jobs PDF (103 KB) DOC (23 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(103 KB) DOC(23 KB)
Withdrawal of banking licences from financial institutions which facilitate tax evasion PDF (6 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(6 KB) DOC(24 KB)
VP/HR - Need for urgent action in the case of Saudi Arabian writer Raif Badawi PDF (103 KB) DOC (25 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(103 KB) DOC(25 KB)
Artificial constraint on the European energy network PDF (5 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(24 KB)
VP/HR - Condemnation of extremely dangerous and provocative actions by Russian aircraft PDF (5 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(24 KB)
Preventing the formation of a duopoly PDF (5 KB) DOC (23 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(23 KB)
Status of implementation of the Coastal Tourism Strategy PDF (4 KB) DOC (23 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(4 KB) DOC(23 KB)
Tax-free zones and relocation of jobs PDF (100 KB) DOC (23 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(100 KB) DOC(23 KB)
Threat to civil aviation from Russian combat aircraft PDF (5 KB) DOC (25 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(25 KB)
Some Member States' failure to comply with the Dublin Regulation PDF (5 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(24 KB)
Luxembourg authorities' involvement in organised tax avoidance PDF (5 KB) DOC (25 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(25 KB)
VP/HR - Irregular release by the Turkish authorities of an attempted homicide suspect in an extradition case PDF (5 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(24 KB)
Safeguarding national payment systems and debit cards PDF (5 KB) DOC (24 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(5 KB) DOC(24 KB)

Individual motions (1)

MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION on fighting discrimination based on race, religion and nationality PDF (254 KB) DOC (48 KB)
2016/11/22
Documents: PDF(254 KB) DOC(48 KB)

Written declarations (3)

Amendments (1450)

Amendment 65 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 7
7. Points that the EU GDP is expected to increase more under zero emissions scenarios than in scenarios with lower emission reductions, however this may be spread unevenly across the EU; considers that the price of non-action would be by far the costliest scenario and would not only result in massive GDP loss in Europe, but also further increase economic inequalities between Member States and regions as some are expected to be harder hit than others by the consequences of inaction;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 68 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 7 a (new)
7 a. Acknowledges that non-action will be by far the costliest pathway for the Union and its Member States in economic and social terms and urges the Commission to therefore quantify the costs of non-action vis-a-vis the gains of achieving the most ambitious scenarios;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 77 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 8
8. Welcomes the inclusion of two pathways aiming at reaching net zero GHG emissions by 2050, and the Commission’s support for these; considers this mid- century objective as the only one compatible with the Union's commitments under the Paris Agreement;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 92 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 9
9. Notes however that those pathways rely to a large extent on carbon removal technologies, including through carbon capture and storage and direct air capture, that yet have to prove their feasibility; considers that the EU net-zero strategy should not overly rely on such technologies, which should complement direct emissions reductions; believes that further aemissions reductions by 2030 isare needed if the Union is to avoid relying on carbon removal technologies that would entail significant risks for ecosystems, biodiversity and food security as confirmed by the IPCC 1.5 report;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 100 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 9 a (new)
9 a. Recalls that by being the first major economy to go for climate neutrality, Europe’s businesses will be able to gain first-mover advantage on international markets to become the global leader in sustainable and resource- efficient production; emphasises that delayed or insufficient action to achieve net-zero GHG emissions by 2050 at the latest will result in ecologically, economically and socially unjustifiable costs and effectively hamper the future competitiveness of Europe’s industrial sector; insists that carbon leakage must be and can be avoided by intelligent policy frameworks;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 119 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 11
11. Believes that Europe's climate transition must be ecologically, economically and socially sustainable; emphasises that tailor-made and sufficiently funded strategies will need to be designed in close collaboration with local and regional public authorities, trade unions, educational institutions, civil society organisations and the private sector, to ensure that social fairness and equal opportunities are offered to all European citizens in this transition while avoiding disproportionate effects on people with low income;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 130 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 11 c (new)
11 c. Emphasises that inclusion and participation of Europe’s citizens is vital for Europe to reach net-zero GHG emissions by 2050 at the latest; encourages all levels of national, regional and local government to put in place concrete measures stimulating and facilitating the participation of citizens in the transition to the decarbonised society;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 135 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 12
12. Insists that carbon leakage must be and can be avoided by intelligent policy frameworks;deleted
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 195 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 18
18. Emphasises that emissions will have to be reduced close to zero in all Member States and sectors of the economy which should all contribute in the joint efforts to reduce emissions; therefore calls on the Commission to develop pathways to climate neutrality for all sectors; stresses the importance of the polluter pays principle in this regard;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 206 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 18 a (new)
18 a. Highlights the central role of renewable energy sources in the transition towards a net-zero GHG economy, as energy is currently responsible for 75% of Europe’s GHG emissions;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 225 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 19 a (new)
19 a. Emphasises that the ‘energy efficiency first’ principle entails large GHG emissions reductions possibilities and must be fully taken into account throughout the full energy chain, including energy generation, transmission, distribution and end-use;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 244 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 21
21. Stresses the need to implement the Energy Union and ensure further integration of the European Energy market in order to most effectively decarbonise the power sector and to facilitate investments where most renewable energy production can be effectuated, whilst reducing energy poverty and empowering consumers;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 263 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 22 a (new)
22 a. Recalls that GHG emissions from international shipping are projected to increase by as much as 250% by 2050; reiterates that emissions from international shipping and aviation activities must be significantly reduced in order to be consistent with the Union’s economy-wide greenhouse gas emission reduction commitment and to reach net- zero GHG emissions by 2050 at the latest;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 267 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 22 b (new)
22 b. Notes that approximately 60% of the current global methane is emitted by sources such as agriculture, landfills and wastewater, and the production and pipeline transport of fossil fuels; recalls that methane is a potent GHG with a 100- year warming potential 28 times larger than CO21a and that methane emission reductions can play an important role in reducing ground-level ozone concentrations and their negative impacts on air quality and human health; welcomes the Commission’s intention to reduce methane emissions in concerned sectors, which could deliver further reductions of ozone concentrations in the EU, and to promote methane reductions internationally; __________________ 1a Van Dingenen, R., Crippa, M., Maenhout, G., Guizzardi, D., Dentener, F., Global trends of methane emissions and their impacts on ozone concentrations, EUR 29394 EN, Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg, 2018, ISBN 978-92- 79-96550-0, doi:10.2760/820175, JRC113210
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 276 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 23 a (new)
23 a. Notes that the buildings sector currently accounts for 40% of Europe's energy consumption and 36% of the CO2 emissions1a; stresses that more efficient energy consumption in buildings constitutes a substantial potential for further reducing Europe’s GHG emissions; __________________ 1a https://ec.europa.eu/energy/en/topics/ener gy-efficiency/buildings
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 289 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 23 b (new)
23 b. Notes that increased energy efficiency in the heating and cooling sector can have positive impacts in terms of reducing GHG emissions as well as reducing prices and thereby energy poverty in European households;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 302 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 24
24. Supports active and sustainable forest management at national level, together with concrete means to incentivise the potential of the EU bioeconomy, given the large potential of forests to contribute to strengthening Europe's climate efforts (through sequestration, storage and substitution effects) and achieving the target of zero emissions by 2050 at the latest; recognising the need to halt the loss of biodiversity and the degradation of ecosystems services in the EU by 2020;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 325 #
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 329 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 26
26. Calls for rapid implementation of the EU ETS Innovation Fund and for the start of the first call for proposals in 2019 in order to boost investments in the demonstration of low-carbon industrial breakthrough technologies; calls for the inclusion in the 2021-2027 Multiannual Financial Framework of adequate financial means for supporting investments in the demonstration of low- carbon industrial breakthrough technologialigned with the objectives under the Paris Agreement and to reach net-zero GHG emissions by 2050 at the latest;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 335 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 27
27. Considers that in order for the Union to reach net-zero emissions by 2050 at the latest, substantial private investments need to be mobilised; believes that this requires long- term planning and regulatory stability and predictability for investors and that future EU-regulations need to take this into consideration, especially for the period up to, and post 2030; stresses therefore that the implementation of the Sustainable Finance Action Plan adopted in March 2018 should be prioritised;.
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 353 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 29
29. Stresses the importance of creating a just transition fund, especially for the regions most affected regions,by decarbonisation, combined with a general horizontal streamlining of social aspects into existing climate funding;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 356 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 29 a (new)
29 a. Underlines that climate mainstreaming must be fully integrated in research and innovation content and applied at all stages of the research cycle as one of the principles of EU funding;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 375 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 32
32. Stresses the importance of green public procurement, of ecodesign, and reducing the carbon footprint of products while at the same time aligning them with the circular economy strategy; considers that options to levy products’ carbon content in Europe might be further explored;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 395 #

2018/2974(RSP)


Paragraph 34 a (new)
34 a. Recognises the need for further international efforts to deliver on the objectives in the Paris Agreement; stresses the importance of the EU delivering climate ambition and leadership at the UN Secretary General's Summit in September; urges the Commission to make climate politics a key part of its approach to international diplomacy;
2019/02/04
Committee: ENVI
Amendment 34 #

2018/2167(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30 – introductory part
30. Still strongly regrets that, accordingRegrets that, despite repeated calls from the European Parliament for establishing a single seat, and the fact that citizens of the Union do not understand why the European Parliament should divide its activities over two the Court,seats, so far the European Council did not even commence a discussion on how to meet Parliament´s requests in this respect; recalls the 2014 ECA analysis which estimated the costs of the geographic dispersion of the Parliament amount to EUR 114 million per yearto be EUR 114 million per year; notes, furthermore, the finding from its resolution of 20 November 2013 on the location of the seats of the European Union’s Institutions1a that 78 % of all missions by Parliament statutory staff arise as a direct result of the Parliament's geographic dispersion; emphasises that the report also estimates the environmental impact of the geographic dispersion to be between 11 000 to 19 000 tonnes of CO2 emissions; reiterates the negative public perception caused by that dispersion; reiterates its call on the Council to develop a comprehensive strategy in order to agree on a single seat for Parliament; takes note of the additional costs linked to Parliament’s 12 journeys per year to Strasburg, which can be broken down as follows for 2017: _________________ 1a OJ C 436, 24.11.2016, p. 2.
2019/02/12
Committee: CONT
Amendment 37 #

2018/2167(DEC)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30 a (new)
30a. Notes that the creation of an institute dedicated to the education of future European diplomats within the EEAS could be an example to repurpose the premises of the European Parliament in Strasbourg to house this diplomatic institute;
2019/02/12
Committee: CONT
Amendment 13 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 8 a (new)
- having regard to its resolution of 29 November 2018 on the cum-ex scandal: financial crime and loopholes in the current legal framework1a; _________________ 1a 2018/2900(RSP)
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 24 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Citation 22 a (new)
- having regard to the proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on protection of persons reporting on breaches of Union law2a; _________________ 2a 2018/0106(COD)
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 39 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1 a. (new) Notes that financial flows and tax mobility have substantially increased; warns that some new phenomena are inherently opaque or facilitate opacity allowing for tax avoidance, aggressive tax planning, tax evasion and money laundering; acknowledges this is mainly due to the current rules no longer fitting into the present context in which information and communication technology (ICT) based tools allow to operate faster and remotely;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 65 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 a (new)
3 a. (new) Recalls that a tax jurisdiction has control only over tax matters related to its territory whereas economic flows and some taxpayers such as multinational enterprises (MNEs) and high net worth-individuals (HNWI) operate globally;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 67 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3 b (new)
3 b. (new) Emphasizes that defining tax bases requires having a full picture of a taxpayer’s situation, including those parts that are outside of the tax jurisdiction, and determining which part refers to which jurisdiction; notes that it also requires that such tax bases are allocated between tax jurisdictions to avoid double-taxation and double non- taxation; affirms priority should be given to eliminating double non-taxation as well as ensuring that the issue of double taxation is tackled;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 72 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 1.2 a (new)
(new para under subheading 1.2) Stresses that tax fraud, tax evasion and aggressive tax planning result in lost resources for national and European Union budgets; acknowledges that quantification of these losses is not straightforward; notes however that increased transparency requirements would not only provide better data but also would contribute to reducing opacity;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 73 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 1.2 b (new)
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 88 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7 a. (new) Welcomes the recent estimates of the non-observed economy’ (NOE) –often called shadow economy – in the 2017 Survey Tax Policies in the European Union1a which provides an indirect broader indication of tax evasion; stresses that the value of the NOE measures economic activities, which may not be captured in the basic data sources used for compiling national accounts; _________________ 1a Tax Policies in the European Union 2017 Survey, ISBN 978-92-79-72282-0
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 109 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 10 a (new)
10 a. (new) Welcomes the Commission’s reply to its calls made in its the TAXE, TAX2 and PANA resolutions to better identify aggressive tax planning and harmful tax practices and provide a clear distinction between what is illegal and what is legal in order to ensure certainty;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 150 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 2 a (new)
(new para before para 15) Recalls that opportunities for choosing a business or residence location on the basis of the regulatory framework have boomed with globalisation and digitalisation;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 183 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 17 a (new)
17 a. (new) Reaffirms that the adaptation of international tax rules needs to answer to avoidance deriving from the possible use of the interplay between national tax provisions, and networks of treaties, resulting in an erosion of the tax base and double non- taxation while ensuring that there is no double-taxation;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 201 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19 a (new)
19 a. (new) Takes note that the actions require implementation and that some of them require follow-up work to draw possible solutions to the identified challenges, as for instance action 1‘Address the tax challenges of the digital economy’;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 206 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20 a (new)
20 a. (new) Recalls that the 2016 EU 'anti-tax-avoidance package' supplements existing provisions so as to implement the 15 BEPS actions in an EU coordinated manner in the Single Market;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 256 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 30
30. Welcomes the fact that DAC6 sets out the hallmarks of reportable cross- border arrangements that intermediaries must report to tax authorities to allow them to be assessed by the latter; welcomes the fact that these features of ATP schemes can be updated if new arrangements or practices emerge; points out that the implementation deadline of the directive has not yet lapsed and that the provisions will need to be monitored to ensure their efficiency;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 321 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 35 a (new)
35 a. (new) Emphasizes that sole agreement on what constitutes digital permanent establishment is a step in the right direction, but does not solve the issue of how to determine tax base to that digital permanent establishment;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 340 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 2.3 a (new)
Dividend stripping and coupon washing
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 361 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 42 a (new)
42a. Also stresses the contribution made through the Fiscalis 2020 Programme which aims at enhancing cooperation between participating countries, their tax authorities and their officials; stresses the added value brought by joint actions in this field and the role of the possible programme in developing and operating major trans-European IT systems;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 373 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 44 a (new)
44a. [New sub-heading] 2.3.1 Dividend stripping and coupon washing
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 375 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 44 a (new)
44a. Concludes that the CumEx-files demonstrate the urgent need to improve cooperation between EU Member States’ tax authorities, especially with regard to information sharing; urges therefore Member States to enhance their cooperation in detecting, stopping, investigating and prosecuting tax fraud and evasion schemes such as cum-ex and cum-cum including exchange of best practices, and to support EU-level solutions where justified;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 380 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 44 b (new)
44b. (new under subheading 2.3.1.) Deplores the tax fraud and tax avoidance revealed by the so called CumEx Files scandal which has led to publicly reported losses of Member States’ tax revenue, amounting to as much as EUR 55,2 billion according to some media estimates; highlights that the consortium of European journalists identifies Germany, Denmark, Spain, Italy and France as allegedly the main target markets for cum-ex trading practices, followed by Belgium, Finland, Poland, the Netherlands, Austria and the Czech Republic;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 381 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 44 b (new)
44b. Notes that the systematic fraud centred around the cum-ex- and cum-cum schemes was made possible in part because relevant Member States’ authorities did not perform sufficient checks on applications for reimbursement of taxes and that relevant authorities lack a clear and complete picture of actual ownership of shares; calls on the Member States to access of all relevant authorities to complete and up-to-date information on ownership of shares; calls on the Commission to assess whether an EU action is needed in this regard, and to present a legislative proposal should the assessment demonstrate a need for such action;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 382 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 44 c (new)
44c. Underlines that the revelations seem to indicate possible shortcomings in national taxation laws and in the current systems of exchange of information and cooperation between Member State authorities; urges the Member States to effectively use all communication channels, national data and data made available by the strengthened framework for exchange of information;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 384 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 44 c (new)
44c. Stresses that the cross-border aspects of the CumEx Files should be addressed multilaterally; warns that introduction of new bilateral treaties on exchanges of information and bilateral cooperation mechanisms between individual Member States would complicate the already complex web of international rules, introduce new loopholes and contribute to lack of transparency;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 385 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 44 d (new)
44d. Urges all Member States to thoroughly investigate and analyse dividend payment practices in their jurisdictions, to identify the loopholes in their tax laws that generate opportunities for exploitation by tax fraudsters and avoiders, to analyse any potential cross- border dimension of these practices and to put an end to all these harmful tax practices; calls on Member States to exchange best practices in this regard;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 386 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 44 e (new)
44e. Calls upon the Member States and their Financial Supervisory Authorities to assess the need to ban exclusively tax- driven financial practices such as dividend arbitrage or dividend stripping and similar schemes, in absence of the proof to the contrary by the issuer that these financial practices have a substantive economic purpose other than unjustified tax reimbursement and/or tax avoidance;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 387 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 44 f (new)
44f. Calls on the Commission to start working immediately on a proposal for a European financial police within the framework of Europol with its own investigatory capacities, as well as on a European framework for cross-border tax investigations;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 388 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 2.4 a (new)
(new para) Welcomes the adoption of DAC4 providing for a CBCR to tax authorities, in line with BEPS Action 13 standard;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 389 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 2.4 b (new)
(new para) Reiterates its call for mandatory public CBCR for large businesses and 'community interest companies' (MNEs) and recalls similar provisions already exist for the banking sector in Directive 2013/36/EU Article 89 (CDRIV)1b; _________________ 1b Directive 2013/36/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 June 2013 on access to the activity of credit institutions and the prudential supervision of credit institutions and investment firms, amending Directive 2002/87/EC and repealing Directives 2006/48/EC and 2006/49/EC (OJ L 176, 27.6.201363.
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 415 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 47 a (new)
47a. Welcomes the Commission’s new proactive and open approach to investigations into illegal state aid during the present term, which has led to a number of high-impact cases being concluded by the Commission;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 496 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 3 a (new)
(new para) Underscores the need for harmonisation of VAT rules at EU level to the extent that it is necessary to ensure the establishment and the functioning of the internal market and to avoid distortion of competition1c; _________________ 1c Article 113 of TFEU
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 528 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 69 a (new)
69a. Calls on the Council to ensure that the CTP status is consistent with the Authorised Economic Operator (AEO) status which is delivered by customs authorities;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 529 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 69 b (new)
69b. Calls for a minimal EU transparent coordination on the definition of CTP status, including a regular assessment by the Commission on how Member states grant CTP status; demands exchange of information between Member States’ tax authorities about refusals to grant CTP status to certain companies, in order to enhance coherence and common standards
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 537 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 3.2 a (new)
(new para) Recalls that the European Parliament has called for addressing the factors contributing to the tax gap, namely regarding VAT;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 666 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 91 a (new)
91 a. Notes that the acquisition of citizenship of a Member State gives the grantee access to a wide range of rights and entitlements in the entire territory of the Union, including the right to move and reside freely; calls thus on Member States implementing CBI and RBI programmes, until they are finally repealed, to duly verify the character of the applicants and refuse their application if they present security risks, including money laundering; calls in this context Member States to compile and publish transparent data related to their CBI and RBI schemes, including the number of refusals and the reasons for denial; calls on the Commission to ensure better data collection and exchange of information among Member States in the context of their CBI and RBI schemes, including on applicants who have had their application denied due to security issues;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 705 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 102
102. Calls on the Commission to table a legislative proposal to ensure the automatic exchange of information between the relevant authorities, including law enforcement, tax and customs authorities, on beneficial ownership and transactions taking place in free ports, customs warehouses or SEZs;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 724 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 4.4 a (new)
(new para) Acknowledges that administrative cooperation in the field of direct taxes framework covers now both individual and corporate taxpayers;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 738 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 108 a (new)
108 a. (new) Notes that the Union’s AML framework chiefly relies on a preventive approach to money laundering, with a focus on the detection and the reporting of suspicious transactions;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 742 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 109
109. Deplores the fact that a large number of Member States have failed to fully or partially transpose AMLD4 into their domestic legislation within the set deadline, and that for this reason, infringement procedures have had to be opened by the Commission against them, including referrals before the Court of Justice of the European Union67 ; calls on these Member States to swiftly remedy this situation; reminds Member States of their legal obligation to respect the deadline of 10 January 2020 for the transposition of AMLD5 into their domestic legislation; supports the Council conclusions of 23 November inviting Member States to transpose the AMLD5 into their domestic legislation ahead of the 2020 deadline; _________________ 67 On 19 July 2018, the Commission referred Greece and Romania to the Court of Justice of the European Union for failing to transpose the fourth Anti-Money Laundering Directive into their national law. Ireland had transposed only a very limited part of the rules and was also referred to the Court of Justice.
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 774 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 115 a (new)
115 a. Is concerned that illicit proceeds entering the European financial system in order to be laundered are further used to finance criminal activities posing threat to the security of Union citizens and/or creating distortions and unfair competitive disadvantages to law-abiding citizens and companies; calls on relevant national authorities to track the destinations of the transactions deemed suspicious by the 6200 customers of the Estonian branch of Danske Bank to confirm that money laundered have not been used for further criminal activity; calls on the relevant national authorities to duly cooperate in this matter as the chains of suspicious transactions are clearly cross-border;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 812 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 123
123. Recalls that the ECB has the competence and responsibility for withdrawing authorisation from credit institutions for serious breaches of AML/CFT rules; notes, however, that the ECB is fully dependent on national AML supervisors for information relating to such breaches detected by national authorities; calls thus on national AML authorities to make quality information available to the ECB in a timely manner so the ECB can properly perform its function; encourages in this connection the ECB and all relevant AML authorities to continue negotiations on a multilateral agreement on exchange of information that should be ready by 10 January 2019;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 831 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 126 a (new)
126 a. Recalls that EU FIUs are strongly encouraged to use the FIU.net system; highlights that information sharing between FIUs and LEAs, including with Europol, should be improved;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 847 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 128
128. Points out that the non- standardisation of suspicious transaction report formats and non-standardisation of suspicious transaction report thresholds among Member States and with respect to the different obliged entities leads to difficulties in the processing and exchange of information between FIUs; calls on the Commission to explore mechanisms to set up standardised reporting formats for obliged entities in order to facilitate the exchange of information between FIUs in cases with a cross-border dimension; and to reflect on the standardisation of suspicious transaction thresholds;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 854 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 128 a (new)
128 a. (new) Calls on the Commission to explore the possibility to set up automated decentralized database of suspicious transactions reports that would allow Member States’ FIUs to look up transactions and their initiators and receivers repeatedly reported as suspicious in different Member States;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 859 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 129 a (new)
129 a. (new) Awaits the Commission’s assessment of the framework for FIUs’ cooperation with third countries and obstacles and opportunities to enhance cooperation between FIUs in the Union including the possibility of establishing an EU level coordination and support mechanism; recalls that according to the AMLD5 this assessment should be ready by 1 June 2019;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 882 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 133 a (new)
133 a. (new) Calls on the Commission to lead a global initiative for the establishment of public central registers in all world jurisdictions; stresses in this regard the vital role of international organisations such as the OECD and the UN;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 886 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 135 a (new)
135 a. Takes notes that, in respect of trusts, national registers will only be accessible to those demonstrating a legitimate interest to access; stresses that Member States remain free to open the beneficial ownership registers for trust to the public;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 936 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 145 a (new)
145 a. (new) Believes that consistency and complementarity of the anti-money laundering list of high-risk third countries with the European list of non-cooperative jurisdictions need to be ensured; reiterates its call to entrust the Commission with a central role for the management of both lists;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 943 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 6 a (new)
(new para) Points out that a European fair tax system requires a fairer global tax environment; reiterates its call to monitor ongoing tax reforms of third countries;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 953 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 149 a (new)
149 a. Calls on the Commission and Member States to monitor new corporate tax provisions of countries which cooperate with the EU on the basis of an international agreement1d; _________________ 1d As mentioned in the public hearing held by TAX 3 committee on 1st of October: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/committee s/en/tax3/publications.html?id=20181018 CPU21161
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 985 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 153 a (new)
153 a. Calls on Member states to push the G20 to reform the OECD blacklist criteria to go beyond pure tax transparency and tackle tax evasion and aggressive tax planning as well;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 986 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 153 b (new)
153 b. Reminds that, in order to improve the Union and Member States fight against money laundering, all available data, including macroeconomic ones, must be used effectively1e; _________________ 1e “The missing profits of nations” by T. Torslov, L. Wier and G. Zucman indicates in its first part that using modern macroeconomic models and data from published Balance of Payments, the tax revenue globally per year amounts to around 200 billion $ and Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) channelled through a tax haven jurisdiction amounts to a range between 10 to 30% of total FDI. These figures are quite higher than the estimations so far using other methods.
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 1040 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 160 a (new)
160 a. Takes note of the Commission action and contributions in the OECD, Global Forum on transparency and exchange of information, Inclusive Framework on BEPS,– to promote higher levels of tax good governance globally, while ensuring that the international tax good governance standards continue to be fully respected within the EU;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 1049 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 161 a (new)
161 a. Recalls the need for Member States for regular spill over analyses of the material impact of the tax policies on other Member States and developing countries, while acknowledging that some work has taken place in this regard in the framework of the Platform on Tax Good Governance; calls on all Member States to conduct such spill over analysis under the supervision of the Commission;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 1057 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 163 a (new)
163 a. Welcomes the cooperation with the African Union (AU) within the Addis Tax Initiative (ATI) and the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) and the Kimberley process;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 1066 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 166 a (new)
166 a. Calls for a concerted external action of the EU and Member States at all levels of the policy to provide third countries and in particular developing ones to bolsters a balanced economic development and avoid dependence on one single sector, in particular the financial one;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 1089 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 170 a (new)
170 a. Recalls that good tax governance clauses should be included in all new relevant EU agreements with third countries, and negotiated in the existing ones at the time of revision, with a view to the fact that these are core instruments of the EU external policy yet, depending on the specific policy field involve different levels of competence;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 1116 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 172 a (new)
172 a. Is aware that bilateral tax treaties do not reflect the current reality of digitalized economies; calls on Member States to update their bilateral tax treaties based on the Commission recommendation on taxation of digitalized economy1f; _________________ 1f C (2018)-1650 final
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 1117 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Subheading 6.7 a (new)
Welcomes the strengthened framework avoiding double non-taxation; emphasizes that elimination of double taxation is of great importance in order to ensure that honest taxpayers are treated fairly and their trust is not undermined; calls on Member States to abide by their double- taxation treaties and cooperate sincerely and swiftly in cases of reported double taxation;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 1145 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 178 a (new)
178 a. (new) Welcomes the monitoring of the enforcement of Directive 2014/56/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 April 2014 amending Directive 2006/43/EC on statutory audits of annual accounts and consolidated accounts1g and of Regulation (EU) 537/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 April 2014 on specific requirements regarding statutory audit of public-interest entities and repealing Commission Decision 2005/909/EC1h, in particular the provision on statutory auditors or audit firms carrying out statutory audits of public- interest entities; points out the need to ensure that the rules are properly applied; _________________ 1g OJ L 158, 27.5.2014, p. 196 1h OJ L 158, 27.5.2014, p. 77
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 1166 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 180 a (new)
180 a. (new) Notes that the US False Claims Act provides a solid framework for rewarding of whistle-blowers in cases where the government recovers funds lost to fraud as presented during the 21 November TAX3 hearing; underlines that according to the US Justice Department report, whistle-blowers were directly responsible for detection and reporting of 3.4 out of 3.7 billion USD recovered; calls on Member States to establish safe confidential communication channels for whistle-blowers’ reporting within relevant authorities and in private entities;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 1175 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 181 a (new)
181 a. (new) Takes note of the proposal for a Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on the protection of persons reporting on breaches of Union law, which is currently under discussion in Parliament1i; _________________ 1i COM(2018) 218 final, 23.4.2018
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 1180 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 183
183. Notes that the TAX3 Committee invited the whistle-blowers in the cases of Julius Bär and Danske Bank to testify at public parliamentary hearings84 ; Deeply regrets the fact, that the Danske Bank whistle-blower, Mr Howard Wilkinson, was unable to share his insights into the Danske Bank case freely and fully, due to legal restraints; _________________ 84 Mr Rudolf Elmer, hearing on 1.10.2018; Mr Howard Wilkinson, hearing on 21.11.2018.
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 1182 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 183 a (new)
183 a. (new) Calls on the Member States to closely work within the Council of Europe in the promotion and implementation in their domestic law by all States belonging to the Council of Europe of the Recommendation CM/Rec(2014)7 of the Committee of Ministers to Member States on the protection of whistle-blowers; calls on the Commission and Member States to take the lead in other international fora to promote the adoption of international binding standards for the protection of whistle-blowers;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 1219 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 192 a (new)
192 a. (new) Regrets that the current rules for accessing classified and other confidential information made available by Council, Commission or Member States to the European Parliament do not provide full legal clarity but are generally interpreted as excluding accredited parliamentary assistants (APAs) from consulting and analysing non-classified ‘other confidential information’ in a secure reading room; calls therefore for the introduction of a clearly worded provision guaranteeing the right of access to documents for APAs on the basis of the ‘need to know’ principle, in their support role for Members, in are negotiated inter- institutional agreement;
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 1230 #

2018/2121(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 198 a (new)
198 a. Calls on the Commission to report on the implementation of the Code and on the application of fiscal State aid, as laid down in Article N. of the Code of conduct for business taxation1j; _________________ 1j The Code is in annex 1 to the (p.2-5) Council conclusions 1 December 1997 establishing the group (OJ C2/1,6.1.1998), point N being review and monitoring provision.
2018/12/20
Committee: TAX3
Amendment 3 #

2018/2002(INL)

Motion for a resolution
Recital D a (new)
D a. whereas the applicable tax regime for the PEPP should be the one of the Member State where a PEPP saver resides;
2018/04/30
Committee: ECON
Amendment 62 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 5
(5) The InvestEU Fund should contribute to improving the competitiveness of the Union, including in the field of innovation and digitisation, advancing technologies and innovations combatting climate change, the sustainability of the Union's economic growth, the social resilience and inclusiveness and the integration of the Union capital markets, including solutions addressing their fragmentation and diversifying sources of financing for the Union enterprises. To that end, it should support projects that are technically and economically viable by providing a framework for the use of debt, risk sharing and equity instruments underpinned by a guarantee from the Union's budget and by contributions from implementing partners. It should be demand-driven while support under the InvestEU Fund should at the same time focus on contributing to meeting policy objectives of the Union.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 68 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 6
(6) The InvestEU Fund should support investments in tangible and intangible assets to foster sustainable growth, investment and employment, and thereby contributing to improved well-being and fairer income distribution in the Union. Intervention through the InvestEU Fund should complement Union support delivered through grants.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 72 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 7
(7) The Union endorsed the objectives set out in the United Nations Agenda 2030 and its Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement in 2015 as well as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030. To achieve the agreed objectives, including those embedded in the environmental policies of the Union, action pursuing sustainable development is to be stepped up significantly. Therefore, the principles of sustainable development should feature prominently inmust be the basis of the design of the InvestEU Fund.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 76 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 9
(9) Reflecting the importance of tackling climate change in line with the Union's commitments to implement the Paris Agreement and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, the InvestEU Programme will contribute to mainstream climate actions and to the achievement of an overall target of 2530 % of the Union budget expenditures supporting climate objectives. Actions under the InvestEU Programme are expected to contribute 3at least 40 % of the overall financial envelope of the InvestEU Programme to climate objectives. Relevant actions will be identified during the InvestEU Programme's preparation and implementation and reassessed in the context of the relevant evaluations and review processes.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 77 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 9 a (new)
(9a) With regard to cost of capital of renewable energy projects, the InvestEU Fund should allow for the use of an innovative guarantee instrument to reduce regulatory risk and associated high cost of capital in some Member States. This possibility should be open on a voluntary basis. To achieve this objective, the InvestEU Fund should contribute where appropriate to the enabling framework for investment into renewable energy as set out in Art 3.5 of the [revised Renewables Directive], including the financing mechanism established by Article 27bis of the [Governance Regulation].
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 79 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 10
(10) The contribution of the InvestEU Fund to the achievement of the climate target will be tracked through an EU climate tracking system developed by the Commission in cooperation with implementing partners and using in an appropriate way the criteria established by [Regulation on the establishment of a framework to facilitate sustainable investment14 ] for determining whether an economic activity is environmentally sustainable. _________________ 14The InvestEU Programme will also contribute to implementing other dimensions of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in line with the Communication on the next steps for a sustainable European future which aims to mainstream the SDGs into EU policies and initiatives, with sustainable development as an essential guiding principle for all its policies. _________________ 14 COM(2018)353. COM(2018)353.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 87 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 13
(13) Low infrastructure investment rates in the Union during the financial crisis undermined the Union's ability to boost sustainable growth, competitiveness and convergence. Sizeable investments in the European infrastructure and energy efficiency are fundamental to meet the Union's sustainability targets, including the Union's commitments towards the SDGs, and the 2030 energy and climate targets. Accordingly, support from the InvestEU Fund should target investments into sustainable development-compatible projects on transport, energy, including energy efficiency and renewable energy, environmental, climate action, maritime and digital infrastructure. InvestEU must prioritise the areas that enable the Union to meet its 2030 and mid-century sustainability and climate targets. To maximise the impact and the value added of Union financing support, it is appropriate to promote a streamlined investment process enabling visibility of the project pipeline and consistency across relevant Union programmes. Bearing in mind security threats, investment projects receiving Union support should take into account principles for the protection of citizens in public spaces. This should be complementary to the efforts made by other Union funds such as the European Regional Development Fund providing support for security components of investments in public spaces, transport, energy and other critical infrastructure.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 94 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 13 a (new)
(13a) The Energy Performance of Buildings directive (Directive (EU) 2018/844) requires Member States to establish a long-term renovation strategy to support the renovation of the national stock of residential and non-residential buildings, both public and private, into a highly energy efficient and decarbonised building stock by 2050, facilitating the cost-effective transformation of existing buildings into nearly zero-energy buildings. Member States are also required to facilitate access to appropriate mechanisms for the aggregation of projects and the reduction of the perceived risk for investors and the private sector.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 117 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 18
(18) The InvestEU Fund should operate under fourive policy windows, mirroring the key Union policy priorities, namely sustainable infrastructure; building renovation; research, innovation and digitisation: SMEs; and social investment and skills.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 124 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 19 a (new)
(19a) The InvestEU Fund should also support just transition actions and strategies supporting investments addressing the situation of workers in specific sectors like coal/lignite mining, automotive, that could be affected from the transition to a low-carbon economy. The Invest EU fund should be able to support the transformation of those economies towards sustainable activities and attract alternative innovative businesses, start-ups, and industries with the aim of building a sustainable regional economy. Further synergies with additional supporting schemes like the modernisation Fund to be set up for the period 2021-2030 as well as other national and Union ‘s programmes addressing fair transition should also be promoted.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 177 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 12
(12) 'midcap companies' means entities employing up to 3 000 employees that are not SMEs or small midcap companies;deleted
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 184 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point b
(b) the sustainability of the Union economy and its growthgrowth of a sustainable economy, enabling the Union to achieve the SDGs and the objectives of the Paris Climate agreement;
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 188 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point a
(a) to support financing and investment operations in sustainable infrastructure and building renovation in the areas referred to in points (a) and (aa) of Article 7(1);
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 199 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point d a (new)
(da) to contribute to an overall target of at least 30% of the EU budget expenditures that must support climate objectives and to allocate to that end at least 40% of the overall financial envelope of the EUInvest Programme to support investments that will directly help to deliver on the EU’s commitments in the Paris Agreement, the EU's 2030 climate and energy targets monitored by Regulation EU (XX) [Governance of the Energy Union] and a net-zero greenhouse gas emissions economy by 2050.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 202 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point d b (new)
(db) to increase investment in climate mitigation and adaptation by contributing at least 40% of its overall financial envelope to climate objectives.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 204 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1
The EU guarantee for the purposes of the EU compartment referred to in point (a) of Article 8(1) shall be EUR 38 000 000 000 (current prices). It shall be provisioned at the rate of 40 %. The Commission may decide to select a financial institution that has a broad coverage across the Union and knowledge of EU policies.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 206 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1
The EU guarantee for the purposes of the EU compartment referred to in point (a) of Article 8(1) shall be EUR 38 000 000 000 (curreonstant prices). It shall be provisioned at the rate of 4025 %.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 208 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2 a (new)
The projects to be financed with the additional amount shall be dedicated exclusively for actions that are eligible under the eligibility criteria set up in the rules of the Union programme under which the amount has been transferred .
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 210 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 2
2. The indicative distribution of the amount referred to in the first subparagraph of paragraph 1 is set out in Annex I to this Regulation. The Commission may modify the amounts referred to in that Annex I, where appropriate, by up to 15 % for each objective. It shall inform the European Parliament and the Council of any modification.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 213 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 4
4. The amount referred to in paragraph 3 may also be used for technical and administrative assistance for the implementation of the InvestEU Programme, such as preparatory, monitoring, control, audit and evaluation activities including corporate information technology systems, but may not exceed 5% of the value of the financial envelope defined in paragraph 1.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 216 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 – paragraph 2 – point a
(a) be consistent with the policy objectives and comply with the eligibility criteria set out in the rule on the Union programme under which the support is decided; not a single financing or investment operation covered by the EU guarantee may undermine or go against the implementation of the SDGs, the EU’s commitments in the Paris Agreement, the EU's 2030 climate and energy objectives and the achievement of a net-zero greenhouse gas emissions economy by 2050;
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 220 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) sustainable infrastructure policy window: comprises sustainable investment in the areas of transport, energy,renewable energy, energy efficiency investments, in line with the 2030 and 2050 energy frameworks; digital connectivity, supply and processing of raw materials, space, oceans and water, waste, nature and other environment infrastructure, equipment, mobile assets and deployment of innovative technologies that contribute to the environmental or social sustainability objectives of the Union, or to both, or meet the environmental or social sustainability standards of the Union;
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 222 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 1 – point a a (new)
(aa) building renovation window: comprises finance of individual or aggregated refurbishment of buildings projects, investment platforms, pre- financing schemes with on-bill or on-tax repayment contributing to the renovation of buildings focused on energy savings, the deployment of decentralised renewable energy and the integration of buildings into a connected energy, storage, digital and transport system.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 226 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 1 – point b
(b) research, innovation and digitisation policy window: comprises research and innovation activities, transfer of research results to the market, demonstration and deployment of innovative solutions and support to scaling up of innovative companies other than SMEs as well as digitisation of Union industry;
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 241 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 3 – subparagraph 1
Financing and investment operations under the sustainable infrastructure policy window referred to in point (a) of paragraph (1) shall be subject to climate, environmental and social sustainability proofing with a view to minimise detrimental impacts and maximise benefits on climate, environment and social dimension. For that purpose, promoters requesting financing shall provide adequate information based on guidance to be developed by the Commission. Projects below a certain size defined in the guidance shall be excluded from the proofing., using criteria established by the [Regulation on the establishment of a framework to facilitate sustainable investment] for determining whether an economic activity is environmentally sustainable. Projects below a certain size defined in the guidance shall be excluded from the proofing, but must demonstrate the positive contribution to the environmental and social sustainability objectives of the Union
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 245 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 3 – subparagraph 2 – point b a (new)
(ba) demonstrate the consistency of the project with the EU and Member States’ climate and energy objectives and trajectories as monitored by Regulation EU (XX) [Governance of the Energy Union] and with the aim to achieve a net- zero greenhouse gas emissions economy by 2050.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 249 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 3 – subparagraph 2 a (new)
estimate the impact on employment and job creation;
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 250 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 3 – subparagraph 2 b (new)
contribution to the Sustainable Development Goals.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 252 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 4
4. Implementing partners shall provide the information necessary to allow the tracking of investment that contributes to meeting the Union objectives on climate and environmentsocial, climate and environment objectives of the Union, based on guidance to be provided by the Commission.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 255 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 5
5. Implementing partners shall targetensure that at least 750 % of the investment under the sustainable infrastructure policy window significantly contribute to meeting the Union objectives on climate and environment. , in line with the EU commitments made at the 21st Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 296 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 11 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. The InvestEU Fund shall not support activities related to production, processing, distribution, storage or combustion of fossil fuels, with the exception of investment related to clean vehicles as defined in Article 4 of Directive 2009/33/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 320 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 17 – paragraph 1
1. The Commission shall be advised by an advisory board which shall have two configurations, namely representatives of implementing partners and representatives of Member States. Both configuration shall strive to ensure gender balance among their Members.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 336 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 19 – paragraph 1 – point b
(b) verify their compliance with this Regulation and the relevant investment guidelines, giving particular attention to the sustainability proofing referred to in Article 7(3), the additionality requirement referred to in [Article 209(2)(b)] of the [Financial Regulation] and to the requirement to crowd in private investment referred to in [Article 209(2)(d)] of the [Financial Regulation]; and
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 353 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 20 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2
The InvestEU Advisory Hub shall be available as a component under each policy window referred to in Article 7(1) covering all the sectors under that window, in particular for those contributing to EU climate objectives. In addition, cross- sectoral advisory services shall be available.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 382 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – introductory part
The financing and investment operations may fall under one or more of the following areas, but shall not support activities related to production, processing, distribution, storage or combustion of fossil fuels, with the exception of investment related to clean vehicles as defined in Article 4 of Directive 2009/33/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council:
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 385 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – introductory part
The financing and investment operations mayshall fall under one or more of the following areas:
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 390 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 1 – point a
(a) expansion of the generation, supply or use of clean and sustainable renewable energy;
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 393 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 1 – point c
(c) development, smartening and modernisation of sustainable energy infrastructure (transmission and distribution level, storage technologies, smart grids);
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 399 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 1 – point e
(e) infrastructure for the carbon- capture and -storage infrastructure. of industrial process emissions and emissions of bio-energy plants.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 402 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 1 a (new)
1a. deployment of electric charging infrastructure.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 406 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 2 – point b
(b) smart and sustainable urban mobility projects (targeting zero and low- emission urban transport modes, accessibility, air pollution and noise, energy consumption and accidents);
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 412 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 2 – point e
(e) alternative fuels infrastructure, including electric charging infrastructure, both stationary as well as electric road systems making use of overhead catenary or in-road charging.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 434 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 5 – point f
(f) new effective and accessible healthcare products, including pharmaceuticals, medical devices and advanced therapy medicinal products, having difficulties to find appropriate private funding.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 438 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 6 – introductory part
6. Development and, deployment and scaling up of digital technologies and services, in particular through:
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 445 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 6 a (new)
6a. robotics and automatisation.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 447 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 7 – introductory part
7. Financial support to entities employing up to 3 000 employees, with a particular focus on SMEs and small mid- cap companies, in particular through:
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 462 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 12
12. Development of the defence industry, thereby enhancingdeleted the Union's strategic autonomy, in particular through support for: (a) supply chain, in particular through financial support to SMEs and mid-caps; (b) disruptive innovation projects in the defence sector and closely related dual- use technologies; (c) when participating in collaborative defence research and development projects, including those supported by the European Defence Fund; (d) infrastructure.defence industry companies participating in the defence sector supply chain defence research and training
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 467 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 12 – point a
(a) the Union’s defence industry supply chain, in particular through financial support to SMEs and mid-caps;deleted
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 468 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 12 – point b
(b) companies participating in disruptive innovation projects in the defence sector and closely related dual- use technologies;deleted
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 469 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 12 – point c
(c) the defence sector supply chain when participating in collaborative defence research and development projects, including those supported by the European Defence Fund;deleted
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 470 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 12 – point d
(d) defence research and training infrastructure.deleted
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 472 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 13 – point b
(b) to foster the competitiveness of space systems and technologies, addressing in particular vulnerabilityindependence of supply chains;, including dual use aspects,
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 474 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – paragraph 1 – point 13 – point d
(d) to foster Union's autonomy for safe and secure access to space, including dual use aspects.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 488 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex III – point 4 a (new)
4a. Number of alternative fuel infrastructure points deployed
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 489 #

2018/0229(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex III – point 4 b (new)
4b. Climate change: Amount of CO2 emissions reduced by Invest EU operations.
2018/09/14
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 98 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 4
(4) Reflecting the importance of tackling climate change in line with Union’s commitments to implement the Paris Agreement, and the commitment to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, this Regulation should therefore mainstream climate action and lead to the achievement of an overall target of 2530% of the EU budget expenditures supporting climate objectives18 . Actions under this Programme are expected to contribute 60% of the overall financial envelope of the Programme to climate objectives, based inter alia on the following Rio markers: i) 100% for the expenditures relating to railway infrastructure, alternative fuels, clean urban transport, electricity transmission, electricity storage, energy efficiency, smart grids, CO2 transportation and renewable energy; ii) 40% for inland waterways and multimodal transport, and gas infrastructure - if enabling increased use ofa measurable transition away from fossil fuels through for example renewable hydrogen or bio-methane. Relevant actions will be identified during the Programme's preparation and implementation, and reassessed in the context of the relevant evaluations and review processes. In order to prevent that infrastructure is vulnerable to potential long term climate change impacts and to ensure that the cost of greenhouse gas emissions arising from the project is included in the project's economic evaluation, projects supported by the Programme should be subject to climate proofing in accordance with guidance that should be developed by the Commission coherently with the guidance developed for other programmes of the Union where relevant. __________________ 18 COM(2018) 321, page 13
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 219 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 17
(17) Regulation (EU) No 347/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council27 identifies the trans-European energy infrastructure priorities which need to be implementhave been established in order to meet the Union's energy and climate policy objectives, identifies projects of common interest necessary to implement those priorities, and lays down measures in the field of the granting of permits, public involvement and regulation to speed up and/or facilitate the implementation of those projects, including criteria for the eligibility of such projects for Union financial assistance. The list of projects of common interest, eligibility criteria and TEN-E guidelines should be revised before the end of 2021 to take fully into account the goals and objectives of the Paris Agreement as well as the Union’s climate and energy targets for 2030 and beyond; to facilitate an enhanced dialogue between the European Parliament , the Council and the Commission on the lists of projects of common interest; and to unlock bottlenecks for increased investments for electricity and smart grid projects. __________________ 27 Regulation (EU) No 347/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 April 2013 on guidelines for trans- European energy infrastructure and repealing Decision No 1364/2006/EC and amending Regulations (EC) No 713/2009, (EC) No 714/2009 and (EC) No 715/2009 (OJ L 115, 25.4.2013, p. 39).
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 231 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 18 a (new)
(18a) Directive [Energy Efficiency Directive] highlights energy efficiency as the first priority for decarbonising the EU energy system and calls for well-designed and effective Union financial instruments to support energy efficiency measures. Investments to enhance energy efficiency should therefore also be eligible for CEF funding, where they fulfil other criteria laid down in this regulation.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 409 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 1
1. The Programme has the general objective to develop and modernise the trans-European networks in the fields of transport, energy and digital and to facilitate cross-border cooperation in the field of renewable energy, taking into accountin order to help achieve the long-term decarbonisation commitments and contribute to sustainable and inclusive growth, with emphasis on synergies among sectors.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 474 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 3 – paragraph 2 – point b
(b) In the energy sector, to contribute to the development of projects of common interest relating to further integration of the internal energy market, interoperability of networks across borders and sectors, facilitating decarbonisation and ensuring security of supply, and to facilitate cross- border cooperation in the area of renewable energy, ensuring the contribution to the Unions goal of net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and help deliver on the EU’s 2030 climate and energy targets monitored by Regulation EU (XX)[Governance of the Energy Union];
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 540 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 2 – point b
(b) up to EUR 8,650,000,000 for the specific objectives referred to in Article 3(2)(b), out of which up to 1025% for the cross-border projects in the field of renewable energy
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 789 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 3 – point a a (new)
(aa) actions related to energy infrastructure projects contributing to improving energy efficiency where these projects have an influence on cross- border energy flows, inter alia through demand response and smart grids.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 804 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 4 – subparagraph 1 – point e
(e) actions supporting access of European households to very high capacity networks and implementing the EU strategic connectivity targets;
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 882 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point i
(i) consistency withtribution to the achievement of Union and national energy and climate plans.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 887 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 1 – point i a (new)
(ia) the potential CO2 reduction achieved by the project
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 962 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 14 – paragraph 3 – point b
(b) The co-financing rates may be increased to a maximum of 75 % for actions contributing to the development of projects of common interest which have a significant impact on reducing CO2 emissions or, based on the evidence referred to in Article 14(2) of Regulation (EU) No 347/2013, provide a high degree of regional or Union-wide security of supply, strengthen the solidarity of the Union or comprise highly innovative solutions.
2018/09/21
Committee: ITRETRAN
Amendment 1164 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – Part III – point 1 – table – Core network corridor “Scandinavian- Mediterranean”
Core network corridor "Scandinavian – Mediterranean" Alignment RU border – Hamina/Kotka – Helsinki – Turku/Naantali – Stockholm – Örebro – Malmö Narvik/Oulu – Luleå – Umeå – Stockholm Oslo – Goteburg – Malmö – Trelleborg Malmö – København – Fredericia – Aarhus – Aalborg - Hirtshals/Frederikshavn København – Kolding/Lübeck – Hamburg – Hannover Bremerhaven – Bremen – Hannover – Nürnberg Rostock – Berlin – Leipzig – München Nürnberg – München – Innsbruck – Verona – Bologna – Ancona/Firenze Livorno/La Spezia – Firenze – Roma – Napoli – Bari – Taranto – Valletta Napoli – Gioia Tauro – Palermo/Augusta – Valletta Pre- Cross-border RU border – Helsinki Rail Rail identified sections København – Hamburg: Fehmarn belt fixed link access routes München – Wörgl – Innsbruck – Fortezza – Bolzano – Trento – Verona: Brenner base tunnel and its access routes Göteborg-Oslo Helsingborg-Helsingør Copenhagen-Malmö København – Hamburg: Fehmarn Rail/Road belt fixed link
2018/09/26
Committee: TRAN
Amendment 1179 #

2018/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Annex I – part IV – point 1 – paragraph 1
Cross-border projects in the field of renewable energy shall promote the cross- border cooperation between Member States in the field of planning, development and cost-effective exploitation of renewable energy sources with the aim of contributing to the Union´s long term decarbonisation targets.
2018/09/26
Committee: TRAN
Amendment 235 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Recital 5
(5) Reflecting the importance of tackling climate change in line with the Union's commitments to implement the Paris Agreement and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, this Specific Programme will contribute to mainstream climate actions and to the achievement of an overall target of 25at least 30 % of the EU budget expenditures supporting climate objectives. Actions undert least 40% of the overall financial envelope of thise Specific Programme are expected to contribute 35% of the overall financial envelopemust support actions or part of actions that will directly help to deliver ofn the Specific Programme to climate objectivesEU’s commitments in the Paris Agreement, the 2030 climate and energy targets monitored by the Regulation [Governance of the Energy Union], and a net-zero greenhouse gas emissions economy by 2050. Relevant actions will be identified during the Specific Programme's preparation and implementation, and reassessed in the context of the relevant evaluations and review processes.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1247 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 3 – point 3.2 – point 3.2.8 – paragraph 3 – indent 2
– Industrial CO2 valorisation; capture, utilization or storage (CCUS); when CO2 is recycled into new products (CCU), priority should be given to products with a long lifespan, such as the mineralisation into construction materials, in order to lock down the carbon as long as possible into the technosphere and keep it out of the atmosphere;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1258 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 3 – point 3.2 – point 3.2.8 – paragraph 3 – indent 3
– Electrification and use of unconventional energy sources and decarbonized feedstock within industrial plants, and energy and resource exchanges between industrial plants (for instance via industrial symbiosis);
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1343 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 4 – point 4.2 – point 4.2.2 – introductory part
4.2.2. Energy SupplyRenewable and decarbonised supply of energy and feedstock
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1351 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 4 – point 4.2 – point 4.2.2 – paragraph 1
The EU aims to be world leader in affordable, secure and sustainable energy technologies improving its competitiveness in global value chains and its position in growth markets. Diverse climatic, geographical, environmental and socio- economic conditions in the EU as well as the need to ensure energy security and access to raw materials, dictate a broad portfolio of energy solutions, including of non-technical nature. As regards renewable energy technologies, costs need to decrease further, performance must improve, integration into the energy system must be improved and breakthrough technologies need to be developed and deployed. As regards fossil fuels, decarbonising their usag and feedstock, avoiding through electrification or substitution by decarbonized alternatives such as green hydrogen and synthetic methane will be essential to meet the climate objectives.
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1363 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 4 – point 4.2 – point 4.2.2 – paragraph 2 – indent 1
– Renewable energy technologies and solutions for power generation, heating and cooling, sustainable transport fuels and intermediate carriersrenewable or decarbonised transport fuels and feedstock, at various scales and development stages, adapted to geographic conditions and markets, both within the EU and worldwide;
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1373 #

2018/0225(COD)

Proposal for a decision
Annex I – part II – point 4 – point 4.2 – point 4.2.2 – paragraph 2 – indent 3
– Technologies and solutions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel-based power generation via CO2 capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS).deleted
2018/09/12
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 457 #

2018/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 26
(26) With the aim of deepening the relationship between science and society and maximising benefits of their interactions, the Programme should engage and involve citizens and civil society organisations in co-designing and co- creating responsible research and innovation agendas and contents, promoting science education, making scientific knowledge publicly accessible, and facilitating participation by citizens and civil society organisations in its activities. It should do so across the Programme and through dedicated activities in the part 'Strengthening the European Research Area'. The engagement of citizens and civil society in research and innovation should be coupled with public outreach activities to generate and sustain public support for the Programme. The programme should also seek to remove barriers and boost synergies between science, technology, culture and the arts to obtain a new quality of sustainable innovation, just as it should help to deliver on the EU’s commitments to the Paris Agreement, the 2030 energy targets and a net-zero greenhouse gas emissions economy by 2050.
2018/09/11
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 486 #

2018/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 41
(41) Reflecting the importance of tackling climate change in line with the Union's commitments to implement the Paris Agreement and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, this Programme will contribute to mainstream climate actions and to the achievement of an overall target of 25at least 30 % of the EU budget expenditures supporting climate objectives. In order to monitor and verify this objective, all climate related expenditures must be recorded in a centrally developed and managed climate tracking data base, based on Rio markers, to cover all EU budget programmes.
2018/09/11
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 745 #

2018/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 – paragraph 6
6. The implementation of the specific programme29 shall be based on a transparent and strategic multiannual planning of research and innovation activities, in particular for the pillar 'Global Challenges and Industrial Competitiveness', following consultations with stakeholders about. This strategic planning process will be based on the results of a periodic assessment of the distances to SDG targets and the reporting of the progress towards the achievement of the objectives of the Energy Union according to Regulation EU (XX) [Governance of the Energy Union]. The specific programme must contribute to the achievement of these targets and objectives and must guarantee the ex-ante application of the Programme's share in the overall target of the EU budget expenditures that must be climate related. The multiannual planning will take into account the stakeholders' views on priorities and the suitable types of action and forms of implementation to use. This shall ensure alignment with other relevant Union programmes. __________________ 29 … …
2018/09/11
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 806 #

2018/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 3 – point a
(a) have a clear EU-added value and contribute to reaching Union priorities, the Union's commitment to the Paris agreement and the implementation of the SDGs;
2018/09/11
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 990 #

2018/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 2 – point b – point 4
(4) EUR 1523 000 000 000 for cluster 'Climate, Energy and Mobility';
2018/09/11
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1062 #

2018/0224(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 3
3. In order to respond to unforeseen situations or to new developments and needs, the Commission may, within the annual budgetary procedure, deviate from the amounts referred to in paragraph 2 up to a maximum of 10%. A greater deviation in the positive direction will be possible under point (b) (4) in order to comply with any new spending target or targets agreed under the Mission Innovation initiative launched at COP21. The Programme’s financial envelope may also be increased to comply with such a target or targets. No such deviation shall be allowed in respect of the amounts referred to in points (b) (6) of paragraph 2 of this Article and the total amount set out for Part 'Strengthening the European Research Area' of paragraph 2 of this Article.
2018/09/11
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 37 #

2018/0164(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 7
Directive 2006/112/EC
Article 13a – paragraph 2 – point a a (new)
(a a) the absence of any record of serious criminal offences relating to the economic activity of the applicant, such as, but not limited to: (i) money laundering (ii) tax evasion and tax fraud (iii) abuse of Union funds and programmes (iv) bankruptcy or insolvency fraud (v) insurance fraud or other financial fraud (vi) bribery and/or corruption (vii) cybercrime (viii) participation in a criminal organisation (ix) offences in the field of competition law (x) direct or indirect involvement in terrorist activities
2018/11/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 38 #

2018/0164(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 7
Directive 2006/112/EC
Article 13a – paragraph 2 – point c
(c) evidence of financial solvency of the applicant during the last three years, which shall be deemed to be proven either where the applicant has good financial standing, which enables him to fulfil his commitments, with due regard to the characteristics of the type of business activity concerned, or through the production of guarantees provided by insurance or other financial institutions or by other economically reliable third parties. The applicant must possess a bank account in a financial institution established in the Union.
2018/11/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 46 #

2018/0164(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 7
Directive 2006/112/EC
Article 13a – paragraph 4 a (new)
4 a. Where the status of certified taxable person is granted, that information shall be made available via the VIES system. Changes to that status shall be updated in the system without delay.
2018/11/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 50 #

2018/0164(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 7
Directive 2006/112/EC
Article 13a – paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. Where the application is refused, the decision as well as the grounds for refusal shall be notified to tax authorities of other Member States.
2018/11/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 51 #

2018/0164(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 7
Directive 2006/112/EC
Article 13a – paragraph 6
6. The taxable person who has been granted the status of certified taxable person shall inform the tax authorities without delayin 1 month of any factor arising after the decision was taken, which may affect or influence the continuation of that status. The tax status shall be withdrawn by the tax authorities where the criteria set out in paragraph 2 are no longer met. Tax authorities of the Member States having granted the status of certified taxable person shall review that decision, at least every two years, to ensure that the conditions are still met. If the taxable person has not informed the tax authorities of any factor possibly affecting the certified taxable person status as laid out in the implementing act or has purposefully concealed it, it shall be subject to proportionate, efficient and dissuasive sanctions, including the loss of the certified taxable person status.
2018/11/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 53 #

2018/0164(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 7
Directive 2006/112/EC
Article 13a – paragraph 6 a (new)
6 a. A taxable person who has been refused the status of a certified taxable person, or who on his or her own initiative has informed thetax authority that he or she no longer meets the criteria set out in paragraph 2, may no earlier than six months from the date of the refusal of that status or its withdrawal reapplyfor a certified taxable person status provided that all relevant criteria are met.
2018/11/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 55 #

2018/0164(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 7
Directive 2006/112/EC
Article 13a – paragraph 6 b (new)
6 b. Where the applicant has been denied the status of an authorised economic operator in accordance with the Union Customs Code during the last three years, the applicant shall not be granted the status of a certified taxable person.
2018/11/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 56 #

2018/0164(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 7
Directive 2006/112/EC
Article 13a – paragraph 7
7. The status of a certified taxable person in one Member State shall be recognised by the tax authorities of all the Member States. National mechanisms will continue to apply for internal VAT tax disputes between the tax payer concerned and the national tax authority;
2018/11/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 37 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 7
(7) In the area of financial services, the added value of whistleblower protection was already acknowledged by the Union legislator. In the aftermath of the financial crisis, which exposed serious shortcomings in the enforcement of the relevant rules, measures for the protection of whistleblowers were introduced in a significant number of legislative instruments in this area34 . In particular, in the context of the prudential framework applicable to credit institutions and investment firms, Directive 2013/36/EU35 provides for protection of whistleblowers, which extends also to Regulation (EU) No 575/2013 on prudential requirements for credit institutions and investment firms. However, a number of high profile cases involving European financial institutions have proven, that protection of whistleblowers within the full range of financial institutions still remain unsatisfactory and that fears of reprisals from both employers and authorities still prevent whistleblowers from coming forward with information on breaches of law. _________________ 34 Communication of 8.12.2010 "Reinforcing sanctioning regimes in the financial services sector". 35 Directive 2013/36/EU of the European Directive 2013/36/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 June 2013 on access to the activity of credit institutions and the prudential supervision of credit institutions and investment firms, amending Directive 2002/87/EC and repealing Directives 2006/48/EC and 2006/49/EC (OJ L 176, 27.6.2013, p. 338).
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 42 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 11
(11) Similar considerations warrant the introduction of whistleblower protection to build upon existing provisions and prevent breaches of EU rules in the area of food chain and in particular on food and feed safety as well as on animal health and welfare. The different Union rules developed in these areas are closely interlinked. Regulation (EC) No 178/200242 sets out the general principles and requirements which underpin all Union and national measures relating to food and feed, with a particular focus on food safety, in order to ensure a high level of protection of human health and consumers’ interests in relation to food as well as the effective functioning of the internal market. This Regulation provides, amongst others, that food and feed business operators are prevented from discouraging their employees and others from cooperating with competent authorities where this may prevent, reduce or eliminate a risk arising from food. The Union legislator has taken a similar approach in the area of ‘Animal Health Law’ through Regulation (EU) 2016/429 establishing the rules for the prevention and control of animal diseases which are transmissible to animals or to humans43 . Systematic breaches of Union law as regards animal welfare remains a significant issue across Member States, however, the number of whistleblowers in this field is very low, which indicates a need to further strengthen protections of would-be whistleblowers and ensuring safe and effective reporting channels for them to disclose their information. _________________ 42 Regulation (EC) No 178/2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 28 January 2002 laying down the general principles and requirements of food law, establishing the European Food Safety Authority and laying down procedures in matters of food safety (OJ L 31, p. 1). 43 OJ L 84, p. 1
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 49 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 18
(18) Certain Union acts, in particular in the area of financial services, such as Regulation (EU) No 596/2014 on market abuse49 , and Commission Implementing Directive 2015/2392, adopted on the basis of that Regulation50 , already contain detailed rules on whistleblower protection. Such existing Union legislation, including the list of Part II of the Annex, should be complemented by the present Directive, so that these instruments are fully aligned with its minimum standards whilst maintaining any specificities they provide for, tailored to the relevant sectors. This is of particular importance to ascertain which legal entities in the area of financial services, the prevention of money laundering and terrorist financing are currently obliged to establish internal reporting channels. As these cases often involve highly complex international corporate and financial constructions, which are likely to be within the remit of differing jurisdictions, provisions for a unified point of contact for whistleblowers should be adopted. _________________ 49 OJ L 173, p. 1. 50 Commission Implementing Directive (EU) 2015/2392 of 17 December 2015 on Regulation (EU) No 596/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council as regards reporting to competent authorities of actual or potential infringements of that Regulation (OJ L 332, p. 126).
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 51 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 19
(19) Each time a new Union act for which whistleblower protection is relevant and can contribute to more effective enforcement is adopted, consideration should be given to whether to amend the Annex to the present Directive should be amended in order to place it under its scope.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 53 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 20
(20) This Directive should be without prejudice to the protection afforded to employees when reporting on breaches of Union employment law. In particular, in the area of occupational safety and health, Article 11 of Framework Directive 89/391/EEC already requires Member States to ensure that workers or workers' representatives shall not be placed at a disadvantage because of their requests or proposals to employers to take appropriate measures to mitigate hazards for workers and/or to remove sources of danger. Workers and their representatives are entitled to raise issues with the competent national or European Union authorities if they consider that the measures taken and the means employed by the employer are inadequate for the purposes of ensuring safety and health.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 58 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 24
(24) Persons need specific legal protection where they acquire the information they report through their work- related activities and therefore run the risk of work-related retaliation (for instance, for breaching the duty of confidentiality or loyalty). The underlying reason for providing them with protection is their position of economic vulnerability vis-à- vis the person on whom they de facto depend for work. When there is no such work-related power imbalance (for instance in the case of ordinary complainants or citizen bystanders) there is no need for protection against retaliation.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 73 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 34
(34) It is for the Member States to identify the authorities competent to receive and give appropriate follow up to the reports on breaches falling within the scope of this Directive, to ensure proper implementation and to ensure full, loyal and expeditious cooperation between competent authorities both within the Member State itself and with relevant authorities in other Member States. These may be regulatory or supervisory bodies in the areas concerned, law enforcement agencies, anti-corruption bodies and ombudsmen. The authorities designated as competent shall have the necessary capacities and powers to assess the accuracy of the allegations made in the report and to address the breaches reported, including by launching an investigation, prosecution or action for recovery of funds, or other appropriate remedial action, in accordance with their mandate.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 83 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 50
(50) Follow up and feedback should take place within a reasonable timeframe; this is warranted by the need to promptly address the problem that may be the subject of the report, as well as to avoid unnecessary public disclosuresensure swift action by competent authorities and safeguard evidence needed for further investigation and prosecution. Such timeframe should not exceed three months, but could be extended to six months, where necessary due to the specific circumstances of the case, in particular the nature and complexity of the subject of the report, which may require a lengthy investigation. In such cases a reasoned argument for such a prolongation must be provided. In all cases an initial reply should be provided no later than 4 weeks from the date of the initial reporting and updates on actions taken and relevant new information should be provided monthly hereafter.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 85 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 57
(57) Member States should ensure the adequate record-keeping of all reports of infringement and that every report is retrievable within the competent authority and that information received through reports could be used as evidence in enforcement actions where appropriate and made available to other Member States' or European Union authorities where relevant. It remains the responsibility of both the transmitting and receiving authorities to ensure full protection of whisteblowers and to ensure full, loyal and expeditious cooperation.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 90 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 61
(61) The requirement of a tiered use of reporting channels, as a general rule, is necessary to ensure that the information gets to the persons who can contribute to the early and effective resolution of risks to the public interest as well as to prevent unjustified reputational damage from public disclosure. At the same time, some exceptions to its application are necessary, allowing the reporting person to choose the most appropriate channel depending on the individual circumstances of the case. Moreover, it is necessary to protect public disclosures taking into account democratic principles such as transparency and accountability, and fundamental rights such as freedom of expression and media freedom, whilst balancing the interest of employers to manage their organisations and to protect their interests with the interest of the public to be protected from harm, in line with the criteria developed in the case-law of the European Court of Human Rights57 . _________________ 57 One of the criteria for determining whether retaliation against whistleblowers making public disclosures interferes with freedom of expression in a way which is not necessary in a democratic society, is whether the persons who made the disclosure had at their disposal alternative channels for making the disclosure; see, for instance, Guja v. Moldova [GC], no 14277/04, ECHR 2008.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 95 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 65
(65) Reporting persons should be protected against any form of retaliation, whether direct or indirect, taken by their employer or customer/recipient of services and by persons working for or acting on behalf of the latter, including co-workers and managers in the same organisation or in other organisations with which the reporting person is in contact in the context of his/her work-related activities, where retaliation is recommended or tolerated by the concerned person. Protection should be provided against retaliatory measures taken vis-à-vis the reporting person him/herself but also those that may be taken vis-à-vis the legal entity he/she represents, such as denial of provision of services, blacklisting or business boycotting. Indirect retaliation also includes actions taken against relatives of the reporting person who are also in a work-related connection with the latter’s employer or customer/recipient of services and workers’ representatives who have provided support to the reporting person.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 108 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point a – point ii
(ii) financial services, prevention of money laundering, tax evasion, tax avoidance and terrorist financing;
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 133 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 4 – paragraph 1
1. Member States shall ensure that legal entities in the private and in the public sector establish internal channels and procedures for reporting and following up on reports, following consultations with social partners, if appropriate.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 140 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 5 – paragraph 1 – point d
d) a reasonable timeframe, not exceeding three months following the report, to provide substantive feedback to the reporting person about the follow-up to the report, 4 weeks to provide initial feedback and 1 week to provide a confidential note of receipt;
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 146 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 5 – paragraph 3
3. The person or department referred to in point (b) of paragraph 1 may be the same person who is competent for receiving the reports. Additional persons may be designated as “trusted persons” from whom reporting persons and those considering reporting may seek confidential advice. These persons may, in particular, be workers' representatives.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 152 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 – paragraph 2 – point c
c) transmit the information contained in the report to competent bodies, offices or agencies of the Union or other Member States, as appropriate, for further investigation, where provided for under national or Union law.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 153 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 – paragraph 2 – point c a (new)
c a) cooperate fully, loyally and expeditiously with other Member States and EU authorities.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 154 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 – paragraph 3
3. Member States shall ensure that competent authorities follow up on the reports by taking the necessary measures and investigate, to the extent appropriate, the subject-matter of the reports. The competent authorities shall communicate to the reporting person and all relevant other Member States and competent EU competent authorities, offices and agencies the final outcome of the investigations.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 157 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 – paragraph 4
4. Member States shall ensure that any authority which has received a report but does not have the competence to address the breach reported transmits it to the competent authority and that the reporting person is informed, including competent authorities in other Member States.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 159 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 7 – paragraph 1 – point a a (new)
a a) they are designed, set up and operated in a manner that ensures the confidentiality of the personal information of the reporting person or persons and effectively prevents access to non-authorised staff members of the competent authority and keeps information on which staff members have accessed this information and when;
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 166 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 2 – point c
c) maintaining confidential contact with the reporting person and/or their trusted representatives for the purpose of informing the reporting person of the progress and the outcome of the investigation.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 167 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 9 – paragraph 1 – point b
b) a reasonable timeframe, not exceeding three months or six months in duly justified cases, for giving substantive feed-back to the reporting person about the follow-up of the report and the type and content of this feed-back;, 4 weeks to provide initial feedback and 1 week to provide a confidential note of receipt.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 188 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 14 a (new)
Article 14 a Support for the reporting person or persons from an independent third party 1. Member States may provide for the person reporting or intending to make a report or a public disclosure to be given support in the procedure. Such support shall ensure the identity of the persons referred to in this paragraph remains confidential and may, in particular, take the form of: (a) free, impartial and confidential advice, especially on the scope of this Directive, the reporting channels and the protection granted to the reporting person and the rights of the concerned person; (b) legal advice in the event of a legal dispute; (c) psychological support; 2. This support may be provided by an independent administrative authority, trade unions or other organisations representing workers or an accredited body designated by the Member State, provided that it fulfils the following criteria: (a) it is properly constituted according to the law of a Member State; (b) it has a legitimate interest in ensuring compliance with the provisions laid down in this Directive; and (c) it is a not-for-profit entity.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 191 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 15 a (new)
Article 15 a Duty to preserve the confidentiality of the identity of the reporting person 1. The identity of the reporting person or persons may not be disclosed without their express consent. This duty of confidentiality also includes information which may be used to identify the reporting person. 2. A person who possesses or obtains the information referred to in paragraph 1 shall be duty-bound not to disclose it. 3. The circumstances in which, by way of derogation from paragraph 2, information germane to the identity of the reporting person may be disclosed shall be limited to exceptional cases where disclosure of such information is a necessary and proportionate obligation required by Union or national law in the context of subsequent investigations or judicial proceedings or to safeguard the freedoms of others including the right of defence of the concerned person, and in each case subject to appropriate safeguards under such laws. In such cases apropriate and effective steps must be taken to ensure the safety and well-being of the reporting person or persons. 4. In the cases referred to in paragraph 3, the person designated to receive the report shall inform the reporting person in due time before disclosing his or her identity and consult with them on other possible alternative courses of action. 5. The internal and external reporting channels shall be designed in such a way as to ensure the identity of the reporting person remains confidential and to prevent access by non-authorised persons. Information shall be kept on which staff members have accessed confidential information, including time and dates of such access.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 198 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 17 a (new)
Article 17 a Obligation to cooperate 1. Member States' authorities who are made aware of breaches of Union law, as covered by this directive, are obliged to expeditiously inform all other relevant Member States' authorities and/or EU offices and agencies and to cooperate with these in a loyal, effective and expeditious manner. 2. Member States' authorities who are notified by other Member States' authorities of potential breaches of union law, as covered by this directive, are required to provide a substantive response on actions taken in connection with said notification as well as an offical notification of receipt and a point of contact for further cooperation. 3. Member States' authorities are obliged to safeguard confidential information received, especially as related to the identity and other personal information of reporting persons. 4. Member States' authorities are obliged to provide confidential access to the information received from reporting persons and to facilitate requests for further information in a timely manner. 5. Member States' authorities are obliged to share all relevant information with other competent Member States authorities pertaining to breaches of Union or national law in international cases and to do so in a timely manner.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 206 #

2018/0106(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Annex I – part I – subpart G – point 4 – point iii a (new)
(iii a) Council Directive 2008/120/EC of 18 December 2008 laying down minimum standards for the protection of pigs.
2018/09/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 21 #

2018/0105(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 2 a (new)
(2a) Member States are obliged to cooperate sincerely, loyally and expeditiously as per Article 4(3) of the Treaty on European Union.
2018/11/07
Committee: ECON
Amendment 32 #

2018/0105(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 16 a (new)
(16a) Designated competent authorities should be empowered to exchange information or analysis already in their possession or which can be obtained following a request to a Financial Intelligence Unit with designated competent authorities of another Member State, following a specific request and on a case-by-case basis, where that information or analysis is necessary for the prevention and combating of money laundering, associate predicate offences and terrorist financing.
2018/11/07
Committee: ECON
Amendment 38 #

2018/0105(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 20 a (new)
(20a) In order to enhance cross-border cooperation, Europol should create a specific unit to support and coordinate cooperation and exchange of information between Financial Intelligence Units. This unit should be empowered to assist Financial Intelligence Units in joint analysis of cross-border cases, produce its own analysis and coordinate the work of Financial Intelligence Units in Member States for cross-border cases, whenever necessary for the prevention and combating of money laundering, associate predicate offences and terrorist financing.
2018/11/07
Committee: ECON
Amendment 43 #

2018/0105(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 28
(28) The Commission should report on the implementation of this Directive three years after its date of transposition, and every three years thereafter. This report shall also include an assessment of the need to ensure diagonal cooperation between Financial Intelligence Units and competent authorities in different Member States, and on the need to harmonise the organisation status and role of Financial Intelligence Unites in national law. In accordance with paragraphs 22 and 23 of the Interinstitutional Agreement on Better Law-Making19 the Commission should also carry out an evaluation of this Directive on the basis of information collected through specific monitoring arrangements in order to assess the actual effects of the Directive and the need for any further action. _________________ 19 Interinstitutional Agreement between the European Parliament, the Council of the European Union and the European Commission on Better Law-Making of 13 April 2016; OJ L 123, 12.5.2016, p. 1–14.
2018/11/07
Committee: ECON
Amendment 46 #

2018/0105(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 3 – paragraph 3
3. Each Member State shall notify the Commission its designated competent authorities in accordance with paragraphs (1) and (2) by [6 months from transposition date] at the latest, and shall notify the Commission of any amendment thereto. The Commission shall publish the notifications and any amendment thereto in the Official Journal of the European Union, as well as communicating this directly to Member States' designated competent authorities.
2018/11/07
Committee: ECON
Amendment 52 #

2018/0105(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 7 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. Where there are objective grounds for assuming that the provision of such information would clearly have a negative impact on ongoing investigations or analyses, or, in exceptional circumstances, where disclosure of the information would be clearly disproportionate to the legitimate interests of a natural or legal person or clearly irrelevant with regard to the purposes for which it has been requested, the Financial Intelligence Unit shall not be under obligation to comply with the request for information, and shall duly reply stating the reasons for such a refusal. In these cases, the Analysis, Support and Coordination Unit within Europol referred to in Article 10a shall be informed.
2018/11/07
Committee: ECON
Amendment 62 #

2018/0105(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 9 a (new)
Article 9a Exchange of information between competent authorities in different Member States 1. Subject to national procedural safeguards, each Member State shall ensure that its designated competent authorities under Article 3 (1) are enabled to exchange information obtained from the access to the national centralised bank account registries set up by the Member States in accordance with Article 32a of Directive (EU)2015/849, upon request, and on a case-by-case basis, where that bank account information is necessary for the prevention and combating of money laundering, associate predicate offences and terrorist financing. 2. Subject to national procedural safeguards, each Member State shall ensure that its designated competent authorities under Article 3 (2) are enabled to exchange financial information or financial analysis requested from the Financial Intelligence Unit from that Member State, upon request and on a case-by-case basis from a designated competent authority in another Member State, where that financial information or financial analysis is necessary for the prevention and combating of money laundering, associate predicate offences and terrorist financing. 3. Member States shall ensure that a request issued pursuant to this Article and its response shall be transmitted using dedicated secure electronic communications ensuring a high level of data security. That network shall ensure the secure communication and shall be capable of producing a written record under conditions that allow for ascertaining of authenticity.
2018/11/07
Committee: ECON
Amendment 69 #

2018/0105(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 10 a (new)
Article 10a Analysis, Support and Coordination Unit within EUROPOL 1. Europol shall establish a specific unit to support and coordinate cooperation and exchange of information between Financial Intelligence Units. 2. The unit referred to in paragraph 1 shall be able to assist Financial Intelligence Units in joint analysis of cross-border cases, produce its own analysis and coordinate the work of Financial Intelligence Units in Member States for cross-border cases, whenever necessary for the prevention and combating of money laundering, associate predicate offences and terrorist financing.
2018/11/07
Committee: ECON
Amendment 77 #

2018/0105(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 19 – paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. By [OJ please insert date: three years after the date of transposition of this Directive] at the latest, the Commission shall draw up a report assessing the necessity of specific measures to ensure diagonal cooperation, i.e. cooperation between Financial Intelligence Units in one Member States with competent authorities in another Member State. The report shall be submitted to the European Parliament and to the Council, and be accompanied by a legislative proposal, if considered necessary.
2018/11/07
Committee: ECON
Amendment 78 #

2018/0105(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 19 – paragraph 1 b (new)
1b. By [OJ please insert date: three years after the date of transposition of this Directive] at the latest, the Commission shall draw up a report assessing the necessity of specific measures to ensure uniformisation of the organisational status and role conferred to Financial Intelligence Units under the national law of Member States, to ensure efficient cooperation and exchange of information. The report shall be submitted to the European Parliament and to the Council, and be accompanied by a legislative proposal, if considered necessary.
2018/11/07
Committee: ECON
Amendment 92 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 22
(22) In a number of Member States, innovative structures for maturity profiles have been developed in order to address potential liquidity risks, including maturity mismatches. These structures include the possibility to extend the scheduled maturity of the covered bond for a certain period of time or to allow the cash flows from the assets in the cover pool to pass directly to the covered bond holders. It is important in order to harmonise extendable maturity structures across the Union that the conditions under which Member States may allow these structures be defined to ensure that they are not too complex or expose investors to increased risks. It is also important to ensure that the credit institution cannot extend the maturity at its sole discretion. Maturity should only be extended when objective and clearly defined trigger events have occurred or are expected to occur in the near future.
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 105 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 3 – paragraph 1 – point 13
(13) 'match funding requirement' means rules requiring that the cash flows between liabilities and assets falling due be matched by contractually ensuring that payments from borrowers and counterparties of derivative contracts be received, fall due prior to making payments to covered bond investors and that the amounts received from the borrowers are at least equivalent in value to the payments to be made to the covered bond investore counterparties of derivative contracts, and that the amounts received contractually falling due from the borrowers and counterparties of derivative contracts are at least equivalent in value to the payments to be made to the covered bond investors and counterparties of derivative contracts, and that the amounts received from borrowers and derivative counterparties be placed in the cover pool in assets according to Article 16 (3) of this Directive until the payments are due to the covered bond investors and derivative counterparties;
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 107 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
1. Member States shall lay down rules entitling the covered bonds investors and derivative counterparties to the following claims:
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 110 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 4 – paragraph 3
3. For the purposes of point (c) of paragraph 1, in the case of insolvency of a specialised mortgage credit institution, Member States may lay down rules granting the covered bond investors and derivative counterparties a claim that ranks senior to the claim of that specialised mortgage credit institution's ordinary unsecured creditors determined in accordance with the national laws governing the ranking of creditors in normal insolvency procedures, but junior to any other preferred creditors.
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 112 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 – title
Eligible assetCover assets for premium covered bonds
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 113 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 – introductory part
Member States shall ensure investor protection by requiringe that covered bonds are at all times collateralissecured by high quality assets. Such assets shall include all assets referred to in points (a) to (g) of Article 129(1) of Regulation (EU) No 575/2013 or by other high quality assets that meet at least the following requirements:in fulfilment of the requirements for the preferential treatment of covered bonds set out in paragraphs 4 and 5 of Article 129 of that Regulation.
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 117 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 – point a
(a) either the market value or mortgage lending value of the assets can be determined;deleted
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 121 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 – point b
(b) a mortgage, charge, lien or other guarantee on the asset is enforceable;deleted
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 125 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 – point c
(c) all legal requirements for establishing the mortgage, charge, lien or guarantee on the asset have been fulfilled;deleted
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 129 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 – point d
(d) the mortgage, charge, lien or guarantee securing the asset enable the credit institution issuing covered bonds to realise the value of the asset without undue delay.deleted
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 136 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2
For the purposes of point (a), Member States shall lay down rules on valuation of assets.deleted
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 140 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 3
For the purposes of point (b), Member States shall lay down rules ensuring the prompt filing and registration of mortgages, charges, liens or guarantee on assets in the cover pool.deleted
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 144 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 4
For the purposes of points (b) and (d), Member States shall ensure that credit institutions issuing covered bonds assess the enforceability of assets before including such assets in the cover pool.deleted
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 148 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 – paragraph 2
2. The Member States shall ensure investor protection by requiring that credit institutions issuing covered bonds have in place procedures to monitor that the assets used as collateral are adequately insured against the risk of damag´ rules on valuation of the collateral shall ensure that the collateral is valued by an independent valuer at the market value or at the mortgage lending value.
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 151 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 – paragraph 3
3. For the purposes of paragraphs 1 and 2, Member States shall require from credit institutions issuing covered bonds to document the assets used as collateral and their lending policies regarding their compliance with those paragraphsthat the collateral is adequately insured against the risk of loss or damage and that the claim out of the insurance is part of the cover pool.
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 153 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 6 a (new)
Article 6 a Cover assets for ordinary covered bonds 1. Member States may allow the issuance of covered bonds secured by high quality cover assets not referred to as eligible in points (a) to (g) of Article 129(1) of Regulation (EU) No 575/2013. In this case, Member States shall require that cover assets provide the credit institution issuing covered bonds with claims for the payment of a determined amount of money as set out in paragraph 2 and secured by collateral assets as set out in paragraph 3. Member States shall also require that the choice of cover assets mitigates cover pool risk as set out in paragraph 4. Cover assets shall also include exposures caused by transmission and management of payments of the obligors of, or liquidation proceeds in respect of, the claims for payment referred to in paragraph 2, and exposures caused by the use of derivatives in accordance with Article 11. 2. Member States shall lay down rules ensuring that the claim for payment referred to in paragraph 1 meets the following legal requirements: (a) Each claim is collateralised by assets for which a public register records ownership and collateral rights or is a loan to a public undertaking as defined in Article 2(b) of Commission Directive 2006/111/EC. (b) Each claim, which is not a loan to a public undertaking as defined in Article 2 (b) of Commission Directive 2006/111/EC, is secured by a legally established mortgage, charge, lien or other guarantee and each of these is enforceable. (c) the mortgage, charge, lien or guarantee securing the claim enable the credit institution issuing covered bonds to receive the payment of the claim in due time and at reasonable cost. 3. Member States shall lay down rules ensuring that the collateral assets referred to in paragraph 1 meet either of the following requirements: (a) for physical assets either the market or the mortgage lending value can be determined or, if this is not possible, the asset is valued by rules laid down by the Member State; (b) for assets in the form of exposures to public undertakings, their safety and soundness is inferred from their tax- raising powers or from being subject to either public supervision or a rating by a nominated ECAI. For the purposes of the asset valuation rules referred to in point (a), Member States shall require that the collateral physical asset is valued by an independent valuer. Moreover, they shall lay down a valuation methodology and process designed to yield values which are equal to or less than the unknown market or mortgage lending value of an asset at the moment of inclusion in the cover pool. 4. Member States shall ensure the risk mitigation referred to in paragraph 1 by imposing the following requirements: (a) all collateral for cover pool assets shall be adequately insured against the risk of loss or damage and the claim out of the insurance shall be part of the cover pool. (b) Member States may for physical assets referred to in paragraph 3 (a) set a value limit for serving as collateral for cover pool claims at the initial time of funding the loans with ordinary covered bonds. (c) exposures to public undertakings with no tax-raising powers and without being subject to public supervision shall not be eligible as cover pool assets if a credit assessment of an ECAI falls below its own threshold for investment grade quality.
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 162 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
Member States may lay down rules regarding the use, by way of an intragroup transaction, of covered bonds issued by a credit institution belonging to a group ('internally issued covered bonds') as collateralver assets for the external issue of covered bonds by another credit institution 'belonging to the same group ('externally issued covered bonds'). Member States shall ensure investor protection by including at least the following requirements in those rules:
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 163 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 1 – point a
(a) the internally issued covered bonds, which are used as collateral for the externally issued covered bonds, are recorded on the balance sheet of sold to the credit institution which issuesing the externally issued covered bonds;
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 164 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 1 – point b
(b) the credit institution issuing the exinternally issued covered bond hass are used as claim on the credit institution issuingover assets in the cover pool for the inexternally issued covered bonds, which is secured by and recorded on the balance sheet of the credit institution issuing the inexternally issued covered bonds;
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 165 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 1 – point c
(c) the externally issued covered bonds are intended to be sold to covered bond investors outside the group;
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 166 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 8 – paragraph 1 – point d
(d) both the internally and the externally issued covered bonds qualify for credit quality step 1 as referred to in Part Three, Title II, Chapter 2 of Regulation (EU) No 575/2013 and are collateralised by residential or commercial property mortgages.are collateralised by eligible cover assets as referred to in Article 6;
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 171 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 10
Composition of the cover pool Member States shall ensure investor protection by providing for a sufficient level of homogeneity of the assets in the cover pool so that they shall be of a similar nature in terms of structural features, lifetime of assets or risk profile.Article 10 deleted
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 270 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 16 – paragraph 5
5. Member States may allow for the calculation of the principal for extendable maturity structures to be based on the final maturity date of the covered bond.
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 271 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 17 – paragraph 1 – point b
(b) the maturity extension is not triggered at the sole discretion of the credit institution issuing covered bonds;
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 279 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 23 – paragraph 1 – introductory part
1. Without prejudice to the right of Member States to lay down criminal penalties, Member States shall lay down rules establishing appropriate administrative penalties and remedial measures applicable at least in the following situations:
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 280 #

2018/0043(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 23 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 (new)
Member States may decide not to lay down rules for administrative penalties for infringements which are subject to criminal penalties under their national law. In such cases, Member States shall communicate to the Commission the relevant criminal law provisions.
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 37 #

2018/0042(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 1 – point e
Regulation (EU) No 575/2013
Article 129 – paragraph 7a (new)
7 a. For the purpose of point (d)(i), (e), (f)(i) and (g) of the first subparagraph of paragraph 1, Member States may decide to apply a higher limit referring to the portion of the loan contributing to the coverage of liabilities provided that the following conditions are met: (a) the limits referred to in those points are applicable at the time of the initial inclusion of the loan in the cover pool; (b) the portion of the loan exceeding the limits referred to in those points remains in the cover pool at the lifetime of the loan and is compliant with all requirements of [OP: Please insert reference to Directive (EU) on the issue of covered bonds and covered bond public supervision and amending Directive 2009/65/EU and Directive 2014/59/EU]; (c) the calculation of overcollateralisation is either based on an approach which takes into account the underlying risk of the assets or an approach where the valuation of the assets is subject to mortgage lending value as defined in Article 4(1)(74); (d) the limit referring to the portion of the loan contributing to the coverage of liabilities cannot be higher than 100%.
2018/09/26
Committee: ECON
Amendment 61 #

2017/2271(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Highlights that the EU-US relationship is the fundamental guarantor for global stability and has been the cornerstone of our efforts to ensure peace and stability for our societies since the end of the Second World War, and stronger multilateral economic cooperation and trade; believes that the ‘America first’ policy will harm the interests of both the EU and the US; stresses that protectionism should be avoided in the interest of all parties;
2018/06/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 128 #

2017/2271(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 11
11. Welcomes the ongoing and uninterrupted work of the TLD in fostering EU-US relations through parliamentary dialogue and coordination on issues of specific common interest, such as trade, security, economic and cultural issues; calls furthermore for a continued intensification of the dialogue and a strengthening of the transatlantic cooperation;
2018/06/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 133 #

2017/2271(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Recalls that both in the EU and the US, our societies are strong because they are built on a plurality of actors, including among others our governments, parliaments, various political institutions, civil society organisations, media and religious groups; highlights that we should foster links across the Atlantic to promote the merits of our transatlantic partnership, including by allocating appropriate funding, at different levels and not only focusing on the East and West Coasts;
2018/06/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 198 #

2017/2271(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 16
16. Stresses the importance of cooperation, coordination and synergy effects in the field of security and defence and insists that burden sharing should not be solely focused on the target of spending 2 % of GDP on defence; states that NATO is still crucial for the collective defence of Europe and its allies;
2018/06/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 218 #

2017/2271(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18
18. Reiterates the need for the EU and the US to enhance their cooperation in the field of cybersecurity and defence as well as ICT-security and strengthening of safety efforts to protect critical infrastructure including advancing common standards and stimulating compatibility and interoperability;
2018/06/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 234 #

2017/2271(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19 a (new)
19a. Stresses the need for proper negotiations regarding standardisation especially in the context of the increasingly rapid developments of technology, especially in the IT area;
2018/06/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 235 #

2017/2271(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20
20. Emphasises that an important part of strengthening EU-US counter-terrorism efforts includes the protection of critical infrastructure as well as a comprehensive approach to fighting terrorism, also via coordination in global forumregional, multilateral, and global forums as well as to promote the exchange of data relating to terrorist activities;
2018/06/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 244 #

2017/2271(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20 a (new)
20a. Calls for the stipulation of a political and societal dialogue balancing anonymity and responsibility in social media in the context of hate speech and fake news phenomena, cybercrime, extremist propaganda, and the infringement of the electoral process in social media;
2018/06/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 316 #

2017/2271(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 27
27. Is concerned about US security and trade policy in East and Southeast Asia, including the political vacuum resulting from its TPP withdrawal, and welcomes the active trade policy of the EU in this part of the world, also for sake of political balance, this also applies to the TTIP or similar EU-US efforts;
2018/06/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 345 #

2017/2271(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 31
31. Reiterates that we have sharedcommon interests in Africa where we must coordinate and intensify our support for good governance, democracy, human rights and security issueefforts regarding stable good governance with respect of democracy, economy with respect to internationally agreed standards for sustainability and the protection of the environment as well as regarding human rights and security issues on local, regional, and multinational levels;
2018/06/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 363 #

2017/2271(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 32
32. Points to our common political, economic and security interests with regard to China and Russia and recalls that joint efforts, including atespecially through the appointment of judges in the WTO, could be helpful to address imbalances in global trade deals with foreign ambitions, as on Ukraine and on the silk road;
2018/06/11
Committee: AFET
Amendment 51 #

2017/2065(INI)

Draft opinion
Paragraph 8 a (new)
8a. Highlights that the digital economy should be regarded as part of a EU taxation agenda and calls on the European Commission to ensure that multinationals in the digital sphere are subject to a fair, efficient and growth- friendly corporate tax system and are taxable in the countries where economic activity takes place and income is generated
2017/10/04
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 33 #

2017/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 3
3. Calls for a clear definition of CBs in a European Directive; insists that the definition for securities henceforth called ‘covered bonds’ must not fall below the standards currently set by Article 12952(4) of the CRR; requests that securities incompatible with this definition but compatible with Article 52(4) of the UCITS DirectiUCITS Directive; CBs which are also compliant with Article 129 of the CRR should benefit from preferential risk weight treatment; for the achievement of the Capital Markets Union's objective, recognizes the potential of UCITS compliant dual recourse securities, with different requirements in terms of eligible cover aressets; calls on the Commission to properly defined them in the same directive under a name clearly distinct from ‘covered bonds’; suggests that this name may be ‘European Secured Notes’; (ESNs);
2017/04/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 50 #

2017/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 – introductory part
4. Calls on the Commission to propose a Directive defining CBs and ESNs, including all the following common principles achievable through-out the life of this issued in-strument independent of potential preferential treatment. :
2017/04/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 68 #

2017/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 – point e
e) Overcollateralisation (OC) is applied toreflecting the risks of the cover pool is applied. By an extent to be determined in national law, the value of all cover pool assets must always be greater than the net present value of outstanding payment obligations. The value of cover pool assets is at all times to be determined on the basis of market prices when market prices are available and on the basis of face values adjusted for market conditions if no market prices are available;
2017/04/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 74 #

2017/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 – point g
g) A part of the cover pool assets or liquidity facilities is sufficiently liquid such that the payment obligations of the CB or ESN programme can be met for the next six months, except in cases with match funded bonds or bonds with a soft bullet and conditional pass through (CPT);
2017/04/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 78 #

2017/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 – point h – paragraph 1 – introductory part
National law provides for a robust special public supervision framework by specifying the competent authority, the cover pool monitor and the special administrator, along with a clear definition of the duties and supervisory powers of the competent authority, which can also function as cover pool monitor, to ensure that:
2017/04/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 79 #

2017/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 – point h – paragraph 1 – point ii
ii) the features of specific programmecover pools meet the applicable requirements both prior to issuance of and until maturity of the security.
2017/04/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 88 #

2017/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 4 – point i
i) The issuer is required to disclose at least biannually aggregate data on the programmecover pools to a level of detail that enables investors to carry out a comprehensive risk analysis. Information should be provided on the credit risk, market risk and liquidity risk characteristics of cover assets, on counterparties involved in the programmecover pools and on the levels of legal, contractual and voluntary OC;
2017/04/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 92 #

2017/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 – point a
a) The security is fully collateralised by assets defined by Article 129(1)(a)-(f) of the CRR and in article 129(1) last two subparagraphs and satisfies the additional requirements of Article 129(2) and (7) of the CRR;
2017/04/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 93 #

2017/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 – point a
a) The security is fully collateralised by assets defined by Article 129(1)(a)-(fg) of the CRR and satisfies the additional requirements of Article 129(2) and (7) of the CRR;
2017/04/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 97 #

2017/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 – point b
b) The maximum LTV parameters for mortgages are set by European law in such a way that they do not surpass the LTV ratios currently fixed in Article 129 CRR, but are subject to regular review and adjustment in line with independent assessments (stress tests) of pricing conditions which might prevail in the relevant real estate markets under stress;
2017/04/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 105 #

2017/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5 – point c
c) The maturity of the CB cannot be extended, except in the event of insolvency or resolution of the issuer and with approval by the competent supervisory authority;subject to objective financial triggers established by national law, including in the event of insolvency or resolution of the issuer.
2017/04/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 121 #

2017/2005(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Encourages the regular execution of stress tests for CB programmecover pools and the publication of stress test results;
2017/04/28
Committee: ECON
Amendment 86 #

2017/0359(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 12 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 – point a
(a) AUM (or assets under management) calculated in accordance with Article 17 is less than EUR 1.22.5 billion;
2018/06/05
Committee: ECON
Amendment 92 #

2017/0359(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 12 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 – point c
(c) ASA (or assets safeguarded and administered) calculated in accordance with Article 19 is zeroEUR 70 million;
2018/06/05
Committee: ECON
Amendment 96 #

2017/0359(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 12 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 – point d
(d) CMH (or client money held) calculated in accordance with Article 18 is zeroEUR 1.5 million;
2018/06/05
Committee: ECON
Amendment 102 #

2017/0359(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 12 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1 – point f
(f) NPR (net position risk) or CMG (clearing member guarantee) calculated in accordance with Articles 22 and 23 is zeroEUR 5 million;
2018/06/05
Committee: ECON
Amendment 135 #

2017/0359(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 18 – paragraph 2 – introductory part
2. Where an investment firm has been holding client money for less than 312 months, it may use business projections to calculate K-CMH, subject to the following cumulative requirements:
2018/06/05
Committee: ECON
Amendment 50 #

2017/0251(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 9 a (new)
(9a) Information on whether an economic operator is a certified taxable person should be accessible via the VIES system.
2018/06/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 71 #

2017/0251(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 1 Directive 2006/112/EC
4a. Where the status of certified taxable person is granted, that information shall be made available via the VIES system. Changes to that status shall be updated in the system without delay.
2018/06/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 86 #

2017/0251(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 3
Directive 2006/112/EC
Article 138 – paragraph 1 – point b
(b) the taxable person or non-taxable legal person for whom the supply is made is identified for VAT purposes in a Member State other than that in which dispatch or transport of the goods begins and possesses a VAT identification number accessible via the VIES;
2018/06/06
Committee: ECON
Amendment 29 #

2017/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 10
(10) Under Regulation (EU) 2016/679, Member States may neither restrict nor prohibit the free movement of personal data within the Union for reasons connected with the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of personal data. This Regulation establishes the same principle of free movement within the Union for non-personal data except when a restriction or a prohibition would be justified for security reasons. In order to avoid undermining the legal framework for personal data in the Union, in the case of mixed data sets, Regulation (EU)2016/679 should apply to the personal data part.
2018/02/27
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 32 #

2017/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 10 a (new)
(10 a) Business and data users will be frequently confronted with mixed data sets and might have difficulties in unbundling personal data from the set. The Commission should provide clear guidance on the legal treatment of mixed data sets and should provide information in a simple manner to business in a website, with tools and guidance on possibilities to unbundled mixed data sets.
2018/02/27
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 35 #

2017/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 19 a (new)
(19 a) In order to properly enforce this Regulation and to incentivise its compliance, Members States should empower their competent authorities to request users to cease breaches of this regulation. The competent authorities should be able to impose effective, proportionate and dissuasive penalties on users not complying with the freedom of free flow and if data localisation requirements persist.
2018/02/27
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 37 #

2017/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 21
(21) In order to take full advantage of the competitive environment, professional users should be able to make informed choices and easily compare the individual components of various data storage or other processing services offered in the internal market, including as to the contractual conditions of porting data upon the termination of a contract. In order to align with the innovation potential of the market and to take into account the experience and expertise of the providers and professional users of data storage or other processing services, the detailed information and operational requirements for data porting should be defined by market players through self-regulation, encouraged and facilitated by the Commission, in the form of Union codes of conduct which may entail model contract terms. Nonetheless, if such codes of conduct are not put in place and effectively implemented within a reasonable period of time, the Commission should review the situation and asses the need to present legislative proposals to effectively reduce the number of barriers to the porting of data.
2018/02/27
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 39 #

2017/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 22
(22) In order to contribute to a smooth cooperation across Member States, each Member State should designate a single point of contact to liaise with the contact points of the other Member States and the Commission regarding the application of this Regulation. Where a competent authority in one Member State requests assistance of another Member State to have access to data pursuant to this Regulation, it should submit a duly motivated request to the latter's designated single point of contact, including a written explanation of its justification and legal bases for seeking access to data. The single point of contact designated by the Member State whose assistance is requested should facilitate the assistance between authorities by identifying and transmitting the request to the relevant competent authority in the requested Member State. In order to ensure effective cooperation, the authority to which a request is transmitted should without undue delay provide assistance in response to a given request or provide information on difficulties in meeting a request of assistance or on its grounds of refusing such request. Member States should allow single points of contacts to request assistance as soon as a data localisation requirement has been identified, without the need to first exhaust all available cooperation mechanisms under national or Union law.
2018/02/27
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 49 #

2017/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point b
(b) carried out by a natural or legal person residing or having an establishment in the Union for its own needs, regardless of whether it is a private person, a public- private entity or a public authority governed by public law.
2018/02/27
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 51 #

2017/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2 a. This Regulation shall not apply to mixed data sets that include personal data which cannot be unbundled.In respect to the mixed data sets, Regulation (EU) No 2016/679 shall apply. The Commission shall publish on its website a detailed guidance for businesses, in particular for SMEs, regarding the relevant provisions applicable to mixed data sets as well as a guidance regarding the treatment of such data sets, and in particular as regards the possible unbundling of personal data from them in order to render the data subject to this Regulation.
2018/02/27
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 59 #

2017/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1
1. Location of data for storage or other processing within the Union shall not be restricted to the territory of a specific Member State, and storage or other processing in any other Member State shall not be prohibited or restricted, unless it is justified on grounds ofby a documented and serious threat to public security.
2018/02/27
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 62 #

2017/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 5 a (new)
5 a. The Commission shall publish on its website a guidance regarding the obligations imposed by this Regulation on providers and users of data processing. This guidance shall be presented in a manner that is easy to understand, using clear and plain language.
2018/02/27
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 63 #

2017/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 5 – paragraph 2
2. Where aA competent authority has exhausted all applicable means to obtain access to the data, it may request the assistance of a competent authority in another Member State in accordance with the procedure laid down in Article 7, and twithout prejudice to the existence at Union or national level of means for obtaining access to the data that is capable of being used in parallel. The requested competent authority shall provide assistance in accordance with the procedure laid down in Article 7, unless it would be contrary to the public order of the requested Member State.
2018/02/27
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 64 #

2017/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 5 a (new)
Article 5 a Compliance and Penalties The competent authorities of the Members States shall have the power to monitor and supervise compliance with the requirement of free movement of data. Competent authorities shall have the power to require undertakings to provide all information necessary to verify the compliance with this Regulation. They shall require that infringements of free movement of data are ended, and shall have the power, where relevant, to impose effective, proportionate and dissuasive sanctions for failure to comply with an obligation to provide data or for unjustified restrictions to free movement of data.
2018/02/27
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 72 #

2017/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 – paragraph 3
3. The Commission shall draw up a report reviewing the development and effective implementation of such codes of conduct and the effective provision of information by providers no later than two years after the start of application of this Regulation. Where the self-regulatory code of conduct has not reduced the number of existing barriers to the porting of data, the report shall, as appropriate, be accompanied by a legislative proposal .
2018/02/27
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 78 #

2017/0228(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 – paragraph 6 a (new)
6 a. The single contact point shall also provide general information to professional users and the public concerning the obligations provided for in this Directive, as well as concerning any code of conduct developed in accordance with Article 6.
2018/02/27
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 245 #

2017/0143(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 19
(19) The pan-European dimension of the PEPP can be developed not only at the level of the provider, through the possibilities for its cross-border activity, but also at the level of the PEPP saver – through the portability of the PEPP, thus contributing to the safeguarding of personal pension rights of persons exercising their right to free movement under Articles 21 and 45 TFEU. Portability involves the PEPP saver changing residence to another Member State without changing PEPP providers, whereas the switching of PEPP providers does not necessarily involve a change of residence. In any case, the place of residence of a PEPP saver shall determine the applicable tax regime for the saver.
2018/04/30
Committee: ECON
Amendment 325 #

2017/0143(COD)

Proposal for a regulation
Recital 67 a (new)
(67a) The tax regime applied to a PEPP shall be the one of the Member State a PEPP saver is resident in order to prevent any abuse due to the different national taxation systems.
2018/04/30
Committee: ECON
Amendment 35 #

2017/0138(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 5
(5) It is necessary to recall how certain financial intermediaries and other providers of tax advice, and auditors, seem to have actively assisted their clients to conceal money offshore. Furthermore, although the CRS introduced by Council Directive (EU) 2014/10727 is a significant step forward in establishing a tax transparent framework within the Union, at least in terms of financial account information, it can still be improved. _________________ 27 Council Directive (EU) 2014/107 of 9 December 2014 amending Directive 2011/16/EU as regards mandatory automatic exchange of information in the field of taxation (OJ L 359, 16.2.2014, p. 1).
2017/12/18
Committee: ECON
Amendment 44 #

2017/0138(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 6
(6) The disclosure of potentially aggressive tax planning arrangements of a cross-border dimension can contribute effectively to the efforts for creating an environment of fair taxation in the internal market. In this light, an obligation on intermediaries and auditors to inform tax authorities on certain cross-border arrangements that could potentially be used for tax avoidance purposes would constitute a step in the right direction. In order to develop a more comprehensive policy, it would also be significant that as a second step, following disclosure, the tax authorities share information with their peers in other Member States. Such arrangements should also enhance the effectiveness of the CRS. In addition, it would be crucial to grant the Commission access to a sufficient amount of information so that it can monitor the proper functioning of this Directive. Such access to information by the Commission does not discharge a Member State from its obligations to notify any state aid to the Commission.
2017/12/18
Committee: ECON
Amendment 90 #

2017/0138(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2
Directive 2011/16/EU
Chapter II – section II – Article 8 a a a – paragraph 1
1. Each Member State shall take the necessary measures to require intermediaries and auditors to file information with the competent tax authorities on a reportable cross-border arrangement or series of such arrangements within five working days, beginning on the day after the reportable cross-border arrangement or series of arrangements is made available for implementation by the intermediary to one or more taxpayers following contact with that taxpayer or those taxpayers, or where the first step in a series of arrangements has already been implemented.
2017/12/18
Committee: ECON
Amendment 93 #

2017/0138(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2
Directive 2011/16/EU
Chapter II – section II – Article 8 a a a – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 1
Each Member State shall take the necessary measures to give intermediaries and auditors the right to a waiver from filing information on a reportable cross- border arrangement or series of such arrangements where they are entitled to a legal professional privilege under the national law of that Member State. In such circumstances, the obligation to file information on such an arrangement or series of arrangements shall be the responsibility of the taxpayer and intermediaries shall inform taxpayers of this responsibility due to the privilege.
2017/12/18
Committee: ECON
Amendment 97 #

2017/0138(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2
Directive 2011/16/EU
Chapter II – section II – Article 8 a a a – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 2
Intermediaries and auditors may only be entitled to a waiver under the first subparagraph to the extent that they operate within the limits of the relevant national laws that define their professions.
2017/12/18
Committee: ECON
Amendment 103 #

2017/0138(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2
Directive 2011/16/EU
Chapter II – section II – Article a a a – paragraph 4
4. Each Member State shall take the necessary measures to require intermediaries, auditors and taxpayers to file information on reportable cross-border arrangements that were implemented between [date of political agreement] and 31 December 2018 Intermediaries, auditors and taxpayers, as appropriate, shall file information on those reportable cross- border arrangements by 31 March 2019.
2017/12/18
Committee: ECON
Amendment 106 #

2017/0138(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2
Directive 2011/16/UEU
Chapter II – section II – Article 8 a a a – paragraph 6 – point a
(a) the identification of intermediaries, or, where applicable auditors, and taxpayers, including their name, residence for tax purposes, and taxpayer identification number (TIN) and, where appropriate, the persons who are associated enterprises to the intermediary or taxpayer;
2017/12/18
Committee: ECON
Amendment 112 #

2017/0138(CNS)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2
Directive 2011/16/EU
Chapter II – section II – Article 8 a a a – paragraph 6 – point h
(h) the identification of any person in the other Member States, if any, likely to be affected by the reportable cross-border arrangement or series of such arrangements indicating to which Member States the affected intermediaries, auditors or taxpayers are linked.
2017/12/18
Committee: ECON
Amendment 99 #

2016/2147(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 12
12. Confirms that 'excellence' should remain the key criterion across the three pillars, while noting that it is only one of the three evaluation criteria, alongside 'impact' and 'quality and efficiency of the implementation’; calls for the reweighting of these criteria and invites the Commission to set out additional sub- criteria by adding ‘SSH integration and geographical balance’ under ‘impact’ and ‘project size’ under ‘efficiency of the implementation’';
2017/04/04
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 211 #

2016/2147(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20
20. Recalls that SSH integration means SSH research in interdisciplinary projects and not an ex-post add-on to otherwise technological projects, and that the most pressing problems faced by the EU require methodological research that is more conceptually focused on SSH; calls on the Commission either to introduce a minimum percentage dedicated to SSH funding, or to create an evaluation sub- criterion that takes account of its inclusion in projects;
2017/04/04
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 356 #

2016/2147(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 32
32. Regrets the mixed set of results achieved by the gender equality focus in H2020, as the only target reached is the share of women in the advisory groups, while the share of women in the project evaluation panels and among project coordinators, and the gender dimension in research and innovation content, remain below target levels; encourages Member States to create a gender-positive legal and political environment and to provide incentives for change, and calls on the Commission to continue to promote gender equality and mainstreaming in FP9 and to consider the possibility of gender as a sub- criterion in the evaluation phase;
2017/04/04
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 13 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A
A. whereas 50% of the energyfinal energy demand is used for heating and cooling in the EU is primary energyof which 80% is used in buildings;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 17 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A a (new)
Aa. reminds that 50% of our necessary cuts in emissions, to live up to our COP21 engagements, must come from energy efficiency, and given that buildings consume 40% of final energy and cause 36% of CO2 emissions, stresses that lowering energy demand in buildings is the most direct and cost-effective way to actually reach our climate ambitions, meanwhile boosting the EU's energy security and re-industrialisation;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 22 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital A b (new)
Ab. given the huge share buildings represent in the total final energy consumption, stresses the crucial role a higher energy efficiency in buildings and demand response programmes can play in balancing energy demand and topping off peak demand, which leads to reducing overcapacity and the lowering of generation, operational and transport costs;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 24 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas – although there is a huge potential for renewable energy on a European, national, local and micro-level – the share of RES energy in heating and cooling in the Member States is insufficient;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 29 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B a (new)
Ba. points out that the demand for heating and cooling highly depends on local circumstances and that 90% of renewable energy is connected to the distribution grid, implicating the importance of the local dimension and distribution grids when talking about heating and cooling;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 32 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B b (new)
Bb. stresses that the focus on the local dimension should also be reflected in infrastructural decisions, preparing the grid for more heating and cooling based on renewable energy at local and micro level, improving sustainability and efficiency and lowering costs and transportation losses;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 59 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E a (new)
Ea. whereas ambitious goals for deep renovation of the existing building stock would create millions of European jobs, especially in SMEs, increase Energy Efficiency and play a vital role in ensuring minimising energy consumption for heating and cooling;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 66 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital F a (new)
Fa. points out the huge untapped potential of using waste heat and district heating systems, given that the excess heat available in Europe surmounts the total heat demand in all European buildings and the fact that 50% of the total EU heat demand can be supplied via district heating;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 73 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital G
G. whereas natural gas is becoming ever more importaprevalent in heating given that the chemical energy stored in it can be converted into heat energy highly efficiently; whereas continued reliance on fossil fuels runs counter to the EU's climate and energy obligations and decarbonisation goals;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 101 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph -1 (new)
-1. Points out the necessity to take along specific measures for heating and cooling when revising the energy efficiency directive (2012/27/EU) and the renewable energy directive (2009/28/EC) as well as the energy performance of buildings directive (2010/31/EU);
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 105 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph -1 a (new)
-1a. Calls for specific sustainable heating and cooling strategies to be developed at national level, giving special attention to combined heat and power, cogeneration, district heating and cooling preferably based on renewables, as is stated in art 14 of the EED (2012/27/EU);
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 107 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph -1 b (new)
-1b. When it comes to heating and cooling, points out the importance of respecting the principles of energy efficiency first and the trias energetica (reduction of demand, utilisation of renewables, optimization of fossil fuel systems) and acting accordingly when making policy and investment decisions;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 108 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph -1 c (new)
-1c. Stresses that energy efficiency measures should be given priority to, or at least treated on the same footage with, generating capacity when deciding on infrastructural and heating and cooling investments;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 109 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph -1 d (new)
-1d. Points out that improving the thermal efficiency of buildings by, amongst others, insulating, can reduce the energy demand in a building up to 70% according to studies; therefore, the optimal first step is often to reduce the energy and heating and cooling demand up to the cost-optimal level, before or combined with optimizing the heating and cooling systems, as the cheapest and most sustainable form of energy is still the one that is not used;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 119 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 1 a (new)
1a. Welcomes the Communication from the European Commission on an EU Strategy on Heating and Cooling;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 125 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 2
2. Takes the view that the shorter the chain by which primary energy is converted into other forms to generate usable heat, the higher the energy efficiency;deleted
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 170 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 5
5. Considers that the use of appropriate architectural solutions and urban design principles, such as urban level network solutions and sustainable district heating and cooling, in the planning of whole residential areas should be the basis for energy-efficient and low- emission construction in the various climate zones in Europe;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 211 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7
7. Stresses that in dense urban agglomerations it is imperative that the use of individual heating systems that depend on fossil fuels be restricted and replaced with large-scale local cogeneration systems that produce heat and electricitystate-of-the-art individual or district heating and cooling systems, which are more efficient and preferably renewables based;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 220 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7 a (new)
7a. Highlights the possibilities of thermal storage systems to enable heating and cooling generated in a sustainable way to be stored in thermal forms when not needed, and transported and used in cases of peak demand, hereby helping to balance the grid, facilitate the integration of renewables, lower energy production, imports and prices;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 227 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7 b (new)
7b. Calls for the development of a heating and cooling energy demand indicator for buildings at a national level;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 228 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7 c (new)
7c. Calls for a strategic approach to reduce the CO2 emissions of industrial heating and cooling demands, by improving efficiency of the processes, substituting fossil fuels by sustainable sources and integrating industries in the surrounding thermal energy environment;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 229 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 7 d (new)
7d. Highlights the huge potential of clustering energy and resource flows to save primary energy use, especially in industrial environments, where, according to the cascading system, excess heat or cold from one process can be re-used in another one which demands less extreme temperatures, and, where possible, up to heating and cooling buildings via district heating systems;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 236 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 8
8. Notes that outdated heating plants with low energy efficiency should be replaced by small, environmentally- friendly CHP plants that use natural gas or other green fuelalternatives;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 295 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 a (new)
13a. Calls on the Member States to set ambitious new goals for their national building renovation strategies in time for the 2017 revision and to ensure full implementation of current strategies; stresses that these strategies should lead to a European building stock consisting of nearly zero-energy buildings by 2050; underscores the importance of ensuring sufficient access to financing and investment capabilities in this regard;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 298 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 b (new)
13b. Reminds the Commission and the Member States that 75 % of the existing European building stock is energy inefficient, and that estimates show that 90 % of these buildings will still be in use by 2050; highlights therefore the urgent need to specifically target these buildings for deep renovation;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 299 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 c (new)
13c. Stresses the importance of a holistic and integrated approach to building renovation, RES integration and energy efficiency projects and initiatives as no building should be perceived as an energy island; highlights the immense potential of integrating energy systems and launching industrial symbioses;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 300 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 13 d (new)
13d. Calls for substantially increased integration between the thermal and the electric power sector, with a strong regard to ensuring efficient transport of energy between the two; stresses that access to adequate heating, cooling and ventilation is important to ensure proper quality of life for European citizens;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 315 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 15
15. Calls on the Member States to take administrative steps to ban the use of outdated furnaces that generate ‘low height’ emissions – releasing into the atmosphere natural pyrolytic gases from incomplete combustion, NOx, soot and fly ash dispersed by convection – in the heating of agglomerations and to promote the use of sustainable and efficient alternatives;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 340 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18 a (new)
18a. Considers that increased electrification of heating and cooling systems is a vital step to ensure both decreased reliance on fossil fuels, increase European energy independence and ensure greater demand for RES; stresses the importance of technologies such as heat pumps in this regard;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 352 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 20
20. Given that fossil fuels account for 75% of the primary energy supply in heating and cooling, and therefore for more than 37% of the EU’s total energy consumption, points out to the Commission the possibility of including those sectors in the EU ETS, including fuel combustion facilities with a capacity of less than 20 MW; calls also for subsidies for fossil fuels to be phased out by Member States to ensure uptake of RES for heating and cooling; stresses that such subsidies could be transferred to energy efficiency projects to avoid negative effects on the fight against energy poverty and to ensure that consumers are not adversely affected;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 364 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 22
22. Takes the view that research should be carried out under the Horizon 2020 framework programme on sustainable and efficient heating and cooling systems and materials, such as small-scale renewable generation and storage solutions, district heating and cooling systems, cogeneration, insulation materials and innovative materials such as structural window panes that let in high levels of short-wave radiation (sunlight) from outside and let out only a minimum of the long-wave thermal radiation that would otherwise escape to the outside;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 418 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 26
26. Takes the view that consumers must be made fully aware of the technological and economic benefits of new heating and cooling systems, so as to enable them to make the best possible choices; reminds the Member States of their responsibilities to ensure that consumers are presented with such information;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 421 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 26 a (new)
26a. Points out the lack of awareness of consumers about the often low performance of their current heating and cooling systems and the ways in which they can improve their situation, stresses in that sense the need for information, awareness raising and guidance campaigns to inform and incentivise consumers to modernise their installations and connect to collective heating and cooling solutions as well as apply for joint purchasing initiatives;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 429 #

2016/2058(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 26 b (new)
26b. Urges Member States to introduce an energy labelling system for installed heating and cooling installations to make consumers aware of the energy performance of their installations and to boost the replacement of old, polluting systems by efficient and more sustainable options;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 431 #

2016/2058(INI)

26c. Urges the Commission and the Member States to come up with specific strategies to tackle the ever growing problem of energy poverty in order to help all consumers, especially the most vulnerable, to ameliorate their housing, heating and cooling conditions, on an individual or collective basis, whether they are home owners or tenants;
2016/05/30
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 191 #

2016/2047(BUD)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 60 b (new)
60 b. stresses that the Parliament and the Council, in order to create long term savings in the Union budget, must address the need for a roadmap to a single seat, as requested by the large majority of this Parliament in several resolutions;
2016/10/04
Committee: BUDG
Amendment 19 #

2016/2041(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital B
B. whereas the development of renewable energy mustwill ensure energy sovereignty, eliminate energy poverty and foster economic development in the EU;
2016/04/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 51 #

2016/2041(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital E a (new)
Ea. whereas offshore wind in the North Sea region has the potential to generate over 8 % of Europe's power supply by 2030;
2016/04/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 153 #

2016/2041(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 9 a (new)
9a. Notes that increased regional cooperation on renewables is key to ensure further development of renewable energy sources;
2016/04/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 244 #

2016/2041(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 18 a (new)
18a. Stresses that electrification of both heating and cooling systems, transport and other sectors is crucial in order to ensure a both fast and efficient transition to renewable energy sources;
2016/04/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 256 #

2016/2041(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 19 a (new)
19a. Stresses that the issue of electricity bottlenecks continue to hamper the free flow of renewable energy across Member State borders and slowing progress on establishing a true Internal Energy Market in the European Union;
2016/04/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 305 #

2016/2041(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 27
27. Highlights the potential of collective energy systems, such as district heating, for renewable heating and cooling;
2016/04/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 308 #

2016/2041(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 27 a (new)
27a. Notes that energy efficiency projects related to both heating and cooling are important tools to ensure stable and predictable energy consumption patterns and to combat energy poverty;
2016/04/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 143 #

2016/2038(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital X a (new)
Xa. whereas as observed during the fact finding mission in the US, there is a lack of transparency and of a common definition of beneficial ownership at global level; whereas this lack of transparency has been especially observed regarding shell companies and law firms; whereas the US is currently preparing the implementation of the OECD BEPS Action Plan;
2016/06/02
Committee: TAX2
Amendment 145 #

2016/2038(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital X b (new)
Xb. whereas cooperation on tax issues between the EU and the US already exists between relevant EU and US authorities, similar cooperation is lacking at the political level, especially as regards parliamentary cooperation;
2016/06/02
Committee: TAX2
Amendment 147 #

2016/2038(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital Y a (new)
Ya. whereas the joint Special Committee TAXE 2 and Committee on Development hearing on "Consequences for developing countries of aggressive fiscal practices" has shown that developing countries face similar problems of base erosion, profit shifting, lack of transparency, globally diverging tax systems and lack of coherent and effective international legislation; whereas developing countries suffer from aggressive tax planning; whereas developing countries' tax administrations lack resources and expertise to effectively fight tax evasion and avoidance;
2016/06/02
Committee: TAX2
Amendment 150 #

2016/2038(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Recital Z a (new)
Za. whereas the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank provide technical assistance, including tools for developing countries' tax administrations regarding international tax issues in order to improve developing countries' capability to tackling tax evasion, avoidance and money laundering issues, in particular related to transfer pricing;
2016/06/02
Committee: TAX2
Amendment 346 #

2016/2038(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 22
22. Is concerned about the lack of transparency and adequate documentation within financial institutions and law firms pertaining to the specific models of company ownership and control recommended by tax and legal advisors, as confirmed by the recent ‘Panama Papers’ scandal; recommends, in order to tackle the problem of shell companies, to strengthen transparency requirements for setting up private companies;
2016/06/02
Committee: TAX2
Amendment 473 #

2016/2038(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 40 a (new)
40a. Supports the creation of a global body, within the UN framework, well equipped and with sufficient additional resources, ensuring that all countries can participate on an equal footing in the formulation and reform of global tax policies; calls the EU and on the Member States to start working on an ambitious Global Tax Summit and aiming a creating such intergovernmental body;
2016/06/02
Committee: TAX2
Amendment 477 #

2016/2038(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 40 b (new)
40b. Calls on international fora to agree on a more stringent and precise definition on beneficial ownership to ensure increased transparency;
2016/06/02
Committee: TAX2
Amendment 489 #

2016/2038(INI)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 43 a (new)
43a. Calls for the establishment of a structured dialogue between the European Parliament and the US Congress on international tax issues; suggests to set up formal interparliamentary fora to deal with these issues, and to utilise the existing Transatlantic Legislators´ Dialogue framework in this regard; encourages the EU and the US to cooperate on the implementation of the OECD BEPS project; takes notes of a significant lack of reciprocity between the US and the EU in the framework of the FATCA agreement; encourages enhanced cooperation between the US and the EU in the framework of the FATCA agreement to ensure reciprocity and invites all involved parties to proactively take part in its implementation;
2016/06/02
Committee: TAX2
Amendment 86 #

2016/2019(BUD)

Motion for a resolution
Paragraph 24 a (new)
24a. Considers that the structural and organisational reforms aimed at achieving greater efficiency, environmental sustainability, and effectiveness should continue through the thorough examination of possible synergies and savings; recalls the substantial savings that could be made by having only one place of work instead of three (Brussels, Strasbourg, Luxembourg); underlines that this process should be lead without endangering Parliament's legislative excellence, its budgetary powers and powers of scrutiny, or the quality of working conditions for Members, assistants, and staff;
2016/03/15
Committee: BUDG
Amendment 207 #

2016/0382(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 27
(27) Member States should be encouraged to pursue all appropriate forms of cooperation in relation to the objectives set out in this Directive. Such cooperation can take place at all levels, bilaterally or multilaterally. Apart from the mechanisms with effect on target renewable energy share calculation and target compliance, which are exclusively provided for in this Directive, namely statistical transfers between Member States, joint projects and joint support schemes, cooperation should also take place within the framework of macro-regional partnership as established by Regulation [Governance] and can also take the form of, for example, exchanges of information and best practices, as provided for, in particular, in the e-platform established by Regulation [Governance], and other voluntary coordination between all types of support schemes. The European Commission's Trans-European Networks for Energy (TEN-E) strategy should support the objectives of this Directive and set out additional incentives for cross-border cooperation as well as regional cooperation between Member States in the area of renewable energy.
2017/07/04
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 227 #

2016/0382(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 43
(43) Guarantees of origin issued for the purpose of this Directive have the sole function of showing to a final customer that a given share or quantity of energy was produced from renewable sources. A guarantee of origin can be transferred, independently of the energy to which it relates, from one holder to another. However, with a view to ensuring that a unit of renewable energy is disclosed to a customer only once, double counting and double disclosure of guarantees of origin should be avoided. Energy from renewable sources in relation to which the accompanying guarantee of origin has been sold separately by the producer should not be disclosed or sold to the final customer as energy from renewable sources. National Regulatory Authorities should ensure that adequate information is provided to consumers to make them aware of the function of guarantees of origin.
2017/07/04
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 267 #

2016/0382(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 53
(53) With the growing importance of self-consumption of renewable electricity, there is a need for a definition of renewable self-consumers and a regulatory framework which would empower self-consumers to generate, store, consume and sell electricity without facing disproportionate burdens. Collective self-consumption should be allowed ion certain ca voluntary baseis so that citizens living in apartments for example can benefit from consumer empowerment to the same extent as households in single family homes. The participation to collective self-consumption should be voluntary for tenants and owners at the individual household level for those households within the reach of the collective project, for example, those households within an apartment building.
2017/07/04
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 287 #

2016/0382(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 59 a (new)
(59a) Household consumers and communities engaging in the trading of their flexibility, self-consumption or selling of their self-generated electricity, shall maintain their rights as consumers, including the rights to have a contract with a supplier of their choice and switching supplier.
2017/07/04
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 336 #

2016/0382(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1
This Directive establishes a common framework for the promotion of energy from renewable sources. It sets a binding Unionminimum targets for the overall share of energy from renewable sources in gross final consumption of energy in 2030and for the share of energy from renewable sources in transport in 2030. The Union target is to be collectively achieved by Member States through binding national targets. It also lays down rules on financial support to electricity produced from renewable sources, self-consumption of renewable electricity, andnergy, renewable energy communities and their cross-border cooperation, renewable energy use in the heating and cooling and transport sectors, regional cooperation betweenamong Member States ands well as with third countries, guarantees of origin, administrative procedures and information and training. It establishes sustainability and greenhouse gas emissions saving criteria for biofuels, bioliquids and biomass fuels.
2017/07/04
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 436 #

2016/0382(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 2 – point f f
(ff) ‘waste-based fossil fuels’ means liquid and gaseous fuels produced from waste streams of non-renewable origin, including waste processing gases and exhaust gases;deleted
2017/07/04
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 467 #

2016/0382(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 2 a (new)
Article 2a 'renewable energy community means' a local energy community as defined by Article 2.7 of [Recast Directive 2009/72/EC as proposed by COM(2016) 864] that meets the requirements set out in Article 22, paragraph 1, of this Directive.
2017/07/04
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 722 #

2016/0382(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 15 – paragraph 4
4. Member States shall ensure that their competent authorities at national, regional and local level include provisions for the integration and deployment of renewable energy and the use of unavoidable waste heat or cold when planning, designing, building and renovating urban infrastructure, industrial or residential areas and energy infrastructure, including electricity, district heating and cooling, natural gas and alternative fuel networks and shall encourage relevant local and regional authorities to include heating and cooling solutions based on renewable energy sources in the planning of city infrastructure.
2017/07/04
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 748 #

2016/0382(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 15 – paragraph 6
6. Member States shall ensure that new public buildings, and existing public buildings that are subject to major renovation, at national, regional and local level fulfil an exemplary role as energy efficient nearly-zero energy buildings wherever feasible in the context of this Directive from 1 January 2012 onwards. Member States may, inter alia, allow that obligation to be fulfilled by providing that the roofs of public or mixed private-public buildings are used by third parties for installations that produce energy from renewable sources.
2017/07/04
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 776 #

2016/0382(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 16 – paragraph 3
3. The single administrative contact point, in collaboration with transmission and distribution system operators, shall publish an accessible manual of procedures for renewable project developers, including for small scale projects and, renewable self- consumers projects and renewable energy community projects.
2017/07/04
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 818 #

2016/0382(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 18 – paragraph 6
6. Member States, with the participation of local and regional authorities, shall develop suitable information, awareness-raising, guidance or training programmes in order to inform citizens of the benefits and practicalities of developing and using energy from renewable sources, including by self- consumption or in the framework of renewable energy communities, as well as of the benefits of cooperation mechanisms between Member States and different kinds of cross-border cooperation.
2017/07/04
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 905 #

2016/0382(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 20 – paragraph 3
3. Subject to their assessment included in the integrated national energy and climate plans in accordance with Annex I of Regulation [Governance], on the necessity to build new infrastructure for district heating and cooling produced from renewable energy sources in order to achieve the Union target referred to in Article 3(1) of this Directive, Member States shall, where relevant, take steps with a view to developing a district heating infrastructure to accommodate the development of heating and cooling production from large biomass, solar and geothermal facilitisustainable biomass, ambient heat in large heat pumps, solar and geothermal facilities as well as surplus heat from industry and other sources.
2017/07/05
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1025 #

2016/0382(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 22 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2a. Member States shall enact rules on renewable energy communities that will ensure that: (a) Energy communities cannot exclude any single consumer that geographically is considered naturally to belong to the energy community. (b) Energy communities set up rules that secure the equal and non-discriminatory treatment of all consumers that participate in the energy community. (c) Energy communities set up fair rules for consumers that cannot pay their bills for momentary or longer lasting periods – on par with the protection of consumers being connected individually to the distribution grid. (d) Secure that the establishment of energy communities shall not lead to distortions in the overall energy system and will not inflict higher energy costs for those consumers that are not self- producers and/or do not participate in energy communities themselves.
2017/07/05
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1066 #

2016/0382(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 23 – paragraph 3 – point c
(c) indirect mitigation measures covered by tradable certificates proving compliance with the obligation through support to indirect mitigation measures, carried out by another economic operator such as an independent renewable technology installer or energy service company - ESCO providing renewable installation services.deleted
2017/07/05
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 1236 #

2016/0382(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 25 – paragraph 4 – subparagraph 1
Member States shall put in place a database enabling tracing of transport fuels that are eligible for counting towards the numerator set out in paragraph 1(b), and require the relevant economic operators to enter information on the transactions made and the sustainability characteristics of the eligible fuels, including their entire life cycle greenhouse gas emissions, starting from their point of production to the fuel supplier that places the fuel on the market source of the feedstocks to the end-of-life phase of the fuel.
2017/07/31
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 61 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 1
(1) The Union is committed to a (1) sustainable, competitive, secure and decarbonised energy system. The Energy Union and the Energy and Climate Policy Framework for 2030 establish ambitious Union commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions further (by at least 40 % by 2030, as compared with 1990), to increase the proportion of renewable energy consumed (by at least 2740 %) and to make energy savings of at least 27 %, reviewing this level having in mind an Union level of 340 %10 , and to improve Europe’s energy security, competitiveness and sustainability. __________________ 10 EUCO 169/14, CO EUR 13, CONCL 5, Brussels 24 October 2014.
2017/06/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 75 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 2 a (new)
(2a) Considering the need to aggregate and assist project development, the path to de-risking energy efficiency investments, and the need to use public funds more effectively, there is a need to promote innovative financial solutions, such as Energy Efficiency Obligations Schemes, European Fund for Strategic Investments and Green Mortgages. It is also crucial to make better use of structural funds and investment funds in the form of grants and financial instruments, such as loans, equity, guarantees, and off-the-shelf instruments.
2017/06/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 87 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 6 a (new)
(6a) The 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change (COP21) must be reflected in the Union’s efforts to decarbonise its buildings stock, taking into account that almost 50% of the Union’s final energy demand is used for heating and cooling, of which 80% is used in buildings. The Union’s energy and climate goals therefore need to be based 100% on renewable energy by 2050, which can be achieved only making full use of energy saving potential and the “energy efficiency first” principle.
2017/06/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 95 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 7
(7) The provisions on long-term renovation strategies provided for in Directive 2012/27/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council13 should be moved to Directive 2010/31/EU, where they fit more coherently, and updated to ensure access to affordable energy also for the most vulnerable citizens. __________________ 13 Directive 2012/27/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2012 on energy efficiency, amending Directives 2009/125/EC and 2010/30/EU and repealing Directives 2004/8/EC and 2006/32/EC (OJ L 315, 14.11.2012, p. 1).
2017/06/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 112 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 8
(8) The agendas of the Digital Single Market and the Energy Union should be aligned and serve common goals. The digitalisation of the energy system is quickly changing the energy landscape, from the integration of renewables to smart grids and smart-ready buildings. In order to digitise the building sector, targeted incentives should be provided to promote smart-ready systems and digital solutions in the built environment. Those targets should, however, take into account the less digitally engaged consumers who should not be left behind. In-building physical communications infrastructure is addressed in Directive 2014/61/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council. Targeted incentives should take into account the Union's connectivity targets, which are a prerequisite to the development of connected, smart homes. However, nearly zero emission buildings with good insulation may block indoor mobile connection and hamper the development of small cells and 5G networks unless the issue is considered during construction and renovation.
2017/06/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 116 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 8 a (new)
(8a) It is crucial to bear in mind the extraordinary potential of the opportunities created by the development of ICT technologies, smart controls, big data and the internet of things when designing measures to improve energy efficiency.
2017/06/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 122 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 9
(9) In order to adapt this Directive to the technical progress, the power to adopt acts in accordance with Article 290 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union should be delegated to the Commission to supplement it by defining the smartness indicator and enabling its implementation. The smartness indicator should be used to measure buildings’ capacity to use ICT and electronic systems to optimise operation and interact with the grid. TWhile the smartness indicator will raise awareness amongst building owners and occupants of the value behind building automation and electronic monitoring of technical building systems and will give confidence to the occupant about the actual savings of these new enhanced- functionalities, consumers should always be in control of their data.
2017/06/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 147 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Recital 12
(12) Notably for large installations, bBuilding automation and electronic monitoring of technical building systems have proven to be an effective replacement for inspections. The installation of such equipment should be considered as the most cost-effective alternative toolds great potential to provide cost-effective and significant energy savings for both consumers and businesses. In particular for large installations, building automation and electronic monitoring of technical building systems have proven to be effective and, because they support informed actions taken on energy savings, can replace inspections in large non- residential and, increasingly frequently, also in multifamily buildings of a sufficient size that allow a payback of less than three years. The current possibility to of opting for alternative measures is therefore deleted. However it should be possible to exempt technical systems explicitly covered by an energy service company (ESCO) programme from the inspection requirement. To avoid double inspections, installations that are operated by a utility or network operator and that are subject to inspections at the system level should be exempt from this requirement. For small -scale installations, the documentation of the system performance by installers and the registration of this information in the databases on energy performance certification will support the verification of compliance with the minimum requirements set for all technical building systems and reinforce energy performance certificates (EPC) role. In addition, existing regular safety inspections and programmed maintenance work will remain an opportunity to provide direct advice on energy efficiency improvements.
2017/06/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 211 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 1
Directive 2010/31/EU
Article 2 – point 3
3. ‘technical building system’ means technical equipment for space heating, space cooling, ventilation, domestic hot water, built-in lightingindoor and outdoor lighting, elevators and escalators, building automation and control, solar shading, on- site electricity generation, on-site infrastructure for electro-mobility, or a combination of such systems, including those using energy from renewable sources, of a building or building unit;;
2017/06/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 217 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 1 a (new)
Directive 2010/31/EU
Article 2 – point 3 a (new)
(1a) in Article 2, the following point is added: ‘3a. 'building renovation passport' means an annually updated long term renovation roadmap of specific building;’
2017/06/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 221 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 1 b (new)
Directive 2010/31/EU
Article 2 – point 3 b (new)
(1b) in Article 2, the following point is inserted: "(3b) 'trigger point' means a key moment in the life of a building when it is easier and more economical to take an investment decision to undertake energy renovation works;"
2017/06/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 222 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 1 c (new)
Directive 2010/31/EU
Article 2 – point 3 c (new)
(1cb) in Article 2, the following point is inserted: "(3c) 'building renovation passport' means an annually updated long-term renovation roadmap of specific building;"
2017/06/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 225 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 1 d (new)
Directive 2010/31/EU
Article 2 – point 3 d (new)
(1d) In Article 2, the following point is inserted: "(3d) 'indoor air quality' means the temperature, relative humidity, CO2, VOC, Radon, mould and other particulate matter;"
2017/06/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 240 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 1 e (new)
Directive 2010/31/EU
Article 2 – point 17 a (new)
(1e) In Article (2), the following point is inserted: ‘(17a) ‘full load’ means the maximum design demand of technical building systems for space heating, space cooling, ventilation and domestic hot water;’
2017/06/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 241 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 1 f (new)
(1f) In Article 2, the following point is inserted: ‘(17b) ‘part load’ means a fraction of full load condition, representing typical operating conditions;’
2017/06/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 242 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 1 a (new)
Directive 2010/31/EU
Article 2 – point 19 a (new)
(1a) in Article 2, the following point is added: ‘19a. ‘decarbonised building stock’ consists of highly energy efficient (currently identified as nearly zero energy standard (nZEB)), comfortable buildings at EU level. These buildings will be the cornerstone for the decarbonisation of the building stock and an essential enabler for the transformation of our energy system. It means that on average, the overall energy demand of the building stock in the EU will improve by 80% by 2050 as compared to 2005 levels of energy demand;’
2017/06/13
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 246 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2 – point a
Directive 2012/27/EU
Article 2 a – paragraph 1
(a) the first paragraph consists of Article 4 of the Directive 2012/27/EU on energy efficiency16 , other than its last subparagraph; __________________ 16 OJ L 315, 14.11.2012, p. 13ollowing paragraph is inserted: ‘1. Member States shall establish a long-term strategy for mobilising investment in the renovation of the national stock of buildings, both public and private with the aim of providing for the decarbonisation of the building stock by 2050 and delivering affordability for tenants and owners of the buildings. That strategy shall encompass: (a) an overview of the national building stock based, as appropriate, on statistical sampling; (b) identification of cost-effective approaches and actions to stimulate renovations relevant to the building type and climatic zone, considering relevant trigger points in the life-cycle of the building; (c) policies and measures to stimulate cost-effective deep renovations of buildings, including staged deep renovations and decarbonisation of the heating demand, as well as targeted small, very low cost renovations, e.g. thresholds and thermostatic radiator valves; (d) policies and actions to target the worst performing segments of the national building stock, households subject to energy poverty and households subject to split-incentive dilemmas for renovations; including by requiring that the buildings in the lowest energy classes of the energy performance certificate are not rented or sold after 1st January 2023; In order to preserve and protect buildings of historical, architectural and cultural value, Member States may exempt buildings that cannot be renovated sufficiently to bring them out of the lowest energy classes in a non-destructive and non-cost-prohibitive manner from this requirement; (e) policies and actions to target all public buildings, including social housing; (f) an overview of national initiatives to promote skills and education in the construction and energy efficiency sectors as well as education in smart technologies; (g) a forward-looking perspective to guide investment decisions of individuals, the construction industry, public institutions including municipalities, and financial institutions.’
2017/06/19
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 260 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2 – point b
Directive 2010/31/EU
Article 2 a – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 1
‘2. In their long-term renovation strategy referred to in paragraph 1, Member States shall set out a roadmap with clear milestones and measureactions to deliver on the long-term 2050 goal to ensure a highly energy efficient and decarbonise theird national building stock, with specific milestones for 2030. and 2040, including indicators measuring progress of implementation towards these milestones. Member States shall specify how their milestones contribute to achieving the Union's binding energy efficiency target of 40% in 2030 and the Union's target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80- 95% by 2050.
2017/06/19
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 280 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2 – point b
Directive 2010/31/EU
Article 2 a – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 2
In addition, the long term renovation strategy shall contribute to the alleviation of energy povertyestablish specific measures and financing instruments to decrease energy demand, eradicate energy poverty and renovate the social housing stock while securing affordable housing.
2017/06/19
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 292 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2 – point b
Directive 2010/31/EU
Article 2 a – paragraph 3 – introductory part
3. To guide investment decisions as referred to in point (d) in paragraph 1, Member States shall introduce or sustain mechanisms for:
2017/06/19
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 304 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2 – point b
Directive 2010/31/EU
Article 2 a – paragraph 3 – point c a (new)
(ca) accessible and transparent advisory tools, such as one-stop-shops for consumers, for guidance on energy efficiency, replacement of fossil fuel boilers with renewable-based alternatives and available financial instruments for energy efficiency renovations in buildings."
2017/06/19
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 316 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2 – point b a (new)
Directive 2010/31/EU
Article 2 a – paragraph 3 a (new)
(ba) in Article 2a, the following paragraph is added: "3a. Member States shall, with effect from 1 January 2020, adopt long-term renovation strategies containing policies and measures resulting in the deep renovation of building stock. Those measures shall include trigger points for energy renovation, a minimum energy performance requirement for the renovation of commercial and public buildings, and financing mechanisms."
2017/06/19
Committee: ITRE
Amendment 318 #

2016/0381(COD)

Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2 – point b b (new)
(bb) in Article 2a, the following paragraph is added: "3b. Each Member Sta